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As more and more organizations look to Experience Management (XM) to grow their organizations, the c-suite is evolving to put ‘experiences’ front and centre and make sure XM gets visibility and support at the highest levels.

It’s led to a new breed — the X-Suite — taking its seat at the top table to help shape how organizations are run and make Experience Management the key growth lever.

Here’s the key job roles at the heart of the X-Suite:

Chief Experience Officer (CXO)

One of the newest C-Suite roles, the CXO is the person responsible for bringing together all the core experiences of the business.

Our own CXO Julie Larson Green describes it as: “The role of the CXO is to unite two very important jobs of the C-Suite: Universal Listening and Universal Action across the entire organization.”  

The CXO is the one responsible for listening to customers, employees, product users and the market in general and using that feedback to drive action at the highest level. They are usually the owner of the entire XM program, with other ‘XM’ roles reporting into them or having direct responsibility for functions such as product design, people ops and brand.

It’s a key role that helps to provide a holistic view of the experiences across the organization, breaking down silos and connecting the work of various departments to drive consistency in both the design and delivery of those experiences.

Read more about the role of CXO from Julie Larson Green

Chief People Officer

Also known as: Chief HR Officer, VP People Operations, Employee Experience Officer

What do they do?
A Chief People Officer is perhaps one of the newest roles in the experience age, not in terms of the job title but in terms of their responsibilities and their impact on the organization.

In the past, a CPO would have been defined as an HR role but today they are seen as a much more strategic position, managing everything from organizational design, executive coaching and development, and learning and development programs.

As the title suggests, they are responsible for everything to do with the people within the organization from their engagement and productivity to their career development and the impact they have on the organization’s bottom line.

While that may bring in some more traditional elements of HR, a CPO tends to take a much wider view to impact the employee experience as a whole whether that’s developing and building the culture, building the employer brand to help attract the best candidates or leading a people analytics team to help optimize the total workforce management of the organization.

Chief Customer Officer (CCO)

Also known as: VP Customer Experience, Chief Customer Experience Officer, Head of Customer Engagement

What do they do?
The CCO is responsible for the total relationship an organization has with its customers, and plays a vital role in driving both acquisition and retention strategies in the organization. It’s a relatively new role still, with the first CCO role believed to have been created by Texas Power and Light in 1999.

The CCO is typically the person in the organization who is the ultimate authority on customers — it’s their role to understand what they need and drive actions across the organization in order to deliver on it.

In recent years the CCO’s role has evolved from one primarily focused on the customer service side of the business to one which now includes multiple different customer-facing touchpoints.

It’s a realization that customer experience goes way beyond just support, and brings in areas like sales, marketing, finance and even parts of HR as they look to help foster the kind of customer-centric culture that’s essential to delivering world-class customer experiences.

With influence across such a diverse range of departments in an organization, it’s important that the CCO is a senior position in order to be able to influence decisions that impact customers with multiple stakeholders.

Chief Product Officer

Also known as: Chief Product innovation Officer, Chief Operating Officer, Head of Product Development

What do they do?
The ultimate aim of a CPO is to deliver products that delight customers and deliver value back to the organization’s bottom line. They typically manage the product across the entire lifecycle from conceptualization all the way through to post-launch iterations and updates.

The most successful CPOs work hand in hand with the rest of the ‘X-Suite’ – for example, they’ll have a close relationship with the CCO to understand customer needs, pain points and how customer feedback can be used to deliver more successful products.

Their role is to take all the data points available, from customer feedback to customer segmentation and market trends and operationalize it to put the people, processes and systems in place to turn it into a finished product.

In many organizations they’re public-facing evangelists for the product and will often be used in PR and marketing efforts, speaking at conferences or in the media about the product.

Chief Marketing Officer (CMO)

Also known as: Head of Marketing, Chief Brand Officer, Head of Brand

What do they do?
The CMO is probably the best known role in the X-Suite, responsible for the marketing, advertising and external representation of the brand.

Their role is to effectively communicate the experience proposition to customers, and their focus is more on growth through customer acquisition rather than retention (although there is a huge knock-on effect on the latter).

In the past, CMOs had more responsibility for areas now covered by others in the X-Suite, such as customer service or even product management. However, as organizations have begun to understand more about how each experience impacts another, those responsibilities have been shared with others such as the CCO or CPO.

One of the most important roles a CMO plays in Experience Management is optimizing the brand experience. This brings together all the different experiences a customer or potential customer has, whether it’s through the organization’s advertising, its products or the employees they interact with. Each experience impacts a user’s perception of a brand, and so the CMO plays a key role is helping to drive consistency across the organization to drive brand recognition and create positive associations with the brand that in turn lead to increased sales.

Chief Information Officer (CIO)

Also known as: IT Director, Technology Director, Head of IT

What do they do?
Experience Management is all about the interplay between the different core experiences of an organization, and we’ve seen already how much shared responsibility the X-Suite has whether it’s the CCO and the Chief Product Officer working together to put customers at the heart of product development, or the CMO and the Chief People Officer working to foster an internal culture that matches the brand.

None of that happens without the CIO. Responsible for the technology infrastructure within the organization, it’s their role to help break down data silos to enable the organization to deliver world-class experiences.

That covers the entire organization, from the systems customer service teams use to gather customer feedback and close the loop with customers, to systems and platforms that allow key customer, employee, product and brand data to be shared and accessed by the right people across the organization.

Learn how to get company buy-in for Experience Management (XM) through our webinar:

Webinar: Building a business case for Experience Management

Watch for Free

The post Meet the ‘X-Suite’ – the job roles shaping Experience Management appeared first on Qualtrics.

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At Qualtrics we want to connect our people to careers that feed their purpose; jobs that motivate & inspire them. This is Thusitha’s “Why Qualtrics” story.

One of my ‘why’s is for my world, and the world around me, to be better than yesterday. I take great pleasure in seeing someone else grow and to be a part of that. In my personal life, this could be from teaching my Grandmother how to use email or helping a friend prepare for an interview.

My job at Qualtrics puts me in a position to help our clients. Through implementation, I am looking to work with our clients to set them up for success both from a platform and capability perspective. Qualtrics uses a ‘train the trainer’ model so at the end of implementation it is great to see a successful launch of a project and for them to be able to use the platform on their own.

What attracted you to Qualtrics in the first place?

I have a friend that works at Qualtrics. A year before I joined, my friend had suggested that Qualtrics would be a great place for me since I was working on Voice of the Customer. At the time, the timing wasn’t quite right for me. As the year progressed though, I became more open to opportunities.

When my friend referred a role to me, I spent some time researching Qualtrics from a few different angles. I wanted to understand the CEO and his vision for experience management. I wanted to understand the culture so looked at the Qualtrics blog and Glassdoor to understand what stories and experiences others were had. And finally Googled Qualtrics to understand who else had an opinion.

After that research, I decided that it was a place I wanted to work and I had something to offer.

What was the turning point where you ‘had to have the job’?

In my situation, the hiring process was quite a long one. So, through each step, I was evaluating if the effort was worth the opportunity and that it was the right next step for me. In the middle of my hiring process, I came across Ellie’s Why Qualtrics’ post. She wrote:

“My colleagues are some of the most impressive people I’ve ever met. I’ve always been a firm believer in the fact that if you’re the smartest person in the room, you’re in the wrong room, because you won’t ever grow. Every bit of help I’ve been able to give to my coworkers, Qualtrics has given me back in spades.”

It was one extra data point and I wanted to be in that ‘room’ that Ellie had described.

What is your favorite part of your role?

The problem-solving part, i.e. when a solution comes together for a client. It starts with a requirement/problem and then using the expertise of colleagues to work through the options. At no point are you alone. And, as someone who is relatively new, this is reassuring that I don’t need to have all the answers. The win then comes when the client is happy with the implemented solution.

What surprised you most about working at Qualtrics?

Everything I knew about Qualtrics from the outside matched my experience once I was on the inside. This was surprising to me as I have had experiences with past roles where there wasn’t the same level of transparency.

I had accumulated several data points from the outside during my research, from interviewers, and from my ‘inside’ friend to form a view of coming in. With a value of ‘scrappy’, I joined knowing there are things that could be improved and there was still some way to go. On the other hand, this was an opportunity to be part of something great that would continue to get better.

Qualtrics is growing, and if you’re ready to find your “why” at a place like this, you can explore our open opportunities at any time by visiting our career page. Looking to discover more reasons “Why Qualtrics”? You can find the whole series here.

Want to chat? You can get in touch by checking out Qualtrics Life on Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram.

Thusitha is an alumnus of Sydney University and UNSW Australia and started his career at Deutsche Bank.

The post Why Qualtrics – Thusitha Perera – Program Architect – Sydney, Australia appeared first on Qualtrics.

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At Qualtrics we want to connect our people to careers that feed their purpose; jobs that motivate & inspire them. This is Kevin’s “Why Qualtrics” story.

In everything that I do, I want to feel like my contributions are improving the world around me. Whether that is for my family, my community, or my workplace, I want to leave the world better than I found it. Qualtrics has given me the chance to be part of shaping the experience economy, which enables a positive impact to any organization interested in improving the experiences of those it serves.

What attracted you to Qualtrics in the first place?

I was attracted to Qualtrics because of the thrill of being part of a company that is changing organizations’ approaches to measuring and taking action on the experiences of their stakeholders. I was drawn to the mission of filling the experience gap across a breadth of scenarios, private and public, education and corporate, and everything in between, and the chance to take part in influencing that mission.

What is your favorite part of your role?

My favorite part of my role is helping to bring solutions together to meet the needs of both internal and external stakeholders. I have frequent exposure to what customers are trying to achieve, and how every department at Qualtrics works together to enable our customers’ objectives.

Any tips for someone who is considering a role at Qualtrics?

Very few people have the opportunity to help shape a nascent discipline like experience management. Qualtrics, to me, is a company that will allow me to look back after many years and be proud of my role in influencing a mission with a global impact.

Qualtrics is growing, and if you’re ready to find your “why” at a place like this, you can explore our open opportunities at any time by visiting our career page. Looking to discover more reasons “Why Qualtrics”? You can find the whole series here.

Want to chat? You can get in touch by checking out Qualtrics Life on Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram.

Kevin is an alumnus of BYU and started his career with internships at Intel and Ernst & Young before working with companies like USAA and Nike.

The post Why Qualtrics – Kevin Brinkerhoff – Solutions Architect – Provo, UT appeared first on Qualtrics.

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Ask Jeanne Bliss, CEO and founder of Customer Bliss, what she does for a living and she’ll tell you she’s on ‘a crusade’. It’s one that has seen her give 2,000 keynotes, coach more than 20,000 execs around the world, and publish four best-selling books.

Her mission? “To help people around the world do a better job of uniting their organization to improve lives and to grow their business admirably.”

Jeanne’s expertise comes from being a five-time Chief Customer Officer, having taken her first role at Land’s End in 1983, aged 26 and before ‘customer experience’ had really been defined as a discipline.

In the 35 years since, customer experience has grown at a phenomenal rate, power has shifted towards  customers and employees as the Experience Economy has boomed.

“We are living in a world where customers have the megaphone,” says Jeanne. “That’s been one of the most wonderful forcing functions when finally it wasn’t about who we said we were. It’s about what employees and customers say we are.

“And they talk about three things. Did you do what you said you were going to do? Did you improve my life? And how did you make me feel as a result of doing that?  That’s really forcing us to focus on this now.”

But for all the advances in methodology and technology that have followed, there’s one key component that continues to drive Jeanne — leadership.

“How you lead, how you grow, and how you choose to grow is what defines you as an organization. So I help people around the world do a better job of uniting their organization to improve lives and to grow their business admirably.”

Start By Honoring Your Customers

‘Growing admirably’ is a common theme throughout our discussion with Jeanne  — a refreshing change as she deliberately steers clear of discussions around cost savings and returns on CX that usually dominate the profession.

For Jeanne, CX needs to be seen as something with a far greater purpose.

“We’re here to honor the person who pays money to us,” she says. “I think we often lose sight of that.”

She rejects the idea that CX is all about short-term financial gain — an attitude she regularly comes up against when coaching exec teams — and needs look no further than her own upbringing for the perfect demonstration.

Jeanne and her siblings would often help out at her father’s Buster Brown shoe store in Chicago, an experience which showed just how intertwined businesses are in people’s day to day lives.

“He put the very first pair of shoes on little kids’ feet,” she says. “He also said to moms when they opened up their pocketbooks and they didn’t have enough, ‘get those shoes on your little one’s feet, bring back the rest in when you’re in town.’

“He had put shoes on a generation of children and their children’s children, so he became a part of the story of their life.

“A line of people three blocks long stood to say goodbye to this man — what he didn’t get in financial prosperity, he got back in many, many more important versions of prosperity.”

‘You Have To Go And Earn Loyalty’

The growth of the CX profession over the past decade has seen countless organizations set up entire practices to improve the experience for customers and the Chief Customer Officer now plays a key role in many leadership teams.

An unintended consequence of that however is that CX is now at risk of becoming its own silo, something Jeanne is keen to nip in the bud at any organization she goes into.

“When I’m working with the company and I’m coaching a chief customer officer, I make it a requirement that I’m coaching the entire C-Suite,” she says.

“Each part of the organization defines scores based on the actions or the tasks that they’re trying to work on. But those actions or tasks done separately are what come together and create an unplanned experience.

“And so it’s deliberateness, it’s uniting and it’s being clear about your purpose in improving lives and then taking the actions to get that right and staying the course. This isn’t a one and done.

“You’ve got to earn it too — you can’t just go get loyalty. You can’t go get growth. You have to earn it  and you have to earn it on a regular basis.”

It’s About Heroes, Not Heroics

‘Unplanned experiences’ are all too common in the vast majority of organizations. That’s not to say they don’t deliver great service — many do, but it’s usually the result of an employee heroically stepping in to work around the system to find a way to delight their customers, rather than the product of a system designed to delight.

“What we have now is organizations of exhausted heroic front line employees,” says Jeanne. “But what we need to do is move them from heroics to enabling them to be heroes, getting rid of the goo inside of the organization that they have to work around.

“I think of it more as really putting people in a position to use their brain and their values that you hired them for. Hire good people, trust them, and put them in a position to make the call.”

She points out that in many organizations, these unplanned experiences are costing them money too as customers get wise to the system and play ‘service roulette.’

“You know, you’ve called an airline more than once, right?” she asks. “I bet you any money you call up, if you don’t get someone who’s been around a lot and they know how to navigate it, what do you do? You put the phone down.

“You actually cost the company more money because you call again and hope for a better outcome.”

Quit Chasing The Money And Focus On ‘Why’

The key to delivering world-class customer experience is nothing new — go back to 1983 when Jeanne took her first role as Chief Customer Officer at Land’s End and the words founder Gary Comer said to her when he gave her the job still ring true today.

“He said ‘You’re the conscience of the company. Your job is to make sure that we keep going back to our heart and our values and our place as we grow’ — that was that, it made my career,” says Jeanne.

Teaching organizations to go back to their values and put that at the heart of their growth is the theme of her highly acclaimed book Chief Customer Officer 2.0, which focuses on the notion of honoring customers as an asset of the business.

“Many organizations still don’t do the basic math,” she says. “We’re waiting for customers to tell us how we did, versus measuring how we did based on them voting with their feet.

“So for example, organizations focus on how many new customers they brought in volume and value in any given time. But how many did they lose in that same period in volume and value? In most organizations, the sales guys are running up the flagpole and shouting ‘here’s how many we acquired’, but we’re not subtracting lost from new, which is the outcome of our experience.”

It’s a culture change for many organizations to get right, and one that all comes back to leadership once more.

“This is an attitude shift,” she says. “It’s about leaders fearlessly connecting the dots for the organization and asking themselves,  ‘did we earn the right to grow? Did we bring in more than we lost? And why?’

“Of course you need to prove there’s an ROI, but what we find is it’s not the ROI that drives people, it’s the integrity, the growth and how they grow.”

To be effective, that culture change needs to go beyond being just another corporate tagline, and really embed itself into the DNA of a company.

That means aligning your CX strategy to your Employee Experience (EX) and walking the walk both externally and internally.

“People are gonna call baloney on you if you say customer is king, but yet you send your frontline on so many customer calls that they don’t have time, and you metric them on the amount of calls they made in a week versus the quality of the conversation and if they really diagnosed a customer,” says Jeanne.

“If you’re measuring the amount of time to onboard a customer instead of the quality of the onboarding you’re sending two different signals. If you’re saying customers important, but you’re nickel and diming them and charging them, your employees are going to start to say, ‘yeah, not so much.’”

Learn more from Jeanne on how to improve Customer Experience in her webinar:

Webinar: 5 Unexpected Steps to Improving Customer Experience

Register

The post Jeanne Bliss: Why ‘how’ you grow is just as important as ‘how much’ appeared first on Qualtrics.

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In an age when many consumers grew up using smart phones and social media, it is becoming increasingly important to use social media in your customer experience efforts. According to a case study by Twitter, when a customer tweets at a brand and receives a response, that customer is willing to spend up to 20% more with that brand on future purchases.

In order to create an extensive overall customer and brand experience, companies must utilize customer service best practices in social media. The best way to do this is to use a good social media service and online reputation management platform. This is integral to their overall experience management strategy, and ensuring customers are satisfied at each step of the journey.

In this article, we’ll look at some of the best examples of customer care on social media, so you can understand how to provide the best care to your customers.

1.   Adobe

Adobe has a dedicated Twitter account, AdobeCare, which is the Official Customer Support account for Adobe. In addition, they post daily support tips and tutorials to help customers use their products better. When a customer buys from Adobe, they not only know that they’re getting a quality product, but quality support and customer care to go with it.

This is just one example of a company using omni-channel feedback to help customers get their questions answered, so they can use your products more effectively. This strategy of helping customers get more educated through social media can help cut down on the amount of support calls your customers get because they’re learning through a self-service model and constantly absorbing information if they’re actively following your accounts.

2. Buffer

Customer Experience (CX) -focused companies understand what is important to their customers. Buffer’s social feeds provide research and data to help their customers reach more people on social media. Their Twitter feed is full of studies, white papers, links to research, and articles that their customers will find useful.

While linking to other research is helpful, curating a content hub of original articles can take your resources a step further. It shows that you’re an expert in your field and you’ll generate a solid base of content for your social media accounts and traffic.

3. Tiffany and Co.

When a customer goes to your social media account, they want to be able to clearly recognize your brand. Tiffany and Co. has been around for years and does a great job keeping a consistent brand image so followers know what to expect from the brand. Not only have they created a consistent brand identity and tied the iconic Tiffany Blue into their photos, but they started doing Instagram stories that educate and delight their customers. One story about NYC, takes viewers through iconic NYC food options, from hot dogs to tea parlors. They manage to be relevant to a younger audience and provide entertaining content, while still keeping their luxurious reputation. Through their use of brand identity, they generate an enormous amount of engagement and are heads and tails above the average jewelry and watch brand.

Tiffany and Co. has turned their brand into a religion and created fans all over the world. You can do this too by managing your brand experience and monitoring your brand, your market, and your competitors to make it easy to find breakthrough insights to turn your brand into a religion.

4. Mitsubishi

If a brand is going to be present on social media, they must also interact with their followers (for both positive and negative comments). Mitsubishi does a great job at interacting with fans that  comment on their Facebook ads. You can see an example of interaction with ads for their new SUV below. By responding to fans, they are drawing engagement and improving their brand experience

5. Dominos

Dominos became a legend in CX when they created the tweet-to-order and the introduction of ‘DOM The Pizza Bot’ a few years ago. Together, these products make it easy to order pizza quickly and conveniently, creating a better customer experience. They have a casual and honest tone which has helped customers grow to love the brand. Brands must make it easy for customers to order or access their products, and this is about as easy as it gets.

6. Zappos

To provide a great customer experience, you must respond quickly on social media. Millennials especially, who grew up on social media expect faster responses than older generations. In fact, 83% of people expect to get a response within 24 hours, and many want it even faster. Zappos is known for speed and often responds to customer comments (both positive and negative) within an hour. Not only do they acknowledge the comment but they often have a lengthy and humorous conversation with the customer which shows they’re invested in their customers as humans. Employees are empowered to use personality (with a little discretion!) when monitoring.

Zappos also monitors their social media accounts not only for direct mentions, but for instances  where the brand is mentioned in the plain text of posts as well. They are constantly monitoring their online presence so they can respond to every comment. Online reputation management is important because most consumers are influenced by online reviews and comments.

Qualtrics helps you monitor your social media and online presence with their reputation management software.

In the future, expect more companies to turn to social media for customer support, especially as millennials and Generation Y become the primary purchasers. These generations grew up on social media and expect brands to be engaging with them and monitoring their complaints and mentions. In addition, bots are growing more popular so you can expect companies to put more AI into the social customer experience. Just make sure the bot actually understands the question before responding.

If you’re not monitoring your social media accounts and online presence, you could benefit from Qualtrics’ online reputation management platform. Not only can you gain actionable insights hidden in your customer’s social reviews, you can monitor and analyze key trends in your online reputation by location, see how it impacts your key customer experience metrics, and understand how you compare to the competition.

Monitor your social media and online presence with Online Reputation Management

Request a demo

The post 6 companies who provide the best experience on social media (and why) appeared first on Qualtrics.

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Qualtrics Blog by Nicole Parish - 4d ago

We want to celebrate a very happy anniversary! One year ago today we welcomed in some amazing talent into Sales and Engineering. Additionally, we had a great group of interns start their careers off with us.

This class of talent came to us from many top companies like Fidelity, BDO, Uptake, Microsoft, EMC, Randstad. They came from universities like the University of Michigan, Penn State, BYU, University of Arizona and many more!  

Congratulations to our Class of May 21, 2018! We’re looking forward to all you do in the next year and look forward to celebrating your 2nd year anniversary.

Join us each week as we celebrate first-year #workiversaries here at Qualtrics! The #QualtricsLife is a diverse one – check out our story series “Why Qualtrics” and explore how our teams are experiencing ‘real life’ with their colleagues and families through the Qualtrics Experience Bonus.

The post Happy 1 Year Anniversary! appeared first on Qualtrics.

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At Qualtrics we believe in experiences.  We want to be sure we provide our employees the best employee experience possible.  One way we do this is to offer to pay for an annual ‘Qualtrics Experience’. After that, employees can decide when, where, and how to have this experience. Then share with us what they learned.   This story is part of the ‘Qualtrics Experience’ blog series showcasing our employees and their ultimate experience.

What did you choose as your Qualtrics Experience?

When I met my wife, she had just returned from a study abroad from New Zealand. That’s all she ever talked about it. When we were married, we promised to go to New Zealand for our 10 year anniversary. We just hit our anniversary so this was a promise fulfilled.

One of our objectives at Qualtrics is to encourage employees to Learn, Lead, and Live.  What did you learn through this experience?

We attended a Maori cultural center where we learned more about their culture, their history, their food etc. We also visited a Kiwi sanctuary to learn more about the plight of this bird.

This is just one more example of why you might want to check out our open opportunities at Qualtrics and see if you are a fit!

Read more #QualtricsExperience stories on our #QualtricsLife blog

The post My Qualtrics Experience – Michael Shields – Manager, Procurement – Provo, UT appeared first on Qualtrics.

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Companies today can’t get by with just offering basic benefits like PTO and health insurance, they must go above and beyond and provide employees with an exemplary experience in the workplace. The employee experience is the sum of all the interactions your employees have with your company. It involves the culture, benefits, physical work environment, and tool’s you provide for employee success, and it can be linked to revenue. In fact, companies with high employee engagement pull in 2.5 times more revenue than companies with low engagement levels.

If you’re looking to improve your talent acquisition efforts and increase employee retention rates, use the 10 tips below to provide a great employee experience for your workers.

1. Utilize Employee Journey Mapping

An employee journey map is a way of visualizing the various stages an employee goes through in their time with a company. It allows you to identify pain points and critical moments where employee feedback and action is needed to close the gap from a current to a desired state. The best employee journey maps start with clearly defined outcomes, utilize X and O-data, and involve key groups within the organization. The employee lifecycle is critical because even if you do yearly employee engagement surveys, each employee is at a different stage in the employee journey, and it’s difficult to understand how personal experiences shape the key outcomes of employee experience like engagement, motivation or productivity.

2. Improve Internal Communication

Internal communication teams do much more than just disseminating company information. They foster a sense of community, encourage employees to work together for a common goal, and create a cohesive company culture. When employees have an increased sense of purpose they’re more productive and become brand advocates and ambassadors for your company. Internal communication must be used for maintaining a connection with your employees and winning their trust.

In addition, as the workforce becomes more dispersed and mobile, internal communication is more important than ever. Keeping remote employees engaged is crucial and providing everyone in the company the proper tools to communicate like Slack or Zoom can help develop employee relationships and facilitate clear communication.

3. Design a great onboarding experience

Many companies don’t have a new employee orientation program, much less an employee onboarding experience, but this is critical to employee success. In fact, according to the Harvard Business Review, 33 percent of new hires look for a new job within their first six months on the job and this can be largely attributed to their onboarding experience. You should design a program that’s measurable, tailored to specific audiences (i.e. sales reps get a different orientation than customer service reps), and has clear objectives.

4. Implement stay interviews

While exit interviews are valuable, they don’t help you keep an employee that’s about to leave. Stay interviews are individual conversations between the manager and employee that help companies understand what’s important to employees and get ahead of retention issues. They should be an open dialogue that’s used to build trust with employees and gather their perspective on their experience. By understanding what works and what doesn’t, you can identify their motivation for staying with the organization and work towards goals that keep them interested. This technique also enhances internal talent pipelines and provides great insight into global areas for improvement as a company.

5. Invest in employee wellness

Active employees incur lower health costs, which saves your company time and money, but employee wellness is more than just physical. Programs that encourage mental, emotional, and spiritual wellness create employees who are rested and more attentive and productive at work. Companies should look to implement health and fitness programs, sick time, paid vacation, paid parental leave, on-site gyms and health clinics, and provide healthy snacks, just to name a few ideas.

6. Use employee benefit surveys

Many employees would take extra benefits over a raise, proving that providing relevant employee benefits is crucial to your retention and talent acquisition efforts. Employee benefit surveys help you understand which benefits are important to your employees. They ask questions about the quality of specific benefits, how they compare to other companies, and any additional benefits employees would like to see in the future. This can relate to PTO, health insurance, parental leave, retirement, stock options, free meals, etc.

7. Act on employee feedback

Many organizations implement employee engagement and feedback surveys to understand where their employees are at, but not all act on that feedback. This can backfire on employees and cause a loss of trust. Employees are more likely to share their opinion and engage if they feel like they’re being listened to, and may stop giving feedback if they know they won’t be heard. Successful companies communicate their action plan to employees and designate a person who is responsible for implementing the changes.

8. Offer career development programs

Employees are more likely to stay at your company if they know there’s room for career advancement. By putting programs in place to train up your next set of leaders, you’ll gain loyal employees who understand you’re investing in them. Managers should have an individual development plan for their employees and discuss long-term career goals at least once a year. Employees can also be assigned a mentor who has mastered the skill to coach them and give feedback. This will increase employee engagement and widen your internal talent pool.

9. Share customer feedback with your employees

There’s an undeniable link between employee experience and customer experience and many employees feel joy from helping customers. However, when a customer gives a compliment, the employee rarely hears about it. By allowing customers to give feedback and sharing it with employees, it can boost employee confidence and give them a sense of purpose in their job. Customer feedback should be broadcast throughout the entire organization, not only recognizing that the company is succeeding, but the employee as well.

10. Provide manager training

Personal relationships are one of the biggest factors that impact the employee experience, specifically the relationships employees have with their managers. When managers don’t know how to properly motivate or communicate with their employees, it causes loss of productivity and eventually ends with the employee finding another job. Manager training should teach delegation, interpersonal skills, time management, goal-setting, and effective ways to give praise and feedback.

If you’re ready to turn your employees into ambassadors, contact Qualtrics today or learn how to set yourself up for success with our Employee Experience eBook:

eBook: 4 Pillars of EX Success

Download for Free

The post 10 ways to improve employee experience at your company appeared first on Qualtrics.

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At Qualtrics we want to connect our people to careers that feed their purpose; jobs that motivate & inspire them. This is Erin’s “Why Qualtrics” story.

One thing that attracted me to the field of software engineering, in general, is the boundless choice of what industry you can work in. Since I had a lot of options, I knew I wanted to work somewhere where I could make an impact on normal people and where the people I worked with were passionate about what they build. Qualtrics completely redefined the meaning of both of those requirements for me.

The platform we build at Qualtrics is focused on making our clients better. Our products help them collect the data that tells them what/where they’ve missed on expectations and identify how they can make things better for their customers and employees. Every time I encounter a Qualtrics survey out in the world, it’s a little reminder of how what I do enables those touchpoints that improve our daily experiences. And it helps that the folks who work here are beyond passionate about creating the best experiences for our customers and employees.

What surprised you most about working at Qualtrics?

Definitely how ready everyone is to make changes for the better. In the three years I’ve been here, I’ve seen so many changes, big and small. And it’s not just the executives. People at all levels are questioning the way things are done and improving our processes to be smarter, faster, and easier. The push for inclusivity also impresses me on a regular basis. I love how committed our leadership is to supporting the diversity of backgrounds, experiences, and ideas.

What does your day look like?

I’m an engineering team lead so I spend most of my time either coding up features or coordinating on behalf of my team with others in the company. Each day looks a little different, but I always start by identifying my goals for the day. This is my favorite time of day because I get to answer the question of “What can I do today to set up my team for the most success?”

My role as a team lead puts me in this super special position where I can multiply the efforts of my teammates every day. Sometimes that means I’m jumping in on a distracting bug fix so the rest of the team can stay focused on the features we want to release that week. Sometimes it means tracking conversations between stakeholders from multiple teams to identify the most pressing needs of our team’s products from an operational and engineering perspective. And sometimes it just means standing out of the way and letting my team do what they’re good at.

In between the tasks I take on to help the team as a whole, I also get to flex my creativity and engineering skills to code up and test new features myself. It’s a super rewarding mix, especially since I get to do it all in collaboration with the super passionate folks who work at Qualtrics.

What made you want to get into engineering?

I actually started out studying journalism and ended up in engineering by happy accident. Unsure where to go next, I realized that my journalism classes weren’t engaging me or challenging me enough. So, I ended up taking an informatics class recommended by a friend just to fill up my schedule while I figured things out.

I enjoyed the class, so I switched my major to informatics. I was a bit behind in course credits by this point, though, and I needed to take some summer classes to catch up. The introductory computer science course was the only class I could take that counted toward my new major before I completed the discrete math prerequisite so I enrolled without a second thought.

That computer science class is what got me into engineering. My professor introduced us to how coders essentially just use language to build things that solve problems. This was a use for my skills in language and composition that played to my interest in math and challenged me more than anything else I’d tried to learn before.

After that class, I switched majors once again. More advanced classes and software engineering internships further solidified my interest in building products that help people, which ultimately led me to my role as an engineer at Qualtrics.

What is your favorite part of your role?

I love the variety in my day. I get to dabble in a little bit of both engineering and product management so I strategize the next set of features our users need and then I implement those features. At a larger company, I understand it’s pretty rare to step outside of your assigned role like that. At Qualtrics, I get to solve product problems and technical problems. Both of which is highly rewarding to me in different ways.

Also, I get to engage in recruiting and gender diversity efforts. I write and edit blog posts on the engineering blog (check it out – www.qualtrics.com/eng) and serve on the Women’s Leadership Development Recruiting Committee in Seattle. I love that I get to work on the initiatives that interest me, on top of getting to build statistical analysis software that challenges me.

Qualtrics is growing, and if you’re ready to find your “why” at a place like this, you can explore our open opportunities at any time by visiting our career page. Looking to discover more reasons “Why Qualtrics”? You can find the whole series here.

Want to chat? You can get in touch by checking out Qualtrics Life on Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram.

Erin is an alumnus of Indiana University Bloomington and started her career at Qualtrics! Outside of work, Erin loves piano, drawing, good books and movies, drinking good coffee, and reading the news.

The post Why Qualtrics – Erin Leonhard – Software Engineer – Seattle, WA appeared first on Qualtrics.

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Finding the right mix of X (experience) and O (operational) data isn’t just about finding a better way to serve customers. It’s also about finding a better way to attract, retain, and understand the needs of employees. That applies to all industries, including aerospace and defense.

In the world of aerospace and defense, there’s no shortage of operational data. Armed services leaders know, for example, how many service members they’re recruiting. They know how many jobs are open and which are the most critical to fill. They know how much is being spent on healthcare, benefits, training, deployments, and how long it takes on average to move service members and their families to a new duty station. That’s operational data, or O-data, and there’s a lot of it in the defense world. And because there’s so much operational data, one might think there’s enough there to understand the employee’s world, right?

But imagine this. A senior pilot with years of experience and training under his belt, currently serving on a six-month tour of duty in a far-away country, just talked to his wife and kids on Skype. The wife says she and the kids are burned out on the military lifestyle. They’re done and want a “normal” civilian life in a “normal” environment. The service member has a choice to make. Stay in and lose his family, or leave the military.

O-data can’t clue you in on that type of employee attrition risk. X-data, on the other hand, could.

Enter X-Data

X-data is short for “experience” data. Asking the service member, asking their families… what’s your experience been like living this life as a military family? What are the things that happen that make you want to stay or leave? And then, for the military base commanders, what can you do about it? That’s what the leadership team at Barksdale Air Force Base in Louisiana wanted to find out, and they chose Qualtrics as the tool to help.

Measuring On-Base “Health”

“Recruiting airmen, retaining entire families” is the mantra at Barksdale Air Force Base. But for years they haven’t had the right data to understand why some stay, and others leave. They knew there were aspects of the on-base living experience they could improve to better serve airmen, but which ones should they prioritize?

Every day approximately 14,000 airmen and their families at this “city within a city” go to work, seek medical care, grocery shop, bank, dine, pursue hobbies, entertainment, recreation, and fitness goals through on-base services. Airmen aren’t just employees here; they and their families are also customers of an extensive set of base services.

A lot of investment goes into creating a resilience-building experience for these communities that could otherwise fracture during deployments and moves to new assignments, new schools, and new communities. Especially during these times, Air Force families look to on-base support and assistance. When airmen and their families perceive the right support to be there, their experience feels one way. When support isn’t there in their minds, the experience is something completely different.

Problems: Too few measures and too few responses

Barksdale AFB’s leadership wanted to know the base-specific factors that influence the decision to leave the Air Force entirely. But when it came to on-base measurement, fewer than 10 percent of target audiences were responding to existing email and paper surveys. They needed a better way to measure the experiences of airmen and their families, including more creative ways to hear from difficult-to-reach populations on base.

Creative, multi-channel X-data capture

With better technology, Barksdale leadership designed more succinct surveys, and, in addition to traditional email and social feedback channels, armed themselves with the survey on iPads and smartphones, and engaged respondents at work, at base social events, and on-base retail facilities. Leadership personally greeted airmen and/or their families and asked, in-person, for answers to a simple survey on the spot.

Flexible tools for comparable reports

Barksdale Air Force Base now has information that can be compared across departments and over time. With shorter surveys and standardized demographic questions, X-data can be compiled to create a holistic picture of the base experience from the airmen and the families’ points of view.

These new approaches help base leadership understand how the community feels about on-base amenities and resources, but it is also a method to help get ahead of some of the additional risks and realities of military life: mental health issues, suicide risk, domestic abuse, and alcohol or substance abuse, for example.

Today, multi-channel surveying continues at Barksdale AFB, including on-the-spot outreach. Base leadership regularly reviews survey results as part of their monthly leadership team meetings. Deep analysis and dashboards housed in the Qualtrics platform help base leadership understand which improvements matter most to airmen and their families. From ensuring on-base services are available during the right hours, to understanding how local schools impact airmen’s families’ desire to stay, Qualtrics tools are helping Barksdale AFB avoid the risk of airmen attrition and create the resilience-building community command leadership envision.

That’s the power of X-data in creating intelligent enterprises. Collecting feedback via Qualtrics’ secure, FedRAMP authorized Experience Management Platform is a decision that can support you in your quest.

Reach out to the Qualtrics federal team for more insights on our experience management work with more than 100 federal government clients at 60+ agencies and the Department of Defense, including our work as the only FedRAMP authorized experience management platform available.

Want expert help? Request a consultation from our federal team

CONTACT US
Author Bio: Stephanie Thum is a Certified Customer Experience Professional (CCXP) and Chief Advisor for Federal Customer Experience at Qualtrics. In a past life, Stephanie was the head of CX for a federal government agency where she built a CX program that included customer surveys, executive councils, employee engagement, and data governance practices. She was also responsible for coordinating her agency’s public-facing annual performance plan and report, based on OMB Circular A-11. She is formally trained in strategic planning for government organizations and in planning, budgeting, and performance reporting for government organizations.

The post Recruiting airmen and retaining families-how X-data supports retention of service members appeared first on Qualtrics.

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