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Picture this: A party of 10 is arguing over where to eat when someone suggests your restaurant. There’s a mutual agreeance that your place has amazing food and service until the one vegan in the group points out that there’s nothing they can really eat on your menu. After some grumbles, they dismiss your restaurant and pick somewhere else to go where everyone can enjoy a meal. Growing up as the sole vegetarian in a family of meat lovers, I can’t even count how many times this scenario has happened to me and probably countless others. Is it worth losing a 10 top over a lacking menu? We don’t think so. That’s why we’re here to tell you not just why any good restaurant should have a vegan option, but also how to best implement a tasty and memorable veganized menu that’ll have people from all across the dietary spectrum raving about your restaurant.

Attitudes Towards Plant Based Lifestyles are Changing

According to Forbes, veganism is growing quickly, from 1% percent of Americans in 2014 to 6% in 2017. It’s a “trend’ that isn’t going anywhere. More interesting though is the rise of the Flexitarian. A “Flexitarian” is a person who mostly follows a plant-based diet but does incorporate animal products like meat and dairy. People who follow this diet tend to attribute their choice to health and environmental influences. A 2018 study by Dataessential found that a whopping 22% of consumers are trying to cut back on their meat consumption. With this information, it shouldn’t come as a surprise that carnivores are the largest consumer group of plant-based protein. Coupling ever improving meat alternatives, with health and environment concerns, there’s been massive growth in this industry. Attitudes are changing toward a plant-based lifestyle and the term “vegan” is no longer leaving a disappointing taste in people’s mouth.

How these Changes are Affecting the Restaurant/Food Industry

Plant-based protein is shaking up the restaurant and food industry. Big names are beginning to incorporate plant-based options into their menu, with massive success. Since releasing the Beyond Meat Taco, Del Taco has been raving about their success in bringing in new customers, along with increased consumer spending. When White Castle initially introduced the Impossible Slider, market share increased by 250% in locations that served the slider over those that didn’t. Meat mogul, Tyson, is releasing their own line of plant-based proteins this summer. I could throw more facts at you, but I’m sure you get the point. The restaurant and food industry is embracing and working to meet the demand for more plant-based proteins. As more restaurants incorporate a vegan-friendly option, it will likely hurt your business if you don’t.   

Why You Should Include a Vegan Option on Your Menu 

What good business owner doesn’t want more people to which they can market and sell their products? That’s a no brainer. Including a veganized menu option that isn’t a boring salad does just this. That’s another 6% (according to the aforementioned Forbes article) of consumers you can add to your customer base, not including those flexitarians looking for a tasty alternative. And like I said before, it’s not just vegans that are into eating this stuff. Odds are you’ll have regular or lapsed customers intrigued by a new addition to your menu, just like Del Taco did. Veganism is a trend that’s playing the long game and you’re going to want to be on the right side of it.

Potential Concerns and Ways to Avoid Them 

With any new change, questions and concerns are natural. You don’t have to worry about this one though. We want to make adding a vegan option to your menu as easy and friendly as your new menu addition(s) will be to your customers. You may be worried that a vegan meal won’t fit with your menu or brand, or that meatless meat might be out of your price range to regularly keep on your menu. These are fair concerns, but they can be easily worked around.

Plant-based meat alternatives can be expensive. The Beyond Burger sells for about $12 a pound vs $5 a for a pound ground beef at Whole foods. While most restaurants upcharge to help cover these costs, meatless meat may not be affordable for your restaurant right now, and that’s ok. Meatless meat is far from necessary to create a memorable vegan dish. There are plenty of easy delicious vegan recipes that don’t have a fake meat component to them.

Are you worried about incorporating a vegan meal that fits with your menu and brand? Don’t be. Google is your best friend here. Whatever type of food your business has to offer, you better believe there’s already a vegan workaround floating around out there online. Do you serve Mediterranean food? Try this easy vegan falafel wrap recipe. Italian? Give this delicioso recipe a shot. Dare I say Steakhouse? The ease of this mushroom-based meal will have you trippin’. Not only do these recipes cover different types of cuisines, but they’re also fake meat or meat-free! This just goes to show you can incorporate a memorable vegan dish or two that will put you on the veg-friendly map.

Tips to Implement these Changes  Menu Icons

Now that you know that you don’t need fancy meatless meat and that your brand won’t be tarnished let’s move onto some tips for unrolling your new addition. Marking your veganized menu with a symbol that indicates your options or meals that can be made vegan is essential. This is a quick way for readers to establish that you have options they can eat without having to look through your entire menu. According to OpenTable, 93% of diners look up menus online before going out to eat, and we typically spend 15 seconds on a webpage before leaving it. That means you’ve only got 15 seconds to let potential customers know that your restaurant has an option for them.

Create a Star Vegan Dish 

Building your new menu item into your brand’s story is exciting, and incorporating a vegan option to your menu has other positives outside of increasing your customer base. Introducing a new menu item creates a fantastic PR opportunity for an  “unveiling” on your website and across your social media. In turn, the publicity can increase your online presence with reposts and new followers. Vegans have their own community and word will spread bringing them in droves to give your restaurant a try.

Having a star vegan dish is a necessity on any good menu, but it’s a nice bonus to have more than one option. Looking through your menu there are probably meals that with a few tweaks can be meat or dairy free. This also means that you don’t have to worry about extra costs for food you don’t normally buy since you’re working with what you’ve already got. Just remember to mark these menu items as well to present all possible options to your customers.

Put Restaurant Dat to Work for You 

Our final recommendation is to track your data. Restaurants rely heavily on data to know that they’re making the best moves for their business and customers. Keeping track of your data can also reassure you that you made the right move by adding a veg-friendly option to your menu. If possible, keep metrics on the number of times someone orders your new vegan dish on a weekly or monthly basis. Furthermore, keep track of the party size that typically includes a vegan meal. Remember that 10 top I mentioned at the beginning of this article? You can now recapture these customers because you have something to offer everyone in the party.

Conclusion 

Adding a veganized menu option is both easier and more in demand than ever before. It doesn’t have to be intimidating or break the bank. Don’t let your business fall behind or exclude you from potential customers. Have fun with it, be open to feedback, and enjoy your new menu item!

Want to get the scoop on everything restaurant tech, marketing, industry news, and more? We got you covered. Subscribe to our blog to get weekly updates on the most buzzworthy restaurant industry topics.


About the Author

Brooke is a marketing intern at QSR Automations. She recently graduated from the University of Louisville with a Bachelor of Arts in Communication. In her free time, she likes hanging out with her pup, spending time in nature and watching Brooklyn Nine-Nine.

The post The Time is Now for a Veganized Menu appeared first on QSR Automations.

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It’s a busy Saturday at your restaurant, and your entire crew is at their stations filling orders. As you stand near the hosts’ stand, readily available to resolve issues at a moment’s notice, you realize one of your servers was scheduled to arrive almost two hours ago. Checking your phone, you don’t see notifications of a message or a missed call. It’s the dreaded restaurant no call, no show. You scan the restaurant and reach for your employee list to see who you can summon as a sizable party enters the restaurant.

According to the CDC, employee absences cost U.S. employers $225.8 billion a year, roughly $1,685 per employee. When an employee doesn’t show up for their scheduled shift, it throws everything out of whack. Managers have one less section covered, there’s less workforce for busier times of the day, and the manager has to call another employee, one who most likely didn’t plan to work that day, and ask them to cover for this unexpected absence. Essentially, the no call no show is a toxic scourge to the restaurant ecosystem, to which operators try to avoid at all costs.  

Employers usually handle these situations, when an employee gives no notice of their absence AKA the no call no show, in different ways. Either they give the employee a warning and issue some consequence, or they fire the employee immediately with no questions asked. Either option is effective; it depends on the policies and preferences of the individual restaurant. There is not a “one size fits all option.” You need a process to handle this issue, whether it’s revisiting an already established attendance policy, a tardiness policy within the attendance policy or developing an attendance policy, you have some options to help combat the no call no show.

The Already Established Attendance Policy

If your restaurant has an established attendance policy and you’re still experiencing a no call no show epidemic, you may need to create more steps in the process to troubleshoot. Consider these questions:  

Does the Attendance Policy Clearly Define the Consequences of Non-Compliance?   

By consequences, we don’t necessarily mean outright firing an employee. Are there steps you can take, like warnings that can escalate over time? If the employee has continuous absences without notifying, then the next step may be terminating their employment.  

Does Management Go Through the Policy with Employees?  

Usually, in the on-boarding process, management will go through any policies that the new employee needs to know. A suggestion would be to have a signature line for the employee to sign recognizing that they understand everything stated in the policy.  

Are Expectations Clear Across Employees?

Consider whether every employee understands the expectations set for them. What happens if they are late? What happens if they do not notify management of their absence from their shift? Is there a penalty for last minute call-ins? Whatever is in the attendance policy needs to be enforced consistently with every employee.    

Is Enforcement of the Attendance Policy Consistent Across Instances?

You might describe this point as setting expectations. An attendance policy would identify how to handle an emergency or unexpected illness. However, you need steps in place to handle an attendance policy violation. Is there a process for coverage? What about consequences? Are there levels of attendance violations for these consequences? If the policy outlines the process for attendance issues and any violations, it’s easier to prepare for the unexpected.   

Creating an Attendance Policy

If there’s not already an established attendance policy, having one in place in an employee handbook would help decrease attendance misconduct instances. The attendance policy would also help combat instances of no call no show because it would provide consequences for employees and the steps to be taken for attendance instances.  

What Should Go Into an Employee Attendance Policy?  

The attendance policy should be simple and easy to understand. Be sure to define the difference between sick time, days off clearly, and tardies to avoid confusion. Your attendance policy should outline the consequences of each situation and what employees and management should do to handle the instance. Also, consider these points:   

How Much Time is Necessary to Notify Management of an Absence?  

“In the case of illness, please let management know of your absence at least 5 hours before the start of your shift (if possible).”  

This example leaves room for flexibility and allows for enough time for you to find coverage before there is a staff shortage. It also lets employees know that in the instance that they are sick, they won’t be penalized for that absence if they notify management as soon as possible. Keep in mind this does depend on the attendance policy of the business.   

Are Emergency Personal Hours Available? How Many Before Consequences?  

If your business provides personal emergency hours for your employees, there needs to be a clear definition of the amount of time an employee can use.  Setting a set number of individual emergency hours before taking significant actions gives your employees “wiggle room” for unexpected issues. An example of this part of the policy could be:    

“Employees have 24 hours of emergency personal time available after 30 days of employment. You do not need to request personal emergency hours in advance, and you can take them at any time. You must notify management that you’re using emergency hours as soon as possible in this instance.”   

What Happens When an Employee Doesn’t Notify Management of an Absence in the Proper Timeframe?  

It needs to be clear what actions you’ll take in the case of absence without notification. Management may call the employee to check on them in case something has happened. If the employee has overslept and come into work, they are then tardy. Does the policy identify the actions taken in the instance of a late employee? You must outline these steps before it happens so that management knows how to handle these attendance issues effectively.   

What steps Will You Take When an Employee is Absent without notification?  

There needs to be a transparent process set up in the attendance policy. Is the employee terminated immediately? Or is there a certain number of absences without notification before that happens? Managers have options here:

“For the first absence without notification, the employee can receive a warning or not be able to work their shift once they return to work. After the third absence without notification, the employee could be written up, and it will go in an official record. After the fifth absence without notifying management, the employee will face termination.”  

Is there a Call List For Extra Coverage in the Event of a No Call No Show?

When management faces an unexpected employee absence they need to find someone to cover for it. Usually, managers call other employees to see who is available to come in for the shift. Instead of making it random, managers should have a list of people that are willing to come in when coverage is needed. This backup plan helps managers and employees because employees won’t receive random calls on their off day and the employees willing to cover will be more likely to provide coverage. If you don’t have many employees ready to be on the “on call,” provide an incentive to cover shifts.   

Will there Be Incentives For Employees Without No Call No Shows or Tardies?

Every action doesn’t need a punishment. What about your employees that have not had any attendance policy violations? To maintain this positive behavior, think about providing incentives to employees that pick up shifts to assist with coverage or employees that have near perfect attendance. Incentives could be a free meal when they are off work, monetary incentives or other prizes. Ensure that your employees are rewarded for their positive actions as well.  

Is There a Section for Employee Signatures and the Date?

This measure holds your employees accountable. If they sign and date the attendance policy section, they are implying that they understand the policy and everything that it includes.  Be sure to include this part as a point of reference, an essential part of employee onboarding, for any issues that may arise.  

Conclusion

No call no shows are the bane of any workforce’s existence, but you can manage them with an effective attendance policy that clearly outlines the consequences and the steps that will be taken in any instance of an attendance policy violation. An attendance policy and a plan can help address the industry’s staffing difficulties and other issues in the workforce.  

Want to get the scoop on everything restaurant tech, marketing, industry news, and more? We got you covered. Subscribe to our blog to get weekly updates on the most buzzworthy restaurant industry topics.


About the Author

Devyn Nance is the Marketing Coordinator at QSR Automations. She graduated from the University of Louisville with a bachelor’s degree in Communication and from Loyola University Chicago with a master’s degree in Global Strategic Communication. She considers herself an (amateur) profiler – trained solely from watching every episode of Criminal Minds. Outside of work, Devyn loves to shop, travel, hang out with friends and family, read, and watch shows on various streaming platforms.

The post The Restaurant No Call No Show: A Piece of the Employee Handbook Puzzle appeared first on QSR Automations.

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As summer approaches, restaurant industry news is really heating up. We’re firing up a hearty helping of topics from environmental action taken by the UK government and the relevance of bars to Burger King’s contest to help app users pay off their student loans. This month’s special is news from the National Restaurant Association Show that was held in Chicago. Be careful, this roundup is spicy! 

UK Government calls on businesses to halve all food waste by 2030

Environmental Secretary Michael Gove and food surplus and waste advocate Ben Elliot hosted a ‘Step up to the Plate’ symposium inviting retail and hospitality leaders and having them commit to tracking and decreasing their food waste. The eventual goal is to begin reporting and taking measures to reduce food waste by the end of 2019. Participants will also be a part of Food Conversation Week in November 2019. When it comes to food waste, Elliot says that it is “an environmental, moral and financial scandal.” The symposium was to be the first step taken to make a change.   

When it comes to environmental actions taken by the UK Government, this latest push to decrease food waste by 50 percent by 2030 is one of many, including a Resources and Waste Strategy that was announced in December.  

5 Key Takeaways from 2019 National Restaurant Association Show 

This year marked the Centennial celebration of the National Restaurant Association Show. Held annually in Chicago, exhibitors from all over the country gather for a few days of thought leadership, education sessions, networking, and product demonstrations. Since the show is filled with so many happenings, Restaurant Business presents five takeaways from this year’s show:  

  1. Success depends on agility and adaptability – Sunday’s Signature session panel member, John Cywinski, who is also the president of Applebee’s, said that there is a growing need for delivery service options, even though the current model for delivery is unsustainable.  
  2. Coaching and classrooms – Education was prominent throughout the entire show from how-to-classes to demos and chats throughout McCormick Place.  
  3. Cause for celebration – There was fun to be had at the National Restaurant Association show as well. There was a daily celebration exhibitors and other attendees could participate in featuring a giant cheesecake created by a local Chicago bakery.  
  4. Hot food and beverage trends – There was an abundance of specialty foods and beverages present from everywhere around the country. Show attendees also scoped out fresh ingredients.  
  5. Plant-based products are in growth mode- These plant-based alternatives, including Impossible Food items and Tofurky, are slowly becoming more common.  

One more tidbit is that the National Restaurant Association CEO and President, Dawn Sweeney announced that this will be her final Show in her role. She will be retiring at the end of 2019 after serving 12 years as President and CEO.  

Are Bars Struggling to Stay Relevant? 

Customers want more than food and drinks from bars, as 55 percent of Americans are choosing to stay in and drink instead of going to a bar. Seventy-four percent of people consider a night in to be more relaxing than going out. The biggest factor to most is that drinking at home is cheaper than going out to drink, therefore bars are struggling to address the decline of patrons. When it comes to cost, it’s referring to more than a simply financial cost. People don’t want to waste time commuting or don’t want to leave their homes to find entertainment. 

What can bars do to make their customers want to leave their homes for drinks? Check out this article for suggestions. First, it’s suggested to think about the entire experience of the bar overall. Offer customers experiences that they can’t achieve themselves. Second, consider social media. Is the bar’s food picture-worthy? If so, bars should consider exploring their menus and food options further to entice customers and make them want to take pictures of the food on the menu. Lastly, what’s the difference between the bar and the supermarket? Bars should make it a point to offer options that their customers can’t make themselves.  

Uber Eats reportedly adding monthly subscription 

When Uber became public, pressure was mounting to increase profits. According to Bloomberg, ridesharing has been decreasing while the food delivery component, Uber Eats has been steadily increasing. The addition of the monthly subscription may help to improve customer loyalty and boost usage. Uber had already employed Ride Passes, but wants to continue to combine Uber and Uber Eats to provide the company a competitive advantage.  

Uber Eats has been adding application features including order tracking and other features in London and Toronto. The Uber Eats subscription, Eats Pass, is estimated to cost a base $9.99 a month and would waive individual delivery costs. Although it hasn’t been confirmed, an Uber spokesperson told TechCrunch that “we’re always thinking about new ways to enhance the Eats experience.” Food delivery subscriptions are predicted to be increasingly common soon mainly because food delivery services would be more cost effective and possibly increase delivery orders at restaurants, drive sales, and help create a more loyal customer base.  

Burger King Wants to Pay Off Your Student Loans 

In 2018, it was reported that over 44 million Americans are affected by student debt. According to LendingTree, $1.56 trillion is owed. Burger King launched the Whopper Loans contest, which will award their customers with assistance in paying their student loans. Throughout the contest, which ends on June 6, the company will be giving away 300 prizes with totaling $250,000. Most of the prizes will be in the amount of $500, and, one customer has the chance to win $100,000.   To enter the contest, customers need to download the Burger King app and make a purchase through the app. If the user is over 18 years old and there is a loan in their name, they are then eligible to enter the Whopper Loans contest. They would need to provide their email and the amount of their monthly student loan payment.  

Want to get the scoop on everything restaurant tech, marketing, industry news, and more? We got you covered. Subscribe to our blog to get weekly updates on the most buzzworthy restaurant industry topics.


About the Author

Devyn Nance is the Marketing Coordinator at QSR Automations. She graduated from the University of Louisville with a bachelor’s degree in Communication and from Loyola University Chicago with a master’s degree in Global Strategic Communication. She considers herself an (amateur) profiler – trained solely from watching every episode of Criminal Minds. Outside of work, Devyn loves to shop, travel, hang out with friends and family, read, and watch shows on various streaming platforms.

The post Restaurant Industry News Roundup: May 2019 appeared first on QSR Automations.

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Go to any chain grocery, and you can see aisle after aisle of consumables available irrespective of season, from strawberries in the heart of the winter to sweet potatoes in the summer. Those conveniences are the fruit of generations of efforts that range from developing irrigation or preservatives to more recent technology like refrigeration or the microwave. Restaurant technologies drive innovation now as ever before, becoming increasingly sophisticated to reinvent the idea of freshness while enhancing the guest experience.

Modern tech is about speed and convenience, storing and accessing reams of data, more often than not with machine learning or through data mining. With Moore’s Law, Intel founder Gordon Moore states that every two years, processing speeds double. In the restaurant that means the ability to predict future needs through statistical models using business intelligence tools, a means to remotely view multiple locations, as well as ways to reduce wait and hold times.

The History of Food Technologies

By the time that the first restaurant opened approximately 250 years ago, there were already a variety of available innovations for operators to use, many of which we now take for granted. For example, while you may not think of fire as technology as one of the earliest developments in humanity, it led to our first reconsideration of how and when we consume our food.

With the spread of humanity, settlers had to utilize critical thinking for food. There is evidence of irrigation projects dating back nearly eight millennia, with the first significant construction occurring in 3100 BC, Egypt. Innovations came much quicker as time with on, including grain mills, fermentation, and sterilization, to name a few.

By the industrial age, ideas like ovens and refrigeration became feasible, with the end of the 20th century leading to innovations like the microwave oven. When coupled with advancements in electricity and telecommunications, these technologies have quickly integrated with one another, streamlining not only food, but how that food is prepared, stored, and delivered to you, either off-premise or at the restaurant table as a guest.

How Restaurant Technology Innovates How You Eat

Beyond the most necessary of innovations like fire, preservatives, and antiseptics for safety, restaurant technologies exist parallel to social change. The industrial revolution brought along with it the birth of the middle class, people with enough disposable income to afford to eat in a restaurant, and gave way to the 40 hour work week with weekends off. Guests had more free time and money, giving rise to the quick service restaurant, which developed the concept of “fast food.”

Food production in the kitchen borrowed from the philosophies of Henry Ford, whose assembly line process helped modularize the process of production. Those methods have found and still hold a place in kitchens, which now make use of kitchen display systems to separate food preparation by station. Coupled with telecommunications and the drive-thru as we now know it was born.

Farmers have used technology to develop leaner more efficient means of raising crops and meat, making for an abundance of food year round. Companies ranging from McDonald’s to Impossible Foods have capitalized on these means of production to create easily reproducible meals that are engineered to remain consistent no matter where or when you grab a bite.

How Restaurants Technology Innovates What you Eat

Chances are, the food that you eat is a result of technological intervention. Modern kitchens engineer their menu around ingredients that may or may not have received genetic manipulation, or to provide meatless alternatives for health, environment, or otherwise concerned consumers. It’s through these choices that restaurants shape your order.

Operators can use business intelligence tools to provide the kind of historical data that helps shape menus. Restaurateurs now can collect and collate that data to help streamline sales for specific times of the day. For example, you may employ a variety of options to increase your lunch sales, including geo-fencing, enhancing off-premise dining opportunities, and a menu design that is quick and efficient to deliver to consumer pinched for time.

Some restaurant technologies go so far as to literally develop the food —not just the recipe, but the food itself– ushering in a new age of consumer choice. That includes restaurants that utilize lab-grown meats, or that use tools like CRISPR to modify your food for healthier alternatives with all the same taste.

How restaurant technology continues to innovate

Modern restaurant technologies utilize wireless signals for front-to-back-of-house communication, including order prep and delivery, and business intelligence. It’s through these integrations that new methods of data mining, business, and artificial intelligence, and machine learning flourish.

With population growth and environmental concerns on the horizon, staying innovative is critical not only to putting food on the table, but in keeping your restaurant profitable. While a reported 32% of restaurants lag in employing technology, companies like McDonald’s are leading the charge, investing millions into tech start-ups so that they can stay ahead of the curve.

The future of restaurant technologies is rich with opportunity. New advancements in blockchain promise less food waste. Research into microbiomic diets may provide fresh food for thought that chefs and operators can use in their menu engineering. Robotic assistants can increase productivity and reduce staffing costs, and they are coming. Lab-grown meat will offer healthy and environmentally considerate options to a new generation of patrons.

These are just ideas today. Can you imagine tomorrow?

Conclusion

How we prepare, store, and serve food has been at the crux of many critical historical innovations, part of a longer dialogue between science and the kitchen that continues to carry us forward. Modern advancements have given us new types of foods to eat and ways to safeguard the sanctity of our consumables and may pave the way to a brighter future.

Restaurant technologies are there to make it easier for everyone involved, the customer and staff. Quick service restaurants, for example, benefit from improving their digital menu and ordering options, with an average gain of 20% or more. Embracing change has historically proven challenging, but staying flexible, adaptable, and receptive to new technologies will only serve to enhance the customer experience while streamlining the efficiency of your operation, and increasing your bottom line.

Want to get the scoop on everything restaurant tech, marketing, industry news, and more? We got you covered. Subscribe to our blog to get weekly updates on the most buzzworthy restaurant industry topics.

About the Author

Syd is a content marketing specialist, which are fancy words for writing pretty to tell a good story. He likes writing things about food, drinks, and music. He’s a musician himself, a father of two, and loves his wife a whole lot.

The post How Restaurant Technologies Drive Innovation appeared first on QSR Automations.

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For as long as there has been technology, there have been people that have looked to exploit vulnerabilities in that system. Attacks on cybersecurity come in all shapes and sizes, from personal attacks aimed at discovering peer-to-peer information in identity theft cases, to more significant instances of fraud. Many restaurants continue to evolve to include more and more tech, moving ever further away from paper tickets and the call-and-response system between the front and back of the house. As restaurant technology becomes progressively more sophisticated, the possibility of a restaurant data breach increases exponentially.

A Look Back On Restaurant Data Breaches

The earliest antecedent to modern telecommunications, the first reported incident of hacking was in the 19th century when the Bell Telephone Company was the subject to outside interference. By the 1960s cybersecurity attacks grew to match the then-nascent rise of computing and the internet. Modern technology has become more mobile, collecting larger stores of information than before, while developers have improved connectivity.

That technology has crept into the restaurant space to include kitchen display systems (KDS), front of house systems (FoH), point of sale devices (POS), and waitlisting/reservation apps. These devices have streamlined restaurant efficiencies while enhancing the customer experience. Unfortunately, they’ve also opened the door to potential hackers, probing for opportunities for a data breach.

Currently, someone is hacked around every 39 seconds, from personal accounts to businesses, and beyond. Over the last several years, hackers have found opportunities to abuse system weakness, causing restaurant data breaches in POS systems. As those systems are in place to collect revenue, hackers were able to scam thousands of dollars worth of money from companies ignorant to the situation.

Who is Responsible for your Restaurant Data Security?

The longer you utilize restaurant technology, the more robust your dataset becomes. In some ways, this is useful information that can benefit operators through business intelligence tools, machine learning algorithms that can help you calculate your maximum success through statistical data. That information is often cloud-based, meaning that it exists spread across a network of computers (think Netflix) that host your data.

The bad news is that as the owner of that data, you are liable for the safety of that information. The good news is that your liability has limitations that involve your implementation of proper data security measures and of your efforts to remain forthright and transparent after a data breach.

Keep in mind that you may be held responsible for the loss. You may be audited or taken to court. But there are ample ways to mitigate cybersecurity breaches, some of which come standard in the technology that you likely already use.

Common Restaurant Cybersecurity Vulnerabilities

As noted above, there are a lot of points of entry for hackers looking to find a weakness in your system. Data breaches occur at an alarming rate across a variety of platforms, including your restaurant. Let’s look at a few of those access points to see what they are, why they are essential, and how you can keep them safe.

Kitchen Display System Hacks

Kitchen display systems are tools used in the back of the house by the cooking staff to streamline their order process. Order screens show you what each customer orders, how long it takes and gives preparation instructions to your team. The end goal is for food to come out at the same time, making each meal fresh and enhancing the customer experience, while allowing the kitchen to keep a lot of balls in the air at once in terms of order volume.

So far, hackers haven’t expressed an interest in breaching KDS tools, whether that’s from the pre-existing firewalls built into the devices, or something else. Hacking a KDS could foment discord in the kitchen, confusing dutiful staff and lending a bad reputation to the restaurant, although in most kitchens correspondence between the front and back-of-house should alleviate any of this confusion.

Front of House Hacks

Front of House devices, like guest management systems, are primarily for the wait and hostess staff to help with seating and order delivery. These systems vary in shape and size but are often configured to let you know the arrival, open menu times of your guests, and when a table is vacant, but still needs to be bussed. At the moment, there is nothing to indicate any front of house hacks have occurred, although, like kitchen display systems, this breach in security would only stir chaos and confusion.

Point of Sale Hacks

Perhaps the most common type of hacking occurs at the POS device. As noted above, POS devices include valuable customer payment data, information which hackers can exploit for personal gain. There are several weak points in a POS, allowing hackers to have control over any financial information entered into the system, including where that money goes.  

Waitlisting/Reservation System Hacking

As you might expect, a waitlisting or reservation app allows guests to check in or get on a waiting list in advance of their arrival. What you may not expect is that reservation or waitlisting apps serve as a particularly vulnerable or viable spot for hacker incursions. Last year, however, the company OpenTable was subject to one such restaurant data breach by a disgruntled former employee who spoofed accounts to fill up restaurants and waste the time of operators and staff.

A waitlisting breach is a unique case of hacking, but one to remain cautious of when considering who you grant access to your systems and why. Before or after that attack, there have been no reported efforts to breach waitlisting or reservation information.

Restaurant Cybersecurity Solutions

Outside of the kitchen, hacking and data security are matters of public and national history. For example, with the advent of self-driving cars, hackers have already found ways to enter into the navigation and re-route -or worse- the vehicle. Beyond that, hackers have used smart devices to track and follow users, from smartphones to baby monitors.

Corporations are eager to invest money into enhancing the available technology in restaurant spaces in a bid to look towards the future. Some of those innovations include smart menus, smart ordering systems, and robotics to help with food production and automated delivery. For operators, business intelligence or restaurant analytics tools, provide opportunities to monitor the business either through historical data or in real time. In every case, with new technologies, comes new concerns.

Fortunately, many of the devices that you may utilize in your restaurant are already set up with possible data breaches and data security in mind. Device manufacturers should include information about their privacy policy and how what security measures are in place in a transparent way meant to integrate with your team. It’s worth asking before you leap to ensure that everyone has the appropriate access and to make sure that your data is stored securely to prevent future incursions.

As part of your business strategy, make sure that you keep a robust and evolving set of passwords, the front line to data sanctity. Account for legal and technical expenses that may occur while your technology is monitored; if you do not need to spend that money, it’s a bonus later on. Build a good rapport with the companies and resellers that you work with, so that you can ensure that you and your team have the resources to provide excellent security should the need arise.

Conclusions

Cyber attacks happen all the time and that number only grows. There are always new things that can and should likely scare you, but the fact that people are already considering how to thwart any possible cyber attacks should illustrate the futurism of the IT community. Your IT team should look for practical and affordable solutions, continually assessing data security while balancing business efficiency and data security.

Ultimately, the silver lining is that with more data incursions, comes more opportunities for IT professionals to learn how to stop these attacks. As an operator, there are a host of things you can do following a breach to help, including transparency to your guests, brand rehabilitation, and incentive programs. Staying in front of an issue and accepting ownership begins the process of redeveloping the trust of your guests.

Want to get the scoop on everything restaurant tech, marketing, industry news, and more? We got you covered. Subscribe to our blog to get weekly updates on the most buzzworthy restaurant industry topics.

About the Author

Syd is a content marketing specialist, which are fancy words for writing pretty to tell a good story. He likes writing things about food, drinks, and music. He’s a musician himself, a father of two, and loves his wife a whole lot.

The post What to Know to Avoid a Restaurant Data Breach appeared first on QSR Automations.

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Efforts to capture speed-to-delivery opportunities leads to the addition of QSR Automations’ enterprise-level reporting capabilities for one of the largest McAlister’s franchisee groups.   

LOUISVILLE, KY and DALLAS, TX, June 4, 2019 — QSR Automations, the leading provider of kitchen automation and guest management solutions, today announced that McAlister’s Deli franchisee, The Saxton Group has doubled down on its commitment and confidence in QSR’s kitchen display system — ConnectSmart Kitchen. As the largest McAlister’s franchisee in sales volume, and second in number of restaurant units, the group will upgrade to CSK’s latest software version to tap real-time dining data that targets improvement areas for customer satisfaction.   

With 80 McAlister units in six states, the Saxton Group has been in business since 1982 and has achieved considerable success. However, extremely small industry margins necessitate constant monitoring and evaluation by restaurant management. “There’s not a lot of meat on the bone for improvement,” said Saxton Group VP of Operations, Stephen Lee. “We are trying to find pennies and fraction of pennies within the restaurant industry; constantly looking for the areas where a little here or there can make a difference.”  

Before transitioning to the latest version of CSK, the Saxton Group had been unable to uncover those crucial improvement areas without access to real-time data. With this software upgrade, the Saxton Group will now see improvements in these key areas:  

  • Enterprise-level reporting — moving from a delayed reporting process to real-time 
  • More ticket display options — addressing off-premise dining increases by making packaging and labels more guest-facing 
  • Increased order speed and accuracy — cutting order time by using an on-the-fly model with order entries and enabling a kitchen call-out for certain modifiers like gluten-free or nut allergies 
  • Ticket text modification — ability to increase font size that aids in guest order pickup 

 

“As the Saxton Group knows, speed is a big driver of customer satisfaction in the industry, and that’s why our ConnectSmart Kitchen software has been so impactful on operators who want to meet and exceed customer expectations,” said Lee Leet, CEO of QSR Automations. “We are delighted that McAlister’s corporate and its deli franchisees have counted on us for for the last decade, and are equally delighted to see them move to the next generation of our products that offer even more dining insights for improvements.”  

According to the National Restaurant Association 2019 State of the Industry Report, improving customer service via easier ordering, as well as providing more takeout and delivery options are areas that consumers most want to see improved. While restaurant operators continue on a strong technology adoption path this year, addressing consumer expectations will be front and center. Operators are finding that access to real-time data is a quick way to capture the opportunities around those improvements. 

“With our previous manual reporting process we were always a week behind and that’s a week I can’t get back,” said Lee. “This minute-by-minute reporting access with the CSK upgrade is expected to make strong improvements to our response time and bottom line because picking up speed is picking up profit. The two, I think, are synonymous.” 

About The Saxton Group  

The Saxton Group is a Dallas based multi-unit restaurant franchisee with a 35-year history of exclusively franchising restaurant leading brands. The company is the largest McAlister’s Deli franchisee in the country and is a Restaurant Franchise Monitor Top 100 Franchisee. The Saxton Group is family owned and operated with a rich history of multi-unit development. Initially a small operation with a single restaurant, the group has evolved into industry veterans and leaders with over 80 locations in six states. They take pride in operating the McAlister’s Deli brand at the very highest level and forming deep relationships within the communities where their restaurants are located. For more information, please visit www.thesaxtongroup.com

About QSR Automations 

QSR Automations, headquartered in Louisville, KY, is a global technology company with leading positions in kitchen automation and guest management services. Since 1996, we have empowered independent, multi-unit, and large chain operators with smart management solutions that improve the dining experience and make restaurants of any size and concept more successful. Working side-by-side with customers, we develop customized solutions that integrate seamlessly to add more efficiency, insights, and better control for restaurant operations. For more information, visit www.qsrautomations.com

MEDIA INQUIRIES CONTACT:  

Marcia Noyes 

PR Specialist 

qsrpress@qsrautomations.com 

(303) 877-4846 

  

 

 

The post The Saxton Group Extends its Use of QSR Automations’ Software to Increase Speed and Accuracy of McAlister’s Deli Orders  appeared first on QSR Automations.

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The 100th National Restaurant Association Show is in the books, and we’re back home reeling from the sights, sounds, and energy of the event! We had our booth set up, detailing a smarter restaurant experience, and how technology can help calm your kitchen, simplify workflows and delight guests. While we spent a lot of time in our booth, we did take some time, during and after the show, to reflect on what it had to offer. Here are some of our favorite things about NRA overall, and what we took home from this year’s show.

The Exhibitor Booths

Yes, NRA is a trade show, but given the bevy of decadent sights and smells, it might feel a bit more like a carnival. We saw exhibitor booths of every size and shape, some with slick video graphics and lighting, others featuring trays of steaming pastrami, frozen yogurt, and other delicious confectionaries. What we love most about NRA is the sheer variety of exhibitors. As the restaurant industry is incredibly multifaceted, including food, technology, staffing, marketing, packaging, and the like, we relished the opportunity to see how these different exhibitors showcased their featured products and services. We felt privileged to be in such elite company.

The Windy City

Every year, we look forward to attending the world’s largest restaurant show in an equally prestigious city! Boasting a strong, regionally-centric culinary identity, Chicago provides the perfect location for NRA. We always struggle to choose between the myriad options in dining and entertainment while we’re there. Still, we did our best to get a sampling of the city’s delights, and though we didn’t have time for a Cubs game, we managed to fit in bowling and dinner at Pinstripes, a trip to Portillo’s and of course, a smattering of world-famous Deep Dish pizza from Giordano’s!  

The Delicious Food

If there’s an unspoken rule of NRA it’s this: Don’t eat before you come. If you’ve ever been, then you know that it’s here, all 1.2 million square feet (!) of the show floor, where many food vendors and exhibitors, excitedly show off their wares to all who pass by. Per usual, the samples flowed freely this year, to the degree that an enterprising individual could procure an entire gourmet meal, including drinks and dessert, just by walking around. Oh, And if you’re worried about extra calories, you might take some comfort knowing that on average, many members our team walked between 3-5 miles a day, on the show floor alone!

The Wonderful People

Having been in the industry for as long as we have, industry trade shows often feel like summer camp or a class reunion. We get to see our old friends and clients and catch up on everything since the last show. Additionally, the event hosts many opportunities to make new friends from all over the world, representing every facet of the restaurant sphere. Whether it was chatting with the folks who visited our booth or merely walking the trade show floor, we thoroughly enjoyed our chance to engage with NRA exhibitors and attendees. As our list of friends expands, we look forward to next year so we can add to it!

The Industry Knowledge

With so many professionals representing the industry, NRA always provides learning opportunities directly from an expert source. Whether it’s in educational sessions or from the conversations we had by walking around, we left feeling invigorated by the depth of knowledge and innovation we saw as we talked about industry trends, technology and all other components of this industry we love.

Given the range of opportunities and adventures we have every year, we’re already getting excited about next year’s event, and hope to see you there too!

Want to get the scoop on everything restaurant tech, marketing, industry news, and more? We’ll help. Subscribe to our blog to get weekly updates on the most buzzworthy restaurant industry topics.

About the Author

Amber Mullaney provides and guides all things marketing for QSR. A proud Texan native, she graduated from the University of Houston with a degree in Public Relations and spent her career in the healthcare industry before making the switch to QSR, saying she loves a good challenge. Amber has a long list of things she loves, including tacos (especially tacos), sweet tea, Texas, the outdoors, and traveling with her husband and two daughters.

The post What We Loved about the 100th National Restaurant Association Show appeared first on QSR Automations.

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When you think of franchising a restaurant, you likely think of any number of chain locations that exist throughout the country. In fact, according to Entrepreneur of the top 20 ranking franchises, 9 are restaurant chains. But how did a restaurant like McDonald’s make the step up from a single location restaurant to an international chain that has served billions? How can a single-site restaurant owner make the move to the next level? Is your restaurant primed for franchising?

Restaurant Franchises versus Chains

You may hear the phrase “franchise” used interchangeably with “chain,” and while there is plenty of overlap that is not the case. To franchise a restaurant is to sell permission for a third-party investor or franchisee to make the use of your name, branding, etc. in exchange for fees or royalties. Franchisees are responsible for the upkeep and management of their restaurant and are typically beholden to specific contractual agreements that may include requirements to use specific technology and more.

By contrast, a chain is a series of restaurants all owned by a singular entity. In the middle is a multi-unit restaurant, an increasingly popular option that describes an operation that is relatively small, but owned by one party. Where it becomes tricky is in the overlap between each: a single entity can own a franchise and then have several locations of that franchise. So a chain is always one entity owning a string of sites, whereas a franchise is a singular entity owning paying to franchise a name, who may then expand to more than one operation.

A Brief History of Restaurant Franchising

As a concept, franchising started as a way for landowners and rulers to permit to tax property in their name. That set the tone for modern business franchising, which took off as we would recognize to mirror the industrial revolution with companies like Coca Cola and Ford serving as early adopters. The first fast-food franchise was A&W Root Beer, who began franchising in 1924, followed by table service restaurants from Howard Johnson in 1935.

The telecommunications boom has allowed for long distance communication between restaurants, as well as modern conveniences like the drive-thru. Now operators who run multi-unit franchises can view real-time business metrics or analyze previous through business intelligence, both of which give franchisees opportunities to work remotely without missing out on anything happening “in the moment.”

The Benefits of Franchising

The main reason that you would even consider any expansion is to increase your bottom line, but there are several benefits to franchising your location. For example, if you’re a multi-unit restaurateur, you’re singularly responsible for the operations management, financial obligations, and oversight for each of your businesses. In that scenario, you net all the gain, but you also carry all the burden. Franchising allows you the opportunity to grow, but with a minimized risk to yourself, as outside investors will serve as your partners.

Additionally, franchising allows you the opportunity to increase your talent pool. The management of your second location isn’t someone you hire or pay, but who earns their reward through the hard work they put into their franchised location. Those operators have paid you for the opportunity to use your name so that in turn gives you expanded capital.

Should You Franchise Your Restaurant?

Franchising is a powerful way to expand your brand if it’s the right fit. What is it about your restaurant that you think others will want to invest in? Will it potentially detract from the charm of a smaller operation? While the end goal in the expansion is to develop a more substantial presence, be mindful of whether or not that growth could potentially hamstring your current business.

There are a variety of factors involved in franchising your restaurant. First, are you prepared to cede any control over your business? While you can include standard operating procedures (SOP) into your franchising contract, you are allowing outside operators the keys to the store. While there may be contractual agreements that they are obligated to satisfy, there is plenty of room for them to do things in a way that you may disagree with otherwise.

The Costs of Franchising

What you charge to begin franchising should reflect the size of your business and the estimated return on investment (ROI) that you can show potential investors. Doing so is a legal requirement from the Federal Trade Commission (FTC), that allows franchisees access to the pertinent information that they need to make their decision.

There are a host of available franchise options out there for investors. Companies like Walk-On’s Bixtreaux & Bar set clear franchising objectives for potential investors, taking interested parties step by step through their process and making it clear what they will need to do to become part of the team and what they gain from doing so.

In general, amounts vary on up-front franchise costs from approximately $10,000 to open a new Chick-Fil-A restaurant, to around $500,000 to own a McDonald’s franchise. Keep in mind that investors know the ROI and expectations inherent to these franchises at the start, and you should do the same. Make sure you have some way of calculating that estimation up front, as a way to illustrate your value. Below are some costs to consider before you get started.

Test the Waters

Franchise owners yield on average around 90K, a healthy ROI, but one that comes at a high cost to your time. Restaurant operators are statistically likely to work more than 40 hours per week, sometimes upward of 50 plus per week. Those hours are often in the evening and late at night, which eats into your time to spend with loved ones.

Before you commit to more time spent overseeing multiple operations, consider starting small. Is it affordable or feasible to open up a food cart/truck or to host a dark/virtual kitchen after hours? This is a cost-effective way to not only test your brand expansion but to get a feel for how this may impact your time. Although you are not

Get Advice

If this is your first time franchising, another approach is just to talk to someone else who has. Getting mentorship is a valuable way to gain insight into the business, from what to expect in bringing in new partners through franchising, to the value that doing so adds to your brand. Since you’ll effectively have to write a bible for how you want the business to operate, including a laundry list of expectations, getting a second opinion from a professional can help you spot the holes that you may not have realized were there.

Lawyer Up

Part of the process is making sure that potential investors are doing things your way. While it may not be your dollars on the line, it is your reputation, which you can’t put a price tag on. That includes making sure you spell out, in explicit detail, the expectations of each franchise owner, including your SOP, your franchise fees, royalties, and anticipated marketing costs. Beyond that, a lawyer can help you navigate what the FTC needs from you, as well as any local or corporate laws that may be affiliated with the franchising process.

Conclusion

Franchisees have a lot of work ahead of them. As a possible franchisor, it’s imperative to ask if you have the time and resources to aid them in finding success. Do you have training or employee retainment programs in place? Do you have a marketing team that can help promote the brand as a whole? You probably already take stock of your total budget and costs, so make sure that you remain transparent and honest, not only with yourself but with potential investors.

Want to get the scoop on everything restaurant tech, marketing, industry news, and more? We got you covered. Subscribe to our blog to get weekly updates on the most buzzworthy restaurant industry topics.

About the Author

Syd is a content marketing specialist, which are fancy words for writing pretty to tell a good story. He likes writing things about food, drinks, and music. He’s a musician himself, a father of two, and loves his wife a whole lot.

The post Restaurant Franchising: How to get Started appeared first on QSR Automations.

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Sweeping changes are unfolding in supermarkets all across the country as grocery industry trends spur innovation. Grocers have been rolling out curbside delivery, online ordering, drive up and go options, and rush delivery to capture the “make-my-life-easier” market segment. Meanwhile, supermarkets also are launching their versions of healthy pre-packaged, heat n’ go meals using a wide variety of ethnic cuisines to address the rise of meal kit delivery services like Hello Fresh, Blue Apron, Plated, and many others that have eaten into their profits; the rise of grocery delivery and pre-packaged meal kit options runs parallel to off-premise restaurant dining.

You may have also noticed that in some areas, a mini quick-serve restaurant has made its debut within your grocery market’s four walls, complete with in-store seating. When market changes occur, businesses and their owners must adapt or die as the tide rises.  Amazon’s acquisition of Whole Foods signaled one of those inevitable changes that continue to have rippling effects today. Yes, your neighborhood community supermarket is an evolving commodity, and it’s only going to evolve more.  

Click and Collect

Some of the changes we see today have roots in the past. In the first half of the 20th century, we shopped for food by making a list and then handing the list of items over to a clerk. The clerk would gather everything for us. A century later, we’re back to doing something very similar. Many Americans now go online, select the groceries they need, then turn their list in with a click of the button. Then, a grocery attendant gathers the items and readies the groceries for curbside pickup or delivery.

Online grocery sales are expected to reach $100 billion by 2025, according to the Food Marketing Institute. For perspective, that is about 20 percent of the retail grocery market. Considering that current online grocery shopping volume comes in around 2 to 4 percent, the projected increase is staggering. No wonder supermarkets are addressing our changing preferences for how we want to shop for groceries. It’s “do or die” time in the grocery aisle.

Ready, Set, Grab and Go

Let’s say you aren’t one of the jet setters with little time to grocery shop. Nor are you a recent post-op patient with mobility issues, or a busy mom or dad with a schedule that rivals a popular band on a concert tour. Instead, you prefer the brick and mortar experience to online options. You like to squeeze your melons and choose your fresh cherries. Well, even your in-store experience is in flux.

Supermarkets have shifted their internal focus to provide complete, ready-to-eat, healthy meals in every variety, and flavor. Whether through their own branded meals, or partnerships with third-party product lines, pre-packaged dining is in significant demand, whether that be meal kits or pre-packaged meals. When you’re facing 30 to 60 minutes of meal preparation (considering you already have the ingredients on hand), it’s hard to pass up the open-refrigerated coolers filled with chef-prepared meals like Stuffed Atlantic Salmon with Asparagus, Roasted Spaghetti Squash with White Meat Chicken, or Spicy Maryland Crab Cakes.

These are NOT your grandma’s frozen Banquet or Swanson TV dinners with watered-down mashed potatoes. These kits draw specific diners who want healthier food options that are often more difficult to prepare and source. Operators who aren’t adapting to these grocery industry trends, preferences for health and wellness, combined with convenience, may soon find dwindling market share.

Sit and Stay Awhile

The retail food industry is also looking at other ways in which we interact with food and exploring their options. We’ve seen a rise in the mini-restaurant experience within the supermarket. Today, you may find a barbecue restaurant in one store and a sandwich and salad eatery in another. To illustrate just how customer-centric these mini-restaurants are, look at the number of grocers who are expressing interest in kitchen display systems  (CSK) for their restaurants. To improve the customer experience from front-of-house (FOH) to back-of-house (BOH), the integrated technology that casual dining establishments use is now in demand by grocers with mini-restaurant facilities.

Trends have transformed the shopping experience in many of these locations. The grocery store is no longer and in-and-out event. It’s similar to Starbucks, where neighbors gather for wine tastings, a leisurely bite, and to hear live musical entertainment. Why make a special out of the way trip to a bar, when you can have the same experience at your grocery market, and pick up a gallon of milk before you head home?

Local, Local, Local

Two more grocery industry trends, one just rolling out this spring and another that continues to develop, should also be on your radar. If you are in the retail food industry or want to stay on top of the latest trends, these are ones to watch seriously.

  • Self-driving grocery fleets— remote-controlled grocery stores on wheels may soon be driving down your street. An innovative grocery delivery company is testing its driverless grocery vehicles in Boston this spring. If all goes as planned, you may soon be screaming (for VEGGIES!) alongside your kids when they hear chimes from the ice cream truck.
  • Local partnerships— Local food sourcing, popularized by comedy television series Portlandia in their “Colin the Chicken” sketch, has become mainstream. Today, we aren’t satisfied with eating food that’s packaged at some remote location weeks before it arrives in our town. Grocers respond by continuing to develop local partnerships to serve our desire for fresh food that is locally sourced.

The grocery retail industry is a massive one — now estimated at $800 billion. Understanding the food industry trends that will shape our shopping experience tomorrow isn’t easy. If we can look at health interests, current economics, and culture preferences, we can better pinpoint where we will see change, and what supermarkets will introduce to address those changes. These grocery industry trends will influence restaurant trends as off-premise dining and shopping experiences become more prevalent. Happy Shopping! — whether it’s in the aisles or from your computer.

Want to get the scoop on everything restaurant tech, marketing, industry news, and more? We got you covered. Subscribe to our blog to get weekly updates on the most buzzworthy restaurant industry topics.

About the Author

Amber Mullaney provides and guides all things marketing for QSR. A proud Texan native, she graduated from the University of Houston with a degree in Public Relations and spent her career in the healthcare industry before making the switch to QSR, saying she loves a good challenge. Amber has a long list of things she loves, including tacos (especially tacos), sweet tea, Texas, the outdoors, and traveling with her husband and two daughters.

The post Grocery Industry Trends: An Evolving Dining Experience appeared first on QSR Automations.

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Excellence and Distinction award winners named by the Academy of Interactive and Visual Arts in 25th Annual Communicator Awards.

LOUISVILLE, Ky, May 14, 2019QSR Automations, the leading provider of kitchen automation and guest management solutions, today conveyed its gratitude to readers of its award-winning industry blog, and also announced the company’s latest website honor. The Academy of Interactive and Visual Arts bestowed QSR Automations with two 2019 Award of Excellence honors for the 25th Annual Communicator Awards in two categories: Individual Blog and Website content for Computer/IT.

Judges chose winners of the Excellence and Distinction Awards from more than 6,000 entries. Companies and agencies of all sizes entered their submissions, making it one of the largest and most competitive awards of its kind in the world that honors creative excellence for communications professionals.

“We are extremely proud to recognize the work received in the 25th Annual Communicator Awards. This class of entries we received this season embodies the ever-evolving marketing and communications industry” noted Derek Howard, director of the AIVA. He added, “On behalf of the Academy, I’d like to applaud the entrants this season for their dedication to producing outstanding content as they continue to push the envelope of creativity.”

This is the third award in a month that QSR Automations’ marketing team has garnered. “The Communicator Awards are among the most coveted peer recognition in the industry,” said Amber Mullaney, QSR’s director of marketing & communications. “This award, along with last week’s announcement about our winning a Gold Stevie® Award in the Web Writing/Content category for the 17th Annual American Business Awards®, has our team glowing with pride because it means that we are meeting our mark in providing the highest level of content to the restaurant operators that we serve.”

Founded over two decades ago, The Communicator Awards is the leading international awards program recognizing big ideas in marketing and communications. Winners like QSR Automations, who received the competition’s highest honor, the Award of Excellence, also include ESPN Films, Forbes

Media, PepsiCo, Scorpion, WWE, and Publicis Sapient. Please visit www.communicatorawards.com to view the full winners’ list.

About QSR Automations

QSR Automations, headquartered in Louisville, KY, is a global technology company with leading positions in kitchen automation and guest management services. Since 1996, we have empowered independent, multi-unit, and large chain operators with smart management solutions that improve the dining experience and make restaurants of any size and concept more successful. Working side-by-side with customers, we develop customized solutions that integrate seamlessly to add more efficiency, insights, and better control for restaurant operations. For more information, visit www.qsrautomations.com.

MEDIA INQUIRIES CONTACT:

Marcia Noyes

PR Specialist

qsrpress@qsrautomations.com

(303) 877-4846

The post QSR Automations’ Continues Winning Streak with Two More Content Awards appeared first on QSR Automations.

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