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At ProTrainings, we believe that everyone should have access to CPR training.

That’s why, for the last 15 years, we have always made our training videos available online to absolutely anyone– completely free.

That’s also why we sponsor classroom CPR courses for thousands of high school students each year, ensuring that young people acquire this important skill.

Plus, our online CPR courses are always Pass > Pay > Print.  This means that students who need a CPR certification for employment only pay for their course after they have successfully passed their exam.

See, we believe that learning how to save a life is not something that should be hidden behind a paywall

Your support of our full catalogue of courses (as well as CE credits!) allows us to continue sponsoring learning opportunities for rescuers worldwide.

Together, we can create a safer world!

Want free CPR training for your school district? Click here to get started.

The post Impacting Our Communities: Why We Teach CPR for Free appeared first on ProCPR Blog.

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Carrie Fisher | Photo Credit: Tinseltown / Shutterstock.com

Actress Carrie Fisher (Princess Leia in Star Wars) suffered a heart attack while on a flight, about 15 minutes prior to landing at LAX. After the plane landed, paramedics continued CPR for another 15 minutes before they were able to get a pulse. Her mother, Debbie Reynolds, tweeted this on Christmas day:

Carrie is in stable condition.If there is a change,we will share it. For all her fans & friends. I thank you for your prayers & good wishes. pic.twitter.com/isXJqqFEB6

— Debbie Reynolds (@DebbieReynolds1) December 25, 2016

How long should you continue to do CPR? It definitely depends on the circumstances surrounding the need for CPR, but continuing compressions and rescue breathing until the next level of care is available is definitely advised. According to the study linked, going longer than 30 minutes can make a difference.

Update (December 27, 2016): Carrie Fisher passed away this morning at 8:55 am PST. Rest in peace, Princess Leia. Our thoughts and prayers are with you and your family.

The post Actress Carrie Fisher given 30 minutes of CPR after Heart Attack (Updated) appeared first on ProCPR Blog.

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The American Heart Association is planning to do a rolling cycle of focused updates. They started with the release of some small minor clarifications on recommendations they had made with the 2015 updates. In November of 2017 the first group of updates were released. As the 2017 updates are not a full guideline release, the most up-to-date are the 2015 guidelines, with included modifications of the 2017 focused updates.

There is not a 2018 CPR guideline focused update yet, but we’ll be sure to write about those if or when that occurs.

The 2017 CPR Guideline Focused Updates

There are 7 changes which include some clarifications on the descriptions of lay rescuers*.

  1. Dispatch-Assisted CPR (for adults in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest)

    When someone calls 911, and they don’t know CPR, they’ll often be directed on what to do over the phone by dispatch. Since chest compressions are pretty simple to teach verbally, the recommendation is to talk the person through hands-only (chest compression only) CPR instructions. Keep in mind that this is the recommendation for adults with a suspected out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA). The change from the 2015 guidelines is the addition to provide the instructions when they are needed.

  2. Bystander CPR (for adults in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest)

    If you’re an untrained lay rescuer, provide hands-only (chest compressions only) CPR, with or without the assistance of a dispatcher.

    If you’re a lay rescuer that has been trained in hands-only CPR, please provide hands-only CPR.

    If you’re a lay rescuer that has been trained in full CPR with both chest compressions and rescue breathing, please provide both compressions and breaths.

    The change from 2015 is more clarification of what we had before, with the addition of the above recommendation for a lay-rescuer that has been trained in hands-only CPR.

    It is important that all lay rescuers know that you don’t need to have taken a CPR class to be able to do chest compressions. A CPR certification card is not like a license to drive. It is meant to certify that you were taught a subject matter.

  3. EMS-Delivered CPR (before placement of an advanced airway)

    Before the placement of an advanced airway, such as a supraglottic airway or tracheal tube:

    • EMS providers will perform CPR with cycles of 30 compressions and 2 breaths.

    • Alternatively, EMS providers may perform the same cycle of 30 compressions and 2 breaths without pausing compressions to deliver oxygen. Providers would use a rate of 10 breaths per minute, or one breath every six seconds, to provide asynchronous ventilation while continuous chest compressions are performed.

    These updates do not preclude the 2015 recommendation for EMS systems that have adopted bundles of care, that a reasonable alternative is the minimal interruption of chest compressions for witnessed, shockable, out-of-hospital cardiac arrest.

    The change from 2015 is based on the use of interrupted vs continuous chest compressions when EMS providers performed CPR using both rescue breathing and chest compressions prior to placement of an advanced airway. The recommendation had been to pause between the cycles of 30 compressions to deliver two breaths, delivering each for one second.

  4. CPR for Cardiac Arrest (when an advanced airway is inserted during CPR)

    Whenever an advanced airway has been inserted during CPR, providers may perform continuous compressions without pausing, while also delivering positive-pressure ventilation. As before, rescue breathing would be delivered at a rate of one breath every six seconds, for a total of 10 breaths per minute, while continuous chest compressions are performed.

    This change seems like more of a clarification in the language. The 2015 guidelines started out with rescuers no longer delivering the cycles of 30 compressions and 2 breaths (ie, no longer interrupting compressions to give those two breaths). It continued with the same recommendation of 10 breaths per minute while continuous chest compressions are performed. This change seems to clarify that CPR is not stopped, rather it is enhanced by the continuous chest compressions.

  5. Chest Compression-to-Ventilation Ratio (for adults in cardiac arrest)

    In 2015, the guidelines here seemed to apply to all rescuers, stating that it is reasonable to provide the 30:2 compression-to-ventilation ratio. For the latest update, it gets more specific as to whom they are addressing. Per the update, the guideline specifically applies to rescuers trained in CPR using chest compressions and rescue breaths.

  6. Components of High-Quality CPR: Pediatric BLS (for infants and children in cardiac arrest)

    Chest compressions with rescue breaths should be provided for both children and infants in cardiac arrest. Since the release of the 2015 guidelines, evidence has pointed toward providing full CPR with both chest compressions and rescue breaths. The old guideline wasn’t specific and only mentioned that conventional CPR should be provided for pediatric cardiac arrests.

  7. Components of High-Quality CPR: Chest Compression-Only CPR (for infants and children)

    The latest update recommends that, at a minimum, rescuers provide chest compressions for infants and children in cardiac arrest if bystanders are unwilling or unable to deliver rescue breaths. The change here is re-introducing rescue breaths for infants and children.

    The 2015 guideline recommendation aligned the adult recommendation for hands-only CPR with the recommendation for children and infants, but the benefit of rescue breaths have justified a different recommendation for children and infants.

    In other words, if you can provide rescue breaths alongside chest compressions for children and infants, do it. If you are unwilling or unable to provide rescue breaths, then at least do the chest compressions.

*A lay rescuer is described as someone that is:
  1. Untrained
  2. Trained to do hands-only CPR (doing only chest compressions)
  3. Trained to do full CPR including both chest compressions and rescue breathing

Here’s a PDF of the highlights from the AHA.

The post What are the 7 Changes of the 2017 CPR Guideline Focused Updates? appeared first on ProCPR Blog.

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In the 2015 CPR guideline update, the rate changed from 100 compressions per minute. It is the same for adults, children and babies.

100-120 compressions per minute.

If this seems like a fast pace, it’s because it is. You’ll be doing 1 to 2 compressions every second.

Remember, the depth of compressions on an adult is 2-2.4 inches with both hands. For a child, you’ll use one hand, and a baby you’ll use two fingers, and you’ll compress to only 1/3 the depth of the chest.

Metronomes can help keep the rhythm.

A study conducted in 2015 showed that when using a metronome alongside chest compressions, the compression rate was able to be better maintained than with those that didn’t use one. There are many Automated External Defibrillators (AEDs) that have a metronome that beeps to the correct speed, to aid in chest compressions, and all training units should have one as well. We recommend that our instructors incorporate the use of a metronome in their classes as well.

Keeping on pace with a metronome can also help with ventilation rate, as you’ll introduce oxygen at the same rhythm. You’ll also be able to pay attention to the depth of your compressions a bit better when you’re not also focusing on your speed.

Music to help with the compression rhythm.

If you want to be sure you’re doing chest compressions at the correct rate, find a song that has a beat that is somewhere within that range.

A classic example is The BeeGee’s Stayin’ Alive, which is often played in CPR classes to help people find the speed. Stayin’ Alive‘s tempo is 103 beats per minute, which is within the range that we need to hit. At the upper end of the spectrum is Lady Gaga’s Just Dance, which clocks in at 119 beats per minute. In the middle is Queen’s Another One Bites the Dust at 110 beats per minute, though that one is a bit macabre.

Here’s a playlist of songs to learn CPR to:
  • “Stayin’ Alive” – Bee Gees – 103 BPM
  • “Dancing Queen” – ABBA – 100 BPM
  • “Cecilia” – Simon & Garfunkel – 102 BPM
  • “Hard To Handle” – The Black Crowes – 104 BPM
  • “Can’t Stop the Feeling” – Justin Timberlake – 113 BPM (This is an original song from the movie “Trolls”)
  • “Rock Your Body” – Justin Timberlake – 100 BPM
  • “I Will Survive” – Gloria Gaynor – 117 BPM
  • “MMMBop” – Hanson – 104 BPM
  • “Girls Just Want to Have Fun” – Cyndi Lauper – 120 BPM
  • “Just Dance” – Lady Gaga, Colby O’Donis – 119 BPM
  • “Something Just Like This” – The Chainsmokers, Coldplay – 103 BPM
  • “Rumour Has It” – Adele – 120 BPM
  • “Fly” – Sugar Ray – 100 BPM
  • “Hips Don’t Lie” – Shakira – 100 BPM
  • “Work It” – Missy Elliott – 102 BPM
  • “Suddenly I See” – KT Tunstall – 100 BPM
  • “Crazy” – Gnarls Barkley – 112 BPM
  • “Man in the Mirror” – Michael Jackson – 100 BPM
  • “One Week” – Barenaked Ladies – 113 BPM

The post Chest Compressions: At what rate do you perform CPR compressions? appeared first on ProCPR Blog.

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When someone’s heart stops, they’re in cardiac arrest, you should jump into action to do chest compressions as soon as possible. The depth of compression is different between adults and children.

2 to 2.4 inches on an adult.

Since the update to the CPR guidelines in 2015, the depth of chest compressions shifted from 2 inches, to 2-2.4 inches deep. You’ll do these compressions at a rate of 100-120 compressions per minute, on the sternum in the center of the chest. This is the same for both men and women, so don’t be afraid when the need to do CPR arises.

Watch our Adult CPR Training Video

Adult CPR - Lay Rescuer - YouTube

1/3 the depth of the chest on a child or a baby.

The rate of compressions is the same here as on an adult: 100-120 compressions per minute. When doing chest compressions on a baby, use two fingers. For a child use one hand.

Watch our Child CPR Training Video

Watch our Infant CPR Training Video

What if I hear cracking sounds? Did I break a rib?

When you do compressions properly, you’re likely going to hear cracking sounds. Don’t stop doing CPR. These sounds can be caused by cartilage or ribs cracking, but the damage is not serious. Remember: the reason you’re doing CPR is to help the person until paramedics, EMTs or the next level of care arrives. You’re giving the person a fighting chance, and you should continue to do compressions. Breaking a rib is not something to be afraid of. You can’t make their situation worse, and you can’t be sued for giving someone CPR thanks to the Good Samaritan laws.

The post Chest Compressions: How Deep Should You Do Compressions with CPR? appeared first on ProCPR Blog.

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ProCPR Blog by Paul Martin - 6M ago

BLS stands for Basic Life Support. BLS certification may refer to two things:

  1. Training that includes Healthcare Provider level skills such as 2-person CPR, pulse checks, bag valve mask use, and rescue breathing without compressions for people that have a pulse.
  2. Countries outside of the United States will often use the term BLS when referring to CPR training. We have also found that many healthcare companies within the U.S. will recommend that their employees get BLS training.

BLS can be performed outside of hospitals by emergency medical technicians (EMTs), paramedics, and other qualified bystanders. Paramedics, nurses, doctors, physicians, EMTs, first responders, public safety professionals, and other healthcare related occupations tend to take BLS classes because of the additional skills that they need to use on a regular basis.

Both CPR and BLS classes will teach CPR (for adults, children and babies) for one rescuer, choking and first aid in the same way.

If you’re looking for BLS certification, we have courses available for each level of CPR/AED.

Healthcare Provider BLS/CPR and AED courses:
1. BLS/CPR and AED
2. BLS/CPR, AED and First Aid

We have many CPR and First Aid courses available for all levels of training. The courses are available to take at your own pace, on your own schedule. We’ll save your progress as you go! Get started today!

Start My BLS Training Now

BLS vs CPR: What's the Difference? - YouTube

The post What is BLS Certification? appeared first on ProCPR Blog.

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Let’s take a look at some of the costs of CPR classes, and how we solve some of the logistics issues with attending classes in-person. We’re going to start with the major factors that can contribute to the overall cost of the class. There are several opportunity costs associated with taking a CPR class.

Travel: Let’s take your Saturday back

Many people we’ve spoken to have to drive over 2 hours to get to the nearest CPR class available, adding to the time, making the class take an entire day to complete. We’ve had students from Alaska tell us the nearest class was a flight away.

With our courses, you can learn wherever you learn best. As long as you have a connection, our videos are available to watch on any device that you use to access the internet.

Money: There’s more to to pay for than attending the class

There are many costs to taking CPR classes. Generally you’ll be required to pay for a book on top of the class itself, and the certificate as well. The course materials can range in price from $20-30, and the certificate can be anywhere from $5-10, and that’s after your class fees, which cost somewhere between $45-105. That’s not to mention any travel costs to get to the class, by car or plane, including fuel, coffee, lunch, and depending on timing, dinner.

Our accredited courses are free for high school students in our Student CPR program, and can cost $40-50 depending on if you’re taking lay rescuer CPR and First Aid, or healthcare provider level BLS/CPR and First Aid. And you don’t need to take a plane to get to our class. If you need the hands-on skill evaluation, we have you covered, with SUMO.

Time: Ever cram for a test? Do you remember what subject?

If you’re taking CPR in a classroom, you’re essentially cramming for a test, getting tons of information, once every two years. The exhaustion of that much information while sitting in a stuffy classroom can be overwhelming. That’s part of why you’ll be sold a book to go with a classroom training course. But how many of us will then go and open that book later? And how many of us remember the content from a class we took even a few months later? Let alone two years?

Why not reclaim your time, learning what you need to in a way that you’ll remember it well into the future. Spread out your lessons with our self-paced CPR videos, that are available even if you’ve taken a classroom course. We also have a weekly refresher email which contains the same lessons, one each week, so you can stay refreshed throughout the two-year certification cycle. You can learn on your schedule. You can pause your course at any time, sign back in, and pick up where you left off. And you can re-watch any material, at any time, without interrupting the instructor and holding up the entire class.

So, what is the price of a CPR class?

That depends on what you need for your profession, if you’re taking the class in school, or if you’re learning because you want to know how to save a life.

  1. Free CPR training

    This is available for high school students enrolled in schools that take part in our Student CPR program. It’s available to any high school nationwide. We do charge for teachers at the school to get certified in CPR (which does include AED training), as that helps to offset the cost of training the students. We have been running this program for many years and have trained over 100,000 students to save lives, at no cost.

  2. Free training videos

    Our videos are also available any time you want to watch them, in our training library. These videos are for use with ProTrainings classes only.

  3. Lay Rescuer (aka Non-Healthcare Provider level) CPR

    Our CPR courses for the general workplace tend to cost about $40 for the online training course. We have a variety of courses available at this price point, but we can help you find the course that you need, quickly and easily. Check this out at ProFirstAid.com

    Start My Lay Rescuer CPR Training Now

  4. Healthcare Provider BLS/CPR

    Our BLS courses for healthcare professionals include CPR. The terms BLS and CPR are both sometimes used to refer to CPR, but BLS often has a few more skills that you can learn here. These courses cost about $50 because of the additional training material. Check this out at ProCPR.org

    Start My Healthcare Provider CPR Training Now

The post How Much does CPR Class Cost to Attend? appeared first on ProCPR Blog.

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Teaching CPR isn’t just about teaching proper compressions and rescue breathing.

I firmly believe that when we teach someone how to perform CPR, we actively make our community a safer place to live. We empower more people to serve as first-line rescuers and train them to do so with bravery and confidence.

As a paramedic, I’ve had the honor of using my training to give people a second chance at life. But, I’ve also carried the emotional burden of watching someone’s loved one slip away when CPR or ACLS aren’t enough. Performing CPR is physically and emotionally exhausting, and the adrenaline of the situation sticks with you long after you’ve stopped.

This is why I know that being a CPR instructor is so much more than just teaching a curriculum and why I have dedicated my career to putting the heart back into CPR training.

I built ProTrainings on the belief that life matters. To me, that means a commitment to high-quality training to ensure that students leave feeling confident that they have the skills to save a life.

Whenever I’m teaching a class, I always start with addressing the reasons why some people are scared to perform CPR.

Teach to the Five Fears of Rescue

Over the years, I found that there were 5 basic fears that students had:

The Five Fears of Rescue - YouTube

  1. Lawsuits

    Many students have heard stories of individuals who were sued for injuring a person while administering CPR. It’s important to remind students that these stories are rarely if ever valid and that rescuers are covered by the Good Samaritan Law.

  2. Unsure of Skills

    I want my students to understand that CPR only slows down the progress from clinical death to biological death– but will not stop it by itself. We know any number combination of rescue breaths to compressions will help buy time for EMS to use an AED and ACLS to administer medications. The numbers are guidelines, not the rule. (Which is part of the reason why Hands-Only CPR has become such a popular alternative to rescue breathing for those who have not been trained or who don’t feel confident to give full CPR.

  3. Might Hurt or Kill Patient

    This goes hand in hand with number two. If someone does not have a pulse and is not breathing, they are already clinically dead. How much worse can the patient physically become? Any attempt to resuscitate the victim cannot make their condition worse but may potentially make them better, even if damage to the ribs or sternum does occur.

  4. Disease

    This fear has been around for some time and can be solved by simply using personal protection. This can be accomplished by ordering a Key-Ring or other accessible CPR shield and protective gloves. That way, you’re always prepared for the worst of circumstances. Hands-Only CPR is better than nothing and may be a good alternative if you don’t have personal protective equipment or don’t feel comfortable giving rescue breaths.

  5. Unsafe Scene

    The fear of an unsafe scene is absolutely valid. It’s important that students remember to protect themselves so they do not become yet another victim. Remind students that if they are going to enter an area to rescue someone, always check for hazards such as busy roads, electrical wires, or other factors that may have caused the initial victim’s cardiac arrest or could place the rescuer in danger.

Create Space for Hard Conversations

At the end of the day, performing CPR does not guarantee successful resuscitation.  A fear even greater than the ones listed above is what happens when CPR doesn’t work.

When CPR Doesn't Work - YouTube

It’s a hard conversation to have, but when approached with compassion, I think it’s a necessary part of CPR training. Unfortunately, statistics are not in our favor when performing CPR. It’s a hard truth that survival rates for out-of-hospital cardiac arrests are very low.

Rescuers need to know that they gave the victim the best possible chance at surviving. That their willingness to jump in, their physical and emotional expenditure, and their compassion for that person in a terribly dark hour, was not in vain.

After all, we’ve built our training careers off of the hope for that small percentage of revivals, right?

It’s not in vain.  What we do matters.  What you do matters.  Because… life matters.

The post Putting Heart in CPR Training appeared first on ProCPR Blog.

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ProCPR Blog by Paul Martin - 6M ago

In October 2017, we received word that costs were skyrocketing on the cards that instructors purchase to give to their students in CPR classes. The cost increase lead us to redesign our instructor program into the new ProTrainings Instructor Network. This is a new program for CPR Instructors.

We decided to rethink how it should work to best fit your needs as an instructor. We thought about what it would be like to build a program for instructors as if nothing like it had existed before. We spoke to many instructors, looking for ways that we could best help with their businesses.

Here’s how it works.

Rather than paying upfront for cards and books, you’re simply charged a monthly subscription starting at only $19 a month, and going up to $199 a month. We like to look at it as “intelligent pricing.”

If you’re a current instructor, with a major competing instructor network, you’re able to be bridged over to ProTrainings quickly and easily.

Let’s save lives together. Let’s give you back your autonomy. Join us. A fully accredited in all fifty state training program that has your best interest in mind. Because life matters.

Join the ProTrainings Instructor Network Today

Join the Instructor Network

The post Become a CPR Instructor appeared first on ProCPR Blog.

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ProCPR Blog by Protrainings Staff - 6M ago

CPR is one of the most important techniques we happen to have in our lifesaving arsenal, but there are many who find themselves a bit hesitant to actually carry it out. There are some who simply do not have the confidence, but then there are those who wonder whether or not they will break the patient’s ribs by doing so. If you read internet forums you may come across several posts in which an individual attempted to perform CPR and actually broke a rib, leaving some to wonder whether or not that break caused a different outcome. The answer might actually surprise you.

Are All Patients at Risk for Broken Bones?

The first thing we want to say is that yes, breaking a rib is always disconcerting, but no, you don’t need to stop performing CPR if you feel a rib break. Yes, we are saying that it is perfectly normal though it does not happen under all circumstances. It has been found that there are a few circumstances under which a rib will actually break during the act of CPR, one of which depends upon the strength of the individual. Men, and laypeople in general tend to have more upper body strength and it is only a matter of course that they should cause a break while performing CPR.

CPR is an action that involves repeated chest compressions, each compression being about five centimeters deep. Two inches is actually a considerable amount, and about 30% of patients will find themselves with a broken sternum or a fractured rib. In some cases, multiple ribs will be broken but once again this should be considered absolutely normal.

The thing that you should consider is the patient themselves as their physical health tends to weigh heavily on the results of the procedure. If you’re looking for a less vulnerable patient, you would look to the morbidly obese as CPR does not easily phase them, nor does it result in broken bones. The opposite is true in older or elderly patients, specifically those who are suffering from osteoporosis. Brittle bones obviously lend to the possibility of breaks during CPR, so keep that in mind before you start the procedure.

What do you Do if you Hear a Break?

So now we come to the million-dollar question: what do you do if you hear a bone break during CPR? The answer is simple: you keep going. Yes, your patient’s chest is going to hurt significantly when they wake up, but the one thing that matters? They’re alive. There are almost zero cases where a patient has significantly complained over CPR being performed on them, and they tend to understand what was at stake at the time. This is a lifesaving procedure that will continue to be useful in the future even as the guidelines are altered and new methods come into play. A little break every now and then should have no effect on your desire to save lives.

The post Is it normal to break ribs during CPR? appeared first on ProCPR Blog.

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