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The state of Colorado currently holds the distinction as the state with 3rd most breweries in the country as well as the 5th most breweries per capita. Statistics aside, the Centennial State has quickly grown to become one of the best states for craft beer propelled by friendly legislation, a great foundation for industry growth established by legacy brands, and a population that’s literally thirsty for new brands and innovative approaches to a centuries-old craft.

Colorado beer fans have plenty to look forward to each and every year, from hyped releases, some of the country’s best beer festivals, to neighborhood brewery anniversary parties. We’ve taken on the indelible task of previewing the massive year ahead by creating the 2019 Colorado Craft Beer Lover’s Calendar.

We’ll be updating this post throughout the year as more major events and event dates get announced so be sure to bookmark this page and check back often because you never know when another must-attend beer festival will get announced in our backyard.

This post is brought to you by our friends at OnTap Credit Union, who have been crafting banking solutions for breweries, brewery employees and beer lovers for the past 64 years in Golden and Arvada.

Colorado’s Can’t-Miss Beer Events Photo by Michael Malvitz, Malvitz Photography

Big Beers Belgians and Barleywines @ Beaver Run, Breckenridge – January 11-13, 2019

There’s no better way to start the calendar year than with one of the country’s best curated and thoughtfully executed beer festivals set to the backdrop of a world-class ski resort/mountain. Still one of the country’s best kept secrets, Big Beers managers to assemble an all-star lineup of breweries for a full weekend of seminars, pairing events, panels, a homebrewer competition, and the main event, The Commercial Tasting.

Photo by Tristan Chan

Mountain Sun Brewpubs Stout Month @ Mountain Sun Pubs – February 1-28, 2019

What began as a way to boost sales during the slowest month of the year has grown into one of the Front Range’s most anticipated months for celebrating the dark and roasty diversity of Stouts. With brewpub locations in Boulder, Denver and Longmont, the Mountain Sun family dedicates almost the entirety of their draft lines at each location to a rotating lineup of in-house and guest Stouts that include everything from the adjunct Girl Scout cookie-inspired Stout to a more traditional Foreign Export Stout, to a variety of barrel-aged gems and rarities, all available throughout February.

Photo By: Julieanna Crynolyn

New Belgium’s Lost in the Wood @ New Belgium Brewing, Fort Collins – February 9, 2019

Perhaps one of the most unique beer events in the country, New Belgium Brewing’s Lost in the Woods is part immersive art experience and part beer release party. Set in the iconic New Belgium Foeder Forrest, this party celebrates the release of La Folie and Transatlantique Kriek. Over the years installations have included massive fabricated owls, and moss-y mushroom covered barrels depending on the theme.

Bristol Firkin Rendezvous @ Bristol Brewing, Colorado Springs – February 16, 2019

I’ll be the first to admit that many, including ourselves, don’t really don’t give Colorado Springs enough credit for its contributions to Colorado’s craft beer scene, but the Bristol Firkin Rendezvous has become one of the state’s stand-out events featuring only one-off experimental firkins, so you’re guaranteed to try something new and exciting that you’ve most likely never experienced before.

Photo by Dustin Hall, The Brewtography Project

Collaboration Fest @ Hyatt Regency, Denver – March 16, 2019

There might be no better festival that captures the essence of what craft beer was founded upon than Denver’s Collaboration Fest. Founded by booze-forward events company Two Parts alongside the Colorado Brewers Guild, Collaboration Fest allows breweries to team up to produce one-of-a-kind never before released beers through the spirit of community.

Craft Brewers Conference (CBC) @ Colorado Convention Center, Denver – April 8-11, 2019

Craft beer’s largest industry facing professional development conference, which rotates to a different city each year, returns to Denver just 5 years since it last hosted, when the Brewers Association decided to move the conference from Indiana after Mike Pence signed the Religious Freedom Law in 2015 that allowed businesses the right to discriminate based on sexual orientation. Great move by the BA, and now Indiana’s loss is Colorado’s gain. While the conference itself is limited to industry members, all of the external events surrounding it is open to everyone, which means the city of Denver is about to see a whole lot of really top tier beer yet again. We’ve even heard rumors that a certain staple funk-focused festival might see a revival around this year’s CBC.

Oskar Blues Burning Can @ Bohn Park, Lyons – June 2, 2019

It seems only appropriate that the country’s first craft brewery to introduce canned craft beer for commercial distribution hosts a yearly celebration of the canned beer format. Over the years, Burning Can has evolved to include an exhibition of outdoor lifestyle programming, concerts and of course beer, with last year’s event featuring over 70 participating breweries.

Photo by Justin Graziano, @BeerBreathCO

Avery Invitational & Anniversary Party @ Avery Brewing, Boulder, CO – June 8, 2019

Over the years, Avery has earned a reputation for throwing top tier beer event, from their Sour Fest, to Strong Ale Fest, Avery dominated the niche festival game. However, recognizing that even the best events must be willing to reinvent and iterate, the Boulder-based brewery honed in on an Invitational Festival to celebrate their anniversary and bring together some of their favorite breweries from across the country. The newly created concept held up to the legacy set forth by its predecessors and we expect it to continue to grow and thrive in its second year.

Photo by Justin Graziano, @BeerBreathCo

WeldWerks Invitational @ Doubletree by Hilton, Greeley – June 22, 2019

While we’ve already waxed poetic at great lengths about the impressive debut of last year’s WeldWerks Invitational Festival, it certainly bears repeating. Not only was the Greeley-based brewery able to assemble a dream-team line-up of breweries but also convinced them to bring some of the best of the best in rarities and elite quality beer. In that debut, we’re ready to pronounce the WeldWerks Invitational as one of the country’s absolute can’t miss events of 2019.

Great Divide 21st Anniversary Party 2015 (Photo Courtesy of The Brewtography Project)

Great Divide’s 25 Anniversary Party @ Great Divide Brewing, Denver – June 22, 2019

It’d be a tenuous task to try to list every single anniversary party from every single brewery in the state of Colorado but certain ones tend to stand tall above the rest, and after 25 years, Great Divide, one of the state’s OGs has it pretty well figured out. For those die-hard fans who’ve lived in Denver since before the mass transplant pilgrimage, this year’s party will serve as a welcome return to its humble beginnings, as the Great Divide Anniversary Party returns as a block party on Arapahoe St just like they did for so many years before.

Photo by Chea Franz

Rapids and Grass @ South Main, Buena Vista – June 28-30

When you live in a state surrounded by such immense beauty, you’ve got to get away from city life and reconnect with nature once in a while, luckily, you can do so while still experiencing high-quality beer. Sarah Haughey and Shane Stewart, founders of Buena Vista’s The Jailhouse Beer Bar followed their dream to live surrounded by nature and now they bring the dream to intrepid beer fans set to the backdrop of the stunning collegiate peaks.

Colorado Brewers Rendezvous @ Riverside Park, Salida – July 13, 2019

Some festivals just feel like one giant industry reunion and the Colorado Brewer’s Guild’s Rendezvous which takes place in neighboring Salida captures that essence like none-other. Join Colorado Craft Beer’s giant beer family in a weekend of camping and sharing great beers.

Photo by Dustin Hall, The Brewtography Project

Great American Beer Festival (GABF) @ Colorado Convention Center, Denver – Oct 3-5, 2019

The world’s second largest beer festival only to Oktoberfest happens to reside in the heart of the Centennial State, and while the event has grown far beyond the confines of the Colorado Convention Center to include a multitude of external tap takeovers, mini-festivals, pairings, and more, the four-session fest still continues to up its game and showcase some of the country’s best of the best in craft beer. Now with over 800 breweries and nearly 4,000 beers, there’s plenty of incredible beer to go around for all attendees.

Denver Rare Beer Tasting @ McNichols Building, Denver – October 5, 2019

As we mentioned above, one of the best benefits of hosting GABF in Denver each year, is the excess of elite level events that surround the week. At the top of that list is the Denver Rare Beer Tasting, which features some of the country’s best breweries pouring their best beers, many of which never actually appear at GABF. This benefit supporting Pints for Prostates has grown its own cult following and has become a yearly tradition the Friday afternoon of GABF week.

Left Hand Nitro Fest @ Armstrong Park, Longmont – November 9, 2019

Much like New Belgium’s Lost in the Woods, Left Hand’s Nitro Fest is just as much a visual spectacle as it is a showcase of incredible beer. Playing off of a circus theme, set under a massive tent, Nitro Fest encourages attendees to match the theme with ornate costumes and face painting. Not to mention wildly creative takes on nitrogenized beers from across the country as well as some international flavor in recent years.

Photo by Dustin Hall, The Brewtography Project

Denver Festivus @ Denver – TBA

Another Two Parts original Denver Festivus began as one giant crunk fest playing off of the fictionalized Seinfeld holiday but has since grown to become a showcase of winter-y beers. This year’s event included all of the Seinfeld inspired touches but has also grown to incorporate a maker’s market, silent disco and luchador-style wrestling. This zany, beery celebration has evolved over the years to become the perfect way to cap off the year.

The Full 2019 Colorado Craft Beer Lovers’ Calendar

Here are all the major beer festivals we know of in 2019. We’ll add anniversaries as they are announced, and we tried to keep this list focused on major established beer festivals rather than include every beer release, tap takeover, or special tapping. Additionally, keep in mind, these are Colorado-centric events. Be sure to check back often as we’ll be updating this throughout the year.

Once again, special thanks to On Tap Credit Union for sponsoring this post.

DateBeer EventLocation What kind of event?Contact
January
January 1, 2019New Years Day
January 10, 2019Crooked Stave's 8th Anniversary CelebrationCrooked Stave, Denver, CO
January 11-13, 2019Big Beers Belgians and BarleywinesBeaver Run, Breckenridge, CO
January 12, 20194th Annual Barrel-Aged Beer FestivalLowdown Brewery, Denver, CO
January 12, 2019Kokopelli's 5th Anniversary PartyKokopelli Beer Company, Westminster, CO
January 19, 2019Verboten's Inaugural Stout FestVerboten Brewing, Loveland, CO
January 19, 2019Denver Beer Co's Beer, Bacon, and Coffee FestDenver Beer Co (Arvada) Arvada, CO
January 19, 2019Estes Park WinterfestEstes Park, CO
January 19, 2019Cannonball Creek's 6th Anniversary PartyCannonball Creek, Golden, CO
January 19, 2019Stem Ciders' 5th Anniversary PartyStem Ciders, Denver, CO
January 25-26, 2019Winter BrewfestMile High Station, Denver, CO
February
February 1-28Stout MouthMountain Sun Breweries
February 8-10, 2019Ratio Beerworks Anniversary WeekendRatio Beerworks, Denver, CO
February 9, 2019Wynkoop Brewing's Beer Drinker of the Year 2019Wynkoop Brewing, Denver, CO
February 9, 2019New Belgium's Lost in the WoodsNew Belgium Brewing, Fort Collins, CO
February 9, 2019Harry Potter Inspired Beer FestivalThe Church, Denver, CO
February 15, 2019Factotum Brewhouse Four Year AnniversaryFactotum Brewhouse, Denver, CO
February 16, 2019Bristol Firkin RendezvousBristol Brewing, Colorado..
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pFriem (pronounced “reem”) Family Brewers is a German and Belgian-inspired brewery in Oregon, a location where breathtaking views of the mountain and rivers make you wonder why you haven’t moved to the Pacific Northwest. Josh Pfriem devoted his career to learning as much as he could about crafting delicious beer and, in 2012, he achieved his lifelong dream of opening an artisanal brewery in Hood River with partners Ken Whiteman and Rudy Kellner. Today, they have several award-winning beers pouring from their taps along with a well-earned, loyal following.

Unlike other breweries, pFriem foregoes punny names for a simplistic approach. Their line-up includes a hefeweizen called Hefeweizen, a juicy IPA called Juicy IPA and a Brut IPA, called (you guessed it) Brut IPA. In the pFriem’s pantheon of beers, each one falls into one of three categories: classic, select and barrel-aged. Classic beers honor the history of brewing; select brews possess a complex, but elegant taste profile. The barrel-aged series contains a range of ales and lagers aged for one to three years. This straightforward naming convention makes their beers very approachable for newbies and hardcore craft drinkers alike.

pFriem’s Bourbon Barrel Imperial Stout is difficult to find outside of the Pacific Northwest, but if you happen to stumble upon it, don’t wait for a special occasion to crack open this elusive beer. One of the best ways to enjoy Bourbon Barrel Imperial Stout is to open it on a Friday evening when the week has successfully beaten you down and, instead of welcoming in the weekend, you want nothing more than to sink into the couch. This full-bodied imperial stout with notes of chocolate mousse, ripe cherries, coconut and bourbon makes the best company.

Plus, the couch is the perfect place for you to drink this award-winning brew because while it goes down smooth, there’s no denying the 11.5% ABV in your glass. The bourbon isn’t shy about showing its face but has an elegant and inviting way of wrapping around your tongue, leaving notes of char and sweet, tart cherries. Between the chocolate and cherry notes, the bourbon gently coats your palate. The presence of pFriem’s Bourbon Barrel Imperial Stout is strong. You won’t have any problem disappearing into the glass and forgetting the drama and stress of the week.

To coat your stomach, pair Bourbon Barrel Imperial Stout with a slice of chocolate raspberry mousse cake to intensify the chocolate and coffee notes. For a savory pairing, braised short ribs with carrots and a side of creamy mashed potatoes taste fantastic alongside the char, roasted notes in this complex beer.

Feature image courtesy of pFriem Family Brewers.

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It’s one of the draws of the annual Big Beers, Belgians and Barleywines Festival: Bold-faced names in craft brewing routinely make the trip, pouring their beer and chatting up fans.  

Who can blame them? Snow-capped peaks, a ski lift right outside the resort door, a world-class brewery lineup, geeky seminars, organizers who know what they are doing, and educated consumers. All can be found in Breckenridge for three January days.

As one brewer put it, it has the feel of a family reunion (but without kids running around).

We caught up with three of the industry’s leading lights at Saturday’s commercial tasting to ask about the festival’s allure, breweries they were eager to check out, the big industry trends of 2018, and what to expect from their breweries this year. Here’s what we learned:

Photo courtesy of Purpose Brewing’s Facebook Page

Matt Brynildson, brewmaster, Firestone Walker

Even one of the country’s most decorated brewers has a few things to learn.

For Brynildson, who has won too many medals to count as the brewmaster of Paso Robles, Calif.-based Firestone Walker, Big Beers offers an opportunity to “come up here and commune with the actual makers of the product” and learn a few things from the cutting-edge seminars.   

The very best festivals — Big Beers, Firestone Walker’s Invitational, the Mikkeller Beer Celebration in Copenhagen — draw the brewers themselves, he said.

“I’ve never understood why a festival that promotes 10 percent-plus alcohol beers at 10,000 feet, how that makes sense,” Brynildson said. “But somehow it does.”  

Before heading to Breckenridge, the Firestone Walker crew made its first visits to WeldWerks in Greeley, the darling of local beer geeks, and Purpose Brewing in Fort Collins, home to former New Belgium brewmaster Peter Bouckaert. At the fest itself, Brynildson was up for exploration.

“I love to come with an open mind and just taste things, take down some notes,” he said. “There is a lot of learning that is going on here, which is cool.”

Brut IPAs were the first trend of 2018 Brynildson cited, but he was more eager to talk about grape-hybrid beers, wine-grape beers and collaborations between breweries and wineries.

Firestone Walker is helping drive the conversation. Last year, it hosted the Terroir Project, “an experimental crossover between wine and beer” that featured seven breweries.    

The brewery is betting on the trend itself with a national release of a grape hybrid beer called Rosalie, in a slim can. With pilsner malt making for the lightest, least-bitter beer possible, it’s 30 percent grape juice sourced in Paso Robles, with a hint of hibiscus, Brynildson said.

Also on the horizon: a bunch of experimentation from Eric Ponce, who formerly ran the barrel program at Goose Island (where Brynildson also worked) before departing for Logsdon Farmhouse Ales in Hood River, Ore. Ponce has been at Firestone Walker for more than a year and has taken the reins of the brewery’s ambitious vintage and barrel-aged programs.

Brynildson said Ponce has come up with “some really cool variants” of Parabola, the Russian oatmeal imperial stout, and some cocktail-infused beers, as well.

“He is just a really creative guy and it has been fun to see him explore some things we haven’t done in the past,” Brynildson said.

Photo by Dustin Hall, The Brewtography Project

Adam Avery, co-founder and CEO, Avery Brewing

The bottles wrapped in gold foil floating in ice promised samples of one bourbon barrel-aged stout with chocolate and raspberries and another with chocolate and peppermint. Both clocked in at north of 14 percent alcohol by volume. How could Avery Brewing not pour at Big Beers?

Avery, a veteran of the festival for all 19 years, called it his favorite event of the year, both for its small size and because “it was born out of a great ideal of pushing flavorful beers without worrying about whether they’re across the pond or from here — and big obviously, and flavor.”

Avery had praise for Ska Brewing’s Moral Panic, one of those aforementioned Brut IPAs (the style was the topic of a festival seminar, too). Avery said he also was eager to check out Side Project and WeldWerks.

Avery’s trend of the year might seem strange coming from a purveyor of big beers. He sees promise in lower-alcohol beers that can be enjoyed post-workout or during outdoor activities. Avery went there last year with the introduction of Go Play IPA, a clean-drinking dry-hopped IPA with a couple of ingredients typically found in sports drinks: sodium and potassium.

“I think there is something there,” Avery said. “Obviously, alcohol, there are some healthy aspects to it. But overall, it’s not that good for you. So I like to see that trend here … Beer is going to put weight on you, but what are you going to do to take it off?”

One of Avery’s major moves this year is to package most of its barrel-aged beers in 16-ounce cans “so we can have less occasional drinking and more of the daily drinker,” Avery said. “We are looking for a smaller package size or something that says, ‘drink me, don’t cellar me.’”

After initially holding off, Avery has jumped on the Hazy IPA bandwagon with the introduction of Hazyish IPA and Double Digit, a 10-percent ramped-up take of the style.  

Avery also pointed to plans to release a Brut IPA and several new gold-foiled beers coming.

“So we’ll still have a bunch of crazy shit,” he said, “as we always do.”

Side Project co-founder, Cory King (right) Photo by Justin Graziano, @BeerBreathCO

Cory King, co-owner/brewer, Side Project

Arguably the longest lines at Big Beers stretched out from the booth of Side Project of St. Louis, which gets rave reviews for its delicate Saisons, sour and Wild Ales, and big barrel-aged Stouts.

As a tiny brewery that doesn’t distribute, Side Project doesn’t take part in a lot of events, King said. It can be choosy. Big Beers is “like a family reunion,” with all the brewers present, he said.

“I grew up as a consumer of beer fests. I was that guy. It’s fun to meet people who have never had our beer, and who hopefully love it. Hopefully.”

We tracked down King near the end of the festival, so he was able to share his thoughts on what he’d tried. A lover of wine before beer, King praised the port-like wine-beer hybrid of Liberati, the Denver brewery and restaurant opened by Alex Liberati and partners last fall.    

One of Side Project’s most popular beers of the fest was of like mind — Punchdown Pinot Noir Ale, a wild aged in wine barrels with California pinot noir grapes (9 percent ABV).

King also singled out Denver’s Burns Family Artisan Ales. King knows co-owner/brewer Wayne Burns’ work from Michigan’s Kuhnhenn Brewing, “so there is some flair in there,” he said.

“It won’t be long before you see some demand there,” King predicted.

Most trends in craft brewing don’t have an impact on Side Project, given its narrow specialty and niche, King said. One exception: the rise of the pastry stout.

Those beers are made with extracts, and Side Project is committed to using only natural ingredients like coffee, cinnamon, vanilla and cocoa nibs, King said.

“We’ll never be able to make your blueberry pancake stout, guys, because guess what, that was from a vial that somebody poured in,” he said. “You may love that. But I don’t want to do that. There is nothing wrong with doing that, I just choose not to. I think there needs to be more transparency amongst producers (about how the beers are made). Let’s just be honest. Tell people what you are doing.”

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Just a short train ride from Chicago, Evanston is home to Northwestern University. Downtown, you’ll find lots of shops and restaurants, as well as some great breweries.

Evanston has an interesting history with alcohol. Even though Prohibition ended in 1933 the city was home to the Woman’s Christian Temperance Union, which was very against allowing alcohol back into the city. Evanston wouldn’t see its first drink poured within the city limits until June 1972.

Today, there are four breweries operating within Evanston’s city limits, while some people might tell you three: Smylie Brothers Brewing, Temperance Beer Co. and Sketchbook Brewing, and there’s also Peckish Pig. The small establishment is actually Evanston’s first brewpub, and they have a very small brewing system on-site. Peckish Pig tends to get overlooked, and while we didn’t make it out there this trip, it’s definitely on the list.

Getting there

When you tell people you want to go to Evanston they look at you like you’re planning to go to Antartica to get some snow in January. Getting to Evanston is actually very easy. The fastest way is to take the Metra. Less than a 25-minute ride from Ogilvie Transportation Center, the Metra drops you off right in downtown Evanston very close to Smylie Bros, Sketchbook and Peckish Pig.

If you don’t want to pay the $5.50 for the one-way ticket or don’t want to be tied to a fixed train schedule, you can take the “L,” which means taking the Red Line to the Purple Line, unless you can catch an express train. That trip will take you an hour or potentially longer, depending on where you’re coming from. However, there’s no schedule and the price is half the cost of the Metra.

There’s also ride-sharing, which will be the most expensive but direct option. Depending on your exact location the prices vary but, expect each way to be around $25-$30. Now if you split that with some friends it becomes much more reasonable, but with traffic, Metra could actually be faster.

The breweries

Smylie Brothers Brewing Co.

Smylie Brothers was the first stop in our Evanston brewery crawl for one big reason: Of the three breweries we visited, they have a full food menu. Doing wood-fired pizzas, BBQ and other pub food favorites, there’s plenty to try at the brewery.

When you first see the brewery you don’t realize just how big it is. The space is enormous and beautiful with arched ceilings and lots of wood, it’s a very impressive. The brewhouse is behind glass behind the bar and you can look into the kitchen including a good view of the pizza oven with a roaring fire.

You’ll find a wide variety of classic beer styles including a lager, stouts and IPAs.

I tasted a lot (not all) of the beers, but my hands-down favorite was the Mosaic IPA. While not a hazy juice bomb, this beer aggressively features the Mosaic hop, in a good way, that presents a great balance of bitterness and fruity notes. It was one of the best Mosaic IPAs I’ve had in a long time.

Their lager was good and the Dunkelsauer was a unique style that I’m not sure I had ever had before. I didn’t know what to expect but I really enjoyed the tartness that gets followed by chocolate and fruit notes. I probably couldn’t drink an entire pint of it, but a taster or half pour would be perfect.

As a certified BBQ judge, I, of course, had to get some ribs. The flavor was spot on, I’d give it a 9 (there’s no 10 in official BBQ judging), but the ribs were slightly overcooked. This is where BBQ judging has ruined me. If ribs fall off the bone, which a lot of people advertise (Smylie does not), the ribs are overcooked. Smylie’s didn’t fall off the bone, but the meat pulled away a bit too easily. I’d give it a 7 on texture in a competition. But going into the intricacies of BBQ judging can be another story. Bottom line, the ribs are great. Enjoy them and don’t get into little details like me.

We got to Smylie right as they opened and were the only ones in the space for about two minutes before it quickly filled up. It was impressive to see them start to get busy that early on a Saturday, especially after a significant snowfall earlier in the morning.

While not open in the wither months, Smylie has a really nice outdoor space that I definitely will check out in the summer. For a nice little date night and something different than the same old same old in Chicago, make the trip up to Evanston and enjoy Smylie for beer and dinner before taking a walk around downtown Evanston.

Sketchbook Brewing

From Smylie Brothers, you can jump on the Purple Line or walk right to Sketchbook. When we went it was cold so we just took a ride-share. It was $7 and took less than 10 minutes.

The smallest of the three breweries, although they are planning to expand, Sketchbook is cozy and warm, and I loved the atmosphere. We were the only ones in there for pretty much the whole time, which allowed us to talk to the bartender who knew the craft beer industry well.

That’s a small thing that gets overlooked quite a bit. Have a bartender who knows what they are selling and the general landscape of beer of whatever city you’re in.

I ordered a flight that included the oatmeal stout, Citra pale ale, Kolsch and then I let the bartender pick their favorite. In this case, it was a rye amber ale that completed by flight.

Side note: Sketchbook has some really great hazy IPAs if you’re interested. Since I’m not drinking hazy beers in 2019 I passed, but in the past, I’ve had them and they’re all really good.

Everything I had was great and I would recommend any of the beers to anyone. I thought the oatmeal stout was warm and full of flavor. At a low ABV, it was one I could sip by a fire all day. The Citra pale ale really impressed me because for a pale ale I couldn’t believe how much flavor they were able to pack into it.

If you’ve been following me on Instagram (@chicagobeer), you’ll know that I’m loving Kolschs so far in 2019. This clean and classic beer style is so inviting to drink anytime. Sketchbook’s was no exception. And the brewer’s pick, Snowy Owl, offered a unique flavor profile I haven’t had in a long time. You get the typical flavors from a red ale of caramel, a little toffee and some dark fruit, but then the rye adds some overarching spice that combines nicely with everything else. Definitely liked the recommendation and could easily get that one again.

Temperance Beer Co.

Deriving their name from the Woman’s Christian Temperance Union that was instrumental in keeping alcohol out of Evanston, Temperance is on the west side of the city so you’ll need to take a ride-share out there. It was about 10 minutes from Sketchbook so not far by any means.

While a bigger space than Sketchbook, it’s not nearly as large as Smylie. But the first thing I noticed was just how much natural light floods the taproom. 

Temperance has a beer list similar to Smylie Brothers with a lot of classic European styles and unique twists on some of them. There aren’t any hazy beers but plenty of things for people to try,

Their big barrel-aged stout series, Might Meets Right, is being released February 9. So if you need a reason to head out there, circle that date.

Temperance made a big splash in the craft beer scene in 2016 when their English-style IPA Gatecrasher took gold at GABF. Just two years prior it won silver in the same category. Gatecrasher is a solid beer that I’ve continued to order when I see it on the menu.

I ordered a new beer I hadn’t tried before, Loose Affiliation, an IPA described as juicy, but not hazy. The description is accurate. I wouldn’t even call this beer juicy as the bitterness from the hops is really the star. But there are slight undertones of fruit that round the beer out.

Like Smylie, Temperance has a great outdoor space that was buried under snow but definitely will be worth a visit come warmer weather. They don’t have a kitchen but you can order bar snacks you, or they have a partnership with 2nd Kitchen so you can order for a few local restaurants.

Whether you come to Evanston and stop at all the breweries or hunker down at one for the day, there’s plenty to enjoy. This city’s craft beer scene is doing very well.

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Quick Sips is our way of highlighting beer events, tap takeovers and other notable beer news around the city of Chicago. If you’d like to submit something to be included in the next Quick Sips, please email us at chicago@porchdrinking.com.

January 23: DryHop/Begyle Collaboration Release

Two northern neighbors have brewed up something special to help Chicago drinkers get through the dreary winter months. Set to be released at 5 p.m. on January 23 at DryHop, the new Cherry Waves collaboration beer is a 9% imperial brown ale made with big hits of cherries and vanilla. The release will also feature four curated selections from Begyle, like BA Imperial Pajamas, along with all of the DryHop staples.

January 27: Chili Cook-Off at Dovetail Brewing

Dovetail is hosting their annual Chili Cook-Off competition again, all proceeds going to Common Pantry. Tickets are $15 and give you the chance to taste and vote on your favorite chilis. While your grazing, pair each taste with a Dovetail brew for a good cause.

February 2: Chicago Ale Fest

The 2019 Chicago Ale Fest – Winter Edition will take place at Lacuna Artist Lofts in Chicago's Pilsen Neighborhood – which made Forbes's list of the 12 Coolest Neighborhoods Around the World.https://t.co/ezN4Ymb2RH

— Chicago Ale Fest (@ChicagoAleFest) January 5, 2019

This year’s winter Chicago Ale Fest will feature more than 100 beer pours from more 40 breweries, live music, entertainment, a bevy of food trucks and more. PorchDrinking.com’s Paul Lewis caught up with the creator of the event to learn more.

Alter Brewing Adds a New Head Brewer

Not an event, but a big deal: Alter Brewing added Matt McCowan to its brew team this month. McCowan was previously the head brewer at Lagunitas-Chicago and will join Alter in the same position.

“I came to Alter because it has all the ingredients to make whatever beer we can imagine, and [owners Mark Hedrick and David Yob] were on board with that from the beginning,” explains McCowan.

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The post Chicago Quick Sips | Jan. 22 Chicago Beer News & Events appeared first on PorchDrinking.com.

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The New Year doesn’t officially start for beer fans in Colorado, until Big Beers, Belgians, & Barleywines kicks off the party. And for the past two years, Big Beers, Belgians, and Barleywines has also served as a great excuse to stop into one of Colorado’s fastest rising young breweries, Outer Range Brewing, which is exactly what the PorchCast crew did last weekend while up in Breckenridge.

Located in Frisco, CO just a stone’s throw away from ski resort towns like Breckenridge, Keystone, Loveland, A-Basin, and Copper Mountain, Outer Range has become a hub for weekend warriors who also happen to love great beer. Specializing in hazy New England-style IPAs, and Belgian beers, Lee and Emily Cleghorn have garnered not only local but also national attention in just over two years of operation.

Photo by Justin Graziano, @BeerBreathCO

In episode 57 of The PorchCast, Tristan and Hunter stopped in to speak with the Cleghorns about what brought them together during their time serving in the military, how they decided to open a brewery while finishing school, internships and caring for their newborn, and how they decided to open up shop in the mountains and focus on hazy, hop forward beers.

Special thanks to our show sponsor On Tap Credit Union. With locations in Golden & Arvada, On Tap Credit Union, has supported brewery employees for over 64 years. They listen carefully to your needs and make sure you have the right services, low-cost loans and expert financial advice for you, your business and your employees. Whatever your needs may be – tap into the services at On Tap Credit Union. www.OnTapCU.org

Photo by Justin Graziano, @BeerBreathCO

Thanks to Made by Chalk for supporting the show and providing web and branding services for national and local breweries alike. And to Denver band, Bud Bronson & the Good Timers for allowing the use of their song, Denver Rock City, for our opening and closing themes.

Like what you’re hearing and want to support The PorchCast? We are looking for new sponsors to join the PorchCast family. If you are interested in sponsoring the show please reach out to tristan {at} porchdrinking {dot} com!

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The post The PorchCast Ep 57 | Outer Range Brewing – Lee & Emily Cleghorn appeared first on PorchDrinking.com.

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I don’t care what season it is—it’s always time for a saison. The word “saison,” after all, means season in French. If you’re like me, you’re always looking for another one to try. And lately, a ton of wine barrel-aged saisons have been popping up. So when I saw Grapeyard Shift from Strange Roots, I knew it belonged in my fridge.

Saisons are a type of farmhouse ale, originally brewed in the cooler seasons in order to age before it was time to consume in the spring. They are bright, slightly tart and absolutely refreshing. Saisons are bottle conditioned and usually have wild yeast strains accumulated from the local terroir, which gives each beer a unique flavor that’s a tribute to its locale. If you’re an equal-opportunity imbiber, you’ll enjoy the saison because of those unique qualities and the funky flavor. For the wine drinkers, this might be a good brew to dive into the wonderful world of beer with.

A closer look at the beer

Grapeyard Shift is a mixed culture saison ale fermented with Lake Erie Concord grapes and aged in French oak red wine barrels. As soon as I opened the bottle, I noticed a beautiful fruit and funk aroma. It’s a beautiful bright pink/red color with a light pink head that dissipates quickly into a very thin lacing over the top of the pour. There’s a musky oak and funk aroma once the beer warms up slightly, and the bright fruit and floral notes peeking out.

The first sip had an initial grape flavor with a hint of tartness that grows as you drink. The oak dryness creeps in toward the end and leaves you with a pleasantly dry palate, preparing you for the next sip. The tart grape skins come through, complemented with a refreshing sweetness that lays nicely over the oak and funk. With a 6.8% ABV, you’ll definitely crave more as you near the end of the bottle.

Strange Roots experimental ales are getting more and more refined, and I’m all about it. Keep an eye on this brewery for more awesome beers!

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The post Strange Roots Experimental Ales | Grapeyard Shift appeared first on PorchDrinking.com.

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I’m not going to lie to you. It’s been a week. Not only did my Philadelphia Eagles lose their way out of the playoffs, but I was also in a minor car accident. The biggest tragedy of them all, however, is the fact that I have not imbibed in one. single. beer. None. It’s quite sad. I will be rectifying that fact this weekend, if I live that long. Until then, I invite you to join me in living vicariously through the rest of the PorchDrinking staff. This is What We’re Drinking.

Electric Lettuce | Moonraker Brewing Company

Keyboard Gangsta | Whitestone Brewery

Best Coast Pale Ale | Red Bus Brewing Company
View this post on Instagram

Love this place @redbusbrew

A post shared by Robert French (@threefrenchs) on Jan 13, 2019 at 3:06pm PST

Little Boss | Blue Owl Brewing

Fundamental Observation | Bottle Logic Brewing

Terps & Caicos | Alvarado Street Brewery

Aperitif Pilsner | Moody Tongue Brewing Company

Deth’s Tar | Revolution Brewing Company

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The post What We’re Drinking | January 18, 2019 appeared first on PorchDrinking.com.

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It’s the dead of winter and I’m not drinking a burly, barrel-aged stout – or even an IPA. Instead, I’ve cracked open a can of Creature Comforts’ Tritonia Gose. Was I envisioning a beach on some far off island? Or a sweltering summer sun? Nope, I just wanted something light and flavorful that wasn’t a lager and wouldn’t weigh me down like some of the heavier stouts and barleywines I’ve had on winter night’s past; andI’m not alone in this sentiment.

Much like the rise of spiked seltzer, the lighter styles of beer, namely session sours such as gose ale, are experiencing a bit of a renaissance this days as folks are beginning to choose tart and tangy beers for their ability to bridge the gap between calorie-conscious and flavor-packed. IPAs aren’t going away – to the contrary even. However, many breweries have begun to appreciate the gose’s spot in giving their beer lineup a bit of balance along with a burst of new flavors. For more insight into the growing popularity of the style over the past few years, I asked several breweries making some of the best gose-style ales in the nation to get their thoughts.

Surprising Growth for a Non-IPA

There’s a lot of room for growth for those non-hoppy offerings like goses and Berliner weisses. Just ask Dogfish Head. Per their brewmaster Mark Safarik, SeaQuench Ale, their session sour “hybrid” of gose, Berliner weisse and kolsch, is the fastest growing beer in the history of their business. It’s also currently the #1 sour in the American market. Not bad for a beer that launched nationally just a few years ago.

But the popularity of the gGose seems to go farther back than that. Illinois’ Destihl Brewing launched their ‘Here GOSE Nothin’ offering back in 2014. According to brewery brand manager, Katy Tilley, Destihl was one of the first to offer a gose in cans. It also soon became the bellwether for their larger Wild Sour Series.

“We seem to have created a monster in a way, since the kettle sours are taking over everything, and we love that.”

One of the reasons the gose style has taken off is due to the nimbleness that comes from its short brewing period. The gose takes on a kettle sour approach in the brewing process; it typically only takes 3-4 weeks to create this light ale from start to finish. Berliner weisses and goses might lose out on the complexity of flavors that traditional barrel-aged sours like gueuze and lambics embody. However, they offer a clear advantage to brewers looking to keep in line with the fleeting tastebuds of today’s consumers: flexibility.

Instead of relying on a stronger ABV beer that hits on three to four key flavor components, a standard gose offering can act as a vehicle to elevate one or two fruit-forward flavors that fit the time and seasons of their releases. This type of flexibility is why Sixpoint Brewing in Brooklyn, New York was able to expand their Jammer Gose portfolio into new flavors like Citrus. According to Sixpoint’s Michael Lenane, the Jammer series doubled in volume last year alone. This helped them make the decision to release the original Jammer Gose in cans year-round, starting this April.

The ability to pair the stringent tartness of a gose with a lighter fruit option and a dash of salt has proven successful for Georgia’s Creature Comforts as well. According to their CEO Chris Herron, the Tritonia Gose variant made with cucumber and limes has grown 126% in sales YOY since its introduction into cans in 2017. He also feels especially bullish on their newer variant made with pineapple. It has quickly become very popular in their market and tasting room.

A Unique Appeal to the Non-Traditional Beer Drinker

There’s a reason Corona expertly markets their beer to be best-served with a lime. Pairing the lightness of a lager with a dash of salt and a hit of tart lime leads to an instantly refreshing drinking experience. That consumer insight has been expertly adapted by those in the hard seltzer space; it  also shows up in the framework of what makes a gose so damn refreshing. It’s also appealing to newer beer drinkers or those who might be newer to sour beer styles, like Avery Brewing’s El Gose.

“We attribute the success of the style to being a crisp, refreshing, and thirst-quenching beer,” said Brian Krueger, National Sales & Marketing Director at Avery Brewing. “The lime and sea salt satisfies your palate in a unique way so it also pairs well with a meal. The gose style is an approachable way to try out a sour beer for the first time.”

Along with a lower barrier to entry, goses have also become prominent among the portfolio of today’s American drinker. Why? Because they’re easy to repeat; consumers can have more than one in a sitting because of their lower calorie count and ABV. It’s quite similar to what someone might find in a seltzer or light spirit drink like vodka with lime. Plus, the added combination of fruit and salt creates an interesting differentiator according to Dogfish Head’s Safarik.

“Consumers have been trending towards lower ABV products for the past few years. I think sour beers, particularly when fruited, have crossover appeal to wine and some spirits drinkers. The sourness and salinity of a gose adds a refreshing quality like the salt on the rim of a margarita glass. It keeps you coming back for one more sip.”

All of this creates a consumption pattern at the liquor or retail store that is consistent across a wider range of consumers; it’s music to the ears of any craft brewer looking to expand their market share. Appealing to a new segment of drinkers with a beer offering isn’t new. However, it seems to be working for the gose style. It’s almost like an alcoholic chameleon, with an ability to play across many different drinking formats and activities.

“The vast majority of beverages have a mild sourness to them (wine, cocktails, lemonade, soda, Gatorade, etc) and people love the tangy flavor,” said Sixpoint’s Lenane. “People are tired of getting fed a bunch of sugar and are ready for authentically crafted drinks with vivid flavor profiles that aren’t overly sweet.”

New Investments for a New Age of Drinkers

So, with all of this talk about its popularity and appeal to newer market segments, is anyone really investing further development of their gose profile in lieu of an eye-catchier hazy IPA? The answer is a definitive yes. Several of the brewers I talked to noted that they were putting their stake in the ground when it came to their gose offering. They talked about expanding on the variants; they also discussed expanding availability of their gose portfolio. It would be similar to what they do for an IPA line or barrel-aged series. Not to mention, Destihl plans to release several variants of Here GOSE Nothin’ in 2019. They’ll begin with a small batch release that features key lime; they’ll also have a few seasonal options for Summer (Pina Colada) and early Fall (Blueberry).

Sixpoint’s popular Jam Pack variety offering comes back with new flavors this summer. Creature Comforts also plans to release several new flavor combinations of Tritonia in their taproom. Oh, and Dogfish Head? They’re not content to rest on their SeaQuench-filled laurels. Mark Safarik of Dogfish Head says that consumers can expect a new gose offering. This will be available on-shelves nationwide this spring in 12oz cans.

According to Safarik, the new SuperEight Gose will be a “brilliant, ruby-hued sour ale made with 8 amazing ingredients; including gobs of prickly pear, mango, kiwi, blackberry, blueberry, raspberry, elderberry and red quinoa. It’s got this wonderful, tart watermelon-berry flavor that gets amped up with red Hawaiian sea salt.”

With both national and regional brewers committing to the style of gose, it’s easy to get excited for a light and easy-drinking future. This will make the summer state-of-mind a year-long reality. Cheers!

Feature image courtesy of Dogfish Head.

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The post An Extended Summer: The Gose’s Evolution into a Year-Long Staple appeared first on PorchDrinking.com.

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Putting aside one’s political party affiliation or beliefs, the government shutdown, which is now the longest in American history at 28 days, has impacted over 800,000 furloughed government workers and contractors and affected even more government adjacent jobs. But luckily, good-willed Americans in all industries have answered the call by supporting their fellow countrymen & women.

No industry represents those ideals of community and lending a hand quite like the beer industry, and in this dire circumstance, several breweries across the country have offered support in their own way as well, through food and beer. Because when we’re a little down on our luck, it always helps to have a friend buy you a beer.

In DC, the epicenter of those most affected, a partnership between Mess Hall, food writer Nevin Martell3Advance, and PR firm Quixotic has given birth to the most extreme case of beer-ing it forward through the appropriately named PayItFurloughed program. The crowd-sourced website allows everyday citizens to donate a beer which can be redeemed by furloughed government workers at Atlas Brew Works, DC Brau, 3 Stars Brewing and Shop Made in DC. Thus far over 2,700 beers have been donated and over 450 beers have been redeemed.

Other breweries from across the country have also begun promoting their own offers to support those affected by the shutdown, so we decided to round-up as many as we could find. Note, all offers require proof of government ID’s to redeem these deals.

Of note… in many states, it is illegal for breweries to offer free or discounted beer. While we do not advocate breaking the law, ironically the TTB, the government’s enforcement division for alcohol is considered non-essential, therefore closed during the shut down so… ¯\_(ツ)_/¯. We’re guessing they could use a beer as well.

Finally, if your brewery is offering discounted or free beer/food to furloughed government employees let us know and we’ll update this post. Just reach out via our contact page. While many tremendous organizations have extended offers, this post is solely focused on breweries.

California

7Sisters Brewing (San Luis Obispo)

Offer: Free grilled cheese sandwich

Colorado

4 Noses Brewing (Broomfield)

Offer: First round free

Currently a furloughed federal employee? We want to buy you a round!

Just show up with a valid government ID, order one of our pints, and hang out with us in the taproom! pic.twitter.com/dOxbtijbav

— 4 Noses Brewing Co. (@4NosesBrewingCo) January 17, 2019

Black Shirt Brewing (Denver) 

Offer: Free knots & 15% off drinks

Copper Club Brewing (Fruita)

Offer: Free Beer on Saturday, January 19

Epic Brewing (Denver)

Offer: 50% off everything

Great Divide Brewing (Denver)

Offer: Buy one get one free beer at both GDBC locations

Left Hand Brewing (Longmont)

Offer: First round free

The Post Brewing (Lafayette, Longmont, Boulder, Denver)

Offer: Free lunch at all Big Red F locations (Including The Post Brewing, West End Tavern, Jax, Zolo & Centro M-F, does not include tax/tip)

Twisted Pine Brewing (Boulder)

Offer: Free lunch from a limited menu, Monday-Friday 11am-2pm

Florida

Dissent Craft Brewing (Saint Petersburg)

Offer: One free beer

Georgia

Sweetwater Brewing (Atlanta)

Offer: First two beers free

Illinois

Argus Brewery (Chicago)

Offer: Free tour on Saturday, January 19 for the first 50 applicants. E-mail: localbrew@argusbrewery.com

Horse Thief Hollow Brewing (Chicago)

Offer: Free lunch under the #ShutdownSpecial until Friday, January 18.

Missouri

Boulevard Brewing (Kansas City)

Offer: Furlough pricing (first beer free).

For those bearing the brunt of the federal gov’t shutdown, we offer a little bit of solace. Through the duration of the shutdown, show your valid US gov’t-issued employee ID for furloughed pricing on beer & discounted food – because you might need to get out & enjoy a beer. pic.twitter.com/uUuQTC3mbi

— BLVDTOURSANDREC (@blvdtoursandrec) January 10, 2019

City Barrel Brewing (Kansas City)

Offer: Free ticket to a private event for furloughed workers, who will receive free beer the brewery couldn’t can because the TTB has been shut down and thus unable to approve labels.

Nebraska

Zipline Brewing (Lincoln and Omaha)

Offer: Furlough Fill Friday, one free 32oz growler fill each Friday until the furlough ends.

North Carolina

Fullsteam Brewery (Durham)

Offer: One free beer 

Trophy Brewing (Raleigh)

Offer: One free small pizza to any government employee and one free large pizza to any two government employees who come in together.

Texas

Circle Brewing

Offer: First beer free

Utah

Roosters Brewing (Ogden)

Offer: 20% off in-restaurant dining for government employees + guest until January 31.

Uinta Brewing

Offer: 20% off all food and a free 32oz unfilled growler.

Washington D.C.

3 Stars Brewing

Offer: Free beer through PayItFurloughed

2,600 beers funded through #PayItFurloughed! It’s time for furloughed feds to start drinking @ShopMadeInDC @AtlasBrewWorks @dcbrau @3starsbrewing – all are open today! @erickmsanchez @MessHallDC @3advance @timcarman @fritzhahn pic.twitter.com/AE8aurPApc

— payitfurloughed (@payitfurloughed) January 17, 2019

Atlas Brew Works 

Offer: Free beer through PayItFurloughed

DC Brau 

Offer: Free beer through PayItFurloughed

Ornery Beer Company

Washington

Rogue Ales & Spirits

Offer: Members of the Coast Guard receive 25% off beer and 50% off food.

Schooner Brewing

Offer: One free meal until the shutdown ends.

Furloughed employees can furlough their food tab at Schooner until the government reopens! Show us your government ID and get one meal a day (alcohol not included) & pay it back after the government reopens & you get paid! pic.twitter.com/Y76IKiBXdL

— Schooner Brewing (@schoonerbrewing) January 15, 2019

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The post Breweries Offering Free Food & Beer to Furloughed Government Workers appeared first on PorchDrinking.com.

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