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This year’s Senior Class Committee was (front, l-to-r): Rylee Gorter, Lauren Powers; (second row, l-to-r): Mara Taubert, Grace Boucher, Lauren Lapthorn; and (third row, l-to-r) Courtney Kanthak, Madison Ference, Autumn Mendro and Kaitlyn Draper. D.A. Fitzgerald

The graduates from the Class of 2019 will accept their diplomas on May 26, the crowning event capping 12 years of educational achievement.

Key to helping plan that event is the Senior Class Committee, made up of Grace Boucher, Kaitlyn Draper, Madison Ference, Rylee Gorter, Courtney Kanthak, Lauren Lapthorn, Autumn Mendro and Mara Taubert.

The committee narrows down to three choices the class flower, ribbon, colors and motto. The options are set in the display cases in the hallway and the class has a full week to vote on its selections.

“So as a class collectively they determine their class motto, colors and flowers,” said Daphne Likness, administrative/activities assistant and senior advisor.

Those selections were kelly green, black and grey for the colors; the white rose for the flower, representing “a clean, fresh start” and “new chapter in our lives,” said Lauren Lapthorn. Kaitlyn Draper added another interpretation of that selection.

“Thorns on the bottom and once we get through graduation, at the top, it’s all pretty,” Draper said.

The motto the class chose is credited to various sources, including “Winnie-the-Pooh,” written by A.A. Milne: “Be bold enough to use your voice, brave enough to listen to your heart and strong enough to live the life you’ve always imagined.”

That motto, said Grace Boucher, tells her to “be confident in the direction you want to go in and have faith in yourself.”

“Just to not be worried about ‘I don’t know what I’m going to do,’” said Autumn Mendro. “It’s OK not knowing.”

Sitting in the auditorium after a committee photo, the students said they felt relieved that soon they would have no more tests and could sleep longer in the morning and maybe make some money of their own, something that was difficult to do as a student.

The Class of 2019 as a whole was fun, relaxed, respectful, driven and well-rounded, the students said.

Likness added that “they respect each other, they support each other. They do get along very, very well. You can see it; you can’t really pick out different groups or cliques. And when there are functions, they’re all there. It’s really cool to see as a community member and as a staff person just to see them all come and support each other. We haven’t had a lot of that in previous years.”

Only one of the students saw herself living in Pipestone within 10 years, a couple others somewhere close by due to family members. The rest said they wouldn’t return to Pipestone either because they didn’t want to be here or thought there wouldn’t be jobs locally for their chosen college majors.

“There will be some hard things about leaving,” Lapthorn said. “I was writing my speech and I just started crying thinking about everything.”

They said both “yes and no” when asked if they felt well prepared for their futures.

“I know what I want to be, just not all the steps to get there,” said Madison Ference.

“I know what I want to do and the steps to get there, but once I get there, if I don’t like it, I don’t know what I’m going to do,” Lapthorn said.

“Having to stick with it,” Draper said. “What if we want to change majors. I mean, it’s OK, but it’s scary.”

When asked what they were looking forward to, Rylee Gorter said, “finishing; it’s always good to finish things.”

“I’m excited to close this chapter of my life and start the next one and see what life has in store for me,” said Lauren Powers.

“I’m excited to spend one last summer with my friends before we all go our separate ways,” said Mara Taubert.

Boucher said she was looking forward to, “seeing all my hard work pay-off. It kind of makes you forget about all the hard stuff you had to go through like turning in your homework on time and staying up late finishing your homework. It makes all the stress go away.”

Several of the students echoed each other with their answers over what they were looking forward to most about their futures: starting over somewhere new, meeting new friends and achieving independence.

“For the future it’s a little scary I’d say because we’re going on our own,” said Courtney Kanthak. “We do have to start over in our lives but we get to do what we want to do. So I’m excited for that part: getting to do what I want to do.”

“I’m excited to be able to pick a future that wasn’t set in stone,” Draper said, and making her own choices, and being “my own boss.”

When asked if the 18-year-olds felt like adults, there was a resounding “No!” shouted in unison.

“I feel like we can all handle it, but it’s just a big step,” Lapthorn said.

Then there are all the unknowns that independence will bring.

“I feel like you’re super excited for it, to have your own freedoms, and then it happens and you’re like, ‘Wow, my parents did a lot of things for me that I now have to do on my own. That’s kind of scary,” Draper said.

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The construction season in Pipestone continues to shape up with the Pipestone City Council opening bids on one project, discarding another, and sending a third out to bid during their Monday, May 20 meeting.

Industrial Road project not approved 

The council had decided to table this project while it considered its assessment policy as it pertained to new streets after three of the five impacted property owners objected to paying 100 percent of the costs to pave the gravel road.

Instead, on Monday evening, the council decided not to proceed with the project this year.

The road travels behind several businesses fronting U.S. Highway 75 south, including Pipestone Building Materials, and along the backside of Pipestone Livestock Auction property. The council had put the project on its list for 2019 because two of those property owners –– Brian Schneider, owner of Pipestone Livestock Auction, and Jeremy Whipple, owner of Pipestone Building Materials –– petitioned the city for the improvement.

City Administrator Jeff Jones told the council on Monday evening that concrete curb and gutter improvements that had been done to the road in 2009 had been assessed based upon an existing road and not a new road. That policy could be followed for the paving of the road, he said. In the past, that would have meant a 20 percent cost-share by the impacted property owners but beginning this year, the city has increased that cost-share to 30 percent.

The city hadn’t planned, however, on financing the additional costs –– the project was estimated at $254,263 –– and estimated it would increase the debt levy by about a quarter of a percent. In addition, two of the property owners attended the meeting –– Steve Everett, owner of Everett Tire and Auto, and James “Rusty” Hartke, owner of Gorter’s Clay and Dairy Equipment –– and both said they didn’t need the new road.

“I can’t really justify the extra expense,” Everett said, and neither did he believe it would increase his property value.

The council unanimously voted against the resolution that would have ordered the improvement, citing various reasons, including that it hadn’t planned on the additional costs for 2019; that the road was passable and fit for commerce and traffic as it was; that two of the five property owners didn’t want it; and that it wasn’t fair to assess that amount of money to only five property owners.

Three bids received

Three bids were received for the city utility work that will be done this summer, the low bid from First Rate Excavate out of Sioux Falls for $1,144,978. The other two bids were $1,261,274.27 from GM Contracting, Inc. out of Lake Crystal and $1,324,678 from Duininck, Inc. out of Prinsburg.

The engineer’s estimate for the work was $1,051,848.

Travis Winter, city engineer with Bolton and Menk, will review the bids and return to the council’s next meeting with a recommendation.

The work will precede the Minnesota Department of Transportation’s (MnDOT) bridge project on U.S. Highway 75 that will be done this summer. The state’s project will shift the existing bridge north and reroute the ditch.

Prior to that work being done, the city will replace water lines from state Highway 23 to Ninth Street NE and sewer lines between Hwy. 75 and Seventh Avenue NE.

The city will also repair other segments of water main and/or sewer on state Highway 30 east from state Highway 23 about half a block; on Ninth Avenue SE between Fifth Street SE and Seventh Street SE (Hwy. 30); and on Ninth Street SW between Fourth Avenue SW and Second Avenue SW.

The project does not include assessments of any property owners.

Mill and overlay out to bid

The mill and overlay project of roughly 22 blocks within the city of Pipestone was unanimously ordered by resolution on Monday evening to be sent out to bid.

The bids will be due by June 17.

The project would mill off the top 2 inches of existing surface on the selected streets and install a new 2 inch layer of pavement.

The engineer’s estimate for the work is $450,000. The preliminary assessment roll has been based upon roughly 300 benefiting property owners paying 30 percent of the total costs of the project.

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Jennifer and Jimmy Bolden of Pipestone plan to restore the Quarry Twin Theater and make it a movie theater again. K. Kuphal

Jennifer Bolden of Pipestone submitted the winning bid of $1 for the former Quarry Twin property in Pipestone at a tax-forfeiture auction Monday morning.

Bolden was the lone bidder at the auction and the Quarry Twin Theater property was the only property on the auction block. She and her husband, Jimmy, must pay $73.68 for the property including the sale price of $1 and related fees and taxes. Bolden said she plans to pay for the property in cash on Wednesday morning at which time the Boldens will receive the keys, according to Pipestone County Auditor-Treasurer Tyler Reisch.

She said her husband likes the structure and plans to restore it for use as a movie theater

“Unless it’s absolutely not possible to use what’s there, he plans to use what’s there,” Bolden said.

Her husband was not able to attend the auction due to work. Bolden said he owns a commercial cleaning company called OpenWorks in Minneapolis and she is the assistant manager at Dollar General in Pipestone. If their plans for the theater work out, she said she hopes her husband will be able to focus more on that and be home more.

Bolden said they’re excited about the property and that she’s been calling Reisch about it regularly for almost a year.

The Boldens haven’t looked too far into what it will cost to restore the structure, which was condemned and tax-forfeited in 2016 and has had the back wall and back portion of the roof removed as a safety precaution while under the county’s care as a tax-forfeited property.

“I do know it will be expensive,” Bolden said.

Bolden said she and her husband moved to Minnesota from Georgia when they bought a Sears store in Fairmont several years ago. The corporate office closed the store in 2017, which she said was about a year-and-a-half after they bought it. Changes in their housing plans then led them to Pipestone.

“It just happened that a guy who was going to sell us a house in Heron Lake owned a home here (in Pipestone), so instead of buying that one we bought this one.”

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It wasn’t clearly evident that Pipestone Area head tennis coach Ed Gustafson’s heart was palpitating, but it appeared as though his Arrows were bent on stressing him out in the early stages of the Section 3A team quarterfinal match-up between No. 4 PAS and No. 5 Lac qui Parle Valley Monday afternoon in Pipestone. The Arrows, who had beaten the Eagles 5-2 during regular-season play May 3, were trailing in all but two of the seven matches after one set. As if teasing the Eagles, however, the Arrows came back in 3-of-5 matches to again claim a 5-2 victory and advance to Tuesday’s (May 21) semifinal round against No. 1 Worthington in Redwood Falls.

“I think there were plenty of nerves, but I’m just happy they came through for us,” Gustafson said. “They all dropped the first set, so they had to go the distance and play all three sets.”

Pipestone Area seniors Dalton Pottratz and Cade Baartman were the lone players to come through their matches unscathed, respectively beating Pedro Lodavico and Levi Olson by scores of 6-3, 6-4, and 6-1, 6-0, at Nos. 3 and 4 singles.

Baartman was the first to get off the court to cheer his teammates on, as he again proved extremely difficult to push the ball past while making the most of an improved serve. 

“My backhand was pretty good today, and just getting the ball back; Gus calls me ‘the wall,’ so I just try to hit it back and make them make a mistake,” he said. “I’ve been working hard on my serve, too, and it’s come around a lot this year… working on it every day at practice and even after a little bit.

“I know Gus is going to be very upset if we don’t pull this match out. He wants us to get our first section win, at home, in a long time, so he’s expecting a lot out of us today.”

Although he momentarily lost focus in his match, Pottratz followed suit and joined Baartman in rooting his mates on from the sideline.

“It was not supposed to go that long,” Pottratz said of his match. “I was getting upset with myself, and I wasn’t too happy about a few (line) calls, but I hit my strokes well and got back into it after a while. 

“I’m good at knowing what works against my opponent, and moving him around seemed to work well. I used that to my advantage and finished it off in two sets. Hopefully, we’ll pull it out today and move on to play tomorrow in Redwood.”

Those hopes were realized through the marathon efforts of the Nos. 2 and 3 doubles teams of Cole Paulson and Isaac Stiles and Jaden Lorang and Ryan Woodbury, and No. 2 singles player Riley Longstreet. 

Paulson and Stiles roared back from a 0-1 deficit (2-6) with relative ease against LQPV’s No. 2 doubles tandem of Wylie Weibe and Heath Buer. Better placement and pace proved the best approach for the Arrow duo, as the pair claimed the match at 6-2, 6-1 over the second and third sets.

“We were hitting better shots and more confident shots,” Paulson said. “We had much better placement with our shots and took a lob when we needed to to keep it away from the net player.”

“We also hit our shots harder,” Stiles added. “We played it a little smarter in the second and third sets.”

For Lorang and Woodbury it was simply a matter of warming up before they put forth their best effort against Liam Risch and Jackson Buer.

“I don’t know where we were in that first set,” Woodbury explained. “We came out, weren’t moving and had to wake up.”

“I think we could have used a little more time to warm up,” Lorang added. “We were just not playing our tennis at the beginning.”

And their ‘tennis,’ for a side that usually has superior height and reach, is often about net play. Throughout the second and third sets of their 4-6, 6-3, 6-3, victory, the PAS freshmen put away shot after shot at the net while also putting more emphasis on their serves.

“We just had to put it away at the net and not let them put it over for a point,” Woodbury said. “That’s how we came back.

“We also wanted to used our height, and I got my serve going better in the second set,” Lorang said. “I just needed to get some practice with my serve and get warmed up. I was not warmed up coming out, so that was a big part of it.”

After dropping the first set of his match to LQPV’s Colton Husby, 4-6, Longstreet used a precision lob shot to even the tilt at a set apiece in the second (6-1). Although the third set proved more difficult, the PAS senior came through with a match-winning 6-4 result in the final frame.

Although he came out on the wrong end of a 6-7 (4-7), 4-6 scoreline against Gavin Olson, PAS junior Jackson Winter played a strong match at No. 1 singles. When not finding the alleys for winners, Winter often forced Olson to push the ball long with a blistering forehand of tricky backhand drop shot.

“Jackson played very well today; he had a chance to close out that first set but dropped it in a tiebreaker,” Gustafson said. “Our singles are going to be okay, I think, they just have to stay consistent and continue to work hard.”

As for the No. 1 doubles team of seniors Taylor Mollema and Cory Cooper, their proactive approach proved counterproductive throughout their 2-6, 3-6 loss to Jake Lee and Tyler Buer. Too often returns were needlessly hammered back, usually sailing long or well below the tape.

And to beat the top-seeded Trojans in the team semifinals, Gustafson knows he’ll need his Nos. 1-3 (doubles) to be playing their best tennis.

“We’re going to have to compete in all the doubles matches,” Gustafson said. “Our (Nos.) 3 and 4 singles are also going to have to compete well, but it’s the doubles who are really going to have to step up. They have to go out, be confident and give their best effort, that’s all we need tomorrow.”

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The Arrow girls placed eighth and the Arrow boys finished 10th out of 12 teams at Monday’s Big South Conference golf championships at Rose Lake Golf Club in Fairmont. Marshall (356) won in a tiebreaker over Waseca (356) for the tournament title on the girls’ side, while Fairmont claimed third place at 369. 

Paced by sophomore Emma Budden, whose round of 94 earned her 14th place overall, the Arrows shot a total of 396 on the day. Budden also earned All-Conference honors through her tournament round and a ninth-best average of 50.5 strokes during a regular-season dual meet schedule that saw the Arrows (3-2, six points) finish second in the West behind Marshall (5-0, 10 points).

PAS senior Jenna Kerkaert was a stroke back of Budden at 95 on Monday, while classmates Courtney Kanthak and Ali Hein shot 100 and 107, respectively, to complete the team tally.

“I think all the girls have had a great season,” Pipestone Area head girls’ coach Steve Rops said. “Emma was the only one who made the cut for All-Conference, but I think Lauren (Lapthorn) would have had a shot had she not gotten tonsillitis… 12th going into the tournament, but obviously didn’t play today. 

“The rest of them made great strides during the season. Jenna had one bad day versus Luverne, Courtney had a slow start to the year but played really well toward the end, and Ali was 120 to start the year but is a little over 100 now. So, they all showed great improvement over the year.”

The Arrow girls are hoping to lower their team total by 10 or more strokes in order to put pressure on the field at Wednesday’s opening round of the Section 3AA tournament at Oakdale Golf Club in Buffalo Lake. 

“If they can all play in that upper 90s range…” Rops said. “I think Emma and Jenna can shoot low 90s or even an 89, and I really think if Lauren and Courtney can shoot 90-92 and Ali can squeak into the 90s we have a legimate shot. There’s no reason we can’t and the forecast should help us shed all that gear that restricts our swings. This is probably the most optimistic we’ve been as a team of making Day 2.”

The PAS boys finished the season similarly to how they played throughout the campaign, up-and-down.

Although senior Cody Thompson earned All-Conference honors with his season points total and 15th-best round of 82 on Saturday, the team again proved inconsistent in totaling a 10th-best score of 368.

“We were all over again, and that just doesn’t help you move forward or challenge the top teams,” PAS boys’ coach Craig Boeddeker said. 

Senior McCaden Biever, who carded the team’s low at several dual meets during the regular season, finished at 86 in Fairmont, while eighth-grader Braxton Thompson and sophomore Will Rops completed the Arrows’ team score with respective rounds of 98 and 102. Eighth-grader Breylon Kuiper shot 103 on the day and sophomore Adam Femrite finished at 115.

The Arrows’ senior members, Thompson and Biever, will be looking to make it to the second day of the Section 3AA tournament – which begins Thursday morning for the boys – but they too can make similar adjustments to their game as the rest of the squad.

“Certainly they could all benefit from slowing down and going through their pre-shot routine better,” Boeddeker said. “There are times when we are playing too fast out there and not focusing on our mechanics. My hope is they can pay more attention to their pre-shot routines and play the round with a good tempo/rhythm. If they do that, they’ll likely be more successful.”

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The bad news for the Arrows is they weren’t able to repeat as Big South Conference softball champions.  The good news is they’re likely going to be a better postseason team for it, after bowing out to state-ranked (AAA) New Ulm 3-0 in the title tilt Thursday evening in New Ulm.

“Of course it does (make you better),” Pipestone Area head coach Troy Bouman said. “You learn from these things. We’ll learn a lot about how to approach a pitcher like this and, next time, we’ll shorten up and put the ball in play rather than striking out as often as we did.”

Down 2-0 after one complete inning, the Arrows didn’t find another base hit to add to Kaitlyn Draper’s first-inning single to left field until the top of the sixth. And even then, Mallary Remund’s line drive-single to the right side of the New Ulm defense couldn’t be capitalized on.

With an early lead to work with, NU hurler Ashlyn Donner fanned 16 Arrows on the evening – mixing up speeds and locations throughout in keeping PAS off balance for the entirety.

“I had a few pitches not working for me, but others were and my change-up and rise-ball got the job done,” said the Eagle senior. “It was very important to get that early lead; it takes the pressure off the defense, and it definitely takes the pressure off of me… being able to mix in my pitches and not worry about runners that get on.”

Issuing just one walk in the contest, Donner and her defense saw only three Arrows on the base paths throughout the tilt. Draper (steal) never made it past second base in the top of the first, as Paige Ahrendt went down swinging for the third out, Jessa Reinert (walk) was cut down trying to steal second base in the top of the third, and Remund (single, steal) also couldn’t be pushed past the middle bag in the top of the sixth.

Donner’s counterpart, Adrianna Johnson, threw a sound game as well, but a trio of singles and a mental miscue as to which base to go to with a groundball aided the Eagles in claiming an early 2-0 lead after one inning. 

Joey Batt led off the bottom of the first with a precision bunt single, and Carli Botten followed with a sacrifice bunt to push the NU outfielder to second base. Second baseman Noelle Forstner knocked Batt in with a line-drive single to Remund in right field, and Ahrendt’s throw on Madeline Gag’s ensuing grounder to third didn’t get to second base in time to record an out – giving NU a pair on the bases with just one out. Donner followed with an RBI single to shallow centerfield, scoring Forstner from second base and giving the Eagles a quick 2-0 lead.

“They played a little better game, no doubt, and we gave them some help with a couple early runs,” Bouman said. “We made some mental mistakes where we could have gotten out of it, maybe, trailing. Now we get a base runner and a mistake and the game is tied, you know, but they (NU) deserved to win.”

It didn’t hurt the Eagles any that Donner faced one more than the minimum nine batters through the ensuing three frames, recording six of her 16 strikeouts along the way as the Arrows struggled to figure out her rise ball – in particular.

“I thought she (Donner) threw extremely well; she throws with good velocity, low 60s, and then mixes in a good change (up),” Bouman said. “I thought she had good movement on the ball, mixed speeds, changed eye levels, and moved the ball in-and-out on us. The biggest thing is we didn’t put the ball in play like we needed to. 

“We really pride ourselves on that, and against a good pitcher like that you have to put pressure on her by putting the ball in play… didn’t do that today. You gotta find ways to move the ball. We talked about shortening up (our swing), and because she throws at a high velocity all you have to do is get the barrel of the bat squared up and it’ll go. When we strike out they don’t have to do anything except pitch and catch.”

Johnson held the Eagles at bay through the second an third frames, but another trio of singles by Nora Windschill, Ellie Bute and Batt helped the hosts plate a third run in the bottom of the fourth – accounting for the final margin of victory.

“They have a little more speed than most teams, and they do a good job of bunting and pushing the ball through the holes,” Bouman said. “They do the little things well, and you have to give them credit.”

PAS               000 000 0 – 0 2 1

New Ulm   200 100 X – 3 6 0

PAS 5, MCC 0

PAS 8, MCC 1 (6 inn.)

The Arrows (17-2) were quick to get back to their winning ways by sweeping the Rebels in a non-conference doubleheader Friday afternoon in Slayton.

Johnson tossed a four-hit shutout in the opener, striking out 10 and walking one for the complete-game victory.

PAS senior centerfielder Carmen Skyberg inflicted the majority to the MCC defense, going 4-for-4 with five stolen bases and scoring two runs. Remund plated two runs with her fourth-inning triple to right field, and April Haupert (2RBI) and Draper each had two hits in the game. Mara Taubert also drove in a run in going 1-for-3 with a stolen base, and Draper and Mandi Miller (2) also pilfered bags in the opener.

Reinert followed Johnson’s lead in the nightcap, tossing a four-hitter that yielded just one run for the hosts. The sophomore gave up the one earned run on four hits while striking out 11 and walking no one to pick up the pitching win.

Draper (two stolen bases) was 3-for-4 with an RBI-double in leading the Arrows at the plate. Miller (1-for-3) knocked in a pair of runs with her double, while Ahrendt (4 SB) and Taubert (2 SB) also had RBI-doubles in the contest. Skyberg (RBI, SB) and MacKenzie Manderscheid also had base hits against the Rebels in the nightcap.

PAS            110 300 0 – 5 10 0

MCC            000 000 0 – 0 4 1

PAS                  300 500 – 8 9 1

MCC                001 000 – 1 4 2

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The Pipestone Area (13-6) baseball team quickly recovered from Friday evening’s Big South Conference loss to the Marshall Tigers to claim back-to-back victories, in and out of conference play, knocking off Worthington 13-4 and Yellow Medicine East 14-3 Monday and Saturday, respectively.  The Arrows were all over the hosting Trojans in the early innings of Monday’s BSC tilt, plating eight runs in the  first two frames alone. Isaiah Byrnes’ first-inning triple to score two in a hurry, as Dawson Schelhaas (walk) and Matt Enger (hit by pitch) claimed the plate on the drive. Reid Homann’s sacrifice pop out to right field brought a tagging Byrnes home, and the Arrows had a 3-0 lead after half an inning.

Byrnes (2-for-5, 4RBI) drove in his third of four runs on the evening in the top of the second, singling in Enger (walk) to start a two-out rally. Homann (1-for-4, double, 2RBI) was struck by a pitch to push another run across the plate and additional singles off the bats of Terry Price (1-for-3, RBI) and Tyson Wacker (1-for-4, RBI) tallied two more runs for the visitors – lifting PAS to an 8-1 lead after 1 ½ innings.

Carson Wipf picked up the victory on the mound for the Arrows, giving up two earned runs on seven hits while striking out two and walking one over four innings. The Trojans managed to plate four runs (two earned) over the first three frames, but Wipf and the PAS defense shut the door on the Trojans in the fourth before the senior multipurpose player yielded to classmate Josh Tinklenberg in the bottom of the fifth. He gave up just one hit over three innings, striking out three Trojans along the way in earning the save.

Enger finished the game 1-for-3 with an RBI-double, while Wipf, Grant Budden and JT Tinklenberg also had hits for the Arrows.

Byrnes went the distance for the Arrows against The Sting Saturday afternoon, giving up no earned runs on seven hits. He struck out three and walked two over five frames. 

Byrnes also drove in two runs with his fourth-inning double to right field and was further aided on the hill by Enger’s (3-for-4, RBI) pair of doubles and Price’s four RBI on two hits. Wipf (1-for-2, 2RBI) also had a double in the tilt, while sophomore Jayden Houselog made his way into the scorebook with a fourth-inning single.

PAS            351 010 3 – 13 9 2

Worth.        121 000 0 –  4 8 4

YME                   000 21 – 3 7 4

PAS                  118 4X – 14 8 2

Marshall 7, PAS 1

The Arrows’ precarious one-run lead over the visiting Tigers indeed toppled in the top of the sixth inning Friday evening in Pipestone. 

Pipestone Area snatched its slim lead in the bottom of the third inning, as Josh Tinklenberg’s RBI single plated Enger, who had driven a two-out triple to the right corner of the A’s Field. 

With starting pitcher Reid Homann (5 inn., 2ER, 5H, 7L 3W) settled through four innings, in front of a defense that helped him out of a jam in the fifth – via a mesmerizing 1-2-3-2 double play – the Arrows certainly had cause to hope one run might be enough to claim a rare victory over the AAA side.

The momentum gained through that defensive play, which began with Homann fielding a chopper off the bat of Isaac Smitt to force Jordan Mernaugh out at home and ended with catcher Josh Tinklenberg tagging Alex Thompson out at the same base, evaporated in a heartbeat via back-to-back doubles of the bats of Nicholas Macchio and Kaleb Welvaert in the top of the sixth. Although the two-baggers only allowed the Tigers to knot the score at 1-all prior to Homann being relieved by Wipf (1 inn., 2ER 2H, 1W), the Tigers squeezed another run across the plate and notched a third – on a Mernaugh double – before the first half of the frame was finished.

Besides JT Tinklenberg’s slicing single to right field, a dejected PAS side struggled at the plate over its remaining six outs.  The Tigers, meanwhile, sent batters 1-9 to the plate in the top of the seventh to score an additional three runs off of the Arrows’ second reliever of the tilt, Brandon Cooper.

Sam Bobendrier relieved Cooper with two outs left to secure in the top of the seventh inning, and the senior gave up no earned runs on one hit while striking out one and walking one.

The fourth-seeded (South) Arrows open sub-Section 3AA tournament play at 1 p.m. Saturday in Luverne, as they face No. 5 Tracy-Milroy-Balaton at Redbird Field.

Marshall     000 003 4 – 7 9 0

PAS               001 000 0 – 1 4 2

R-T-R 5, RCW 4

The Knights came back from a 4-1 deficit after three innings to edge the Jaguars Monday evening in Tyler. 

Payton Hess (1-for-3, 2RBI) not only doubled in the tying runs with his fifth-inning double, but also picked up the pitching victory – giving up two earned runs on three hits while fanning three ad walking two over six frames. 

Kyle Fischer had an RBI double to get the Knights on the scoreboard in the second, and Parker Wendland also had a double in the tilt.

Hayden Gravley had a pair of singles for the Knights, while Cody Wichmann, Collin Johnson and Mason Brust had additional hits for the hosts.

RCW             013 000 0 – 4 3 0

RTR              010 040 X – 5 8 0

R-T-R 8, CMC 1

The Knights claimed a comfortable Camden Conference victory over the Blue Jays Thursday evening in Prinsburg, as Cody Wichmann gave up just one earned run on four hits while fanning six and walking no one in a complete-game effort on the hill. 

Gravley and Hess were 3-for-5 apiece at the plate, with the former knocking in a run on a pair of doubles and the latter also hitting a two-bagger in the tilt.

Cody Wichmann was 2-for-5 with an RBI, Fischer was 1-for-3 with an RBI, and Johnson finished 1-for-4 with an RBI. Logan Lamote and Carter Hansen also had hits for the Knights, who hope to wrap up the regular season Thursday evening in Edgerton with a non-conference game against the Flying Dutchmen.

RTR            100 031 3 – 8 13 0

CMC             100 000 0 – 1 4 0

HL-O/F 5, E/SWC 0

The Flying Dutchmen fell to 6-7 on the season following a six-inning shutout loss to the Coyotes Thursday in Heron Lake.

Kade Fey suffered the loss on the bump for E/SWC, giving up two earned runs on hits while striking out two and walking one over four frames.

Fey and Tannen Groen each had a single for the Dutchmen in the loss. 

E/SWC hopes to wrap up the regular season Thursday when it hosts Russell-Tyler-Ruthton in a non-conference game in Edgerton.

E/SWC            000 000 – 0 2 0

HL-O/F           001 130 – 5 5 0

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To the editor,

Poppies have a long history of being used to honor the dead, beginning in Greek and Roman mythology. Since 1920, following World War I, the American Legion and American Legion Auxiliary have distributed millions of red crepe paper poppies as a reminder of the sacrifices made by our fallen military veterans. These poppies are all handmade by veterans and offered in exchange for donations. All donated funds are given directly to support a variety of programs for local and Minnesota veterans and active-duty military throughout the year.

Friday, May 24, has been designated as National Poppy Day. Please join us by wearing a red poppy to remember those who made the ultimate sacrifice and support the future of veterans and their families for generations to come.

We thank you for your support!

Nancy Koets, President

Pipestone Michael-Boock Post 6

American Legion

Auxiliary

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It’s an exciting yet often scary time for high school seniors as they prepare to head out into their futures.

There is a lot of pressure on these 18-year-olds to know what they want to do for the rest of their lives. We all know this pressure. Adults will go through several careers or jobs before they decide upon one that fits. Others will fall into something. Others will carry on a family business. Still others will find out only decades later what they want to be when they grow up after spending a lifetime doing something else.

All to say: It’s more natural than not to be uncertain about a profession or job or general course of life action.

Meanwhile, there are other things 18-year-olds need to learn, things I wish I’d learned earlier, things they don’t teach in school. A post-high school-graduation preparatory class would have helped. So I’ve designed one. The syllabus for this class would look something like this, addressed to my imaginary students:

1) How to take criticism 101. Yes, you now have 12 years of education. This does not mean you know everything. This does not mean you know even a quarter of everything. And though you’re probably pretty great, few of us actually live up to the images our parents have of us and that we’ve bought into. There are still things you need to learn, ways of doing things, ways of being. You won’t always get things right. You’ll make mistakes. Fortunately, there are many, many adults who want to help you. This help will likely come in the form of criticism. Listen, take it and then consider yourself lucky. If no one ever gives you any criticism, it’s not because you don’t need it, it’s because you’ve probably already been typed as a difficult or stubborn person who will not listen to advice.

2) Regulating emotions 101. It’s a big world out there full of different kinds of people. They will not all relate to you the way you are accustomed to having your friends and family and schoolmates relate to you. Perhaps you’ll find that all the things that worked for you for the past 12 years no longer work for you around a different set of people, in a different environment. For those who couldn’t quite get the magic formula for negotiating high school, this is going to be a good thing. For others it’s OK, too. You’re only 18 years old. Your brain isn’t even fully developed and won’t be until you’re about 25. So while you’re supposed to be mature, the part that’s responsible for decision-making, reasoning and emotional regulation isn’t quite there yet. This means things may fall apart, causing your immature brain to believe this means that YOU are falling apart. But this is not true. Let the feeling pass through you. Don’t allow it to get trapped inside. That’s how anxieties begin to accumulate and before you know it, you’re 40 years old and sitting on a therapist’s couch talking about weird phobias, like how you’re afraid to eat oranges in October.

3) Perseverance 101. This is not what you may think it is. If your parents made you take piano lessons even if you didn’t like them, and told you quitting is not an option and you must persevere, the worst that can come of it is you’ve spent a few hours a week thus far doing something you didn’t like.

If you have made yourself take a certain course of study or a particular job and you don’t like it, and you apply the ‘quitting is not an option, you must persevere’ lesson, you’re not just stuck on a piano stool for a few hours a week for a limited number of years, you’re stuck in a job for what could be the rest of your life. If you went to college, you’ve also wasted thousands of dollars of college tuition on the wrong course of study.

Perseverance is a very important quality to master, but not an easy one to understand –– like Kenny Rogers sang, you’ve got know when to hold em’, know when to fold ‘em. That’s why we need this course.

4) Coping with failure 101. You have failed. Maybe it’s a course, maybe you’re fired from a job, maybe you are not cut out to be the thing you thought you wanted to be. You feel like a loser and think everyone sees you that way. This is not true (see ‘Regulating Emotions 101’). After an acceptable but short period of wallowing, it’s time to congratulate yourself on creating an opportunity to cope with this.

The more you practice dealing with failure, the better you’ll be at it. You’ll learn to be so good that you will reach the point where you are unstoppable. That fear of failure that plagues probably 85 percent of all adults? That won’t be you. This doesn’t mean seek out failure or do dumb things on purpose that are difficult to walk back. This does mean that failure should not be a land mine in your life around which you gingerly walk, avoiding it as if it were a matter of life and death. The more failures you’ve had, the harder you’re trying and the closer you will be to achieving what you were put on this earth to achieve.

The people who have accomplished their goals have stumbled into the wisdom of the above courses the hard way, also known as learning by doing. But know that others have gone before you; you don’t have to reinvent growing up. Respect the advice your elders may offer, use what you can, file the rest away for when you’ll inevitably pull it out to use it, and above all, relax and remember it’s a journey. Trust that journey.

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Pipestone County Star by Kyle Kuphal - 2d ago

A new Minnesota law that takes effect Aug. 1 bans the use of hand-held cell phones while driving and requires drivers to use voice-activated or hands-free features for calls, messages and other functions on their phones such as GPS navigation. The law is intended to prevent distracted driving accidents.

Distracted driving is a topic that’s been on my mind recently for several reasons, including the warming weather, which has brought more children outside to play.

Just a week or two ago I saw a young child chase a ball into the street. Fortunately, her older sibling quickly ran after her and brought her safely back to the yard. Just minutes later a vehicle came barreling around the corner and down the same street at what appeared to be well over the 30 mph speed limit. Had these occurrences happened at the same time, tragedy could have struck.

Within days of seeing that, I was out for a walk with my kids. We were crossing the street when my three-year-old son — watching his feet instead of the road in front of him — veered his tricycle toward the middle of the intersection. A vehicle was approaching and had I not acted quickly to stop him or had the attentive driver not stopped their car, my boy could have been hurt, or worse.

I also recently spoke to a local couple who was severely injured in an accident earlier this year. Their experience had nothing to do with distracted driving, but their story left me thinking about the potential impact thousands of pounds of metal traveling at high speed can have on the human body.

It only takes an instant for something terrible and life changing to happen when we’re behind the wheel. The best thing we can do to prevent that is be attentive.

I am admittedly not free of blame. I’ve caught myself backing out of the driveway without first surveying the land behind me. On some occasions I or another vehicle have even had to hit the brakes to avoid a collision. I’m also guilty of occasionally checking a message or looking at the navigation feature on my phone while driving.

These recent experiences and the new law have triggered in me an effort to do better, to be more cautious and to do my best to protect others around me while I drive. I hope for the sake of my children and everyone else that we can all do our part to keep our roads safe. And if we don’t, maybe a ticket issued under the new law will serve as a reminder.

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