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The 2018 FA Cup Final generated over 1 million searches last year in the UK. Thats a huge amount of opportunity for both publishers and betting sites alike to increase traffic and ultimately drive revenue.

From 17th to 19th May, we tracked 17 of the hottest terms surrounding the FA Cup Final using our Rapid Tracking feature, revealing exactly how this sporting event played out online in each SERP feature, every 2-hours.

In doing this, we not only have a full view of the changing search landscape, but highlighted previously unidentified opportunities for improving your online strategy.

The FA Cup Final feature visibility

Firstly, let’s look at the overall make-up of the SERPs for FA Cup Final terms.

SERP Radar

This visualises all the features returning for all 17 terms in our campaign from 17th -19th May.

Other than ‘Classic Links’, we can see that ‘Top stories’, ‘Video carousel’ & ‘Sports results’ features are the most prominent during the FA Cup Final weekend. ‘People also ask’ is being served with these terms. This is an indication of the many searches surrounding the FA Cup Final during this time period.

Using this insight, you can start to build out a content plan for similar sporting events based on the most prominent features. For example, is it worth creating video content as the ‘Video carousel’ is present in the SERPs 36% of the time?

The data presented by the SERP Radar can also help inform reactive content decisions; if you’re not showing in ‘Top Stories’ what content can you produce to infiltrate this feature today?

Get the FA Cup Final Rapid Tracking report

Send me the report

The FA Cup Final SERP landscape

Using our SERP Matrix we can pinpoint the content being served every 2-hours in real-time for any of our tracked search terms.

SERP Matrix

Each column represents the composition of page one in Google, at different times of day.

The ‘Top stories’ and ‘Sports results’ remained at the top of page one for the term ‘FA cup final’ throughout the weekend.

The ‘Twitter cards’ feature began to gain visibility as the match was taking place, whilst Google awarded higher visibility to the ‘Video carousel’ feature on the day following the match.

‘FA Cup Final betting’ returning features

If we put our betting hats on and focus on the term ‘FA Cup Final betting’, we see a very different SERP landscape, with all the action happening a few hours before and after the match.

If we further filter this landscape by URL, we can reveal how well a site is performing for this term:

OddsChecker

Although achieving the highest visibility for this term in ‘Classic links’, OddsChecker may ultimately lose out as their competitors are either bidding on this term and showing in the true top position for ‘Text ads’, or are making it into the ‘Top stories’.

This is a perfect example of the need to optimise for more than just ‘Classic links’; richer SERP features will have more engagement, and most likely generate more clicks, all because they are favoured at the top of the SERPs and they make for more eye-catching content in Google.

The opportunity in the FA Cup Final

We’ve seen how the SERP landscape can change drastically within a few hours and how even similar search terms can offer completely different feature results.

Having this rapid overview allows for content ideation, and quick responses to unfolding events, giving a greater chance of offering the right content to reach those top SERP features.

If you want to see a deeper dive into The FA Cup Final, get in touch and we’ll send you our Rapid Tracking report, with further insights and a breakdown of our Rapid Tracking feature.

Get the FA Cup Final Rapid Tracking report

Send me the report

The post The opportunity in The FA Cup Final appeared first on Pi Datametrics.

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Disruptor banks, a growing threat in search? - SoundCloud
(634 secs long, 19 plays)Play in SoundCloud

Disruptor banks, a growing threat in search?

As disruptor banks have grown in search by 32% from Jan 2016 to Jan 2019, this month we discuss how fintech and disruptor banks are changing our banking habits online.

We explore:

  • The success of challenger banks in search
  • How disruptive these banks really are
  • The decline of traditional banks online
  • What traditional banks can do online to stay abreast of these changes

Listen on Apple podcasts and Spotify.

Want to be a guest on the Elevate Search podcast?

If you’ve got a search intelligence topic you think Elevate Search listeners may be interested in, please get in touch!

The post Podcast | Disruptor banks, a growing threat in search? appeared first on Pi Datametrics.

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AdWords: New CPC Format

You may not know but Google’s Keyword Planner has a new format and interface that was released last year. Last week it discontinued the old Keyword Planner on our account, so we were forced to switch.

With the new interface, it has provided a new Cost-Per-Click metric. Rather than the suggested bid that always appeared to be an average of what most advertisers would pay, it now presents the CPC as a top of the page low bid and a top of the page high bid.

The updated CPC metrics appear to be a little more accurate and reflective of the commercial impact of the search terms.

Impacts within Pi

We will be collecting both the low and high CPC bids and you’ll be able to find them in Position Explorer Table ‘columns’ selection.

Furthermore, our Organic Value Score that drives Market Intelligence will be slightly impacted as CPC is part of the algorithm. We’re taking the middle of the low and high CPCs to help calculate the organic value.

Largely, this will not impact many Mi’s overall outputs, however, they will all showcase a slightly more accurate reflection of the market.  

When is this happening?

All new search terms added to the system from last week are currently collecting the low and high CPCs. Mid next month we will have the entire search term base refreshed with the new data.

Position Explorer and Market Intelligence will have new formats over the next few weeks.

Questions

Of course, if you have any questions about this change don’t hesitate to get in touch with our Support team or your Customer Success Manager.

The post New AdWords CPC Format in Pi appeared first on Pi Datametrics.

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For recruitment agencies, save some archaic ads in even more archaic print newspapers, online job advertising is their main medium for reaching job seekers. Therefore, SEO for recruitment agencies, is a high priority, especially when the online market is teeming with rival job sites.

SEO for recruitment agencies

Using our Market Intelligence tool we took an in depth look at SEO for recruitment agencies across a sample selection of recruitment terms, including job types and job location, to answer the questions:

  • Which UK regions are most sought after for jobs?
  • Which jobs types are the most searched?
  • Who has the largest share of voice for job searches online?
Searches for jobs in the South East reaches 577k in volume

‘Jobs in “location”’ UK search volume 2016 – 2018

In January 2018 search volume for positions in the South East of England peaked at 577k.

Whether its people already living there or those looking to move down south, the South East job market is in high demand with the largest search volume over the last 3 years.

This is followed by the North West and the East Midlands – London is way down in 6th place for search volume. However, this isn’t so strange as these regions may have a number of big cities within their borders that can easily rival London’s professional allure. It may also be the plethora of jobs advertised in the London means searchers have no need to input the location – London based jobs will inevitably appear when searching by job types. 

Search volume across 2018 by region

South East – 5.328m
North West – 4.065m
East Midlands – 3.442m
Wales – 1.945m
Scotland – 1.92m
London – 1.614m
North East – 959k
Northern Ireland – 212k

Start tracking this data today

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‘Sales’ roles the most searched in the UK

‘Job type’ UK search volume 2016 – 2018

It’s unsurprising that each January searches for each job type peaks – the new year encouraging people to finally go after that dream job.

The most searched job roles online are Sales positions, although searches have been steadily declining over the last three years; between January 2016 to January 2018 search volume fell by 2.9k.

With this knowledge, recruitment agencies can target their SEO efforts towards the most popular job searches.

Indeed.com increased share of voice by 21%

Recruitment share of voice Oct 2016 – Mar 2018

Indeed have seen huge growth in share of voice, completely breaking away from its competitor sites, increasing by 21% from March 2017 to March 2019!

Reed ended 2016 neck and neck with Indeed and even saw some impressive increase in 2017, but were unable to sustain that growth and declined in the first months of 2018.

It seems that Indeed currently have an online monopoly – can search data be used to rival their success?

Using SEO for job postings

Having this insight into what jobs the public is searching for online is invaluable SEO insight for recruitment agencies – ensuring they are optimised for the most popular searches and are serving the correct content at the right time of year to perform well online and ultimately win custom.

Start tracking this data today

Start tracking

The post 5 million searches in 2018 for South East jobs – SEO for recruitment agencies appeared first on Pi Datametrics.

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Taking another look at our fashion retailer growth data, we’ve isolated the top five growing brands in each fashion retail category.

This is the final post in our trilogy focusing on fashion retail growth in the UK:

    1. The biggest UK retailer brands between 2015 – 2019
    2. Breakdown of search volume by fashion category in the UK 2015 – 2018
The largest growing fashion brands in each category

Below is a break down of each fashion retail category and their largest growing brands in search.

Fast fashion (CAGR increase)

I Saw It First – 1624.67%
Aces Couture – 561.91%
Boohooman – 472.03%
Shein – 337.98%
Fashion nova – 216.54%

Department store

Flannels – 45.41%
Nordstrom Rack – 25.01%
TK Maxx – 12.99%
Burlington – 12.76%
Fortnum & Mason – 10.49%

Clothing brand/retailer

Thought Clothing – 929.14%
Arket – 810.98%
Hope and Ivy – 486.67%
Avail London – 288.67%
Community Clothing – 274.79%

Sports/ outdoor wear

Alpinetrek – 942.60%
Pink Soda Sport – 142.07%
Gym King – 132.74%
Champion – 98.10%
Fila – 97.27%

Designer

Heron Preston 329.17%
Marine Serre 323.32%
Namacheko 307.16%
Palm Angels 296.19%
Rixo London 275.23%

The retailers turning to search to inform brand partnerships, and the brands assessing their own search performance and competitors online, will be the ones succeeding commercially.

Combining data sets to assess brand value

Combining datasets also enables you to get a broader view of your brand’s value.

In this example, we can see the growth of the brand ‘I Saw It First’ on both Social and Search between 2017 – 2018.

These data sets directly corollate, further revealing the rising strength of this brands value.

Having this data at your fingertips is essential to validating growth, and enables you to prove the equity of your brand.

Book a demo today

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The post 3. The largest growing UK fashion brands: retail category breakdown 2015 – 2018 appeared first on Pi Datametrics.

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Following our blog revealing the biggest UK retailer brands between 2015 – 2019, we’ve broken down this data by category.

Breakdown of search volume by fashion category in the UK 2015 – 2018

The below chart visualises search volume for retailer/brand names split into their fashion retail category.

Overall retail search volume has fallen 2015 to 2018

All categories have seen some fluctuations, but we can see that the combined search volume has fallen by 4mn from 2015-2018. This indicates that searchers are becoming less likely to search for specific brands, instead using general search terms.

Fast fashion (pink) has by far the most search volume throughout the 3 year period examined here. Will the sustainability trend and ‘slow fashion’ soon contribute to the decline of fast fashion in search and elsewhere?

Category percentage change 2015 – 2018

Fast fashion -2%
Department store -15%
Amazon -6%
Clothing brand/retailer -14%
Sports/ outdoor wear 13%
Designer 29%
Footwear -1%
Lingerie -7%
Childrens 17%

Amazon competes with fashion retailers

Amazon (blue) is included here to highlight how large its search volume is in comparison to fashion retailers. Amazon is branching out into many verticals, offering many of the same products as department stores, and can convincingly compete with these retailers.

In fact, Amazon’s overall search volume across the 3 years only lags behind all the combined retailers in the department store category by 29mn.

2018 search volume by fashion category 

If we just focus on 2018, we can see seasonal peaks; for example all categories except fast fashion peak in December. Department stores see the most uplift in December 2018 with an 18% increase from November.

Want to see the data behind these chart? Get in touch.

Designer Fashion Brands

Download the report

The post Fast fashion continues to dominate UK fashion market appeared first on Pi Datametrics.

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Our recent bar chart race obsession has captured our interest; we’ve analysed 972 fashion retailers and created a very compelling search volume bar chart.

Fashion retail search volume growth

Using just the retailer/brand name as the search term, we’ve revealed the fluctuations in these retailers vanity search volume over the last four years.

Fast fashion retailers do particularly well online, making up at least half of the 20 retailers shown in this bar chart race at any time.

Next is only knocked from its top spot twice by John Lewis in Q4 2015 and Q4 2017; presumably this is a result of Christmas shoppers taking advantage of the department stores broad product range.

Retail search volume remains steady

There is minimal fluctuations in all retail categories, with search volume remaining fairly steady. Fast fashion (blue) has by far the most search volume throughout the 4 year period examined here. 

Amazon (pink) is included here to highlight how large its search volume is in comparison to fashion retailers. Amazon is branching out into many verticals, offering many of the same products as department stores, and can convincingly compete with these retailers.

Break down of growth by category

Below are the largest growing retailers in search volume within each retail category.

Fast fashion (CAGR increase)
I Saw It First – 1624.67%
Aces Couture – 561.91%
Boohooman – 472.03%
Shein – 337.98%
Fashion nova – 216.54%

Department store
Flannels – 45.41%
Nordstrom Rack – 25.01%
TK Maxx – 12.99%
Burlington – 12.76%
Fortnum & Mason – 10.49%

Clothing brand/retailer
Thought Clothing – 929.14%
Arket – 810.98%
Hope and Ivy – 486.67%
Avail London – 288.67%
Community Clothing – 274.79%

Sports/ outdoor wear
Alpinetrek – 942.60%
Pink Soda Sport – 142.07%
Gym King – 132.74%
Champion – 98.10%
Fila – 97.27%

Designer
Heron Preston 329.17%
Marine Serre 323.32%
Namacheko 307.16%
Palm Angels 296.19%
Rixo London 275.23%

The search growth of these fashion retailers reveals how well they are doing; when a retailer is doing well online, they are likely prospering as an overall business.  

Designer Fashion Brands

Download the report

The post Online growth in fashion retail appeared first on Pi Datametrics.

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On the 20th February Samsung unveiled their Galaxy S10 phone, along with an exciting foldable tablet – the Galaxy Fold. Pre-orders for the S10 also kicked off on this day.

This saw a huge uplift in searches for the S10 as consumers clambered to secure their pre-order. Search volume grew to a whopping 1.24mn.

Focusing on the 20th February, we took a look at how this unveiling and pre-ordering played out using our two-hourly Rapid Tracking feature.

The long wait to pre-order

The below chart tracks the term ‘galaxy s10’ and shows the composition of page one features.

Each column represents the composition of the page one landscape in search every two hours, and each row represents the feature present for that position (i.e. Top Stories, Classic Links etc.).

Key

SERP Matrix

Text Ads show first place every two hours, except at 10am where Top Stories overtakes. Samsung were the only site bidding on ‘galaxy s10’ until 8pm when the s10 was FINALLY  revealed, then we can see other sites bidding; Sky and Carphone Warehouse begin offering pre-ordering.

The SERPs get a bit more interesting around this time with Twitter cards appearing as people begin to discuss the phone on social media.

Video cards perform highly throughout the 20th, with speculative reviews from YouTubers and Top Stories appear throughout the day – Samsung can use this insight to identify who is covering their release and what their audience is being served at any time of the day.

Where did Samsung appear?

We can see where Samsung appears within the whole of page 1 by searching for Samsung’s URL.

They are consistently appearing for Text Ads, but only show twice elsewhere on the 20th with Classic Links at 8pm and 10pm.

Whilst dominating in Text Ads is great for maintaining consistent visibility, there is further opportunity to gain more traffic and save on cost by building your search presence organically in time for a release.

Seeing the landscape of the whole day

SERP Radar

Taking a look at Samsung’s performance across all the highest volume, most relevant product release search terms, we can see what percentage of each SERP feature appeared throughout the whole day, and what percentage and where, Samsung was present within that.

Again, we can see that they completely dominating the Text Ads, showing 48% of the time, and they had some visibility in Classic Links – 15.7%. The diversity of the SERPs reveals a huge opportunity to appear elsewhere on top of these.

For example, Video Carousel is performing very well for these terms – Samsung could gain more exposure by optimising its own video content with the aim of appearing here.

It seems that Samsung were in the right place at the right time throughout the day of their reveal, maintaining their top spot in the SERPs. This undoubtedly led to increased traffic and most likely contributed to the number of pre-orders they received directly from their site.

Having this insight in invaluable, not only to track how the campaign is unfolding in real-time but also to use in hindsight; who was covering you? Could you partner with these publications/influencers in the future? What content is ranking highly for your terms and can you create your own content to ensure you are featuring more on page one?

Electrical | Leaderboard

View now

The post Rapid tracking the Samsung S10 launch online appeared first on Pi Datametrics.

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As a recruiter, you’re probably used to dealing with people who are frustrated with the job hunt. They’re looking to you to introduce them to a new opportunity or simply save them from the ‘perfect job’ turned hellscape they inhabit everyday, in the most painless way possible.

But what jobs are people searching for most online? Which sites are already dominating this space?  We took a look…

Indeed have increased 393% in organic visibility

Using our Market Intelligence tool we looked at share of voice over time for job searches.

Indeed have seen huge growth, completely breaking away from its competitor sites, increasing by 393% from March 2017 to March 2019!

Reed ended 2016 neck and neck with Indeed and even saw some impressive increase in 2017, but were unable to sustain that growth and declined in the first months of 2018.

It seems that Indeed currently have an online monopoly – can search data be used to rival their success?

Sales and Care roles are the most searched

The below chart reveals search volume for Job Type categories.

It’s unsurprising that each January searches for each job type peaks – the new year encouraging people to finally go after that dream job.

There are also smaller peaks each September, presumably because the beginning of the new school year mimics the same renewal feeling ignited in us each January.

The most searched job types online are Sales and Care roles, although searches for Sales roles has been steadily declining over the last three years.

The South East has the highest job demand

Where are people looking to work in the UK regionally?

Whether its people already living there or those looking to move down south, the South East job market is in high demand with the largest search volume.

This is followed by the North West and the East Midlands – London is way down in 6th place for search volume. However, this isn’t that strange as these regions may have a number of big cities within their borders that can easily rival London’s professional allure.

Having this insight into what jobs the public is searching for online is invaluable for recruitment sites – ensuring they are optimised for the most popular searches and are serving the correct content at the right time of year to perform well online and ultimately win custom.

Book a demo today

Demo

The post Recruitment online: Indeed dominate the market appeared first on Pi Datametrics.

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