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On Wednesday 17th April 2019, Loki and Pippin were outside in their garden in Kineton, Warwick with another family Dachshund and members of the family when Weimaraner, Loki heard something and managed to sneak through the family’s hedge into next door’s garden followed by the other two dogs. In the time it took the family to get to the neighbours, literally two minutes later, they had completely disappeared.

It’s very hard to understand how they managed to get out of the neighbours garden without being seen as there were a number of builders there at the time and if they did somehow manage to get through a 5-bar gate, it’s on a very busy road. If they wandered out onto Southam Road, then someone must have seen them but no one has come forward.

As soon at the family realised they were missing, they immediately started their search. Loki especially wouldn’t have wandered, would have immediately returned when called and absolutely wouldn’t have gone off with someone else.

Therewere no reported road accidents involving a dog in the following hours and days and a massive poster and social media appeal led to not one sighting, not one person came forward to say they’d seen anything.

The only ray of light is that the other Dachshund did return about 20 minutes after they disappeared but was clearly scared and very nervous.

“We just don’t understand how they’ve just disappeared and haven’t been seen; unless they were picked up and stolen. Our other Dachshund was clearly agitated when they returned and was very scared, which confirms our suspicions that someone is responsible for Loki and Pippin’s disappearance” the family say.

This is also the opinion of Warwickshire Police, who also believe that Loki and Pippin are a victim of dog theft; a horrendous crime that is quickly on the increase in the UK. They have issued the family with a crime reference number and the family have alerted their microchip company to let them know that both dogs are now classed as stolen.

“The person who is responsible for the theft may have kept them but it’s also likely that they have split them up as they are an unusual pairing and they may have now been sold on separately to an unsuspecting family.” Iszy says.

“If you are that family, I just want to let you know that I understand your reluctance to get in touch as you may already love them or you may be concerned over any repercussions but my sole purpose is to bring my babies home. My life isn’t the same without them. My life is on hold until they come home. I miss them every second of every day”.

Both dogs are microchipped so they would be easily identified with a normal, routine microchip scan.

Iszy also wants to point out that Loki does have a hernia that does need to be regularly checked at a veterinary practice.

If anyone has any information relating to Loki and Pippin’s disappearance or knows where they are, please do contact DogLost on 0844 800 3220, quoting dog IDs 142702 and 142703 or
call Warwickshire Police.

For more information:

https://doglost.co.uk/dog-blog.php?dogId=142702

https://doglost.co.uk/dog-blog.php?dogId=142703

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Many people dream of owning their own horse, and taking it out into nature for a long ride whenever they please. Alas, for many, that remains a pipe dream, but that doesn’t mean that you have to abandon your horse-related dreams altogether. Absolutely not! While you may never have that country house with your own stables, it’s more than possible that you can learn how to ride a horse at an existing stables. In the process, you’ll learn how to ride horses, look after them, and make the overall culture part of your life.

Below, we take a look at a few recommended tips that’ll help you to get the most out of your new venture! And you never know, while learning you might just save up enough money to buy your own….

Find the Right Learning School

Depending on where you live, you may have a few options when it comes to which learning school you’ll attend for learning how to ride horses. While the general principles will be similar for all of them, it’s important that you’re taking your time to find the one that’s right for you. Pay a visit to all that you’re considering, and take a look around. What is the general atmosphere? What are the horses like? If possible, watch a lesson. It’ll give you an insight into what you can expect if you choose that school.

Look the Part

You’ll feel more like a rider, and also find it easier to do, if you have all the correct clothing. You won’t need to buy your own horsing equipment just yet (though you can), but the clothes are an important consideration. For comfortable and stylish horse riding clothing, take a look at Ariat clothing and footwear. What you’re wearing really does make a difference to your performance levels, plus, who doesn’t want to look great while they’re on horseback?

Embrace All Parts

While you may have gone into your learning experience just wanting to ride horses, you’ll quickly discover that there’s much more to horses than simply galloping around. Part of the process is cleaning out the stables, feeding, and all-around making sure that the horses are well looked after. If you want to immerse yourself in the lifestyle attached to being a horse rider, then don’t bow out for this part. Dig in, and get your hands dirty — it’s physical work, but also rewarding.

Ride with Confidence

As with anything, it’s important that you’re learning with confidence! Some people are apprehensive when they got on a horse, but all you’ll be doing is making the process more complicated. Horses are one of only two animals that can smell fear. If you’re afraid, then you’ll be making them nervous! Relax, try to enjoy it, and everything will be much smoother.

Give Yourself Time

Finally, give yourself time. Few people get on a horse and find that they’re a natural. As with everything else, it takes some time to be brought up to speed. It’ll come eventually!

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Nineteen heroic Police Dogs who supported emergency services during the London terror attacks at Westminster Bridge, London Bridge and Borough Market were honoured today for their service by leading vet charity, PDSA.

Seven of the dogs were selected to represent the Metropolitan Police (Met) and British Transport Police (BTP) animals who served during the 2017 attacks. Today they received the PDSA Order of Merit*– the animal equivalent of the OBE. 

PD Kai will be awarded the PDSA Order of Merit

The dogs and handlers gathered at the Honorable Artillery Company, London today as Met Police Dogs Kai, Delta and Dave joined BTP Dogs Bruno, Marci, Jax and Bobby** to formally receive their Medals. 

Commenting on the awards, PDSA Director General Jan McLoughlin, said: “It is with great pride that we honoured these incredible Police Dogs with PDSA Medals today.

“Their awards follow two truly horrific events which tragically claimed thirteen innocent lives and where many more individuals were injured.  Amid the chaos, it fell to the dogs from the Metropolitan and British Transport Police to clear the locations of further danger.

“Their actions kept the public safe and allowed the emergency services to carry out their vital work.  These are truly deserving recipients of the PDSA Order of Merit. It is an honour to recognise their devotion to duty and service to society.”

Westminster Bridge – Wednesday 22 March 2017

In March 2017, Central London was hit by a terrorist attack that, in just 82 seconds, left five people dead, including a police officer, and 29 injured.

In the moments following the attack, the BTP Explosive Search Dog Section and the Met Police Explosive Detection Dog Team were rushed to the scene to assess the situation and ensure public safety.

BTP Dogs Ollie, Oscar, Bruno and Scooby searched through the chaos for potential devices that could cause further harm on the bridge itself and around Parliament Square.

They were joined at the scene by Met Police Dogs Kai and Bruce and their handlers.  They searched the car that had crashed into the wall of the Palace of Westminster, as a precautionary measure in case it contained a bomb. Once safe, Helicopter Emergency Medical Services landed in Parliament Square to help injured victims.

Police protocol states that if an object or area has been declared suspicious, all emergency services must withdraw until the scene is confirmed safe. The dogs and handlers put themselves directly in harm’s way to secure the scene, ensure the safety of the public and allow life-saving treatment of the casualties.

London Bridge and Borough Market – Saturday 3 June 2017

In June 2017, a white van containing three attackers drove into ten pedestrians on London Bridge, seriously injuring eight and killing two. The van collided with the railings alongside Barrow Boy and Banker Public House. The attackers alighted from the van armed with knives and appeared to be wearing suicide vests. They ran through Borough Market, continuing their assaults on innocent members of the public. In total, eight people were killed and 48 people were injured during the attack.

PD Dave will be awarded the PDSA Order of Merit

BTP General Purpose Dog Teams were called to the scene alongside Firearms Officers to clear the streets, buildings and public areas. Police Dogs Jax, Marci, Johnny, Rocy, Tara and Bobby searched amid a volatile situation for over 13 hours. They worked tirelessly, never faltering in their duty.

Met Police Dogs Alfie, Dave, Poppy and Robson were also deployed to undertake a systematic search of the area.  Together with Police Dog Kai (who had only qualified in November 2016 and was relatively inexperienced) they searched a dozen buildings. 

Police Dog Delta worked with her handler and a team of Firearms Officers to search over 30 buildings. Her skills, calibre and professionalism saved vital time.

At Borough Market, the Met Dog Teams joined Armed Officers to search for a suspect who was still unaccounted for, despite the unknown risk level to themselves and their dogs. 

Meanwhile, Police Dogs Casper and Romeo were tasked with searching the suspects’ suicide vests for explosives.

Police Dog Casper and his handler were later dispatched to clear a suspect vehicle under a nearby railway bridge that, it was believed, could be harbouring an explosive device.  Despite the horrendous surrounding conditions, Casper was able to indicate the vehicle was safe, allowing a visual check inside the vehicle to take place. 

Throughout the incident the teams worked with the knowledge that potential further danger remained all around them, but put the safety of the public ahead of their own as they tirelessly continued their work.

Award reaction

British Transport Police Inspector Paul Miles said: “I am immensely proud of our dogs and their handlers, and absolutely thrilled to see their bravery and resilience recognised through this very special award.

“It is impossible to overstate the courage and dedication show by our dog teams, and all of their colleagues who responded to the tragic events of 2017. They worked through physically and emotionally challenging conditions without second thought, willingly walking into danger and putting the public’s safety before their own. While today is a day of celebration, the horror of these incidents will never leave us and our thoughts will always remain with those who lost their lives and were injured.”

Chief Inspector Graham Horwood from the Met’s Taskforce said: “It is a huge honour for our heroic police dogs to be awarded with such a prestigious medal.

“Our Police Dogs and their handlers work day and night, in some of the most challenging environments, to help keep London safe and we are immensely proud that their exceptional work has been recognised.

“Our thoughts and condolences remain with those affected by the awful events that took place in 2017.”

The Met and BTP Dogs will take the total number of PDSA Order of Merit recipients to 28, including 18 dogs and 10 horses. For more information on the recipients visit www.pdsa.org.uk/policedogs.

The PDSA Order of Merit, which was instituted in 2014, recognises animals who display outstanding devotion to their owner or wider society, above and beyond normal companionship – and represents an exceptional example of the special relationship that exists between animals and humans. For more information about the previous recipients, visit www.pdsa.org.uk/pdsaorderofmerit.  

PDSA’s Animal Awards Programme was instituted in 1943 by the charity’s founder, Maria Dickin. She believed that, if animals were recognised for their heroic actions, it would help to raise their status in society, ensuring they are better treated. The charity continues this legacy today with the world’s leading Animal Awards Programme.

PDSA is the UK’s leading veterinary charity providing free and reduced cost veterinary care to the pets of people in financial need. The charity strives to improve the wellbeing of all pets’ lives through providing preventive care, educating pet owners and treating pets when they become sick or injured. Today, PDSA treats around 470,000 of the UK’s most vulnerable pets a year through our nationwide network of 48 Pet Hospitals. For more information about the charity visit www.pdsa.org.uk.

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BREED:  Staffie/American Bulldog

SEX: Male

MICROCHIPPED: Yes

Following recent published statistics that show that 52% of stolen dogs are taken from the safety of their own back gardens, this weeks’ appeal focuses on 12-week-old Rocky who was taken from his own back garden in Little Hulton, Manchester whilst his owner what clearing up “a little puppy accident” in the kitchen.

Anyone who has had a puppy understands that toilet accidents happen a lot whilst puppy training and we’ve probably all, at some point, popped them outside while we clear up.

Sadly, on Saturday 30th March little Rocky’s owner Terri did just that; turned her back for a couple of minutes and Rocky was gone.

“I just couldn’t believe it! I kept thinking he was hiding somewhere but then I notice that the outside gate lock had been broken and I knew then that he’d been stolen. You honestly think it will never happen to you. I can’t begin to tell you how absolutely devastated I am”

“The garden is secure, it has very tall fences so it never crossed my mind that he was in any danger, I mean it’s our back garden, it should be safe for him to be in.”

Rocky was registered on the DogLost website and the family have printed posters and shared these in their local community. They have also pushed to raise awareness of his theft using social media but sadly, just over a month later, there is no news on where he is and who took him.

Rocky is a sweet natured, typical puppy with lots of energy but was already so much more to his owners. He was already providing support and therapy to Terri’s auntie which is why he was there that day.

“Dogs are more than a possession, they are part of the family and I can’t begin to explain to you what the last few weeks have been like for us. You never rest, it’s constantly on your mind and I am always worrying about how he’s been cared for.”

DogLost is appealing for people to take a look at Rocky’s photo and consider anyone who has suddenly got a dog in the last four weeks that looks like him. We know that dogs can be moved out of the area very quickly so no area should be discounted.

Rocky was wearing a blue collar on the day he was taken but there was no tag.

A simple microchip scan would quickly identify Rocky so if you have rehomed a young puppy similar in looks, in good faith, please do take it to your vet and ask them to scan for a potential microchip.

If anyone has any information relating to Rocky’s case or knows where he is, please do contact DogLost on 0844 800 3220, quoting dog ID 142112.

For more information: https://doglost.co.uk/dog-blog.php?dogId=142112

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Brits have been urged to take caution as the warm weather approaches and ticks emerge to feed on the blood of passing humans and animals.

Gardening experts at BillyOh.com have compiled a list of top tips to help the public stay safe during peak tick season.

Ticks are most common in the UK’s woodland areas and are often found clinging to tall grass and shrubs – but numbers have increased dramatically in the past ten years.

A blood-sucking member of the spider family, there are over 22 species in the UK, each becoming particularly active from the start of spring to mid-autumn.

The majority feed on wild animals such as bats, woodland birds and badgers, but they are known to cling onto family pets or bite at the ankles of passers-by, too.

Ticks can transmit bacteria when feeding which can cause Lyme disease, which can become serious if not treated.

Named as a danger to public health, experts are urging people to remain vigilant of the critter and ensure that they are properly prepared to deal with the risk.

Tips include swapping out sandals for wellies, opting for light coloured clothing and not straying from footpaths unless necessary.

A spokesperson from BillyOh.com said: “As the weather conditions improve, many Brits will be out enjoying the sun in grassy areas, where ticks are usually found.

“It’s vital to be educated on the risks of these tiny critters, as if you’re bitten and it’s not treated correctly, this can potentially result in serious consequences.

“Following a few simple tips can lower the risk of being bitten by a tick dramatically and prevent further health issues.”

Here are BillyOh.com’s top tips for ticks:

1. Stick to paths

Try not to stray from paths and avoid overhanging vegetation unless necessary. Ticks do not jump or fly so sticking to clear areas without tall grass or shrubs will decrease the chances of being bitten. If in an area where there is no footpath, try and avoid tall grass or shady areas that are surrounded by shrubs.

2. Light Clothing

When in areas of woodland remained covered, wear long sleeve tops and full-length trousers. Protect areas such as the back of the knees, armpits and the groin area. Opt for light coloured clothing in order to easily identify any ticks present that may become attached.

3. Footwear

Wellies are not only reserved for rainy days and are perfect when in high risk areas, as you can tuck trousers into the wellie boots. Tucking trousers into socks is also a great defence mechanism if wellies are not an option.

4. Regular checks

Ticks are very small and hard to identify when not paying attention. Check regularly whilst outside and also when home in order to remove any feeding ticks. The longer a tick is left attached the harder it is to remove.

5. Right tools

Avoid any home remedies to try and remove ticks such as covering the affected area of the body in Vaseline or nail varnish or even burning them off. Instead, use a tick removal tool. This will help avoid aggravating the tick and lower the risk of secondary infection. When removed, use an antiseptic wipe and be aware of any symptoms of Lyme disease.

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To say that exercise is important, is a no-brainer. You might focus on some form of fitness during the week yourself, not only for enjoyment, but because you understand the benefits exercise affords you.

You will reduce the chances of obesity, strengthen your bones and muscle joints, and alleviate the risk of a heart attack by reducing both your blood pressure and your cholesterol level. And hey, you might have taken a dog into your home to give you the incentive to exercise more, and that’s great

Understanding the importance of exercise for yourself then, you should also transfer your knowledge to your dog. When you focus on their physical fitness on a daily basis, you reduce the chances of them becoming obese, and consequently, lower the risk of arthritic and heart problems occurring in their lives. On a slightly more selfish level, you will also reduce your vet bills should a health problem present itself

Of course, we are sure you already exercise your dog to some capacity. You might take them for a walk around the block every evening, or you might take them to the park. However, to improve your dog’s physical fitness, you should go the extra mile with them, perhaps literally!

Here are some practical ways to improve your dog’s level of physical fitness.

#1: Go the extra mile

As we have just suggested, this is one of the best ways to improve your dog’s fitness. You do need to be mindful of the breed of dog you are walking, of course. Certain dogs don’t require as much exercise as others, including these examples. However, there are certain dogs that do, and these are usually larger animals, such as Border Collies, Dalmatians, and Shetland Sheepdogs. You should research your breed online and speak to your vet to find out more. Still, once you know the limits of your dog, you should then walk them accordingly. Walk for their benefit as well as your own, giving them the luxury of a longer walk if appropriate, even if it takes up a little more time of your day. Your dog will appreciate it, and their physical health will benefit as a consequence.

#2: Walk faster

Sure, there are times when a leisurely stroll is more appropriate. Your dog does need time to stop and smell the roses (perhaps literally), and both you and your canine companion might not always have the energy for anything more. However, you don’t always have to walk at a slow pace, as the faster your walk, the more effort your dog will put in, and consequently, their level of fitness will improve. You might even consider jogging too if both you and your dog can manage the extra speed. Of course, if you or your dog starts to have difficulty breathing after an exerted bout of exercise, do stop and take a breather, and if necessary, slow down your pace on the rest of your walk together.

#3: Let your dog off his leash

You should only do this when it’s safe to do so, of course, so no letting your dog off his leash in a public area or in places of danger, such as near a main road. Rather, take your dog to a piece of land where he is free to roam around and exercise his legs and muscles further, such as at a field or on the beach. This will give them the opportunity to run around without restrictions, and it will give you a chance to go for a run unrestricted too, assuming you are fit and able to do so.  This will also give you time and space to focus on the next point.

#4: Spend time playing with your dog

This is a great way to both increase your dog’s level of fitness and to boost their enjoyment level while doing so. And the same applies to you, of course. When you’re out and about, and your dog is off his leash, there are loads of games you could play with them. Fetch is an obvious example, be it with a frisbee, stick, or ball, but you might also play hide and seek, go on a treat hunt, or play tug-of-war with an old piece of rope. There are some other game ideas here. To ensure your dog puts in a little more effort, you might also play in hilly areas, as the changes in the environment will flex his joints and muscles to a greater degree. You can also play some of these games outside in your garden or yard if you have one, so as well as walking your dog 2-3 times a day, spend a little extra time with them at home in play activities.

#5: Give your dog more freedom at home

When we say freedom, we aren’t telling you to let them jump on your sofa, sleep in your bed, or help themselves to the food in your refrigerator. Rather, we are asking you to give them more freedom to move around at home. So, you might let them have a little more access to the house than normal, as this will give them scope to stroll around at home, even when you’re not around. You might also consider a dog flap, ensuring you get the right size for big dogs if you have a larger canine companion, as this will give them the opportunity to venture out into your yard or garden for a longer and more extensive stroll around; again, useful for when you’re at work or away during the day.

#6: Enable opportunities for agility training

There might be an agility course near you, so do your research online to discover more. However, you can also set up an agility training course in your yard or garden, using the objects you have at your disposal to create obstacles and pathways for your dog to weave in and out of, perhaps with healthy treats along the way to keep them moving in the right direction. Not only are agility courses great for developing muscle coordination in your dog, but they are a lot of fun too, and an excellent way to mix up your dog’s exercise routine.

And Finally…

In both the short and the long-term, you will boost your dog’s health and their happiness levels if you take steps to improve their physical fitness. And as we have said within the article, the same applies to you, so for the benefit of both you and your four-legged friend, find ways to exercise more today and in the days and weeks to come. You would be barking mad not to!

Thanks for reading!

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Truffles, a 6-year old black sow, who loves nothing better than having a good stroke, has become the mascot for Rochdale-based pig rescue charity, Pig Inn Heaven (www.piginnheaven.co.uk)  

Arty Lobster (https://artylobster.com),  3D pet sculpture specialists, chose friendly and lovable Truffles as the perfect candidate for a complementary ‘micro’ version of herself to help raise awareness of pigs in rescue. Although Truffles has now found her forever home, her sculpture will serve as the charity’s ‘mascot’.

Janet Deveraux, Secretary of Pig Inn Heaven, said: “We love the 3d printed sculpture of Truffles; this little pig is the best sort of micro pig!”

The charity is constantly raising awareness of the issue of ‘micro’ pigs which look cute and small as piglets but are anything but ‘micro’ when they grow up. The issue is leading to fully grown micro pigs being abandoned by owners who can’t cope with their pets.

Janet said: “Truffles came from a home where the landlord said she could no longer stay. Unlike many pigs in our charge, she was looked after very well by her previous owner. She has now found her forever home, but we have 60 plus other pigs waiting for new homes, as well as turtles and terrapins.

“We have rescued pigs from flats, terraced houses, outside space which is too small, and roaming the streets in towns where they have been dumped. Anyone thinking of getting a pig please visit our sanctuary first as part of your research, you need to be able to look after a pig for a long time, the life span of a pig is between 10 to 20 years.

“It is very important to do your research in advance, if you are told from a breeder that a pig only grows as big as a Labrador please take into account that a pig also grows wider, longer and stronger than a Labrador and in a lot of cases bigger in height.

Lars B Andersen, Founder and MD of Arty Lobster, said: “We chose Truffles because of her lovable, but slightly cheeky, looks. She’s a wonderful character and we wanted to put that across in her 3D sculpture. Her sculpture has already become a talking point at the charity, and if it can help in even a small way to raise awareness, that will be worthwhile.”

To give a Pigs Inn Heaven pig a home, the charity charges a fee of £400 per pig – this covers the initial veterinary health check and the first month of care.

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Peanut, Butter and Jelly are now being cared for while RSPCA investigates

The RSPCA is investigating after three puppies were found dumped in a box in County Durham just days before Easter.

A man found the puppies in a red and white box in an alley off Grainger Street, Darlington, on Thursday night (18 April).

RSPCA Inspector Clare Wilson went out to collect the puppies. She said: “The man was walking past when he heard a squeaking noise coming from the box and went to investigate. Thank goodness he did because inside he found the tiny terrier puppies.

“He said he’d walked past this location not long before and the box hadn’t been there so we believe they’d just been abandoned.

“The puppies were inside the box which was filthy with faeces and urine.”

Inspector Wilson took the pups to a local vets for a check-up where they’re now being cared for. They’re believed to be between four and five-weeks-old. The two black and white puppies are female and the brown and white puppy is a male.

“They are very dirty and smelly and are riddled with worms so they’ll need a good bath and flea and worm treatment at the vets,” Inspector Wilson added. “The two girls also have suspected hernias.”

The puppies – now named Peanut, Butter and Jelly – are being fostered by one of the vet nurses over the Bank Holiday Weekend. Once they’re old enough and well enough they will be rehomed.

Inspector Wilson added: “I’d like to appeal to anyone who may have CCTV in this area or any witnesses who saw anyone acting suspiciously around this location to get in touch. I’d also like to hear from anyone who recognises the puppies or may have information on where they’ve come from.

“These pups are too young to leave their mother and I dread to think what would have happened if they hadn’t been found so quickly.

“I’d also be concerned about their mother’s welfare so I’d like to follow up any enquiries as quickly as possible.”

Anyone with information should contact the RSPCA’s appeal line on 0300 123 8018.

To help the RSPCA continue rescuing animals in need like Peanut, Butter and Jelly please donate by visiting www.rspca.org.uk/give.

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Nobody wants to think about their death but with almost half of UK adults* owning a pet, it’s essential that we consider who will take care of them and how they will be provided for after we die.

April is National Pet Month and Gordon Brown Law Firm LLP (GBLF) is raising awareness of what happens to pets when their owners die. Recently, it has been revealed that millionaire fashion icons Karl Lagerfield and Alexander McQueen both left substantial amounts of money behind for their companions, whereas it has also been reported that Oprah Winfrey has plans to leave round $30m to her dogs. But what about does this mean for the everyday pet owner?

Here, Hannah Moffett, who is part of the Wills, Trusts and Probate team at GBLF, has some advice for worried pet owners about what would happen to their beloved pet if they were to die before they do.

What happens to my pet should I die?

UK law regards a deceased person’s pets as Personal Chattels which are defined by the Administration of Estate Acts 1925. If specific provisions for what should happen to a person’s pets are not made within their Will, their pets shall legally form part of their estate as a Personal Chattel and will pass to their residuary beneficiary.

Pets are considered property under the law, so like all personal assets, proactive steps should be taken to help settle your affairs after you die. Pet owners can also make sure that the person accepting responsibility of the pet will receive a pecuniary legacy (cash gift) from their Will.

Owners can also stipulate that should their pet have predeceased them, the pecuniary legacy will no longer be applicable as the pet has died. It is always advisable to ask the person who the pet would be left to if they would be willing to look after the pet upon the owner’s death.

What if they are unable or don’t want to look after my pet after my death?

Should they refuse after the owner’s death, once again, the pet would form part of its owner’s estate and pass to the residuary beneficiary. It may be that the owner is leaving their estate to a certain person but do not wish to leave their pet to them and they have no other person who they trust.

Is it essential to include my pet within my estate?

For people who would prefer their pet not to form part of their estate, it is a good idea for them to stipulate in their Will who will take over ownership. Pet owners should provide the name of a designated person to the pet’s caregiver so that person will be able to continue medical care for the pet after the owner’s death.

In this instance, owners could consider including in their Will that they wish to leave their pet to a particular Pet Charity for rehoming. They could also include a pecuniary legacy to pass to the charity should they so wish. It would be advisable that the owner contacts their considered Pet Charity to ensure they do offer a rehoming programme.

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BREED:                   Weimaraner

SEX:                        Male

MICROCHIPPED:   Yes

FINDER’S FEE:      Yes

2-year-old Weimaraner, Obie lives with his mum Lyndi, dad Darren, his three best friends
Oscar, Evie and Archie who are 11, 10 and 7 and the family’s other dog Stewie in Bosham in West Sussex.

The family, who are currently building a new home live in a static caravan on the grounds of the new build so while Darren is working on the new house, Obie normally had free reign to wander the grounds as he never really leaves his mum or dad’s side.

On 11th December 2018, Lyndi an Aeronautical Operations Controller for the HM Coastguard Search and Rescue Helicopters had just finished a nightshift so was sleeping in the caravan with their other dog Stewie.

Darren let Obie out to have a run around with him whilst he was working on the house; something that they had done numerous times before however at about 10:30am Darren went back to the caravan, as he couldn’t find Obie and presumed that he had gone back to bed. Sadly, this wasn’t the case. Obie never wandered and never went far without Stewie so the couple knew that there was something wrong immediately.

The driveway to the house leads to a country lane, Newells Lane, and it is believed that for some reason, Obie must have made his way to the top of the drive when Darren wasn’t looking and it is believed that this is where he was picked up. Obie is an extremely friendly and trusting dog and the family confirm that he would have unfortunately jumped in anyone’s car.

The family searched for weeks, taking Stewie out with them but there have been no sightings of their handsome boy and they are truly bereft without him.

The couple’s children have been especially affected by Obie’s disappearance as they’ve grown up with Obie and they are desperately missing him. They don’t understand why an adult would steal their very best friend – in fact their youngest was convinced that Santa was going to bring him back.

Initially, it was very difficult for Lyndi to get the local police to register Obie as stolen. They stated that there was no proof he had been taken as there was no CCTV footage.

However, there had been no reported accidents involving a dog, the Highways Agency and Network Rail also confirmed that there had been no fatalities and given the search took place very soon after Obie was last seen they eventually agreed that it was a highly likely Obie had become another horrendous statistic of dog theft.

Lyndi said: “Our lives have changed since the 11th December, every day we desperately hope to hear news; it’s on our minds constantly. It’s a horrendous feeling; worrying about him, Where is he? Who is he with? Is he being looked after properly? Is he missing us? Does he think we’ve abandoned him? It’s like living in a permanent nightmare.

“I spend every spare second I can trawling adverts, dog lost sites, dog found sites, rescue centres etc and those images haunt me too.

“I would like to plead with anybody, if they think they know anything at all to please, please get in touch; there is a substantial finder’s fee for his safe return or information leading to his safe return”

Obie has a very distinct black mark on the pupil of his right eye; he is microchipped and was wearing a collar on the day he went missing.

If anyone has any information relating to Obie’s case or knows where he is, please do contact DogLost on 0844 800 3220, quoting dog ID 138042

http://www.doglost.co.uk/dog-blog.php?dogId=138042

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