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Stephen Eisenmann saw his metastatic diagnosis as a problem to be solved… and PCF-funded doctors and researchers helped him do it.

Stephen Eisenmann met his wife Elizabeth in 1990 when they were both working together. There was an instant spark, but they didn’t think much of it at the time since they were both married to other people. Much later, after they had both divorced, Elizabeth moved to Switzerland. “He found me when I moved back to the United States,” says Elizabeth. “This friend of mine calls and says, OK, Steve Eisenmann is going to call you and ask you out on a date; he is so bad at this that you are not going to know that he is asking you out on a date… and you’re so bad at it that you are not going to realize what’s happening. So I’m telling you.”

If you’re the kind of guy who waits 12 years for a woman, I think it’s safe to say you’re the kind of guy who doesn’t give up easily.

So, when Stephen was diagnosed with metastatic prostate cancer in 2016, there was no way he was going down without a fight; “I determined this was a problem to be solved. And at that point, I kind of sat back and I said, ‘Hmm. What’s the first step?’” Stephen used every resource at his disposal, called on friends, and made connections. Eventually, he ended up speaking with PCF CEO Jonathan Simons who recommended he meet with PCF-funded researcher and medical oncologist Dr. Dana Rathkopf at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center.

Dr. Rathkopf put Stephen on the standard of care at the time – continuous hormone therapy combined with chemotherapy for 6 treatment cycles. Stephen responded to the treatment, and his PSA went down to undetectable. Nevertheless, after about a year, Dr. Rathkopf decided to perform repeat imaging to confirm the response. Despite an undetectable PSA blood test, the imaging showed enlarging lymph nodes. The prostate cancer was back, even though Stephen wasn’t making any PSA. “I said, ‘No big deal,’” recalls Stephen. “‘We’ll just go to the next drug.’”

Unfortunately, it wasn’t that simple. Dr. Rathkopf explained that most current treatments and clinical trials assume that the patient’s cancer cells are making some PSA. Approximately 5% of prostate cancer patients don’t make any PSA, and Stephen was one of them. “There are few trials for men in your situation who don’t make any PSA.”

“When you meet the love of your life so late in life – the whole thing is just like this gut punch,” says Elizabeth, “it was just devastating.” But Dr. Rathkopf, never one to give up either, clarified that while there were few treatment protocols for his cancer, there might be a precision drug. She biopsied his cancer to figure out if there were any genomic markers they could use. Meanwhile, just days before Stephen’s test results came back, a PCF-funded study out of the University of Michigan found that about 6.9% of prostate cancer patients had a mutation in a gene named CDK12, and that some of those patients had responded to pembrolizumab, an immunotherapy drug that was approved for the treatment of other cancers, but not prostate cancer. Then the best of the worst of news came in: Stephen had a CDK12 gene mutation marker. Dr. Rathkopf wanted to give the pembrolizumab immunotherapy a try, but she also wanted Stephen to get a second opinion to ensure that “no stone was left unturned”. She sent him down to Johns Hopkins to see another PCF-funded investigator and medical oncologist, Dr. Emmanuel Antonarakis. Stephen’s wife was unrelenting in her questioning of Dr. Antonarakis. Elizabeth asked if all Stephen’s cancer cells made CDK12. Dr. Antonarakis said they did. Elizabeth asked if pembroluzimab killed all cells that made CDK12. Dr. Antonarakis said that it did.

“So, are you telling me he could be cured?” Elizabeth asked. “We don’t use the word cure, we prefer the term complete remission,” said Dr. Antonarakis. Elizabeth looked at Stephen and said, “Okay honey, we’re going out to celebrate. We got this. You’re going to be cured. I know, it sounds crazy.”

Since all of the patients in the CDK12 Michigan study had prostate cancer that made PSA, the exact treatment protocol for Stephen was not set in stone. He was basically an “N of 1,” as doctors like to say, or his very own clinical trial of one person. They agreed to give Stephen 4 cycles of pembrolizumab, then retest.

But between cycles 2 and 3, Stephen began to feel that his urination had changed. Dr. Rathkopf decided to order another imaging study to evaluate this change, since PSA was not a reliable measure in this case. Stephen was already on his way to his fourth and final treatment the day he missed a call from Memorial Sloan Kettering about his test results.

When Stephen arrived at MSK within the hour, Dr. Rathkopf brought in her whole staff to tell him the news.

After only 3 cycles of pembrolizumab, results of his imaging showed a complete response to the treatment.

“The Prostate Cancer Foundation saved my life,” says Stephen, “Dr. Rathkopf saved my life. My wife and my family saved my life. I’m the beneficiary of all that, and I’m the luckiest person in the world.”

Stephen continues to receive pembrolizumab treatments every 3 weeks to keep his prostate cancer at bay. But he doesn’t mind. “I never looked at this like being defeated. My grandkids are a big motivating factor, you know? I want to be there when they get married,” says Stephen. “My father taught me: Never give up. Always fight. Always find a solution.”

The post Never Give Up: The Journey from Metastatic to Complete Response appeared first on Prostate Cancer Foundation.

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Prioritize telling your children

Many people face understandable reluctance when deciding whether they should tell their children about their cancer diagnosis. Are they too young? Is it too much for them to handle? Is it too much for me to handle? These concerns are reasonable, but you must set them aside.

The truth is, if your children are old enough to communicate, they’re old enough to catch on when something is wrong. Cancer treatment comes with many changes: to your behavior, appearance, routine, mood, you name it. Even very young children will pick up on these changes, and if they don’t know the cause, they may suspect other and perhaps more sinister explanations.

Relieve your children of the stress of uncertainty and relieve yourself of the guilt in keeping them in the dark. It isn’t an easy conversation to have, but it is an important one.

When to tell your children

It may take some time before you are ready to tell anyone about your cancer diagnosis. That’s okay – take the time you need. But when you are ready to talk about it, your children should be some of the first to know.

Why? You don’t want your kids to find out about your cancer from anyone but yourself. Whether someone slips up and mentions it in their presence, or they overhear you talking about it, finding out any other way other than you telling them is a missed opportunity for you to disclose the challenging news in an appropriate setting where you can control the narrative with facts, optimism, and hope.

When you do tell them, find a time where your schedules are clear. This is not the kind of news you want to squeeze into the couple of hours between school and soccer practice. You may find evenings to be ideal given they tend to be more relaxed in the household with less on everyone’s plate and the promise of the night to sleep on and process the news.

Where to tell your children

Privacy is your friend when delivering difficult news. When telling your children about your cancer diagnosis, do so in an environment that is quiet, free of distraction, and familiar.

Maybe the car is where you and your children have your most free conversations. Maybe the kitchen table, maybe their bedroom, maybe the couch. As a parent you will know where your children feel safe to express themselves freely.

All that said, if there is a sacred place you share with your children, a place that is special to you, holds many great memories, or belongs to a beloved tradition, do not taint it with this unfortunate conversation. You don’t want to attach a negative association to a place that means a lot to you and your children.

With whom to tell your children

Depending on the size of your immediate family and the age of your children, this conversation may look like a single collective group conversation or a few more intimate one-on-ones.

If you are married or in a relationship, decide ahead of time whether you think your child would respond better with both parents present or just the affected parent. Consider your emotional state, and the emotional state of your partner. Having them there when you tell your children may be a tremendous comfort to both you and your child. On the other hand, if it’s likely that your partner will become terribly upset at the conversation, you may decide to do it without them so as not to further stress your child.

With multiple children, consider their ages. If they are similar in age, telling them all together may be ideal, as it will lessen the amount of times you need to have the conversation. Similarly, your children may be a comfort to each other and one child may ask a question the other didn’t think to ask. Family discussions with everyone present create a sense of unity and keep everyone on the same page.

If your children are very different ages, say, 16 and 5, it may be best to have separate conversations. You are likely to find it difficult to address both levels of comprehension at the same time. Furthermore, older children who are more familiar with the dangers of cancer may initially become very upset at the news. Younger children may pick up on that energy and take the news worse than they otherwise would.

Expect the unexpected

You may find that your children react differently than you might anticipate. If you have more than one child, there may be drastically different reactions among them. One might immediately become upset and cry, while another becomes angry and detached. Particularly young children may seem fairly oblivious and be ready to move on more quickly than you are!

Whatever the reaction, be patient with your children and the time it may take them to process this news. Try not to take too personally that their reaction may not seem appropriate for the magnitude of the situation.

If your child seems to be having a particularly hard time with the news, comfort them, but do not lie about the severity of your disease. If your child’s mood or behavior take a prolonged turn for the worse, seek advice from a professional on how you might get them the help they need – you may want to start with your child’s pediatrician.

Be honest

As previously mentioned, it is important to be honest with your children about the severity of your diagnosis. Adjust the level of detail you give depending on your child’s age. Very young children don’t need to know your exact treatment plan or understand the difference between Stage2 and Stage 4, but they should know that you are sick, you have something in your body that shouldn’t be there, and you are working with a doctor to help make it go away.

Make sure to emphasize to younger children that your disease is not contagious and that in no way did they cause or contribute to your cancer. If helpful, you can use props or dolls to illustrate to young children where your cancer is.

Answer any questions they have honestly. If they don’t ask questions initially, let them know they can come to you with questions any time. 

Regardless of age, make sure to inform your children that there are going to be some changes once you start treatment. Depending on the severity of your disease and the type of treatment you undergo, these changes could be mild (things like diet and exercise adjustments, frequent doctor’s appointments, and fatigue) or much more severe (drastic physical changes, extended time in the hospital for surgery, and even changing financial priorities – cancer is an expensive disease). Priming children for changes early on will benefit the whole family as you move toward treatment.

Answering the dreaded question “Are you going to die?”

Are you going to die? This is one of those seemingly impossible questions that everyone affected by cancer dreads. Even when not directly asked, it can linger in the air. However difficult, the question should be addressed if asked.

Honesty in this matter is so important, and you may be surprised with how hopeful honesty can be. Consider this as a basic outline for how to answer this question: Everyone is going to die. Because of my disease I may be at risk of dying sooner than I otherwise would, but I am getting help from doctors to lower that risk. Adjust the vernacular as needed based on your child’s age and add information based on your unique situation. For instance, if your cancer is at an early stage or your doctor has expressed optimism about your future, share that with your children to help alleviate fear.

You are opening up a discussion that is unlikely to close

You can look at talking to your children about your cancer diagnosis less as a singular conversation and more as a communication path you will take together. The initial conversation is important, but so is the continued dialogue you have with your children as you move through the stages of treatment and remission. Even when the last trace of cancer is gone from your body, there will still be follow-up appointments, occasional tinges of fear, and news to share. Establishing open lines of communication will make your cancer less scary over time to not only your children, but to you as well.

The post How to Tell Your Kids About Your Cancer Diagnosis appeared first on Prostate Cancer Foundation.

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The feeling of helplessness brought upon a patient and those who love them is perhaps one of the worst parts of a prostate cancer diagnosis. Between the uncertainty of the future and the many changes to your day-to-day life, you may feel as if life is spiraling out of your control.

But there are three things you can control during your prostate cancer journey: your attitude, your diet, and your exercise routine.

You may have just rolled your eyes because the above statement may sound like a truism as innovative as “the grass is always greener on the other side,” but allow us to challenge that notion.

The first thing you should know is that this list of three comes from a patient who was diagnosed with stage 4 prostate cancer. Stephen Eisenmann is what refer to as an extraordinary responder (a patient who has had a remarkably positive response to treatment), but before this response, he and his family were preparing for the worst.

As Stephen’s wife, Elizabeth Eisenmann, recalled, “We got very practical, and there was one point we updated our wills, we got our documents together, our powers of attorneys. We did a lot of that stuff that you don’t want to do, you don’t want to think about, because you don’t want that to be your life.”

Nonetheless, throughout all of this, Stephen and Elizabeth remained optimistic on account of some advice Stephen received from a friend: the three things you can control during your prostate cancer journey are your attitude, diet, and exercise routine.

Long before Stephen experienced his positive response to treatment, he kept these principles top of mind. “If I maintained a positive attitude, restricted my diet to things that were going to be good for me, since I had prostate cancer, and maintained my exercise routine, that I would have a better chance at a better response.”

While Stephen’s exceptional response to treatment is unique (at least for now), the agency he took over his attitude, diet, and exercise are 100% replicable.

Is it always easy to keep a positive attitude in the face of so much trauma? Of course not. Similarly, eating healthy and going on a daily hike might seem frivolous, or “too little too late.” But these three aspects of your life, regardless of how treatment is going, are dictated by you and only you.

Cancer is a powerful disease, but it cannot tell you to put down that forkful of salad. And no oncologist is going to strongly advise that you don’t remain active. So, by taking conscious control of your attitude, diet, and exercise regimen you will find you begin to regain a sense of agency in your own life.

What makes cancer so devastating is not just the toll it takes on our physical health, but the way it manages to disrupt our life while we are still living it. But we can push back on this, in many ways. Attitude, diet, and exercise; those are good places to start.

The post 3 Things You Can Control During Your Prostate Cancer Journey appeared first on Prostate Cancer Foundation.

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The phrase “cancer does not discriminate” gets thrown around quite a bit. It comes from a good place –– the idea that cancer is everyone’s problem and that whether you are rich or poor, black or white, that you too are at risk of cancer and should care about finding a cure.

But here’s the thing: prostate cancer DOES discriminate.

Men of African descent in the U.S. and Caribbean have the highest documented prostate cancer incidence rates in the world. African American men are 76% more likely to develop prostate cancer than Caucasian men and are more than twice as likely to die from the disease. That means that 1 in 6 African American men will be diagnosed with prostate cancer, and for non-African American men that likelihood is 1 in 9.

It is important that we acknowledge this disparity because only by acknowledging it can we work to eliminate it. However, though we know that African American men are significantly more at risk for prostate cancer, what we currently do not know is why.

While scientists have not yet cracked the code as to exactly why African American men are at higher risk for prostate cancer, there are some theories. It is widely believed that a combination of genetics (a factor we know to be the culprit for many diagnosed with cancer), access to care (we know that African American men are less likely to receive surgical treatment than white men with similar disease characteristics), lifestyle, and nutrition habits are the main causes.

In order to get a fuller understanding as to why this disparity exists, we launched the PCF African American Research Initiative. This is an initiative which supports researchers who are seeking concrete answers to this important question: why are African American men at higher risk?  From there, we can work on decreasing the rate of prostate cancer not only in black men, but all men.

We are not completely helpless against these odds. Even now, there are steps you can take to reduce your risk of prostate cancer and death from prostate cancer. If you are an African American male, talk to your doctor about getting screened at age 40. Early detection is key to preventing death from prostate cancer. Most importantly, we must continue to talk about this issue. There is nothing taboo about wanting your loved ones to live. Awareness is our first line of defense against prostate cancer.

To learn more, download our guide for African American men here.

The post Prostate Cancer Does Discriminate appeared first on Prostate Cancer Foundation.

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When faced with a prostate cancer diagnosis, like any cancer diagnosis, the typical reaction is to want to do anything and everything that might cure you of the disease. In our pursuit of solutions, it is easy to get caught up in some rather suspicious all-natural “medicines.”

Nutrition tends to be at the center of many of the cure your cancer quick promises.  And as well-meaning as your aunt who found an article that says, if you just eat this one native plant from Southern Yucatan then you too will be cured of prostate cancer, might be, you will be hard-pressed to find any evidence that it will help you at all.

But fear not – though there is no food you can eat that will cure you of cancer overnight, there are plenty of diet adjustments that are scientifically proven to have positive effects for men with prostate cancer.

Here are 5 easy ways to eat better with prostate cancer:

  1. Eat! Between the side effects of certain treatments and the stress that comes along with a cancer diagnosis, you may experience loss of appetite. However, it is important to fuel yourself with nutritious, unprocessed foods as your body deals with cancer and treatment.
  2. Avoid Processed Meat. Several studies have shown a link between processed meat consumption and advanced and lethal prostate cancer. If you already have prostate cancer, please do not stubbornly insist that the damage is done, so you might as well go on eating all the pastrami you want. There is considerable evidence that processed meat increases the risk of chronic disease and death overall, not just for men with prostate cancer. It’s never too late to make healthier choices.
  3. Cook Meat Low and Slow. You may have heard that charred meats are carcinogens and should be avoided. In fact, the risk is with any meats that are cooked at a very high temperature, not just those that have char. Meats cooked at a high temperature produce a carcinogen called PhIP. This is true for all meat, not just red meat. So, cooking your meat low and slow can reduce the cancer risks associated with meat intake. Remember, like all things, moderation is key – this does not mean eat all the meat you want so long as it’s cooked slow.
  4. Get Your Vitamins from Vegetables, Not Supplements. If you’re in the habit of taking a daily multivitamin, don’t let this discourage you. But if your pantry has become an apothecary of supplements (no matter how “natural”), let us be the first to tell you that there is a better way. Eating a hearty serving of vegetables might not be as time-efficient as popping some pills, but the benefits are numerous and it will give you a head start on our next tip.
  5. Eat Cruciferous Vegetables. Broccoli, cauliflower, cabbage, brussels sprouts, kale, and mustard greens are all cruciferous vegetables (and yes, there are more). We recommend that men with prostate cancer eat 1 serving or ½ cup of cruciferous vegetables on most days. Why cruciferous vegetables specifically? Because daily consumption of cruciferous vegetables has been shown to substantially lower the risk of prostate cancer recurrence. They contain compounds that may stop cancer from growing and dividing and even kill cancer cells altogether. Note that this is not a cure-all, but there is legitimate science to back up the benefits of these

For more in-depth diet and lifestyle recommendations, download our nutrition guide here.

The post 5 Easy Ways to Eat Better with Prostate Cancer appeared first on Prostate Cancer Foundation.

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When we hear the dreaded word cancer, money is not usually the first thing that comes to mind. But if you ask survivors or the families of patients, they will tell you that treating cancer is expensive. When a cancer patient does not have health insurance, or when there are extensive costs of care not covered by their health insurance, there is a real financial risk to the patient. These financial problems – which range from financial stress, debt, and even bankruptcy  – can be devastating to not only patients themselves, but also to their families.

The medical term for problems related to the cost of medical care is financial toxicity.

Financial toxicity is not unique to cancer, but cancer patients are among the most likely to experience it. Not only is cancer treatment expensive, but cancer is also a disease that can affect your ability to work, which further debilitates patients financially.

Often, families will attempt to pick up the slack and work longer hours or take on personal debt of their own to help pay for the treatment of someone they love. This added financial strain to individuals and families already dealing with intense medical and emotional trauma is heartbreaking, and is a reality that needs to be talked about more.

When first diagnosed with cancer, the urge to seek the best treatment possible regardless of cost is an absolutely understandable reaction. Avoiding treatment because the costs are too high is not a solution to this problem. However, avoiding the financial reality of treating cancer is also not a solution. Everyone’s circumstance is different, but simply having the conversation of cost of care early on with your doctor will help lead you on a clearer path. A path where even if you are affected deeply by financial strain, you will not be blindsided by it.

The post Financial Toxicity in Cancer Patients appeared first on Prostate Cancer Foundation.

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Kristen Bell on Dax Shepard's 'Sweet Bromance' with Bradley Cooper - YouTube

We are very pleased to announce that our favorite spokescouple Dax Shepard and Kristen Bell discussed their support of PCF on The Ellen DeGeneres Show. Recently Dax and Kristen did the Choco Challenge, a challenge we have in partnership with Fuego Box, where brave souls eat the worlds spiciest chocolate to raise money for prostate cancer research. Their reaction was so hilarious Ellen featured it on her show, but it gets better! Ellen also presented a $10,000 check to The Prostate Cancer Foundation on behalf of Shutterfly! Check out Dax and Kristen’s appearance above!

The post We’re on The Ellen DeGeneres Show! appeared first on Prostate Cancer Foundation.

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PCF’s very own Ramiro Siliezar turns his love of running into research dollars

When Ramiro Siliezar was growing up in his hometown of Antiguo Cuscatlan, El Salvador, about 45 miles away from the capital of San Salvador, he and his friend, Samuel, used to run three times a week to the local lagoon. The run was approximately 16 kilometers (about 10 miles) there and back, and it was during this time in his life that he discovered his natural talent and love for running long distances. Although not interested in academics while in school, his two coaches – a futbol (soccer) coach and a running coach – helped focus his interest in sports and physical activity. “Running is what I love to do. I run with my heart,” he said. “I would run no matter what, but running for an important cause gives me energy and motivation and adds meaning to each mile.”

In 1987, Ramiro moved to the U.S. at the tender age of 21 and he first got connected with the Prostate Cancer Foundation through the Milken Institute when he joined Execpro, the property management company for the office building where both organizations are located. A friend asked him to participate in a 5K run in Anaheim at Angels Stadium for Mike’s Math Club, and he took the chance. He received his first medal for this run, finishing first among a large field of competitors. Soon after, a friend asked him if he would run in support of the Prostate Cancer Foundation and his answer was “Why not?”

But Ramiro does much more than running… he is also a star fundraiser. While preparing for his first marathon in support of PCF, Ramiro learned that fundraising is a great way to get more people involved and interested in his running. In just his first few weeks, Ramiro raised over $10,000 in donations for PCF. The following year he ran twice, and raised nearly $20,000. His secret? Never be afraid to share your story and to invite people to join you in supporting an important cause. “Don’t be shy, and never miss an opportunity to ask someone for support!” Ramiro even created his own flyer with his fundraising link, and he always keeps a few copies in his pocket. He says his runs for PCF are a blessing and when campaigning for donations, he asks everyone he meets. “I have my tool [the flyers], I just need illumination.” He also attributes his great success with donations to his relationship with God.

Ramiro runs for PCF through its grassroots fundraising community, Many vs Cancer. He has also used social media like Facebook and Instagram to update his friends, family, and many supporters during his training process. “I keep updating people on my progress and my training and this helps remind them to donate again and again.” He posts frequently, including all of his morning runs, which can begin at 4 a.m. some mornings.

Overall, Ramiro has raised over $83,000 for PCF-funded research, run 12 full marathons and too many half marathons and 10Ks to count. Last year, he ran in Mexico City which was a different experience for him due to the high altitude. He says it feels as though you’re slow and tired in the beginning of the race, but after about two miles everything starts to open up.

For 2019, he’s going to run a half marathon in Pasadena at the Rose Bowl, another half marathon in February, the Los Angeles Marathon on March 24th (from Dodgers Stadium to Santa Monica) and then back to back marathons in May (in both Vancouver, and Ventura, CA). His goal this year is to qualify for the Boston Marathon and to exceed $100,000 in funds raised for PCF.

Ramiro’s biggest inspiration for running is his twin sister who was diagnosed with breast cancer and who moved to the U.S. a year after he did. Prior to her diagnosis, there were no known members of his family with cancer. Now, with a family connection to cancer, Ramiro gets his PSA level tested every year and he tells everyone to see their doctor regularly. “Take care of your body, and it will take care of you. I am an old man, but I still run like a young one!” He also has a few tips for those who want to do more. “Join Many vs Cancer and start fundraising in a way that is fun for you. If you want to run like me, run. If you prefer to cycle, go for it! Whatever you love, do it for a good cause. Create a flyer that you can hand out to others and never be afraid or too shy to ask for people to donate. You’re not asking for money or a handout, you’re asking for others to join you in funding a cure for prostate cancer.”

Thank you, Ramiro for all you the hard work you have done and continue to do to help PCF fund research for a cure for prostate cancer. To see Ramiro’s track record and to join yourself, please visit Ramiro’s Page.

The post “I Run With My Heart”: Conquering Cancer 26.2 Miles at a Time appeared first on Prostate Cancer Foundation.

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Valentine’s Day may seem like a complete non-priority when you or your loved one is dealing with a cancer diagnosis, but maintaining some romance during this difficult time is good for both your mental and physical health. Whether just diagnosed, currently undergoing treatment, or in remission yet not feeling 100%, here are five ways to make this Valentine’s Day special:

  1. Don’t feel guilty about staying in. Dates at home can be some of the best dates there are –– cancer or no cancer. The trick is to put some intention behind it. Pick a movie or TV show that means something to your relationship. Choose your partner’s favorite meal. It’s these little intentions that make the one you love feel acknowledged and appreciated.
  2. Whether you’re at home or at a hospital, decorate with all the cheesy hearts and cupids you can stand. If you look around the room and it looks like it does every other day, it is going to feel like every other day.
  3. Take a walk down memory lane. You know all those old photo albums you haven’t looked at in years? This is the perfect time to blow the dust off of all those wonderful memories and remind yourselves of the beautiful life you have built together. They may make you laugh, cry, or wish you could turn back in time and NEVER get that haircut. That’s all part of the fun!
  4. Plan your next adventure. Cancer is greedy. It wants to take all of your time, energy, and attention. Planning for a time when cancer is no longer the first thing on your mind will help you have something to look forward to and get excited about. Go wild, too! This is not the time to talk about whether a post-treatment vacation is financially wise. This is a time to visualize your future in a positive way!
  5. Be intimate. Relax, you don’t have to pull out all the stops for this. It’s less about recreating the car scene from Titanic and more about paying intimate attention to each other. Kiss your loved one good morning AND goodnight. Hold hands. Tell her she’s beautiful. Tell him he’s the strongest man you know. You get the idea. It’s the little things.

The post Five Ways to Make Valentine’s Day Special for Cancer Patients appeared first on Prostate Cancer Foundation.

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Dr. Mike Walks a Celebrity Packed Runway For Charity - YouTube

Fashion and prostate cancer might not seem like they belong in the same sentence, but we’ll explain how they actually do.

For the last three years, the Blue Jacket Fashion Show has brought together designers, celebrities, athletes, entertainers and media icons to raise awareness and funding for prostate cancer research. Esteemed designers John Varvatos, Michael Kors, and Thom Browne are just a few of the designers that will be showcasing their custom interpretations of the classic blue jacket.

As the only New York Fashion Week-sponsored non-profit event, the night is all about empowering men to look and feel good. Dr. Mike, Bill Nye, Mario Cantone, Dr. Oz, and Nigel Barker are just a few of the celebrities who hit the runway in last year’s Blue Jacket Fashion Show. Watch above to see some of the highlights.

But it isn’t all about high-end designers and brushing shoulders with celebrity A-listers. The blue jacket is symbolic of what it means to support men with prostate cancer. Not only is blue the universal color for prostate cancer awareness, it’s also ubiquitous with the demographic that is at risk of prostate cancer. The blue suit is the everyman’s suit, and every man is at risk of prostate cancer (at least for now). However, events like the Blue Jacket Fashion Show are the reason more men are surviving prostate cancer than ever before.

The 2019 Blue Jacket Fashion Show will take place on Thursday, February 7th, and promises to be our most exciting runway yet. In partnership with Johnson & Johnson, proceeds from the Blue Jacket Fashion Show will benefit the Prostate Cancer Foundation.

For more information on the Blue Jacket Fashion Show and to learn how you can attend this amazing event, click here: https://www.pcf.org/bluejacket/

The post Fashion for a Cure appeared first on Prostate Cancer Foundation.

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