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Post written by Andres Perea

Spain is always a good idea! When again the weather is not best in Northern Europe, Spain is only a 2 hours flight away and the perfect escape. Be it for the food, the weather, the vibrant culture or the music. 

 

As cities within Spain differ a lot, I prepared a list with my favorite city breaks in Spain. Whether you’re looking for a shopping trip, beach life or party mood, Spain’s cities have got it all!

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1. Malaga

One of my favorite cities for a quick getaway is definitely Malaga. This city in Southern Spain has got it all: lovely shops, great beaches and a vibrant nightlife. The airport of Malaga is one of the busiest in entire Spain, thus it’s easy to find the cheapest flight tickets.

 

In the main shopping street “Calle Larios” you can find most international brands, whereas the narrow streets of the ancient city center still host a lot of traditional artisan Andalusian shops.

2. Madrid

The capital of Spain was a not a very popular travel destination for a long time. It seemed in an eternal competition with Barcelona. Even though Madrid has no beach, it is the perfect city break for those who love metropolitan vibes.

 

Even though Madrid is the capital of Spain, it managed to preserve some of its authentic Castilian vibes. Indeed many traditional shops can still be found in neighborhoods such as Malasaña or Chueca.

 

The theaters of Madrid are famous all over Spain and the neighborhood La Latina is extremely coveted for its delicious tapas. Madrid is the main airport of Spain and connected to many European cities, thus perfect to get the cheapest flight tickets.

3. Barcelona

Barcelona is the classic city getaway in Spain. The town is not only popular for the gorgeous architecture of Antonio Gaudi, but also the perfect destination for shopping lovers and party goes. Indeed the clubs along the beach side attract visitors from all over the world. 

 

La Rambla is the best place for people watching and you can’t miss the lively market of La Boqueria where you get all kind of fresh fruits and vegetables.

4. Valencia

Valencia could be Barcelona’s hardest competitor. With its long beach stretches and affordable rates, Valencia became increasingly popular for city breaks.

 

Whereas the city center is typically Mediterranean and easy to fall in love due to its narrow streets and laid-back vibes, the modern “City of Arts and Sciences” attracts architecture lovers from all over the world.

 

The buildings designed by star-architect Santiago Calatrava can be visited in the “City of Arts and Sciences” and its anormal shapes will leave you speechless. I particularly liked the reflection of the bright white buildings in the water.

5. Seville

Seville may not have a beach, but it can easily compete with other Spanish towns due its numerous attractions and the beauty of its city center. 

 

The narrow streets of Santa Cruz neighborhood with its bright flowers represent the traditional Andalusian stereotype. Seville is also the cradle of flamenco, thus you can’t miss a flamenco show at one of its numerous tablaos.

I hope this selection inspired you to visit one of Spain’s gorgeous cities. What is your favorite city in Spain for a quick getaway? I can’t wait to read about it in the comment form.

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Good morning from the political capital of the Netherlands: The Hague! Also known as the unagitated contrast of Amsterdam, Den Haag, lures us with its unique combination of cool city life and laid-back beach vibes. The perfect getaway and city break for a long weekend. But who’d guess that there is much more to do in The Hague and its seaside resort Scheveningen than only beach & mere city life?

 

From Urban Farming to Chinatown and top kitesurfing locations, The Hague and Scheveningen seem to be the perfect weekend getaway for active and culturally interested travellers.

 

Join me on a long weekend in The Hague and full of city vibes and beach fun.

The Hague is totally fine with its role of being the more elegant and laid-back alternative to Amsterdam. I cannot remember seeing a single coffee shop (even though there are!) or anything close to the Sodom & Gomorrha atmosphere on a weekend in Amsterdam. 

 

Instead, The Hague keeps it real and impresses with innovative city life projects, relaxing parks, elegant and surprising shopping options and of course its 11km of beaches. The main beaches of The Hague are Scheveningen, the lively seaside resort with the emblematic Kurhaus building, and the pristine beach of Kijkduin.

 

Together, they offer almost infinite leisure options at the beach. 

 

Even though The Hague is the political capital, the royal seat of the Netherlands and home to 160 prestigious international institutions, as a visitor, I hardly witnessed any pomp, exuberance or bumbledom. The political institutions and even the royal palace are kept small and discreet. Even though the political importance of The Hague is unmatched by many other European capitals, locals are cool with it and enjoy their city without much fuss. 

 

That’s another contrast to Amsterdam that I really enjoyed: strolling through the city without seeing “DEN HAAG” merchandising products and branding on every corner. It’s just a normal city where you can actually imagine to live in.

 

And indeed, The Hague boasts a very important expat community. Boldly put, Amsterdam is for tourists, excitement and absolute liberalism, whereas The Hague is all about working expats and conservative wealth.

 

After a long weekend in The Hague and its 2 seaside resorts Scheveningen and Kijkduin, I bring you my list of the Top 15 Things To Do in the Hague and its seaside resorts.

 

I promise the captivating mix of city life and beach vibes will quickly give you a severe case of wanderlust to the political capital of the Netherlands!

 

Find all locations in a map at the end of the post!

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General Info

Geographic situation: City on the western coast of the Netherlands and the capital of South Holland province. Political capital of The Netherlands and home to over 100 international institutions. 11km stretch of beach.

Language: Dutch. English is widely spoken.
Currency: EUR
How to get there:

Activities: Lage number of diplomats and civil servants, large international businesses such as Royal Dutch Shell, fishing activity in Scheveningen, active startup/entrepreneurial scene, second biggest tourist destination, after Amsterdam

Where to stay in The Hague
1. Visit Urban Farmers
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One of the most fascinating and surprising countries we visited on our boat-hitchhiking trip across the Atlantic was definitely Trinidad and Tobago. I immediately fell in love with the combination of Caribbean lifestyle, Indian heritage and European legacy. For a second, my partner and I could even imagine to live & work here for a longer time. 

 

What is it that makes Trinidad and Tobago so irresistible but still a not so known travel destination?

 

Read on why you should definitely include Trinidad island of the 2-island state in your upcoming travel plans.

Trinidad & Tobago consists of 2 islands and we only got to visit the main, larger one: Trinidad which holds the capital Port of Spain and the business hub of the country.

 

Many travellers overlook Trinidad island and head straight to Tobago because of its paradisiac beaches. 

 

However both islands couldn’t be more different:

 

Trinidad island is all about executive business, the oil industry and the language strongly varies between the 2 island.

 

Trinidad island is a real cultural melting pot due to historical upbringings and heritages. One third of its population is Hindu. You’ll find hundreds of Hindu temples and mosques along the roads, right next to churches.

 

Tobago is mostly Christian and famous for its pristine beaches and lush nature.

 

However there are many reasons why you shouldn’t skip Trinidad island

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General Info

Geographic situation: twin island sovereign state that is the southernmost nation in the Caribbean. High-income economy, primarily industrial economy with an emphasis on petroleum 
Language: English. But main spoken language is either of two English-based creole languages (Trinidadian Creole or Tobagonian Creole)
Currency: Trinidad and Tobago dollar (TTD)
How to get there: By airplane to Port of Spain Airport. I recommend renting a car as public transport hardly exists. Check prices on rental cars.

Activities: One of the wealthiest in the Caribbean. Economy is strongly influenced by the petroleum industry. Tourism and manufacturing are also important. Tourism is growing , although not as important as in many other Caribbean islands. Agricultural products include citrus and cocoa.

Where to stay in Trinidad, Trinidad & Tobago
Budget
Hotel Normandie Limited

Inn at 87

Mid-Range
Trinidad Gingerbread House
Ramela's B&B (very helpful client service, nice neighborhood, great manager)
Luxury
Hyatt Regency Port-of-Spain
Hilton Trinidad
Paria Bay
1. Trinidad Carnival
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Post written by Hugo Perea

Visiting Tenerife, Canary Islands, includes much more than beach and party. In the north of Tenerife Island there is a hidden gem called "La Cueva del Viento", a natural, volcanic attraction close to Icod de los Vinos town.

 

La Cueva del Viento (“The Cave of the Winds”) is the perfect day trip from Puerto de la Cruz, Santa Cruz de Tenerife or from any location in the South of Tenerife. Whether you’re a hiker or outdoor lover, or if you want to explore the natural and geological history of Tenerife, you just can’t skip this attraction. 

Make sure to reserve your spot in advance and book your ticket here.

Practical Information
How to get there? The best way to get there is by car or by public transport. Take the TF-5 northern motorway to Icod de los Vinos. Once you reach the municipality of Icod, take the TF-366 road towards El Amparo and follow the signs for the Visitors Centre reading 'Centro de Visitantes – Cueva del Viento'. At the El Refugio restaurant, turn left and carry on for about 1 km (⅔ of a mile) until you reach the Visitors Centre.
Opening hours

Monday, Wednesday, Thursday and Friday: from 9:00 to 19:00

Tuesday, Saturday and Sunday: from 9:00 to 16:30

 

Winter Opening Hours (from October to March):

Everyday (except Thursday): until 17.00

Thursday: until 18.00

What to wear?

Visitors must wear long trousers and hiking boots or trainers.  

Tickets

Need to be booked in advance, you can buy them here.

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What is the Cave of the Winds?

The first written reference to Cueva del Viento (literally Wind Cave or Cave of the Winds because of the noise of the wind) dates back to 1690, by Bernardo de Valois, a local terrateniente who gave the name to the site.

 

However this is not a cave, but a gallery of lava-shaped tunnels spanning across the entire island of Tenerife. With a total estimated length of 75km, it could be the biggest lava-tunnel-system in the world.

The volcanoes of Tenerife

Let me get briefly into a few facts about Tenerife and its volcanic activity.

 

Tenerife’s Mount Teide is not only the highest peak of Spain but it’s also a volcano. But it’s not the only volcano on the Island. Teide is just the highest of the 321 volcanoes shaping Tenerife. One of the most important volcanoes in Tenerife is Pico Viejo and it expulsed lava for the last time 27.000 years ago. This last expulsion formed the tunnels we can now explore in the Cave of the Winds, Tenerife.

 

A volcano can erupt in two ways, effusively like Tenerife Volcanoes do, or explosively like Vesuvius Volcano did. The dangerous ones are the explosives, also called prinianos. Don’t worry when visiting Tenerife, as priniano eruptions in Tenerife ended 500.000 years ago! 

 

As a matter of fact, there is a historical link between explosive Volcano Vesuvius and effusive volcanoes in Tenerife: the Roman historian Pliny the Old died at the Vesuvius eruption which erased Pompeii. He also commanded an expedition from Mauritania by which he ended up discovering Canary Islands. They called the archipelago the “lucky islands” and Tenerife volcano was named Nivaria (snow peak in latin).

 

Other important volcanic locations of Tenerife are Punta de Teno, Anaga and Roque del Conde.

 

Those peaks were three independent volcanic islands (respectively 8M year old, 7M years old and 12M years old), combined into a single one, Tenerife, thanks to the apparition of Teide Volcano between them.

 

If you want to know more about volcanic activity in Tenerife you can read more here.

What is a lava-tunnel?
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What comes to your mind when you think of glamping?

 

An enhanced version of camping? Yes!

A more comfortable way of enjoying and experiencing the beauty of nature and great outdoors? Yes, yes, yes!

 

But would you also associate it with utterly surprising accommodation locations?

 

This wasn't my case until I stayed for a glamping experience in a historic cave near Granada with Glamping Hub. From tree houses to house boats, there is no location that is too creative to be featured on the Glamping site per excellence.

 

After discovering that they even offer accommodation in the historic caves near Granada, I just couldn't resist to plunge in a very special glamping experience.

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The Historic Cave Homes of Granada & Guadix

The cave-houses near Granada and Guadix have an impressive and long history. Some of the oldest caves are believed to have been built during the early period of the Moorish rule, and date back around 1,000 years, although most were built during the 15th and 16th centuries. Until a few decades ago, cave homes in Guadix and Granada were seen as houses for the poor, considered inferior to the town’s more modern houses. 

 

Today, they are becoming increasingly popular, and many local residents are transforming their dwellings into restaurants, holiday rentals, museums and hotels. Don't be surprised if you are invited in to have a look around!

 

Most of today's cave-dwellings are well-appointed, like any other Spanish home, and some are even quite luxurious, with marble floors, fitted kitchens, faxes and internet connections.

 

Still nowadays about 25.000 people call a cave their home in the region of Guadix and Granada. For most of them, living in a cave is  a lifestyle, as it requires much more care than a “normal” house.

 

The main advantage of living in a cave are the cool temperatures during very hot Andalusian summers and relatively warm temperatures in winter. Temperatures are thus constant throughout the year. 

 

On top, there are considerable advantages of living in a cave-home. Not only is it very affordable as you save money on heating in winter and air conditioning in summer, but living in a cave also has benefits for your health. Indeed living in a natural environment is supposed to have positive effects on your skin and respiratory system.

 

You can spot thousands of caves along the main road connecting Granada to Almeria. In case you want to learn more about living in a cave and the history behind this original concept, I strongly recommend to visit the “Barrio de las Cuevas” in Guadix. It hosts a documentation centre and a very high concentration of cave-houses which reminded me of a hobbit-town.

 

More and more people are visiting Guadix in order to enjoy the unique experience of sleeping in a cave first-hand.

 

On top, Guadix and Granada boast a vibrant tapas culture: most drinks come with a free, delicious tapa. 

Review of Glamping Cave
House / Cave Front of the Couples Cave
The Glamping Concept

The term of glamping - a fusion of "camping" and "glamour" - refers to a new way of experiential traveling. Basically you get to enjoy the great natural outdoors without all the inconvenient little things of camping like pitching a tent, getting soaked in case of rain or waking up being surrounded by ants.

 

It's a glamorous version of camping which rapidly caught fire especially among outdoor lovers.

 

Nowadays glamping accommodations can be tree houses, yurts, boats, safari tents... or caves like the historic house-caves near Granada and Guadix, Spain. The big advantage of glamping is definitely its incomparable access to nature all year round.

 

On top, each accommodation location has its very own individual character, story and background which sets it apart from common hotels.

Happy Girl in the gardens surrounding our Cave Home
How to Get There?

The region around Granada, Southern Spain is famous for its historic caves and thousands of them are located between Granada and Guadix.

 

Our cave was called the “Couples Cave” and is one of the 7 historic caves of the La Tala Cave Complex close to Guadix, Andalusia.

 

It’s about 1h driving from Granada and 15 min from the town of Guadix, a real hidden, not very known gem. The access from the highway to the cave was unpaved and I recommend to make sure that your car is resilient as the road is..

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Post written by Tiffy

Japan is home to some of the best hiking trails in the world. There are many awe-inspiring views just waiting to be discovered. There are trails for those extreme adventure seekers, and trails for those individuals wanting to take a leisurely hike. Some of the best sites in the world happen to be off the beaten path.

 

You never know what you can find in Japan. You may be fortunate enough to stumble upon an active volcano, or even an old temple. With so many options it can be difficult to narrow down a prospective list.

 

Below you will find 7 of the best hiking trails in Japan.

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1. Mount Fuji (Shizuoka and Yamanashi Prefectures)

This is the highest mountain in Japan. They say the higher the altitude, the better the views. This hike is not recommended for amateurs. The extreme altitude changes can cause altitude sickness, so it is best to not rush the hike in one day.

 

It is best to hike this active volcano from July- September so you can avoid the treacherous snowfalls

2. Daisetsuzan National Park (Hokkaido Prefecture)

The name of this national park means “Big Snow Mountain”. This is Japan’s largest national park, and it is almost always covered in snow. There are many different paths throughout this park, you just have to pick what scenery you want surrounding you.

 

You can hike near active volcanos, crystal clear lakes, or dense forests. The best part is that this national park is not frequently overflowing with tourists. 

3. Aso-San (Kumamoto Prefecture, Kyushu)

These trails are part of a semi-active volcano, so they are perfect for thrill seekers. These trails offer stunning views and memorable moments. Along the trail, you will get to see the Aso-San volcano caldera, the world’s largest.

 

The summit of this hike is sometimes off-limits due to toxic gas emissions, so you need to check with the tourist information center before beginning your hiking adventure. It’s not every day you can hike alongside a volcano that could erupt, so this is definitely a hike to pursue.

4. Mt. Daimonji (Kyoto)

There are numerous trails alongside this mountain. It is often difficult to find a short path with rewarding views, but look no further. There is a trail here that is recommended for beginners.

 

In just 90 minutes, hikers can make it to the fire bed and take in those breathtaking views.

5. Mt. Hiei (Kyoto and Shiga Prefecture)

Bordering Kyoto and Shiga, this mountain is unique, as it is home to the World Heritage Site. For many years, natives have believed this mountain to be sacred. It is a very popular trail that even beginning hikers can try. Roundtrip is about 5 hours, but the hike is not extreme.

 

The mountain itself is a temple that has almost 150 structures throughout it. This is a perfect hike for those who want sites to see before they reach the top. Along with the incredible sites on the way up, once you reach the top you will have even more rewarding views.

 

You will be able to catch views of the city, Lake Biwa, and glimpses of other mountains in the distance. Finding a place to stay isn’t hard either. 

6. Mount Oku-Hotaka (Takayama, Nagano Prefecture, Gifu Prefecture, Matsumoto)
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Let me confess you a little soft spot: for me personally, Bruges is the most romantic town in Europe. It just can’t compete with Paris or Venice. This opinion may be due to the fact that I like small towns, which are still not too crowded. Even though tourism in Bruges is growing with every season, you’ll still find many picturesque corners that invite you to sit down and forget about time. And take photographs of Bruges most beautiful squares and locations.

 

Let me take you on a photographic journey along Bruges most photogenic and scenic places. 

During the late springs and summer months, Bruges can get extremely crowded. Indeed some locals are already complaining about “overtourism”. In order to avoid the crowds, I recommend to visit during autumn and winter. Even though you may risk that the weather may not be the best, the mists will give the town a very mysterious touch.

 

My favorite moment to go on photography tours in Bruges is during night. The crowds are gone or are enjoying a delicious Flemish dish and you’ll have the town with its hidden corners for your own. Indeed the warm light tremendously enhances the enchantment of Bruges. 

 

Any season makes Bruges a great setting for photography tours. Indeed the town seems to change with every season: Winter covers the old houses with a white blanket and during spring thousands of flowers are blooming in Bruges’ numerous parks and balconies.

 

As I love to showcase my photographic work on Instagram, I’d like to share with you some of Bruges’ most Instagram-worthy places.

 

For this post I didn’t follow a certain route or previously checked the spots I wanted to visit. I just wandered through the picturesque streets of Bruges and tried to capture its beauty as much as possible. On top, photography tours are for me yet another form of traveling slow and to pay attention to the hidden details of a destination.

 

I attach you a map with all the mentioned locations at the end of the post.

 

Have you been in Bruges? I’d like to hear about your favorite places to visit and to shoot. 

 

This post contains some affiliate links. They help me running this site and come without any extra cost for you.

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Table of Content

Best Time to Visit Tenerife

1. Beguinage of Bruges

The Beguinage is my favourite place in Bruges to shoot photos. Despite figuring on every tourist itinerary, it still has this serene and quiet atmosphere.The former convent is indeed an oasis of peace and it’s the perfect place to stroll around. It used to be inhabited by the emancipated, but living in a spare and pious lifestyle.

 

In spring hundreds of flowers, mostly daffodils, are popping up in the convent garden and will add an additional touch of color to the place.

 

Please consider that the Beguinage is a place of worship and do not walk on the flowers please :) They are just sooo pretty.

What To Do in Tenerife

2. Minnewater Park
Minne Water Park

The Minnewater Park (Park of Love) is located next to the Beguinage convent. It’s the perfect place to get lost with your beloved one and an utterly romantic location. The Sashuis and the cute little restaurant next to the lake of Minnewater are the perfect setting for a photo shoot.

 

It is said that if you walk over the lake bridge with your partner, you'll be in love forever. 

 

It may be highly probable that you’re not alone, as hundreds of swans are either having a nap or swimming around. And is there anything more romantic than 2 swans swimming below one of Bruges’ scenic bridges?

Where To Stay in Tenerife if you are a party animal

3. Rozenhoedkaai
Roezenhoedkaai by Night

The Rozenhoedkaai is the favorite place for photography lovers. Here any photo will be postcard-perfect! It is probably also one of the most photographed places in Bruges.

 

During the day the place may be extremely crowded, but once night falls, the Rozenhoedkaai is one of Bruges’ most beautiful spots. The nocturnal light enhances the beauty of this emblematic place.

 

If you want to get a more secluded place to shoot this location at night, I recommend to go to the Hotel Croix de Bourgogne in the street of Wollestraat.

 

Where To Stay in Tenerife fo Luxury Holidays

4. Market Place - Belfry
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Post written by Tom

If you are a risk taker or an adrenaline junkie (like me), then you probably have participated in some pretty exhilarating sports and activities in your life time. Having fun in the water is undoubtedly one of the most adventurous activities, both kids and adults always appreciate. And for good reason, as Water Sporting offers plenty of ways to have fun, along with developing strength, coordination and fitness.

 

From scuba diving and snorkeling, to windsurfing and aqua-fitness, to kayaking and river rafting, you need to simply have the enthusiasm to plunge into waters and have a wonderful experience of a lifetime. However, among the many types of water sports, there are some that stands aside for being extremely dangerous and risky for life.  Let’s have a look at them.

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1. CLIFF JUMPING

This is top of the list. Some people find this activity very appealing while others would never dream of taking their life like this. Simply put, cliff jumping is exactly what it sounds like, jumping off a cliff into water. You have no safety hooks or belts and nothing to hold you at the bottom but the deep deep sea.

 

 This sport has been recently all over the news of being most dangerous and risky sport as it has taken so many young lives. So many youngsters lost their lives or severely injured themselves while jumping off the cliff, unaware of the height or depth of the water.

 

Cliff jumping was originated in Hawaii in 1770 when the last King of Maui, King Kajekili commanded his men to leap the island of Lanai’s high cliffs and enter the water feet first without splashing so that they could prove their courage and skills, and from then it continues to be a thrilling sport to this day.

2. CAVE DIVING

Cave diving is a surreal experience; it allows you to explore unexplored chambers and caverns. Cave divers have been known to describe the experience as the closest thing to being in space – not bragging about it but this is true as I have been lucky enough to experience this myself.

 

Last month, when I was in UK with my family, I heard about this sport for the first time and it sounded so interesting for a sea sport lover like me that I couldn’t resist to try it. UK is actually the home of cave diving. The Cave Diving Group was established in 1935 to explore the underwater chambers of the Mendip Hills in Somerset, and today, it is one of the world’s most dangerous sports.

 

Fatalities for cave diving hover around the 1 in few hundred mark every year. Comparatively, for recreational diving, the figure is closer to 1 in 15,000 every year – a big difference. Well this is something to satisfy a risk taker’s thirst of adventure. 

3. WHITE WATER RAFTING

River Rafting is one of those experiences which I can’t forget my whole life. I have been to water rafting thrice till now and each of them was spectacular.

 

This fun and exciting sport, which has been around since about 1970, is extremely dangerous and risky at the same time. Serious injuries and even deaths has occurred while water rafting. Drowning is very common reason of deaths among so many dangers of this sport.

 

So if you are not an experienced swimmer do not take the risk. Hypothermia – a point when the body’s internal temperature is below 35°C is another one, which can occur in a matter of moments and cause heart rate, breathing rate and blood pressure to increase. Other dangers include equipment failure and dangerous water conditions. So if you really want to enjoy this sport be safety-cautious and be good in health before sitting in that rollercoaster. Don’t say I didn’t warn you!.

4. SURFING

I personally adore this water sport. Surfing over tall and powerful waves of water is something I crave for, a water sport lover craves for. It’s like the ocean is playing with you.

 

But it can be dangerous in a wink of an eye as Riptides sweeping surfers out from the coast is a frequent occurrence in this sport – report says that every year around 21 Australians lost their lives by riptides. Rip currents also account for many surfing accidents; a rip current is a swift of water which flows from shore out to sea and mostly happens when large quantities of water accumulate near shore due to natural wave action.

 

Surfers not only have to look for water waves but the creatures too under the water. You could be that “wanted” guest of sharks, swimming under your feets. Be aware!

 

Just avoid plan your surfing holiday in ‘The Red Triangle,’ which goes from Bodega Bay to Monterey Bay to Farallon Islands and is home to many sharks.

5. KAYAKING
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It’s now almost one year that we visited Cape Verde and stayed on the archipelago during more than 1 month. In the context of our boat hitchhiking adventure, we sailed from Tenerife, via La Gomera, to Cape Verde where we were looking for our next boat to cross the Atlantic.

 

As things didn’t go as quick and smoothly as originally planned, my partner and I had plenty of time to discover this rather not so known travel destination. There’s always something good even if things don’t go as originally planned. This long stay on the Capeverdean archipelago allowed me to create a lot of content on traveling to Cape Verde and to develop my love for the criollo culture. One of the most frequent questions I get from my readers is what is the best place to stay in Cape Verde? What is the best island for my holiday?

 

Well, here it goes: The Ultimate Guide on Where to Stay on Cape Verde, one of most vibrant destinations I’ve visited so far.

In total, we stayed during 1 month on the Capeverdean archipelago, which consists of 10 volcanic islands. Even if we got to visit only 3 of them for a longer period, we learned a lot about the other islands by talking to locals, sailors and other travellers. That’s how we got a profound knowledge about Sal Island, Sao Vicente and Santo Antao, but also learned about the best that islands like Fogo, Sao Nicolau or Santiago have to offer. 

 

Choosing the “best” island to visit Cape Verde, heavily depends on your expectations and plans for your holiday.

 

First of all you have to distinguish between the “barlavento” (windward) referring to Santo Antão, São Vicente, Santa Luzia, São Nicolau, Sal, Boa Vista; and “sotavento” (leeward) islands including Maio, Santiago, Fogo, Brava.

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Hard Choice: which island of Cape Verde?

If you are looking for crystal-clear beaches and relaxing time on the beach, then the islands of Sal and Boa Vista are made for your holiday. However, in my opinion, those islands were not very interesting from a cultural point of view. Large hotel complexes and resorts prevent a genuine exchange between locals and tourists. 

 

If you are a hiking and outdoor activity lover, then you'll be the happiest on Santo Antao or Fogo, boasting the highest mountain of the archipelago. Culturally interested people will fall in love with Mindelo, Sao Vicente, the hometown of Cesaria Evora.

 

So before you head to Cape Verde, first decide if you want party holidays, quieter locations, amazing hiking trails, nature, city life or remote beaches. 

 

If you can’t decide on which island to stay, island hopping is also an option about which I’ll give you more details in each island paragraph.

 

The opinions of this post are based upon my professional experience in the tourism sector and upon my stay in Cape Verde during which I visited and stayed in many hotels/hostels.

 

 Accommodation places are categorized location-wise and budget-wise.

 

This post contains some affiliate links for your convenience. They help me running this site and come without any extra cost for you.

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Best Time to Visit Tenerife

Why travel to Cape Verde?
Beautiful Santo Antao

Because Cape Verde has so much to offer that you’ll be wondering why you didn’t of visiting earlier! From stunning mountains and hiking trails in Santo Antao, to the vibrant music scene in Mindelo, Sao Vicente, pristine sandy beaches in Sal or wine culture in Fogo: there are a 1001 reasons to visit Cape Verde as soon as possible.

 

On top, the country boasts a very stable democratic regime and you can generally safe when visiting as a foreigner. Apart of islands like Sal or Boa Vista, Cape Verde is a relatively cheap holiday destination where you get extremely good quality & quantity for your money. 

 

Another reason why I loved Cape Verde so much and would go back, like tomorrow, is the vibrant cultural mix and the Capeverdean people. They are just the sweetest and most generous people I met in a long time. Of course you always need to be a careful and can't trust anybody blindly, but we only had extremely positive experiences (except in Mindelo, where I was a bit scared to walk alone in the streets in the beginning).

 

The cultural créole mix is breathtaking and the multifaceted music culture is just everywhere. I can’t remember a day in Mindelo where we didn’t hear music in the streets. 

 

Cape Verde is still not very known as a tourist destination. However the “beach holiday islands” like Sal or Boa Vista are becoming increasingly popular thus I recommend to visit as soon as possible. Especially such gems as Santo Antao, Santo Nicolau and Fogo.

What To Do in Tenerife

Best Time to Visit Cape Verde
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The Algarve is the most popular tourist destination in Portugal and one of the most popular ones in entire Europe. The sandy beaches and the impressive cliffs near Lagos attract people from all over the world resulting in a triplication of Algarve’s population during peak holiday season.

 

This means that you’ll be confronted with masses of tourists during the months of June - August, most of them being from the United Kingdom, Ireland and Germany.

 

In case you want to avoid the crowds, enjoy empty beaches and appreciate the vernal beauty of Algarve’s countryside, you’ll highly fancy the idea of traveling to Algarve during winter. Don’t worry about the weather: Algarve’s mediterranean climate boasts an average of 170+ hours of monthly sunshine from November - February. 

 

The perfect getaway during long, cold and grey winters in Northern Europe!

Unlike the widespread idea, that there is nothing to do in the Algarve during the winter months, you’ll be spoilt for choice when it comes to outdoor activities.

 

Not only are there over 25 top-class golf courses, but the Algarve also became a very popular destination for birdwatching. During the migration and winter season several hundreds of different bird species can be found in Southern Portugal.

 

This post will focus on things to do near Faro, Algarve as this area is still mostly unspoilt with its empty, sandy beaches and natural reserve of Ria Formosa which are quintessential for the beauty and relaxation of Algarve during the winter months. November - March are considered as off-season/winter months in this post. 

 

Here they go, the Best Things to do near Faro in sunny Algarve during winter.

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General Info

Geographic situation: Southernmost region of continental Portugal. The administrative centre is the city of Faro. 
Language: Portuguese. English is spoken as well.
Currency: EUR
How to get there: By airplane to Faro Airport or Lisbon Airport and drive 2 hours to Algarve. Check prices on rental cars.

Activities: Tourism, food production including fish and other seafood, different types of fruit like oranges, figs, plums, carob beans and almonds.

Where to stay in Faro, Algarve
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