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Special thanks to BENU for once again sending me fountain pens to feature on my blog. It has been a while since I featured any new pens.

This new pen is called Island Breeze and it's from this new series called Briolette.



The Briolette series of pens features a multi-faceted body design. When the cap is on, the flat surfaces are perfectly aligned. You can put it on the table without it rolling off.


Island Breeze features a mix of turquoise, black and gold-like particles in its resin body. It looks really cool and unique. I've not seen many fountain pens that look as flashy as this.

The surface is polished to a gloss and feels nice to hold in hand.



The pen doesn't have a cap and the cap can't be posted behind. To go with the Briolette pens, BENU has also released new pen holders. They are the lumunious and crystalline pen holders. The luminous one glows in the dark.



This is the Schmidt stainless steel nib. Nibs are available in F, M and B. The nib is stiff so there's no flex at all.


The diameter of the grip section is much smaller compared to the body. Holding it still feels quite comfortable though.



The ink convertor is not included and sells for US $5. The pen is priced at US$65. That's quite a good price for a pen with this design.


The nib is smooth and glides around easily. It writes and draws well.


You can turn the nib over and draw with it too. The lines are slightly thinner but not noticeably so. The thinner lines are on the right in the picture above.


When writing on fine grain paper with a bit more texture, the nib is less smooth but that's because of the paper. So on rougher paper, you can feel the paper.

Conclusion

Island Breeze looks good and writes well. With looks like this, the pen is definitely going to draw attention whenever you're using it with people around. I've no doubt this will be a conversation starter.

You can check more details or get one for yourself at the BENU online store.

Do check out the other interesting designs too, and all the BENU pens I've reviewed.

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I've reviewed so many graphics tablets over the years and they are all starting to become difficult to differentiate. So it's really refreshing to see something different once in a while. The tablet we're going to look at today is the WoodPad.


The WoodPad is a drawing tablet that's made of bamboo instead of the usual black hard plastic. It looks great and there's a nice feeling about it that comes from using wood. I love the texture of wood and really appreciate the natural look and feel of this device.

The WoodPad that I'm reviewing was sent to me by ViewSonic, which is also the company that made it. I received it a few months ago and the drivers weren't working well so I had to delay my review. When this was first sent to me, the tablet was just called WoodPad but now it seems to go by the name WoodPad Palette 7.


This is a rather small drawing tablet. The active area measures 6.4 x 4 inches. The tablets I have are mostly medium-sized tablets (10 x 6 inches) so I felt really constrained by the smaller dimensions. This is especially so because I use a large 27-inch monitor. Each small movement on the tablet translate to a large movement on screen. Those who use smaller monitors should have better drawing experience.


The four corners of the active area are marked by tiny markers. The active area does not go all the way to the edge so the bezels provide some space for your pen to overshoot.


The tablet surface is not made of one single piece of bamboo. It's actually several bamboo pieces glued together, like plywood, and polished. The surface is as smooth as those plastic tip tablets. I'm not sure how well it resist scratches but I'm not one who's particularly annoyed by scratches.



The tablet is quite thin. Beneath the bamboo are the electronics and beneath that is a large piece of foam with 4 rubber feet.


This is the micro-USB cable that's included.

Pen


The pen feels well built, sturdy and has a nice weight to it. This is a battery-less pen and supports up to 2048 levels of pressure sensitivity and has 45 degrees tilt sensitivity.


The grip is made of hard rubber and doesn't attract dust.


Three replacement nibs and a nib remover are included.


You can choose between using felt-tip or hard tip nibs. The hard plastic ones are quite smooth and slippery on the tablet. The felt-tip nibs provide more friction and control.


There aren't many options in the driver settings. The only shortcuts are limited to the pen's two side buttons.

Drawing performance

I've tested the tablet on both Windows and Mac. Here are the findings.


Photoshop CS (Mac) has this strange tapering effect. It may not be obvious in the screenshot above but at the end of those hatching lines just below the "Phot" letters, there are very thin lines from the tapered stroke. You can click on the picture above for a larger view.


Medibang Paint Pro (Mac) also has that extra thin line tapering issue as well but otherwise work fine.


Adobe Illustrator (Mac) has pressure sensitivity.


Mischief (Mac) works fine.


Clip Studio Paint (Mac) works exceptionally well and does not have the weird thin line tapering effect.


Krita (Mac) has issues with broken lines.


Photoshop (Win) works fine and does not have any problems with extra thin tapering lines.


Krita (Win) works fine and does not have the broken line issue that the Mac version has.


Clip Studio Paint (Win) works perfectly.

The other Windows app I've tested are ArtRage, Sketchable, Mischief and Adobe Illustrator, and they all work fine.

Conclusion

The overall drawing performance is quite satisfactory except for the thin tapering lines with the Mac versions of Photoshop and Medibang Paint Pro. If you're using those two apps on Mac, that problem could be the deal breaker. I did not experience any issues with Windows drawing software so those are probably driver issues.

The pen is quite sensitive and the lines produced in all the apps I've used are quite smooth. That's a major plus. My only major complaint is the active area is too small. It would be great if they had a larger option available for sale.

Here's a list of pros and cons:
+ Design looks good
+ Drawing functionality is overall satisfactory except with certain Mac apps
+ Well built battery-less pen with good sensitivity
- Active area is a bit small
- Some issues with Mac versions of Photoshop and Medibang Paint Pro
- No shortcut buttons on the tablet

Availability

The WoodPad is currently available for purchase through these links:
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B077DQ69S8?tag=artprdus-20
https://www.momoshop.com.tw/goods/GoodsDetail.jsp?i_code=5370444
https://detail.tmall.com/item.htm?id=560849257646

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Special thanks again to Gearbest for providing yet another monitor for a review. This continues my exploration into the different monitors made by China company HKC. The earlier monitor I featured was the HKC T7000, a budget colour accurate monitor.

From the list of monitors available on Gearbest, I picked the HKC Q320 Pro for this review because, first, it's an IPS panel and secondly, for a 32 inch monitor with 2560 x 1440 resolution, it's selling at an incredible price of US $250.


My review unit arrived pretty quickly but the box suffered from what looked like punctured holes. Thankfully, the monitor itself was not damaged.


The only graphics cable included is the HDMI cable.


That's the stand that you have to fix up yourself. The feet is quite thin and the stand itself is large and heavy.


This is how the back of the monitor looks like. The HKC Q320 Pro is only available in white.


To fix up the stand, you slot it into the two slits on the back of the monitor.


Screws are provided for you to secure the back of the monitor to the stand. But it's very difficult to actually put the screw in the hole because parts of the stand actually blocks the hole. So I just left the monitor on the stand without any screws. It's quite secured and tight and will not drop off easily, but I must remember not to carry the monitor upside down with the stand.


These are the holes for VESA mounting. This is the 10cm setting.


The stand looks pretty good. The stand only allows for tilt adjustments. The monitor is top heavy and the stand is actually not that heavy (compared to other brands I've used), so rotating the tilting the monitor requires both hands, one holding the top and the other holding the bottom. With other monitors, I could tilt the monitor by holding the sides of the monitor, but with the Q320 Pro, one has to hold the top and bottom. I don't adjust the stand often after i set it right the first time.


The ports available are HDMI, DVI and VGA. Note that if you want to drive the 2560 x 1440 resolution with DVI, you will need a Dual Link DVI cable. There's no DVI cable included. Just one HDMI. The HDMI port is HDMI 1.0.



The monitor is really slim. I've never seen such a slim IPS panel before. TN or TFT panels this thin, yes, but IPS, nope. Actually, the Q320 Pro uses an IPS-ADS panel. Well, it's still an IPS panel so I'm quite impressed. In the photo above, I compared the thickness to my wireless Bluetooth keyboard.

Because my table space is limited, having such a thin monitor allows me to push the monitor all the way to the back to free up some space in front. I wasn't able to do that with the other monitors I've used because of their huge stand footprint.

Image quality

IPS panels typically have good colour reproduction and viewing angles. However, the colour accuracy of this screen is questionable though. I highly suspect it may be affected by the brightness of the screen.

This monitor isn't particularly bright. 224cd/m2 is the maximum brightness I measured with the Spyder5Pro. The maximum brightness is even dimmer than some laptop screens.

The relatively low brightness might be a problem if you're working in a brightly lit room.

The colour gamut readout I got was 98% sRGB, 71% NTSC, 77% AdobeRGB. Those readings are supposed to be quite good for IPS panels. But even after calibration, the colours just don't look right to me. I'm using the monitor with a Mac and the gamma looks a bit off. And there's no way to choose the gamma from the monitor settings because there's really not much settings there to choose from.

So even though it can achieve 98% sRGB, it just doesn't look right to me. This is not a suitable monitor for graphic design, photo or video editing. The colours are decent but they are not at the standard where I would recommend it for work that requires colour accuracy.

I was reading the Wikipedia entry for HDMI and discovered that HDMI does not support the sRGB colour space. Hmmmmm.... But the colour calibrator recorded 98% sRGB support though.

Glitches
For some reason, with the colour profile that I created, brightness would flicker occasionally. For example, when I switch from a darker webpage to a white webpage, it seems like the screen would flicker. From a dark page to another dark page is fine. That's really weird because when I set the colour profile to something else (those pre-configured ones), I do not get the brightness flicker. I'm using it on my Mac Pro, and when I use the monitor on my Macbook Pro and Surface Pro 2017, there are no problems.

In short, if I don't use the colour profile created by the Spyder5Pro, I did not see any brightness flicker issue.

I'm not sure what's wrong.


The menus are in Chinese by the way. Changing brightness and contrast is pretty straightforward even if you don't know Chinese.


These are the menu buttons.

How big is too big?

This is the largest computer monitor I've ever used. It's quite a step up from the my main 27-inch BenQ SW2700PT which I thought was already a big monitor. The Q320 Pro with its extra diagonal 5-inch makes it look humongous, more so because with computer monitors we tend to sit closer to the screen.


The resolution of 2560 x 1440 is sufficient for a screen this size but it's not ideal. Pixelation is obvious because of the pixel density. But I don't find the pixelation to be distracting or annoying. The combination of screen size and resolution is good enough for me.


After using this monitor for a few weeks, I know my next monitor is definitely a 32-inch. It is really satisfying to watch movies, play games on such a huge screen. It feels so immersive while watching videos. And the colours are great for videos. Speaking of games, the refresh rate is 60Hz.

Backlight


Backlight is rather uneven. There are large obvious patches at the edges that can be quite distracting when the screen is black. But when movies are played, it's less distracting because of the contrast provided by the video against the black bar. Uneven backlighting is not cool but when watching a movie on such a huge screen, I don't even notice the backlight patches anymore.

There's also the usual IPS glow.

Conclusion

Despite all the downsides, I still enjoy using this monitor very much because of its sheer size. It's such a joy to see everything so large. It's seriously a fantastic deal for a 32-inch monitor with 2560 x 1440 resolution when you consider the price point of US $250.

Availability

You can get the monitor at
https://www.gearbest.com/desktop-computer-monitor/pp_691710.html?lkid=13...

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Pang Sua Pond is located in Bukit Panjang. Our sketchwalk will start at 9.30am in the morning. Be sure to bring mosquito repellent just in case.

Check out more details on the Facebook page at https://www.facebook.com/events/577270619272468/

Giveaway contest


Here are the prizes I'll be giving:

Criteria for winning the prizes
  • Prizes are given out at the end of the sketchwalk to winners.
  • Post a comment on the prize you want.
  • Only comments here count.
  • Leave your real name if you're using nickname.
  • You'll need to introduce yourself and your sketch that day.

Good luck!

Comments posted will not appear immediately. But fear not, they are received.

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The Artist 13.3 from XP-PEN was released around the same time as the the Artist 15.6 if I remember correctly. With these two new products, XP-PEN now has a good range of sizes for their pen displays, namely 10s, 13.3, 15.6, 16 and 22HD.

If you haven't read my review for the Artist 15.6, it's alright because the Artist 13.3 performs very similarly to it, except that it's smaller.

Oh, the unit that I'm using was sent over from XP-PEN. Thanks a lot once again!

Specifications
  • Product dimensions: 39 x 25 x 1.4cm
  • Active area: 29.3 x 16.5cm
  • Screen: 13.3 inches with 1920 x 1080 resolution
  • Panel type: IPS
  • Colors: 16.7 million
  • Input: USB-C
  • Graphic ports supported: HDMI, miniDisplay
  • Pen does not require battery
  • Pressure sensitivity: 8,192 levels

The main highlights for me are the matte screen, battery-less pen and pressure sensitivity support at 8,192 levels.

What's in the box


The packaging box features a very simple clean design. With this box, you lift up the cover to reveal the pen display and all the things included.

  • HDMI/Power/USB all-in-one cable
  • USB extension cable
  • HDMI to miniDisplay adapter
  • Pen and stand
  • 8 replacement nibs
  • Wall charger and various international plugs
  • Manual, warranty card, cleaning cloth and glove


Instead of a power brick, a wall charger is included with interchangeable power plugs for different socket types.


You can install the driver from the USB storage included. But it's always best to download the latest driver from XP-PEN's website.


I appreciate that a mini-DisplayPort to HDMI adaptor has been included. Lots of graphics card and laptops are using the mini-DisplayPort.


This is the HDMI and data cable. The HDMI head is split to three different cables: the data USB, the red coloured power USB and the USB type-C.

The data USB (black) connects to the computer so that the pen can be recognised. The red power USB goes to the power outlet. If your USB port provides sufficient power to the black USB, you may not need to use the red power USB or wall charger. The USB type-C is the only cable that's connected to the pen display. The whole setup is quite clean.


You may not need the USB extension cable if the HDMI and data cable is long enough.


That's the pen and stand included. The pen supports 8,192 levels of pressure sensitivity. It does not use battery so it does not need to be charged.


There are two side buttons but no eraser.


The pen stand can be opened up to reveal 8 replacement nibs. The nib remover is that tiny hole at the bottom of the pen stand.


Nib removal instructions are behind. Basically, stick the nib inside, tilt it, pull it out.


You can also put the pen vertically but it's not a tight fit so it's going to wobble when you hit it accidentally.


This 13.3 inch pen display supports a 1920 x 1080 resolution. For a screen this size, which isn't too big, everything appears sharp.

When you first open up the box, the screen has a protector film over it which has to be peel off to reveal the matte screen protector. It's a nice texture to draw on. However the matte screen protector does affect the sharpness slightly but it's not really a big deal when you have a nicer surface to draw more.

I find that after each drawing session, my hand would deposit some grease on the screen protector. It doesn't affect the performance or anything but I wipe it down to make it look good. Based on my experience with matte screen protectors, it's not uncommon to see scratches after a while since they are not as hard as glass.

The Artist 13.3 used an IPS panel so colour reproduction is quite decent. Using a Spyder5PRO colour calibrator, I managed to get a readout of 89% sRGB, 68% NTSC and 70% Adobe RGB. Surprisingly, the colours on this smaller pen display is better than the Artist 15.6. When I first power on the display, I could see instantly that the colours are better.

The maximum brightness is measured at 300 cd/m2 which is a bit too bright for me. I typically work at 200 cd/m2. Over time, like all displays, the brightness will dim, but it's good to know that you can still turn up the brightness when that happens in the future. The Artist 15.6 produced only 166 cd/m2.


Six physical shortcut buttons are located on the side. They do feel a bit cheap but the click feedback is firm.


On the other side, there are the power button, brightness control buttons and the USB type-C input port.


The overall build quality is solid. Edges are all rounded off. It actually looks quite good. Can't compare to the build and looks of the Wacom Cintiq but the price is much more affordable. At the time of this review, it's selling on Amazon at US $330.

Driver

With the driver, you can change the pressure sensitivity, assign functions to the side and physical shortcut buttons, calibrate the screen to compensate for parallax offset and switch to left-handed mode if you want to.

When you're using it for the first time, there's going to be parallax. The glass is close to the screen but there's still a distance. There's parallax so you'll definitely want to calibrate the screen.


There isn't much difference between Windows and Mac drivers except that with the Windows driver, you can change the pressure curve but the Mac driver uses a pressure slider dial.


If you use dual monitors, the driver also allows you to click a button to switch between monitors to use.

Drawing performance

Drawing performance is generally fine except for some minor issues.

Let's look at the drawing apps on the Mac first.


Quick strokes on Photoshop (Mac) works well. When it comes to curves, it seems like there's some wobble and the thickness varies slightly.


To get pressure working with Adobe Illustrator, Wacom Intuos driver need to be installed.


Medibang Paint Pro (Mac) seems to perform similarly to Photoshop. There's some wobble for curves as well. Quick strokes are fine. When used for drawing, I don't really notice the wobble issues. Same applies to Photoshop (Mac).


Mischief (Mac) works fine.


Krita (Mac) works fine but there's the wobble again.


Clip Studio Paint (Mac) performs perfectly. The lines are smooth, taper well and there's none of the wobble issues seen in other apps.

And now on to Windows apps...


Photoshop (Win) seems to have slight wobble with curvy lines. When used with Lazy Nezumi Pro, the lines are smoother. In the picture above, the Lazy Nezumi lines are those on the right side.


Adobe Illustrator (Win) works fine.


Medibang Paint Pro (Win) performs better than the Mac version. Lines are smoother and able to hold a consistent width, and when the thickness varies, it varies gradually.


Krita works fine.


Clip Studio Paint works fine.


There is an issue with Mischief. You need to turn on Windows Ink for Mischief to work well.


Windows Ink needs to be enabled for Sketchable to work well too. Without Windows Ink, there's no pressure sensitivity.

Conclusion

Overally performance is quite good but I wished that it could even be better. There's this inconsistency or the challenge of maintaining a consistently smooth line when drawing curves. When you're testing for it, it's going to show up, but when actually drawing with it, it's not that big of an issue. Out of all the apps, Clip Studio Paint works perfectly without any of the wobble or stroke issues.

If you're using Windows, the performance of the pen is better than on Mac. You get nicer looking lines.

Artist 13.3 vs 15.6
In terms of performance, it's basically similar to the Artist 15.6.

The Artist 13.3 is better than the 15.6 in two aspects: Colour accuracy is better on the smaller model. I suppose they are using some better quality IPS panel here. And the 13.3 also has better brightness topping out at 300 cd/m2.

The larger size of the Artist 15.6 makes it more comfortable to work on. The sharpness and resolution of the 13.3 inch screen is good but to be able to draw on a larger screen feels more liberating. It's the same feeling as drawing on a small sheet of paper vs a larger sheet.

Glitch alert!
I've just copied the text below from the Artist 15.6 review because both models suffer from the same glitch.

On the Mac, I've issues with double clicks behaving inconsistently. Inside Finder, when selecting files in the list mode, a single click will become a double click and open the folder. This makes selecting multiple files using Cmd+click impossible because each time you click to select, you're opening the folder instead. And when you click to select a file, you are opening the file. This glitch does not happen when the Finder is in Icon mode for some reason.

The same double click issue happens when I need to upload files. I hit the upload button, and the Finder window opens, I'm faced with the same problem again.

The problem is opposite when I'm using Adobe Lightroom. When I double click a photo to view it large, it does not do anything, as if I'm only using a single click.

None of these glitches above exists in Windows.

Pros and cons at a glance

+ Good build quality and design
+ Pen does not require battery
+ Pen is quite sensitive
+ 8 replacement tips included
+ 6 shortcut buttons are useful, but more would be great
+ Matte anti-glare screen does not have reflections
+ Nice texture on screen to draw on
+ 1080P resolution on the screen this size is sharp enough
+ Screen has decent colour accuracy and viewing angles. Better than Artist 15.6
+ Does not heat up significantly. Can be used for long periods of time without discomfort
+ Drawing performance generally good but depends on the OS and app that you use
+ Lines have little to no wobble and jitter (mostly on Windows apps)
+ You can power this display from a single powered USB port if you want to
+ HDMI-miniDisplay port adaptor included
+ Price is very competitive for a screen of this size
- Matte screen protecter affects sharpness of the screen but a good tradeoff for the texture it provides
- Some issues with the specific drawing apps mentioned in the review
- Parallax exists, corrected by calibration
- Double click issue on the Mac with certain apps (thankfully not drawing apps)
- No stand included for the display

Availability

The XP-Pen Artist 13.3 pen display is available on Amazon via the direct product links below:
Amazon.com | Amazon.ca | Amazon.co.uk | Amazon.de | Amazon.fr | Amazon.es | Amazon.it | Amazon.co.jp

You can check out more reviews on Amazon too. Purchases through the links get me a commission at no extra cost to you, and helps me put out more reviews like this.

Oh, and special thanks to my Patreon supporters for their support which allowed me to have the funds to purchase some of the graphic apps (that I don't normally use) to test out. That's your contribution. You guys rock.

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Peter Brown has put up his artbook on Kickstarter and it features some amazing paintings. Check it out at http://kck.st/2BZRooq

Campaign ends March 17 2018 7:00 PM AWST.

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The Art of The Dam Keeper is a wonderful companion artbook for the animated short film directed by Dice Tsutsumi and Robert Kondo.

This 168-page hardcover artbook collects the concept art and included character designs and beautiful scene paintings from the animation. There are numerous interviews included to give you insight into the making and production. It's an insightful read that goes behind the scenes to talk about the motivation and inspiration behind this humongous project. You can definitely feel that this is a labour of love from the two ex-Pixar directors. The two also talk about story elements of the animation.

I love the style of the art because it's so different from other animation. The design and art direction are fantastic, charming.

It's a book worth getting if you're fan of the animated short or Dice Tsutsumi and Robert Kondo.

-

This book was borrowed from Basheer Graphic Books for review purposes. You can order the book from them. Check with Basheer on Facebook.

The Art of The Dam Keeper (book flip) - YouTube

Visit Amazon to check out more reviews.

If you buy the links, I get a little commission that helps me get more books to feature.

Here are direct links to the book:
Amazon.com

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Robert Kondo and Dice Tsutsumi’s graphic novel The Dam Keeper is a spinoff from their award winning short film by the same name. The graphic novel is published by First Second and comes with a beautiful textured book jacket and in hardcover.

For those who are not familiar with the short film, the story is about Pig who lives in a windmill and spends his time keeping it spinning to repel the dark fog from engulfing the town. Pig is socially awkward and often gets bullied in school despite his efforts at keeping the town safe. There’s also Fox, a new student who becomes his best friend.

For this graphic novel, the story follows a similar premise, but with more details being fleshed out through the pages and expands on Pig’s and his friends adventures.

The book achieves a similar aesthetic feel to the short film, in terms of the color palette and painterly feel. Each page is gorgeously illustrated by the 2 artists with muted tones. The anthropomorphic characters of Pig, Fox and other characters are beautifully conceptualised and designed. Perhaps that’s why besides the graphic novel, the IP is branching out to an animated television series too. The book seems to be targeting at the younger readers as the storytelling is pretty straightforward and the page ends with a cliffhanger. To find out what happens, readers will have to wait till July 2018 for the publication of the 2nd book titled The Dam Keeper: World Without Darkness.

-

This book was borrowed from Basheer Graphic Books for review purposes. You can order the book from them. Check with Basheer on Facebook.

Sorry that no pictures are included. I forgot to take the photos before returning the book. You can check out the art from The Art of The Dam Keeper instead.

Visit Amazon to check out more reviews.

If you buy the links, I get a little commission that helps me get more books to feature.

Here are direct links to the book:
Amazon.com | Amazon.ca | Amazon.co.uk | Amazon.de | Amazon.fr | Amazon.it | Amazon.es | Amazon.co.jp | Amazon.cn | Bookdepository.com

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Registration for Urban Sketchers Symposium 2018 at Porto will start on 17th February, Saturday, 15:00hrs GMT. Passes are sold almost instantly, so good luck!

https://www.eventbrite.com/e/9th-urban-sketchers-symposium-porto-2018-re...

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Gregory Manchess must be one hell of an artist to put out a book like this, a large wide format that's fully painted on every page. It's amazing. I saw no other name on the cover so he must be the one writing the story as well.

The story is about a son looking for a lost city that his dad has discovered. And this city is hidden in The Waste, a vast landscape of snow and treacherous mountains. There are also other people looking for that city, and they aren't friendly.

The story and the artworks work well together. Gregory Manchess is a masterful painter. To paint all the paintings in this book is no small feat. In fact, it's astounding when you consider how beautiful they are. They may look a bit rough but the composition, lighting and mood are all spot on. I cannot even begin to imagine the amount of work and time he spent on these paintings. Incredible, and awe-inspiring.

This is a fantastic book, a visual treat.

-

This book was borrowed from Basheer Graphic Books for review purposes. You can order the book from them. Check with Basheer on Facebook.

Above the Timberline is available at Amazon (US | CA | UK | DE | FR | IT | ES | JP | CN) and Book Depository

Above the Timberline by Gregory Manchess - YouTube

Visit Amazon to check out more reviews.

If you buy the links, I get a little commission that helps me get more books to feature.

Here are direct links to the book:
Amazon.com | Amazon.ca | Amazon.co.uk | Amazon.de | Amazon.fr | Amazon.it | Amazon.es | Amazon.co.jp | Amazon.cn | Bookdepository.com

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