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Colour Calibration Tips for Professional Photographers with the ViewSonic VP2785-4K Monitor

With a stunningly smooth palette of 4.39 trillion colours, the ViewSonic® VP2785-4K Ultra HD monitor meets the high color standards of photographers, graphic designers, video editors, print departments and other design professionals.

Reviewed  Sponsored Content by Jason DiMichele

The ViewSonic VP2785-4K monitor provides professional quality colour accuracy and uniformity. Although the VP2785-4K ships in a calibrated state from the factory, as a professional you’ll want to take full control. 

In order to harness the power of the VP2785-4K, it is essential to calibrate/profile the monitor for your own environment. The ideal colour management solution is the ViewSonic Colorbration Kit, designed specifically for ViewSonic monitors in partnership with X-Rite (Colorbration software also works with the X-Rite i1Display Pro spectrophotometer). 

When calibrating/profiling your VP2785-4K, here is a list of important dos and don’ts to ensure accuracy:  Do:

• Set the User Mode option to Advanced to unlock more of the
professional features 

• Set the White Point to CIE Illuminant D65 instead of Native 

• Set your Luminance between 80-120cd/m2, dpending on how
bright your space is (a slightly dim enviroment is best) 

• Set Contrast Ratio to a custom value to match various papers if
you print (matte paper typically supports a 200:1 ratio and
glossy 300:1)

• Use ICC Profile Version 4 instead of Version 2 for the best colour
transformations 

• Set the Patch Set to Large (462 colour patches) for the best colour
accuracy; if specific colours are required, be sure to add spot or
image colours by clicking on the spot colour and image buttons 

• Use Automatic Display Control (ADC) instead of manually adjust-
ing brightness, contrast and RGB gains for a more accurate and
consistent outcome (a USB cable needs to be connected be-
tween your computer and monitor to allow for the automatic com-
munication/adjustments) 

• Perform the Display Uniformity Check when finished, and choose
a 3×3 grid for the most accurate results

• Use Colorbration, even if you’re a black and white photographer,
as you are controlling tonality as much as colour

• Create and use multiple monitor profiles with different settings for
different purposes and switch when necessary 

Don’t: 

• Place your monitor in front of a window with continually changing
colour temperature and brightness 

• Work with really bright clothes or objects on your desk that could
be distracting if they reflect off the monitor 

• Have mixed colour lighting in your environment; using daylight
balanced bulbs (D65/5500-6500K) is ideal 

• Rely on your eyes to configure colour management as there are
too many variables that can hinder accuracy (a spectrophotometer
is mandatory) 

• Change monitor settings after you’ve completed the calibration/profil-
ing process 

An exceptionally useful feature of the VP2785-4K for those with a single monitor is Picture by Picture (PBP). Utilizing ViewSonic’s Dual Colour Engine technology, you can split the screen in half, with each half having a different colour space.

For example, since the VP2785-4K delivers 99 per cent of the AdobeRGB colour space, you can have one half of the monitor displaying your image in AdobeRGB and the other half displaying the same image in the sRGB colour space. This allows you to edit and compare the image simultaneously. 

As a professional photographer, it’s important to have an edge on your competition. Impressing your clients with perfect colour, and never having to make colour editing guesses provides that edge, and the ViewSonic VP2785-4K is the monitor to help you deliver.

ViewSonic is an award-winning provider of digital display solutions for business, education and commercial customers. For more information visit www.viewsonic.com/ColorPro4k.

The author of this article was provided with a free ViewSonic product in consideration for this endorsement. The views and opinions expressed herein are those of the author and were not influenced by ViewSonic Corporation and/or its affiliates in any way.

Jason DiMichele is a fine art photographer and printer from Ontario, Canada who specializes in nature and abstract photography. Jason is an X-Rite Coloratti, a Hahnemuhle Certified Studio for fine art printing, the Outdoor Photography Canada magazine Gear Columnist, and the Nature, B&W and Macro Photography teacher at Humber College. Visit his website www.jasondimichele.com to view his portfolio or read about his services.

The post Gear – ViewSonic VP2785-4K Monitor (full review) appeared first on Outdoor Photography Canada.

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©Adam Hill
Cape Breton Highlands, NS
Settings: 20mm focal length lens, ƒ11@1/2500 sec., ISO 800

Story and photography by Adam Hill

The Cabot Trail, Cape Breton Island and the Acadian Forest are all well-known features and areas of Nova Scotia. Hiking, spectacular vistas, waterfalls and an array of flora and fauna can be found at the eastern end of the Maritime province. Adam Hill highlights the region.

To read and see more of Adam Hill’s photo trek to the Cape Breton Highlands, and to read more of this not-to-miss issue please pick up the Fall/Winter 2018 issue today online or at your local newsstand. To never miss an issue you can subscribe here

The post East Coast Colour (preview) appeared first on Outdoor Photography Canada.

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©Don Komarechka
Butterfly eye
Settings: ƒ5@1/200 sec., ISO 1600, (light source: ring flash)

Story and photography by Don Komarechka

Macro photographers know that once you get a glimpse of the detail in an insect’s eye or the inside of a flower, you want to get even closer.

Some subjects have unending detail and no matter how close you get, there’s still more to see. A surprising number of people have been asking me lately how to push to these extremes, and the answer is with microscope objectives.

It might have never crossed your radar but a good microscope objective can cost a few hundred dollars in the used market (eBay is a great source) and are available in 2X, 5X, 10X, 20X and higher magnifications. It’s cheaper than a new ultra-powerful macro lens, and the gear to mount it on your camera is incredibly inexpensive.

Look for an infinity-corrected objective, and one that pairs with a 200mm focal length (in the microscope world, this is often written as f=200). There are a lot of options from manufacturers like Mitutoyo and Nikon and a wide variety of focal lengths. For this article, I used a Mitutoyo Plan APO 20X objective … but how the heck do you get it to work with your camera?

The first thing you’ll need is a lens that covers a 200mm focal length. Across different camera systems I have used a 100-400mm lens set to 200mm and it does the trick. You’ll need to set your lens focus to infinity, but first we need a little bit of hardware to fit the two lenses together.

To read about Don’s Delving into Another World column, and to read more of this not-to-miss issue please pick up the Fall/Winter 2018 issue today online or at your local newsstand. To never miss an issue you can subscribe here

The post Pushing Limits — Delving into Another World (preview) appeared first on Outdoor Photography Canada.

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©Glenn Bartley
Connecticut Warbler (Oporornis agilis), MB
Settings: 700mm focal length, ƒ5.6@1/320 sec., ISO 800

Story and photography by Glenn Bartley

For all the photo trips I take to exotic tropical destinations I have to admit that my absolutely favourite type of bird photography excursion is a good, old-fashioned Canadian road trip.

I love the freedom and flexibility of road trips. I love that I don’t have to spend time in airports or take any flights. Perhaps most of all I love seeing parts of Canada that I would probably otherwise never visit.

I have done some pretty serious bird photography road trips in my days as a nature photographer. Usually I like to go for at least three weeks to really cover some ground and see a lot of species.

The longest trip I undertook was seven weeks and involved more than 10,000 kilometres of driving! On that trip I visited many different habitats all across Canada — from the Okanagan Valley in B.C., to the Prairies of southern Alberta, to the boreal forest of northern Manitoba and even the tundra near Churchill, Man.

The images in this article are all from that one epic road trip that I took in my trusty old Subaru.

©Glenn Bartley
A male chestnut-collared longspur sings from its territory in southern Manitoba
Settings: 700mm focal length, ƒ9@1/500 sec., ISO 200

Preparation and Research 

Any good photography road trip starts well in advance of the actual journey with thorough research and the scouting of locations. When I am researching for a trip I usually start by flipping through my field guide and picking out a handful of species that I am really excited to photograph. Once I have my list of targets I start to try to figure out when will be the best time of year to photograph them. In most cases this is going to be in the spring during breeding season. More specifically I aim for the first week that these birds are on territory. 

Perhaps the most valuable tool available for narrowing down the timing and specific sites is the website Ebird (www.ebird.org). This citizen science project is an incredibly valuable resource for bird photographers. Simply enter a species name and zoom in on the map to your area of interest and instantly you will have incredible insight about where and when your target bird has been seen.

Locating hotspots for a given species can save a lot of time in the field and lead to much greater odds of locating your subject.

Once you know where and when to go you can focus on trip specifics such as where to stay, any specific gear needed, while making sure that you are familiar with the calls of the birds you are pursuing. 

Black-backed woodpeckers specialize in disturbed habitats such as those affected by forest fire. A quick question to a friendly park naturalist in Riding Mountain National Park in Manitoba allowed me to locate the most recently burned areas and within minutes I was photographing this species.

Get Intimate with New Ecosystems 

While not an absolute necessity, I think it is hugely beneficial to try and camp onsite during road trips. One of the main reasons for this is to become acquainted with new and unfamiliar ecosystems. Spending the maximum amount of time on location will allow you a more intimate knowledge of the local environment. You will hear the birds singing first thing in the morning and last thing at night and will therefore be able to find them more easily.

Nature photography (especially bird photography) is all about understanding your subjects and their behaviour. To do this best you need to spend as much time as possible in their presence. On a road trip you may only have a few days in a given ecosystem so it pays to camp onsite if possible.

©Glenn Bartley
Black-backed Woodpecker perched on a burned tree trunk in Manitoba.
Settings: 500mm focal length, ƒ5@1/80 sec., ISO 800

Finding the Birds — Sight, Sound and Habitat 

Doing your research in advance will get you in the vicinity of your target birds. Actually getting your lens on them though will require a bit of knowledge. I often say to people that being a good birder is the No. 1 skill required in being a good bird photographer. You simply cannot separate the two. 

Step one of identifying birds is to know your subject when you see it. For the most part this is pretty straightforward. Even more valuable to the keen birder or photographer is to know your target birds by their song. This requires a lot more time in the field but will ultimately pay the biggest dividends.

A final and more nuanced skill is to be able to look at a given habitat and know what birds should be there. Understanding the species composition of different ecosystems allows you to really refine what you are looking for. It also allows you to make targeted stops on the road when the habitat looks right for a species you are after.

Often tricky to photograph, the Connecticut Warbler would have been impossible for me to photograph without being familiar with its song. 

Last Words 

We are so lucky to live in such a vast and beautiful country. In my opinion there is no better way to explore Canada and all of the incredible birds that live here than on a road trip. Whether it’s just for a weekend getaway or a multi-week expedition, do yourself a favour and get out on the road with your camera, binoculars and camping gear. You won’t regret it!

To read more of this not-to-miss issue please pick up the Fall/Winter 2018 issue today online or at your local newsstand. To never miss an issue you can subscribe here

The post Bird Photography Tips — Bird Photography Road Trip (full story) appeared first on Outdoor Photography Canada.

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©Ethan Meleg
Using my professional nature photography skills for a birthday party

Story and photography by Ethan Meleg

Outdoor photographers are often extremely specialized in their field.

There are the Don Komarechkas zoned in on snowflakes for months at a time, John Marriotts living with grizzly bears and wolfpacks more than he’s at home, and the Glenn Bartleys who can identify a Crested Bush Thrush fart from a mile away. These pros are super-specialized and extraordinarily good at what they do.

However, it doesn’t matter if you’re the world’s best salamander photographer … to the average person you’re just another photographer. And as a result, anytime anyone needs any photo taken of anything, guess whom they’re going to ask? Yup, it’s you. 

To read more of Ethan’s humorous piece on being a pro photographer please pick up the Fall/Winter 2018 issue today online or at your local newsstand. To never miss an issue you can subscribe here

The post Out of Focus – So You’re a Photographer? (preview) appeared first on Outdoor Photography Canada.

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©Kelly Funk
Setting out on kayaks, Kamloops Lake, BC
Settings: 16mm focal length, ƒ14@1/80 sec., ISO 100

Story and photography by Kelly Funk

Does the thought of getting up a couple of hours before dawn to trek to the same tried and true local areas have the appeal of brushing your teeth, washing your car or taking out the garbage?

On a planned shoot day, do you roll over in bed and hit snooze or say to your spouse, wake me in 10, OK?

If that’s the case, it might be time for a min-adventure! What’s a mini-adventure you ask? Simply as it sounds, a relatively small trek that’s close to home lasting a night or two and ultimately uses another form of transportation to get you to an entirely new and unique spot. Depending on where that area lies relative to your home that transportation can include things like canoes or kayaks, ATVs, short helicopter rides (which can be surprisingly affordable) or even mountain bikes.

The key here is that you’re exploring and photographing something unique while keeping things both affordable yet intriguing. Once that feeling of wonderment and mystery starts to wane from your favourite locations, you’ll probably find that your work ethic and level of fun both drop off dramatically. When that happens, photography can lose the appeal, but by spicing things up the kid in you can be brought out to play again.

To read more of Kelly’s column on Mini-Adventures, Big Rewards and this not-to-miss issue please pick up the Fall/Winter 2018 issue today online or at your local newsstand. To never miss an issue you can subscribe here

The post Your Image – Mini-Adventures, Big Rewards (preview) appeared first on Outdoor Photography Canada.

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©Joe Cantin
Sunset from Toronto Island, Toronto, ON
Settings: 24mm focal length, ƒ14@0.5 sec., ISO 50

Story and photography by Joe Cantin

Landscapes, forests, wildlife, national and provincial parks are common subjects for professional and amateur photographers. Perhaps the road less travelled for avid shooters is the one leading to points of interest in their own urban backyard. The city can provide intimate and interesting photographic settings.

To read and see more of Joe Cantin’s Urban Spaces photo techniques, and to read more of this not-to-miss issue please pick up the Fall/Winter 2018 issue today online or at your local newsstand. To never miss an issue you can subscribe here

The post Urban Spaces – Parks and Forests Near the City (preview) appeared first on Outdoor Photography Canada.

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©Stuart Retallack
Algonquin Highlands, ON
Gear/Settings: DJI Drone, 4.73mm focal length (in 35mm: 26mm), ƒ2.2@1/60 sec., ISO 100

Story and photography by Stuart Retallack

See our exclusive drone video HERE

Drones have been the rage in Canada for a couple of years. Like any technology that begins to creep into the realm of use by the average citizen, the benefits and potential drawbacks must be considered. Stuart Retallack takes things to another level in discussing aerial photography.

To read and see more of Stuart Retallack’s Elevated Perspectives article, and to read more of this not-to-miss issue please pick up the Fall/Winter 2018 issue today online or at your local newsstand. To never miss an issue you can subscribe here

The post Elevated Perspectives (preview) appeared first on Outdoor Photography Canada.

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©Mike Grandmaison Sunrise on Caraquet Bay (Golf of St. Lawrence – Atlantic Ocean)
Caraquet, NB

Story and Photography by Mike Grandmaison

The eastern coastline of New Brunswick, Chaleur Bay, Lameque and Miscou islands offer photographers shoreline landscapes dotted with things like fishing boats, wildflowers, lighthouses and churches. Mike Grandmaison recounts his times on the Acadian Peninsula.

To read and see more of Mike Grandmaison’s adventure to the eastern coast of New Brunswick, and to read more of this not-to-miss issue please pick up the Fall/Winter 2018 issue today online or at your local newsstand. To never miss an issue you can subscribe here

The post Discovering Canada – Eastern Coast of New Brunswick (preview) appeared first on Outdoor Photography Canada.

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Each issue we will feature five winners from the Outdoor Photography Canada Instagram page (#OPCMAG). We will choose one overall winner and four runners-up. The winner receives $100. All winners and runners-up receive a free one-year subscription to Outdoor Photography Canada magazine. Here are this issue’s recipients:

OVERALL WINNER

Dave Zimmerman (@davez906) Winnipeg, MB — Juvenile Burrowing Owl

©Dave Zimmerman

RUNNERS-UP

©Alan Poleman (@alftown)
Elk shot at Park Omega, QC

Moose ©Jean-Simon Bégin (@jeansimon_wildlife_photography)
Jean-Simon Bégin, Pont- Rouge, QC

©Argen Elezi (@argenel)
Niagara Falls, New York, USA
Argen Elezi, Toronto, ON

©Michael Sidofsky (@mindz.eye)
Moody Mornings, Jasper National Park, AB
Michael Sidofsky, Toronto, ON

To read more of this not-to-miss issue please pick up the Fall/Winter 2018 issue today online or at your local newsstand. To never miss an issue you can subscribe here

The post #OPCMAG INSTA WINNERS – Fall/Winter 2018 (full story) appeared first on Outdoor Photography Canada.

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