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Wellington Orienteering Club is hosting Nationals 2020 and so we are seeking expressions of interest for two new maps. Information on each of these maps is below.

Please don’t hesitate to get in touch with Sarah (president@wellingtonorienteering.org.nz) otherwise we look forward to receiving your quotes by Sunday 4 August 2019.

 

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Ticks and Long Distances - NZ JWOC Team 2019 | Day 3 - YouTube

The New Zealand JWOC team’s preparation and racing at JWOC 2019 in Silkeborg, Denmark.

Follow the team at https://www.instagram.com/nzjwocteam/

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Shorts Choice and Sprints - NZ JWOC Team 2019 | Day 1 - YouTube

Day 2 of JWOC training week was also Kurtis’ birthday! So we celebrated with forest AND sprint training, just for him. Tune in for some insight on the NZ boys shorts of choice discussion and plenty more goodness…

The New Zealand JWOC team’s preparation and racing at JWOC 2019 in Silkeborg, Denmark. Follow the team at https://www.instagram.com/nzjwocteam/

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Forest and Pastry - NZ JWOC Team 2019 | Day 1 - YouTube

Watch on YouTube

The New Zealand JWOC team’s preparation and racing at JWOC 2019 in Silkeborg, Denmark. Follow the team at https://www.instagram.com/nzjwocteam/

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As usual June has seen a major upturn in happenings. This started, of course, with the massive turn-out at Queen’s Birthday. This was followed a week later by the first round of the World Cup for 2019, though it was not particularly uplifting from the local point of view. Now we have the departure of the JWOC team and we start to look forward to both that and WOC, and not forgetting the World MTBO Champs which take place at the end of July.

Malcolm Ingham

(mandg.ingham@xtra.co.nz)

Queen’s Birthday 2019

 Quite apart from being the home leg of the Pinestars-Bushrangers Test Match and the final round of the NOL, Queen’s Birthday provided the final domestic hit-out for those heading overseas for higher things. In that regard the two forest events showed the JWOC team to be in fine fettle, filling 5 of the top 6 places in M17-20E on both days, and almost completing the same feat in W17-20E. WOC-bound Gene Beveridge also showed his form finishing in the top 4 in all 3 individual races.

Competition kicked off on the Saturday on a re-mapped Whirokino in the north-east corner of Waitarere Forest. This was not the typical white, fast-running Waitarere with the rotting thinnings, inkweed, and steep slopes making it tough going for much of the courses, before the final blast on the hilly rough-open dunes. In M21E, what can probably be regarded as the current “big three” of New Zealand forest orienteering filled the first three places, gene holding out Matt Ogden and Nick Hann by around a minute, and none of the visiting Bushrangers featuring in the top 6. In contrast, in W21E Bridget Anderson started what was to be an excellent weekend for her, with a comfortable margin over Imogene Scott and Sara Prince forcing herself into third ahead of the rest of the Pinestars and Bushrangers. In the 17-20E classes it was New Zealand all the way with clear victories to Joseph Lynch (by over 8 minutes) and Katie Cory-Wright (by just under 5).

M21E: 1 Gene Beveridge (NZL) 1:04:09, 2. Matt Ogden (NZL) 1:05:02, 3. Nick Hann (NZL) 1:05:17, 4. Ed Cory-Wright (PP) 1:07:41m 5. Aaron Prince (PP) 1:08:17, 6. Tommy Hayes (AK) 1:08:47.

W21E: 1. Bridget Anderson (AUS) 1:14:07, 2. Imogene Scott (NZL) 1:16:20, 3. Sara Prince (PP) 1:22:19, 4. Lara Molloy (NZL) 1:23:51, 5. Renee Beveridge (NZL) 1:26:05, 6. Rachel Smith (BP) 1:27:04.

M17-20E: 1. Joseph Lynch (NZL) 53:12, 2. Kurtis Shuker (NZL) 1:01:28, 3. Scott Smith (NZL) 1:03:19, 4. Daniel Monckton (NZL) 1:04:19, 5. Angus Haines (AUS) 1:04:18, 6. Stephen Harding (PP) 1:05:15.

W17-20E: 1. Katie Cory-Wright (NZL) 1:01:51, 2. Briana Steven (NZL) 1:06:29, 3. Kaia Joergensen (NZL) 1:07:17, 4. Georgia Skelton (CM) 1:09:43, 5. Tegan Knightbridge (NW) 1:14:36, 6. Jess Sewell (NW) 1:15:23.

Sunday morning’s sprint on Awatapu-West End presented a completely different challenge. The small nature of the map meant that courses criss-crossed back and forwards through the two schools, with many sharp turns and only the backlog (mea culpa) at the obligatory crossing controls giving respite. Interestingly the Australians came much more to the fore with Brodie Nankervis only just pipped by Matt in M21E, and Krystal Neumann joining Bridget in the top 6 in W21Em albeit a little behind Renee Beveridge. Three of the visitors also figured in the top 6 in M17-20E where Kurtis Shuker shaded Joseph, while Caitlin Young was second to Kaia Joergensen in the junior women.

Round and round the buildings on Course 1 on Awatapu

M21E: 1. Matt Ogden 12:08, 2. Brodie Nankervis (AUS) 12:11, 3. Gene Beveridge 12:13, 4. Nick Hann 12:16, 5=. Cameron Tier 12:17, 5=. Tommy Hayes 12:17.

W21E: 1. Renee Beveridge 13:27, 2. Imogene Scott 13:42, 3. Bridget Anderson 14:01, 4=. Krystal Neumann (AUS) 14:02, 4=. Alice Tilley (NW) 14:02, 6. Amelia Horne (RK) 14:23.

M17-20E: 1. Kurtis Shuker 12:14, 2. Joseph Lynch 12:18, 3. Angus Haines 12:30, 4. Dante Afnan (AUS) 12:36, 5. Alastair George (AUS) 12:41, 6. Liam Thompson (AK) 12:44.

W17-20E: 1. Kaia Joergensen 13:34, 2. Caitlin Young (AUS) 13:52, 3. Jess Sewell 13:55, 4. Briana Steven 14:22, 5. Carolyne Nel (HB) 14:50, 6=. Arabella Phillips (AUS) 15:29, 6=. Tegan Knightbridge 15:29.

The most exciting racing of the weekend, for both athletes and spectators, came in the form of the sprint relay on IPU New Zealand on Sunday afternoon. The spacious private tertiary campus provided an interesting mix of terrain and the opportunity for good visibility for spectators, with proceedings significantly enhanced by Duncan Morrison’s informative commentary. NZL and AUS each had 3 teams and were joined not just by the NOL teams but also the school seniors.

One version of the women’s sprint relay course

NZL 1 (the elite team) had a start to finish win, leading at the end of every leg, with a final winning margin of 13 seconds. Behind them, however, positions changed continuously. Notable at the end of the first leg was that three schools teams, two from Auckland, with Penelope Salmon and Zara Stewart, and one from Central, with Tessa Burns, were in 2nd, 3rd and 4th ahead of the other 5 international teams and all the NOL teams. On leg 2, fast times from Gene Beveridge and Simon Uppill pulled NZL 2 and AUS 1 into the top 3, while Tommy Hayes put the NOL Northerners in touch with the leaders. Brodie Nankervis then put AUS 1 into second position at the final change-over, with Kurtis Shuker pulling the NZL 17-20 team into 3rd. Just over half-way through the final leg it looked as if Bridget Anderson for AUS1 had overhauled Renee Beveridge but the longer of the final splits appeared to make the difference as not only did Renee bring NZL1 home, but a fast finishing Katie Cory-Wright put NZL3 into second place.

Sprint Relay: 1. New Zealand 1 (Imogene Scott, Nick Hann, Matt Ogden, Renee Beveridge) 47:34.26, 2. New Zealand 3 (Kaia Joergensen, Joseph Lynch, Kurtis Shuker, Katie Cory-Wright) 47:47.87, 3. Australia 1 (Krystal Neumann, Simon Uppill, Brodie Nankervis, Bridget Anderson) 47:54.06, 4. Northerners 1 (Emily Hayes, Tommy Hayes, Cameron Tier, Alice Tilley) 47:54.51, 5. New Zealand 2 (Lara Molloy, Gene Beveridge, Daniel Monckton, Briana Steven) 50:30.30, 6. Australia 3 (Arabella Phillips, Angus Haines, Duncan Currie, Caitlin Young) 50:32.20.

The final race on Monday presented a much different Kaikokopu than in its last appearance in 2013. Pruning and thinning of many of the blocks meant that there was little, apart from a single block, in the way of open, clean running. Nevertheless the top end of the M21E field made short work of the thinnings – Matt pulling off his second win of the weekend ahead of Nick and Simon. One-two in women’s elite was the same as on Saturday with Bridget having a relatively comfortable margin over Imogene and Lara getting into the top 3 for the first time. Joseph was back on top of M17-20E but was run hard by Daniel Monckton who managed to push Kurtis out of the top 2 for the first time. Katie also repeated her win from the first day with Georgia Skelton 2 minutes back and Kaia, who early in the week was in doubt of running, completing a trifecta of top 3 finishes.

M21E: 1. Matt Ogden 43:51, 2. Nick Hann 44:06, 3. Simon Uppill 44:52, 4. Gene Beveridge 45:30, 5. Aaron Prince 46:12, 6. Conor Short (WN) 47:05.

W21E: 1. Bridget Anderson 51:36, 2. Imogene Scott 52:48, 3. Lara Molloy 55:00, 4. Sara Prince 55:46, 5. Renee Beveridge 56:20, 6. Rachel smith 58:17.

M17-20E: 1. Joseph Lynch 40:10, 2. Daniel Monckton 40:37, 3. Kurtis Shuker 42:10, 4. Stephen Harding  42;25, 5. Will Tidswell (NZL) 42:48, 6. Dante Afnan 44:04.

W17-20E: 1. Katie Cory-Wright 52:09, 2. Georgia Skelton 54:13, 3. Kaia Joergensen 56:43, 4. Carolyne Nel 58:33, 5. Jess Sewell 59:27, 6. Tegan Knightbridge 1:03:08.

In terms of the Pinestars-Bushrangers Test Match, after the weekend the final scores were M21E: Pinestars 78 Bushrangers 57, W21E: Pinestars 73 Bushrangers 62, M17-20E: Pinestars 94 Bushrangers 54, W17-20E: Pinestars 78 Bushrangers 52, Relay: 21E Pinestars 20 Bushrangers 15, 17-20E Pinestars 20 Bushrangers 15.

However, under the new system in which the home and away legs are combined into an overall competition, scores are normalized to give the winning team in each class 100 points. When this is done the situation looks as follows:

M21: AUS 72 NZL 100, W21: AUS 82 NZL 100, M17-20: AUS 59 NZL 100, W17-20: AUS 68 NZL 100, Overall: AUS 281 NZL 400

Thus the Australian Bushrangers have a bit of catching to so when competition resumes at the three Oceania individual events in late September.

National Orienteering League

The Queen’s Birthday 3-day event was also the final round of the NOL. The series consisted of 11 races in total with the best 8 scores to count, with competition in men’s and women’s senior and junior elites classes.

The M21E title was retained by Gene Beveridge  – the only one in this class to run in all 11 races. Gene was 80 points ahead of 2016 and 2017 winner Nick Hann. Matt Ogden, who ran in only 6 races, was third with a relatively large gap back to the next placings.

M21E: 1. Gene Beveridge 700, 2. Nick Hann 620, 3. Matt Ogden 510, 4. Ed Cory-Wright 338, 5. Conor Short 330 , 6. Tommy Hayes 327 – full table Senior Men (M21E)

In W21E Imogene Scott took the title for the third consecutive year with 680 points, overhauling Lara Molloy over the course of Queen’s Birthday weekend. A series of consistent performances pulled Renee Beveridge into 3rd place just ahead of Sara Prince.

W21E: 1. Imogene Scott 680, 2. Lara Molloy 561, 3. Renee Beveridge 494, 4. Sara Prince 440, 5. Alice Tilley 332, 6. Tessa Ramsden 307 – full table     Senior Women (W21E)

Pride of place, however, goes to Joseph Lynch in M17-20E, who won 7 of the 11 races, finishing with 780 points out of a possible maximum of 800. Joseph was another to retain the title won in 2018. Second place went to Kurtis Shuker with Will Tidswell third.

M17-20E: 1. Joseph Lynch 780, 2. Kurtis Shuker 490, 3. Will Tidswell 452, 4. Daniel Monckton 433, 5. Stephen Harding 413, 6. Scott Smith 375 – full table Junior Men (M17-20E)

W17-20E was the only class with a new winner as Katie Cory-Wright took out the win with 600 points. Tessa Burns, the early leader in the series missed the last 3 races in favour of ensuring making the schools team to Australia, thus finishing 88 points behind. Third place produced a tie between Briana Steven and Kaia Joergensen.

W17-20E: 1. Katie Cory-Wright 600, 2. Tessa Burns 512, 3=. Briana Stevens 490, 3=. Kaia Joergensen 490, 5. Jessica Sewell 427, 6. Marisol Hunter 365 – full table Junior Women (W17-20E)

The junior elite classes were in fact highly competitive with no fewer than 13 of the men’s field and 11 of the women’s competing in at least 8 of the 11 races.

Southern Cross Challenge Team(s)

Queen’s Birthday was also the trials for the NZL schools teams to compete against the Australian state school teams in the Southern Cross Challenge. With New Zealand now being allowed 2 teams this has become a really major logistical exercise involving 40 athletes. The events take place in the week between the two weekends of the Oceania Championships. Congratulations to all the following.

NZL Harua: Senior Boys – Mitchell Cooper (AK), Patrick Hayes (AK), Ryan Moore (PP), Liam Stolberger (NW), Will Tidswell (HB); Senior Girls – Tessa Burns (HB), Anna Duston (AK), Sylvie Frater (AK), Kyla Rayward (NL), Jessica Sewell (NW); Junior Boys – Nathan Borton (AK), Luke Clements (AK), Riley Croxford (NL), Luke Farrand (NW), Flynn Hunter (PP); Junior Girls – Juliet Frater (AK), Paulina Harrison (NL), Emily Hayes (AK), Sophie Toes (AK), Daisy York (PP).

NZL Karahiwi: Senior Boys – Adam Bateman (AK), Cameron Bonar (NW), Tom Harding (PP), Ronan Lee (HB), Aryton Shadbolt (PP); Senior Girls – Cara Bradding (NW), Amy Culham (HB), Jessie Fa’avae (NL), Kaia Jeorgensen (PP), Penelope Salmon (AK); Junior Boys – Olaf Baker (WN), Liam Buyck (AK), Zefa Fa’avae (NL), Felix Hunt (PP), Samuel Sinclair Taylor (AK) ; Junior Girls – Alice Egan (PP), Mercy Jones (TK), Hannah Mangnall (NL), Ruby Nathan (AK), Zara Stewart (AK).

World Cup Round 1 – Helsinki

The first round of the 2019 World Cup took place near Helsinki from 8-11 June involving a middle distance prologue, a chasing start (or pursuit) long distance based on the prologue results, and a sprint relay. New Zealand had 2 entrants, Tim Robertson and Lizzie Ingham, although injury forced Lizzie to miss the two forest races. The middle distance was a tough challenge over a mix of white forest, bare rock interspersed with marshes.  Tim did not have his best day finishing some way behind winner Gustav Bergman of Sweden who was a minute clear of the rest of the field. In the women’s race Tove Alexandersson destroyed the competition winning by over a minute and a half.

Men: 1. Gustav Bergmann (SWE) 30:20, 2. Frederic Tranchand (FRA) 31:23, 3. Olav Lundanes (NOR) 31:51, 4. Magne Daehli (NOR) 31:56, 5. Marin Regborn (SWE) 32:10, 6. Daniel Hubmann (SWI) 32:25, 107. Tim Robertson (NZL) 45:40

Women: 1. Tove Alexandersson (SWE) 29:54, 2.Natalia Gemperle (RUS) 31:32, 3. Marika Teine (FIN) 31:53, 4. Karolin Ohlsson (SWE) 32:03, 5. Kamilla Olaussen (NOR) 32:29, 6. Venla Harju (FIN) 32:30.

Phi-loop from women’s long distance at World Cup 1

The chasing start long was more of the same with phi-loops to split the field up. This was where both Tove Alexandersson and Natalia Gemperle at the front of the women’s field both made mistakes, showing that under pressure even the best can come slightly off the rails. First Tove, approaching 4 missed the control to the north and bounced off the road, meanwhile, Natalia, with number 4 being her number 3 and the chance to take the lead, left the control towards number 9 rather than to the east to number 5. Still in the lead Tove went on to overall victory although well done in times on the day. Natalia’s mistake proved more costly with her dropping to 4th overall. In the men, the prologue winner Gustav Bergman, considerably slower than Emil Svensk on the day, retained his position at the front of the field, ahead of Frederic Tranchard of France and Norway’s Magne Daehli. Tim, having picked up a slight injury, pulled out.

Men: 1. Emil Svensk (SWE) 1:09:57, 2. Miika Kirmula (FIN) 1:10:22, 3. Vojtech Kral (CZE) 1:10:55, 4. Joey Hadorn (SUI) 1:10:57, 5. Jerker Lysell (SWE) 1:11:11, 6. Martin Regborn (SWE) 1:11:15.

Women: 1. Anastasia Rudnaya (RUS) 56:54, 2. Anna Bachman (SWE) 56:55, 3. Elena Roos (SUI) 57:16, 4=. Marika Teini (FIN) 57:20, 4=. Kamilla Olaussen (NOR) 57:20, 6. Sari Anttonen (FIN) 57:23.

Perhaps somewhat perversely, however, the World Cup points are awarded both on the prologue and on the basis of the finishing order, not the actual running times, in the chasing start. Thus, overall, Gustav and Tove took the honours for both races.

With only the two Kiwis present there was no NZL team in the concluding sprint relay. Tim, following his pursuit experience, did not run, but Lizzie, trusting her dodgy ankle on the flatter surface, ran with 3 Australians in an unofficial team. Although officially only thebest team from each country counts, the race was dominated by the Swedes who finished 1st and 3rd, only the Swiss getting into the medals with them.

Sprint Relay: 1. SWE 1 50:53, 2. SUI 1 51:24, 3. SWE 2 51:43, 4. CZE 1 51:47, 5. NOR 1 51:58, 6. RUS 1 52:08

JWOC 2019

Now, of course, attention turns to JWOC. For those wanting to know such things as how the team members start their day, check out https://www.orienteering.org.nz/blog/introducing-the-new-zealand-jwoc-team-2019/ . More seriously, JWOC starts on Sunday 7 July with the sprint in Lyseng. The following day sees the long distance in the wonderfully named Velling – Snabegaard. There is then a day’s rest before the middle qualification, middle final and relay on three successive days. Risking the kiss of death, what do the NZL chances look like?

The old map of Velling-Snabegård – venue for the JWOC long distance

Being realistic, perhaps the best opportunity lies in the opening sprint with Joseph Lynch and Kurtis Shuker. Both have shown a real affinity for this distance, Joseph having finished 15th at JWOC2018. Although sand-dune terrain, the forest races will present a much different challenge to such terrain in New Zealand, with more varied vegetation and runnability. Max Griffiths, Daniel Monckton, Will Tidswell, Marisol Hunter, Briana Steven and Katie Cory-Wright will all be keen to improve on their long distance results from last year, with the key to that probably being the perennial importance of good execution of route choice. In the middle distance, priority will be qualification for the final, something achieved by Max, Joseph and Katie in 2018, but often elusive in a race where a single mistake can be crucial. The 2018 relay performances were disappointing with 2 of the 4 teams mispunching. In 2019 a strong performance from both the top men’s and women’s teams looks a possibility as long as fitness holds up at the end of a tough week. Denmark is currently 10 hours behind New Zealand and live tracking, commentary and on-line results will presumably be accessible through IOFLive (https://orienteering.sport/live/).

NZL bid for JWOC 2022

Responses to various questions raised by IOF have now been sent. These dealt with a variety of issues, one of the principal ones being arena production. This has required not only advice on GPS tracking (thanks to Magnus), but also trying to tie down the actual location of arenas for the various races (thanks to Russell and Gillian for an entertaining tour of one particular forest). The picture below, sadly, will not be a JWOC arena.

Not a JWOC arena

The next stage is a presentation to the IOF Foot-O Commission, which will be given by the HP Leader in Sarpsborg on Monday 12 August, the day before the start of WOC.

 Overseas

Following the World Cup in Helsinki, the field almost exclusively remained in Finland for the Venla and Jukola relays the following weekend. Both Tim (first leg – Koovee 1) and Lizzie (second leg – Halden SK 2) fronted up and were joined by Kate Morrison running the first leg for OK Linne 2. All three Kiwis had good runs, with Tim, especially, bringing Koovee in in 20th place at the first changeover, the team eventually finishing 7th.

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Orienteering NZ by Onz Online Coordinator - Roger Wood.. - 3w ago


National Volunteer Week last week celebrated the collective contribution of the 1.2 million volunteers who enrich Aotearoa New Zealand.

National Volunteer Week 2019 ran from June 16-22. This year’s theme was “Whiria te tangata – weaving the people together”. Volunteering, Mahi Aroha and social action weave people and communities together.

Orienteering NZ wishes to thank all our orienteering volunteers who make orienteering happen and help others find their adventure.

Applications are now open for the position of Orienteering NZ General Manager

The term of the current General Manager ends in late September, and the Council are now inviting applications from people who may have an interest in this role.

This is a contracted position and the term will be for a period of 1 year, based on 20hrs week.

Applications close 15 July 2019

View from the Chair

Aside from the short days and inclement weather, mid winter has a few pluses as well, not least being the midst of the orienteering season for many orienteers around the country. And the start of winter kicked off in fine style thanks to the efforts of Wellington and Red Kiwis orienteering clubs who hosted the Queens Birthday carnival in and around Palmerston North and the southern Manawatu. The weather gods threatened rain, hail and thunder, but for the most part orienteers were spared their wrath and enjoyed (mostly) dry running conditions on some fantastic terrain and maps. It was a great three days and a real highlight was seeing the impressive numbers of people competing, including many juniors competing in the secondary schools competitions, and the junior and open elite runners from NZ and Australia competing in the Pinestars/Bushrangers test match. A big thank you to all the Wellington and Red Kiwis people for putting on a very successful three days racing.

One of the things that the Queens Birthday events demonstrate is the amazing strength that exists in the sport. It constantly amazes me how you can turn up in a muddy field, or remote forest area, or hidden city park, and there is a whole event set up and running. And this happens literally hundreds of times each year all around the country, year in year out. It is an amazing sustainable model of effort, passion, and expertise that makes orienteering unique and special. And what makes this happen? Well in my mind a lot of what makes this happen is the culture which has been built up over the years around orienteering. Each of you will describe it in your own way, but to me it is a culture built on empowerment – the systems clubs use enable people to take on different roles and entrusts them to make things happen. It is a culture built on expertise – having people who can deal with the technical aspects of the sport, train others, and build systems for sharing expertise and ensuring quality events. And it is a culture built on volunteerism – people give their time generously in order to create the experiences we all love, and with an understanding that if we don’t all play our part the sport wouldn’t happen. It strikes me that there is a huge amount of motivation that fuels the sport, and it is interesting to note the conditions that support motivation are having autonomy, purpose, and mastery – arguably things that many people find in orienteering (for more information on this model of motivation check out Dan Pinks excellent TED talk [at] https://www.ted.com/talks/dan_pink_on_motivation?language=en).

So with that in mind, the Council have the challenge of determining how ONZ should be managed and governed in a way that best supports the sport. Operating in a way that complements and sustains the culture which has been core to the success of the sport, engaging with people in a way that fuels motivation, and involving clubs and members in the process of solving the complex problems that are impacting the sport, are in my mind important principles that should underpin how ONZ operates. One of the complex issues the Council debated at its last meeting, is the problem of major events allocation, which was the basis of the Major Events discussion paper that was recently circulated for consultation. It was pleasing to see how the paper generated a lot of discussion and there were a number of thoughtful and considered submissions made from clubs around the country. Having considered all of the submissions, as well as feedback from the club forum (at the Nationals) and other ad hoc feedback, it was clear that there is little support for the proposal presented in the paper, and the decision was made not to continue with it. Whilst the concept of having the national body take a central organising role had appeal on some levels, the proposal would potentially have weakened the culture that has been core to orienteering’s success, and not worked to actually strengthen capability in the club network. However the problem remains around how major events should be allocated, and to that end we are keen to engage with clubs to develop a solution that the majority are happy to go with. Any solution requires buy in, and our goal is to facilitate an outcome that will achieve that. A process for this is now being developed and we will be in touch in the coming weeks to get each clubs input and views.

Associated with this, but also to address a broader and long term goal of member engagement, I have started to talk with clubs around the country. I am keen to hear how clubs are going, what the issues are, how they see ONZ currently, and how would they like to see ONZ in the future. The Council have agreed that an operational review would be helpful to refine the focus of ONZ, and also to assess its operating model – does it meet the needs of members and clubs, and is it set up for future success. These discussions will feed into that operational review and make sure the Council and operations are aligned with club expectations. You will note that an advert has gone out for the GM role. This is due to the current term finishing in September, and whilst the usual term is 3 years, because of the operational review it was decided a 1 year term would be appropriate in the circumstances.

Lastly, I am happy to hear from any member and welcome any feedback on ONZ or ideas you may have for the sport. I can be reached by email on orienteeringnzchair@gmail.com, or phone 027 302 4863. I look forward to talking with many of you in the coming weeks.

Pete Swanson

Event Liaison Update 2020 NI Secondary Schools – CMOC – Wed 22 – Fri 24 April 2020, due to Anzac day falling on Sat 25. Health and Safety at work Act – Private land access for recreation clarified.

Sometimes Landowners are reluctant to grant access to their property on Health and Safety grounds. The ONZ Safety Management plan outlined the issue under the heading Landowners and Local Authorities with a link to  Agriculture visitors and events.

WorkSafe has issued a new Policy clarification: Recreation access and the Health and Safety at Work Act (2015) which explains their view on the responsibilities of PCBU (Landowner) and visitors which reinforces the above.

  • PCBUs* don’t have to manage the risks of the recreational activity. That’s the responsibility of the person doing the activity.
  • PCBUs aren’t responsible for naturally occurring features that aren’t part of, or affected by, their work.
  • If someone accesses land for recreation and hurts themselves as a result of the recreation activity, the PCBU who provided access isn’t responsible.

*PCBU = Person Conducting a Business or Undertaking. A PCBU is the person/organisation that is responsible for safety at a workplace.

If a club has any queries regarding  land access and Heath and Safety matters please contact ONZ Event Liaison Russell Higham: events@orienteering.org.nz

High Performance Update ANZ Test Match

The New Zealand Pinestars took the lead after the home leg of the annual Test Match against the Australian Bushrangers run in the Manawatu over Queen’s Birthday weekend.

International Teams

The international competition season is starting shortly and we have a number of teams who will be competing soon.  All athletes are in the final stages of their preparation, beit at home or already in Europe.

  • JWOC – 6-12 July, Demark
  • WMOC – 6-12 July, Latvia
  • WMTBO – 28 July-3 August, Denmark
  • WOC – 12-17 August, Norway

Good luck to all our athletes.

In other news ….

Important Policy clarification from Worksafe NZ on Recreational access and the Health and Safety at Work Act (2015)

This policy clarification explains Worksafe’s view on the responsibilities of the PCBU and visitors, and how they will manage and respond to related concerns.


Sport NZ and the Ministries of Health and Education have been allocated $47.6 million over four years under the recently announced Wellbeing Budget. This new investment will fund the delivery of a new initiative called Healthy Active Learning that will benefit all schools (primary to secondary), kura and early learning centres.

Healthy Active Learning is about improving child and youth wellbeing by better promoting healthy eating and physical activity. All schools, kura and early learning centres will be supported through new HPE curriculum resources, improved use of external providers and nutrition guidance from a new health promotion workforce.

Sport NZ’s role is to deploy a physical activity workforce to more intensively support 40% (800) of all primary schools, intermediate schools and kura, together with their local communities, to improve the quality of physical activity. A key part of their work will be connecting with local clubs and other providers. We will be focusing on lower decile schools and kura across years 1 to 8, building on the approach and lessons learned from Play.sport.

Sport NZ intends to deploy this new workforce through the RST network to work into selected schools and kura.

Review of Walking Access Act 2008

The Ministry for Primary Industries is reviewing the Walking Access Act 2008 – we want to hear from you and people in your networks interested in access to the outdoors, so we get the best possible results from the review.

The review is about being able to get into the outdoors

The Ministry for Primary Industries is reviewing the Walking Access Act 2008 – we want to hear from organisations and individuals involved in access to the outdoors so we get the best possible results from the review.

The Act is about increasing free access to tracks, trails and other areas for all sorts of recreation associated with walking – biking, horse riding, four wheel driving, access by Māori to sites of significance, surfing, hunting and fishing. Tracks, trails or areas can be in, close to or far from towns and cities.

Getting New Zealanders’ input

We want to raise awareness of the review, encouraging a wide range of groups, organisations and individuals around the country to have their say.
We want to hear from people already involved in outdoors activities and those who are interested in increasing access to the outdoors for themselves or others.
We’d really appreciate your help with this.

GM in Kiribati

Catriona McBean, our GM, will be away from 29 June to 10 July 2019 in Kiribati.  Internet and cell access can’t be guaranteed so she may not be able to reply to you during this time.  An out of office reply with contact directions will let you know who to contact during this time if your enquiry is urgent.

We welcome your feedback at any time.

Our mailing address is:
gm@orienteering.org.nz

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Orienteering NZ by Onz Online Coordinator - Roger Wood.. - 3w ago

The European Youth Orienteering Championships (EYOC) are taking place in Grodno, Belarus on Thursday 27th June through to Sunday 30th June 2019.

For details refer to EYOC Event Bulletin #3 (PDF)

To follow events, including live results and GPS tracking visit https://eyoc2019.by/en/program/

NZ orienteers are travelling independently to the European Youth Orienteering Champs in Belarus.

“There is a team of 3 athletes from NZ, all W16s and all from PAPO. Kaia Joergensen, Daisy York and Isabella Zinzan-Dickie.” – Elite NZ Orienteering

Friday, 28 June 2019 – EYOC2019 Long Distance Final

District of the village Radzivilki and Sapotskin

10:00 – 14:30 (NZST: 7PM – 11:30PM 28 June 2019)

Opening ceremony. Medal ceremony – Soviet square

19:30 – 20:30  (NZST: 4:30am – 5:30am 29 June 2019)

Saturday, 29 June 2019 – EYOC2019 Relay

Village of Ozyry-Starina

10:00 – 13:00 (NZST: 7PM – 10:00PM 29 June 2019)

Medal ceremony – Soviet square

19:30 – 20:00 (NZST: 4:30am – 5:30am 30 June 2019)

Sunday, 30 June 2019 – EYOC2019 Sprint Final

Sovetskaya Square, Grodno

9.30 – 12:15 (NZST: 6:30pm – 9:15pm 30 June 2019)

Medal ceremony and Closing ceremony of the European Championship

12:00 – 13:00  (NZST: 9PM – 10PM)

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The term of the current General Manager ends in late September, and the Council are now inviting applications from people who may have an interest in this role. The role is being advertised on SEEK, and we are especially interested in hearing from suitable applicants who have experience or knowledge of orienteering or similar sports/club environments. This is a contracted position and the term will be for a period of 1 year, based on 20hrs week.

This is a national role, which can be based anywhere in NZ. It offers flexibility and the chance to work closely with the Council, and national body staff and volunteers, who are all passionate about the sport of orienteering. The General Manager is a diverse role, responsible for the efficient running and administration of the national office, as well as close liaison with orienteering clubs, volunteers, and external stakeholders. A key part of success in the role, will be the ability to build positive relationships with clubs and volunteers, and collaborate on key activities or initiatives. The dimensions of the role include office management and administration, financial management, stakeholder management, communications, planning and organising, grant applications and funding, process and policy improvement.

We are looking for candidates with the following:

  • Capabilities in sports administration and management
  • Effective relationship builder and collaborative style
  • Proven leadership capabilities with staff and volunteers
  • Effective in planning, organising, multi-tasking and financial management
  • Experience in orienteering and/or an empathy with a club based sports environment driven by passionate volunteers

For more information or to discuss this, please contact Peter Swanson (ONZ Council Chair) on orienteeringnzchair@gmail.com, or phone 027 302 4863.

Closing date for applications is July 15th 2019. Applications will need to include a CV and cover letter and should be sent to Peter at orienteeringnzchair@gmail.com

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Wagga Wagga and Surrounds, 27 September to 6 October 2019

This year, two teams of equal ability will be selected to compete for the Southern Cross Trophy against the six Australian states and the Australian Capital Territory in the 2019 Australian Schools Championships.

  Team 1 (Harua) Team 2 (Karahiwi)
Senior Boys:  Mitchell Cooper (AK)

Patrick Hayes (AK)

Ryan Moore (PP)

Liam Stolberger (NW)

Will Tidswell (HB)

Adam Bateman (AK)

Cameron Bonar (NW)

Tom Harding (PP)

Ronan Lee (HB)

Ayrton Shadbolt (PP)

Senior Girls:  Tessa Burns (HB)

Anna Duston* (AK)

Sylvie Frater (AK)

Kyla Rayward (NL)

Jessica Sewell (NW)

Cara Bradding (NW)

Amy Culham (HB)

Jessie Fa’avae (NL)

Kaia Jorgensen (PP)

Penelope Salmon (AK)

Junior Boys:  Nathan Borton (AK)

Luke Clements (AK)

Riley Croxford (NL)

Luke Farrand (NW)

Flynn Hunter (PP)

Olaf Baker (WN)

Liam Buyck (AK)

Zefa Fa’avae (NL)

Felix Hunt (PP)

Samuel Taylor Sinclair (AK)

Junior Girls:  Juliet Frater (AK)

Paulina Harrison (NL)

Emily Hayes (AK)

Sophia Toes (AK)

Daisy York (PP)

Alice Egan (PP)

Mercy Jones (TK)

Hannah Mangnall (NL)

Ruby Nathan (AK)

Zara Stewart (AK)

Non-travelling reserves (in order of selection):

 

Senior Boys:    Thomas Brendolise (AK), Michael McCormack (AK)

Senior Girls:     Anna Cory-Wright (AK), Rebecca Greenwood (AK)

Junior Boys:     Daniel Wood (CM), James McGuire (CM)

Junior Girls:     Rachel Duston (AK), Pippa Plummer (NW)

* Anna Duston’s selection is dependent on her proving her fitness to the Selection Panel’s satisfaction at either the North Island Secondary Schools Championships (18 – 20 July) or the New Zealand Secondary Schools Championships (23 – 25 August)

Team Manager – TBA

Coach – TBA

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Meet the NZ team heading to the Junior World Orienteering Champs 2019 being held in Silkeborg, Denmark 6-12 July 2019.

Youngest to eldest, ladies before gentlemen

Kaia Jorgensen

How do you start your day?  With a hundred push ups

What would the title of your autobiography be?  Being brought up by the moose

What is your why?  Food and fun

If you weren’t an orienteer, which sport would you be a professional athlete in?  Hockey

What is your favourite NZ Orienteer quote?  “Pain is weakness leaving the body.”

What is your favourite post session meal?  Chocolate milk and mandarins

What so far is the best decision you have made in your life?  My mother makes the decisions in my house

What is your life motto?  Det fixar sig

Interesting Fact about Denmark is?  I was born there

Georgia Skelton

How do you start your day?  I’m always late to the bus because I spend 20 minutes making porridge on the stove when I do not have time to make porridge on the stove, but it’s always worth it.

What would the title of your autobiography be?  North Lines and Good Times

What is your why?  The people, the places, and the addiction of filling coloured folders with maps.

If you weren’t an orienteer, which sport would you be a professional athlete in?  Is chess a sport?

What is your favourite NZ Orienteer quote?  “If it’s not the fastest route, run faster until it is.” – Tommy Hayes

What is your favourite post session meal?  Banana pancakes just like Jack Johnson

What so far is the best decision you have made in your life?  Learning to drive in a manual (thanks mum and dad) because I’m always jump starting the car after forgetting to turn the lights off and flattening the battery.

What is your life motto?  Life was made for living, so do what you love and not what you don’t.

Interesting Fact about Denmark is:  Denmark has a place where you can surf called Cold Hawaii, and it’s actually one of the best surf beaches in Scandinavia. Might need a wetsuit though!

Briana Steven

How do you start your day?  Turning off six alarms and cursing the fact I don’t live closer to uni

What would the title of your autobiography be?  The Briana-Webster Dictionary -Heckadoodle to yop edition; words to live your most excellent life by

What is your why?  Getting to see Marisol grow as an athlete by packing less and less on each o-trip

If you weren’t an orienteer, which sport would you be a professional athlete in?  Professional weightlifter

What is your favourite NZ Orienteer quote?  “Don’t mispunch” – Derek Morrison

What is your favourite post session meal?  Chip Chip Chips hot chips can we get some chips pleeease

What so far is the best decision you have made in your life?  Asking a very important question in a Hungarian kitchen about 11 months ago

What is your life motto?  On a scale of one to excellent, I rate it M O S T E X C E L L E N T

Marisol Hunter

How do you start your day?  I open my eye

What would the title of your autobiography be?  TBA

What is your why?  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZXsQAXx_ao0

If you weren’t an orienteer, which sport would you be a professional athlete in?  Gumboot throwing

What is your favourite NZ Orienteer quote?  “If I had to rank sprints on a scale of one to excellent, I would rank them… most excellent” Briana Steven (2018)

What is your favourite post session meal?  Pasta of any kind

What so far is the best decision you have made in your life?  Still undecided on this one

What is your life motto?  “I’ll do it later”

Interesting Fact about Denmark is?  They have their own set of 10 commandments called the Janteloven written into the constitution, so you can actually be arrested for thinking you’re better than someone else or for laughing in their misery.

Tegan Knightbridge

How do you start your day?  Smoothie in one hand, cat in the other

What would the title of your biography be?  Navigating from sloth-land

“An inspiring tale about the struggle of self motivation” – Renee Beveridge 2019

What is your why?  The places you travel to and the constant challenge

If you weren’t an orienteer, which sport would you be a professional athlete in?  DH Mountain Biker

What is your favourite NZ Orienteer quote?  “If you’re not reading the map, read the map” – not sure who said it but I like it

What is your favourite post session meal?  A Nature Valley Salted Caramel muesli bar, some scrambled eggs and a NOM chocolate milk from Austria

What so far is the best decision you have made in your life?  Sticking with Orienteering after spending a good 1.5hrs on a 20min course in year 7, after vowing never to do it again

What is your life motto?  Smarter not harder

Interesting fact about Denmark?  The highest point in Denmark is 170m above sea level

Katie Cory-Wright

How do you start your day?  Struggle out of my bed at 7am, tell myself to go for a run but end up watching baking clips on instagram for 2 hours instead.

What would the title of your autobiography be?  Stupid genius

What is your why?  Global warming’s probably going to take us soon, so might as well send it

If you weren’t an orienteer, which sport would you be a professional athlete in?  Gymnastics or Dancing

What is your favourite NZ Orienteer quote?  “If you’ve made a few mistakes today, come and buy an little book of orienteering techniques. I’ll be by the registration tent” – Jean Cory-Wright

What is your favourite post session meal?An overpriced brunch (Pancakes or eggs Benedict)

What so far is the best decision you have made in your life?  I usually only make bad decisions to be honest, but this one time I decided to trial for JWOC as a fresh 15 year old and that went pretty well.

What is your life motto?  Stay fit, run quick, take a hit, get over it, don’t be a hypocrite, get lit, dance a bit, be legit, banana split

Interesting Fact about Denmark?  Danes are the largest consumers of coffee in the world.

Will Tidswell

How do you start your day?  Generally, by sleeping in, then gapping the 50m to not miss the bus.

What would the title of your autobiography be?  WillT, and His Life

What is your why?  I guess its because of all the freak’n awesome opportunities and experiences that I have had with orienteering. And the terrain/sights. And the people

If you weren’t an orienteer, which sport would you be a professional athlete in?  Yeah, ahhhh… Triathlons

What is your favourite NZ Orienteer quote?  “Hydration is key” – Devon Beckman

What is your favourite post session meal?  Blueberry & Mango smoothie

What so far is the best decision you have made in your life?  Having Devon Beckman as my coach

What is your life motto?  Don’t let small things get in the way of your long-term goals – Jenna Tidswell

Interesting Fact about Denmark  “Denmark is a Scandinavian country comprising the Jutland Peninsula and numerous islands. It’s linked to nearby Sweden via the Öresund bridge. Copenhagen, its capital, is home to royal palaces and colorful Nyhavn harbor, plus the Tivoli amusement park” – Google

Daniel Monckton


How do you start your day?  Snoozing through 5 alarms, getting up 3 hours later, coffee and a bowl of hearty porridge?

What would the title of your autobiography be?  Don’t Pick Up The Wrong Map: And Other Fun Things I Have Learnt

What is your why?  For the sweet prize money, sponsorship and global televised fame that orienteering is known for.

If you weren’t an orienteer, which sport would you be a professional athlete in?  The sport of procrastination

What is your favourite NZ Orienteer quote?  “Just send it.”

What is your favourite post session meal?  Pineapple, hot chips and choccy milk

What so far is the best decision you have made in your life?  Avoiding uni… haha whoops

What is your life motto?  Just chuck it in the f**k it bucket.

Interesting Fact about Denmark is?  It’s a tradition to get covered in cinnamon if you are 25 and unmarried.

Joseph Lynch

How do you start your day?  With the soothing commentary of Per Forsberg as my alarm

What is your why?  I enjoy the getting through the grind

Name of your autobiography?   The story of how Ryan Williams changed my life

If you weren’t an orienteer, which sport would you be a professional athlete in?  Race walking

What is your favourite NZ Orienteer quote?  There’s no such thing as route choice, only weakness

What is your favourite post session meal?  Pancakes with butter

What so far is the best decision you have made in your life?  Moving to Christchurch

What is your life motto?  Run fast, burn out faster

Interesting Fact about Denmark is?  It’s the country where Kurtis Shuker will be the first Kiwi to win a JWOC Long

Stephen Harding

How do you start your day?  5 weetbix with milk & yoghurt followed by 2 eggs on toast, beans with cheese on top, salt, pepper, healthy dose of siracha and one glass of full fat milk

What would the title of your autobiography be?  Stephen Harding – An Autobiography

What is your why?  Why would you want to be vegan?

If you weren’t an orienteer, which sport would you be a professional athlete in?  Pool and darts

What is your favourite NZ Orienteer quote?  “Sometimes you run the course, and sometimes it runs you” – Matthew Goodall

What is your favourite post session meal?  BP Wildbean Cafe Butter Chicken Pie and a Redbull

What so far is the best decision you have made in your life?  Leaving Geraldine

What is your life motto?  Nothing is ever so bad that it can’t get worse.

Interesting Fact about Denmark is?  Did you know?1?!As of July 2019 there will be 12 very sexy New Zealand athletes present in the country of Denmark, keep an eye out for them

Kurtis Shuker

How do you start your day?  Bang, alarm. Good ol hearty porridge and can’t go without a coffee, then crack into the day.

What would the title of your autobiography be?  Wouldn’t recommend reading it.

What is your why?  Not too sure really, still trying to find it.

If you weren’t an orienteer, which sport would you be a professional athlete in?  Maybe something like Ultra trail running, just something about those big mountains.

Favourite NZ orienteer quote?  “if in doubt, just send it” – Daniel Monkton

Post session meal?  Trusty banana doesn’t go astray or something salty after a good gear grinder.

Best decision in my life?  Purchasing a Str8 compass.

What is your life motto?  Work hard, train smart, enjoy the journey.

Interesting fact in Denmark?  Did you know that there are more pigs than humans living in Denmark. Last time I checked the Denmark human population was 5,748,769.

Max Griffiths

How do you start your day?  Regretting if waking up was worth it.

What would the title of your autobiography be?  Where did I go wrong? (You’ll need to read it to find out if this refers to life or an orienteering race)

What is your why?  Why is the control not here? *staring at map angrily*

If you weren’t an orienteer, which sport would you be a professional athlete in?  Adventure racing (the less-precise orienteering)

What is your favourite NZ Orienteer quote?  When you’re not reading your map you should be reading your map

What is your favourite post session meal?  Nachos!

What so far is the best decision you have made in your life?  Becoming a founding member of UCOC.

What is your life motto?  If you don’t ask, you don’t get. There’s no harm in trying.

Interesting face about Denmark:  I’ve been stopped 3 times at the uni gym asking if I’m from Denmark.

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