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Every decision of your day contributes to your overall health. Consciously and subconsciously, you are constantly telling your body how you want it to look and feel.

Year after year, studies have proven that if you treat your body right, you’ll reap some amazing benefits. We are seeing examples of how you feel on the inside determines what happens on the outside. For that, you truly can’t put a price on living a healthy lifestyle.

What is a healthy lifestyle?

A lifestyle includes what you eat, who you socialize with, how you dress, and more.

The operative words here are balance, discipline and responsibility. We all have impulses and cravings. When you choose a healthy lifestyle, you make your decisions with your future in mind. You consider that things may feel good in the moment, but they are not wise for your long-term health. Yes, even eating that one extra cookie!

How does a well-rounded lifestyle translate to good health?

First there’s your physical health, for which benefits are obvious. The American Medical Association found it was true for both men and women – individual lifestyle factors are directly linked to risks of heart disease and heart failure.

Then there’s the mental side, and for this we can’t say enough. When you exercise, you produce endorphins. These are magical receptors in your brain that improve mood function and decrease stress. They are said to have similar effects to opiates, but they’re naturally produced! Those who exercise often also see improvements in cognitive function and decreased levels of stress. Imagine what this can do for your professional life.

On the other side of that is sugar. A 2012 study at UCLA showed high intake of fructose (sugar) can hinder communication between brain cells – i.e., it literally slows down your brain. We know sugar is delicious, but remember one of the operative words…balance.

Benefits of Feeling Good About Your Health

An analysis of a self-reported health survey with more than 8000 participants found that the worse people described their health in the beginning of the study, the less likely they were to be living 30 years later. The study suggests that there is a self-fulfilling prophecy of sorts when it comes to rating one’s own health.  There have previously been several short-term studies finding that how people rate their own health is a predictor of their mortality, but this the first to examine the issue beyond a 5-10 year scope.  The short time span of these studies has left questions about whether people who reported poor health were actually having early symptoms of health conditions or disease, prior to being diagnosed.

The analysis was conducted by researchers at the University of Zurich’s Institute of Social and Preventive Medicine.  In 1970 the participants were first asked to describe their health, on a scale ranging from “excellent” to “very poor.” In 2000, the researchers assessed how the participants had fared. The study found that men who rated their health as “very poor” were more than three times as likely to die over the study compared to men of the same age who reported their health as “excellent.” Women who reported very poor health had double the risk of death compared to women said that they were much healthier. Rates of death gradually grew with each notch lower on the health scale. Overall, roughly half of the participants rated their health as ‘‘good’’.  After accounting for factors including smoking history, disease diagnoses, blood pressure, and use of medications, the trend was significant.   The analysis concluded that that self-reported health offers relevant and sustained health information beyond medical history or classical risk factors.

In response to the study, Dr. Mona Misra, a bariatric surgeon in Los Angeles, said “This is something to keep in mind for individuals struggling with their weight, where self-esteem takes a beating with repeated failed attempts at dieting, and discrimination they face daily. Giving people a solution that can actually work long term will not only improve their health through ways we already know about, such as diabetes and hypertension resolution, but by treating their weight and improving their self-esteem and self-image, this study shows that their overall health and wellness should also be benefited. This once again reinforces what weight loss surgeons understand: obesity affects the entire body from head to toe, and by attacking obesity we are treating the entire body.”

Perhaps people who rate their health as ‘excellent’ have an advantage over others, and not solely because of absence of disease, but because of a high satisfaction with their life.  These findings, combined with other long-term results, suggest that people who have an optimistic view of their health are not just tuned in to medically induced premonitions–they may also have personality attributes that boost their resilience and boost their well-being.

The whole process builds upon itself. Once you’re in a better mood, you’re more inclined to socialize and go out more. Human beings are social creatures, after all. We function better when we’re more social, as proven by a study by University College of Dublin.

It’s a Lifestyle Change

Your lifestyle is about far more than just what you eat. That’s just the start. There’s also your exercise, moderation and socializing. Remember, each part of your health is not exclusive – one thing affects the other. The healthier you eat, the more inclined you are to exercise, as you have more energy.

Your health is the foundation of your life. It affects everything around you. The good news? You are in charge of it. This is your story, and you have the opportunity to determine its course.

Your Partner in Change

We can help. Non-invasive weight loss procedures are the best way to get a head start on your life’s transformation. See the results our other patients have had, or explore our different procedures.

The post A Healthy Lifestyle is a Better Lifestyle appeared first on Oregon Weight Loss Surgery.

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If you’ve recently undergone bariatric surgery, you’re likely figuring out the requirements of your new diet so you can eat well and maintain a healthy weight. Your nutritional needs will be different after surgery. This may require a shift in thinking in addition to making smart choices at the grocery store. Here are some helpful tips on how to make healthy choices when you go grocery shopping:


Don’t wander the aisles.

It may be tempting to walk up and down every aisle of the grocery store, but if you avoid wandering the aisles, you will be less likely to fill your cart with tempting food that you don’t need.


Stick to your list.

Resist the urge to buy items on an impulse. Before you head to the store, make a detailed list of the groceries you need rather than what you want. Then, when you arrive at the store, stick to the list, steering clear of putting items in your cart that are not on the list. Before you put it in your cart, ask yourself if you’re making a healthy long-term choice or not.


Bring reusable bags.

If you bring your own reusable bags, you will be less likely to purchase extra goodies that will not fit or are unnecessary.


Don’t shop on an empty stomach.

If you go grocery shopping when you’re hungry, you’re a lot more likely to purchase items on impulse. Before you head to the grocery store, eat a good meal so your stomach isn’t empty. This will help you stick to your list!


Fill up on healthy items.

Your bariatric surgery will place limitations on how much you can eat, so be sure your food is full of the vitamins and other important nutrients that your body needs. Your diet should include lots of fresh fruits and vegetables. It should also be high in dietary fiber and protein, low in calories, and low in saturated and polyunsaturated fats. You should always try to avoid foods that are full of empty calories and harmful fats, as this can be a detriment to your weight loss goals.


Your new diet will definitely take dedication, but once you begin seeing a difference in your weight and the amount of energy you have, it will be an exciting motivator!

Give us a call for more information.

The post Grocery Shopping Tips for Bariatric Patients appeared first on Oregon Weight Loss Surgery.

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After you have bariatric surgery, your life will be changed forever. If you play your cards right, that transformation will change you dramatically for the better. One of your “aces in the hole” is regular exercise.

While bariatric surgery is an amazing tool, you still have to put in some work to meet your goals. Exercise is still an important element in not only maintaining a healthy weight, but taking advantage of all the other potential health benefits that come with it.

While it’s recommended you exercise post-bariatric surgery just like everyone else, your approach will be different, at least in the initial months after the procedure. In addition to being mindful of your recovery process, your prior fitness experience needs to be considered. Both of these factors will play a part in what your doctor will recommend for your post-bariatric exercise regimen.

Often, doctors will recommend very low impact exercise for the first one to three months after surgery. This might simply be a walking regimen as your body heals. But there are other exercises that are at a similar level of difficulty.

Low Impact Exercises

Walking – It’s as simple as can be, but don’t underestimate the benefits walking can bring, including increased stamina and strengthening your body. You can start with just 10 minutes, then work your way up to 30 minutes. As you feel more comfortable you can increase your pace as well.

In addition to walking, here are some other low impact exercises you will likely be able to do a few weeks after your surgery:

Sitting Exercises – Some exercises don’t even require you to get out of your seat! You can grab a chair and do arm rotations and leg lifts. With arm rotations, you lift your arms straight out to your sides at shoulder length and do small circular rotations forward and backward. This is a great arm-toning exercise. Sitting leg lifts to your front benefit your hips and thighs.

Once your body has sufficiently healed, more challenging exercises can be added to your routine, including:

Cycling – Going for bike rides is a low-impact exercise that you should be able to do shortly after your surgery.

Water aerobics – This is another great low-impact exercise that is easy on your joints. You can do water aerobics on your own or enjoy the social aspect of a group class.

Strength training – Once your doctor says you are ready, strength or resistance training is important for losing weight and building lean muscle. Both men and women benefit greatly from this type of exercise. Women in particular can help prevent bone loss, which often comes with middle age, with a steady strength training regimen.

Yoga – It’s become increasingly popular, and for good reason: yoga is great for building strength and improving your mental health. Don’t be fooled. Yoga isn’t just a bunch of easy stretching. Many movements are really challenging and need to be performed correctly after being adequately warmed up.

When you get to the point where you are fully recovered, take new exercises slowly. It’s better to ease in and use proper form than risk injury and deter your positive attitude.
Looking for more post-bariatric surgery exercise tips, or want to discuss your routine with an expert? Our team at Oregon Weight Loss Surgery is all ears. Contact us today!

The post Post-Bariatric Exercises to Get You Moving appeared first on Oregon Weight Loss Surgery.

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With tons of produce back in season, your diet just got way more colorful

The weather’s warm, the flowers are blooming, farmer’s markets are in full swing…this all means one thing: summer is here!

The Pacific Northwest is a cornucopia of fresh produce, and the spring and summer months result in some of the year’s best harvest. We wanted to highlight some of the healthiest, most versatile ingredients you can get in the summer, as well as suggesting some quick and easy ways to cook them.

1. Asparagus

Asparagus has been nicknamed the “food of kings” because of it’s rich history – King Louis XIV had greenhouses built just so he could eat it as much as possible. This vegetable is high in fiber, low in fat, and grows especially well from mid-April to June. They are so easy to cook too – our preferred method is to coat in olive oil, season with fresh lemon and garlic, and bake on 415 degrees F for about 12-15 minutes. Our tip is to pair it with fresh fish, which are rich in fatty acids and Omega-3s.

2. Radishes

One cup of radishes can give you 30% of your daily Vitamin C requirements, and accounts for less than 25 calories. Most times they are used as garnish, but we wanted to give you a salad recipe as well: start with two cups of sliced radishes, as well as one cup each of cucumber and then red onion; whisk enough olive oil, white wine vinegar, garlic and dill to coat the vegetables, then pour and mix. Keep the mixture covered for an hour before serving.

3. Oyster mushrooms

Oyster mushrooms are one of the many varieties grown in Oregon, and certainly one of the tastiest: besides their flavor, they are packed with vitamins and nutrients. We recommend sautéing them in vegetable oil and cider vinegar. Pair these with teriyaki sauce and baked salmon, and you have a quick, healthy meal on your plate.

4. Fava beans

Fava beans, unfortunately popularized by Silence of the Lambs, are loaded with nutrition. They also have no cholesterol or saturated fats. They are commonly sautéed with olive oil, garlic, lemon juice and a bit of salt and pepper. Add some couscous and you have a terrific vegetarian dish that’s packed with protein!

5. Rhubarb

Rhubarb was used for thousands of years as a Chinese medicine, then making its way to North America in the 19th century. Thankfully so, as it’s packed with calcium and Vitamin K, two essential nutrients. Your healthiest option would be to eat it as part of a fruit salad, though many people use it in pies and crepes.

Most of these ingredients will be available at your farmer’s markets. They’re all great ways to get your essential vitamins and minerals, and terrific options for a seasonal diet.

Have some recipes, questions or suggestions of your own? Let us know! We’d love to hear what you’re up to in the kitchen, and other uses you have for these delicious ingredients. Until then, enjoy!

The post Best Locally-Grown Produce for Summer Dinner Recipes appeared first on Oregon Weight Loss Surgery.

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As little as 10 minutes of exercise per day has benefits. That’s good to know if you struggle to find time for physical activity. And, who doesn’t? Between work and family, most of us don’t have a lot of time to devote to fitness. Finding even half an hour during a busy day can be a challenge.

Many experts recommend 30 minutes of physical activity daily. On days when that’s not possible, you can break up your workout into 10-minute sessions.

A study of overweight women who started exercising for an average of 72 minutes per week found they improved their cardiovascular fitness by 4.2 percent compared with a group who did not exercise. The women in the study exercised at an intensity equivalent to walking at 2 to 3 miles per hour.

Researchers noted that more time spent exercising led to greater benefits. Another group of women in the study completed about 196 minutes of activity per week, the equivalent of about 30 minutes a day and improved their cardiovascular fitness by 8.2 percent.

Other studies have focused on the benefits of short, high-intensity workouts. If this type of exercise interests you, speak with your physician and ask if you’re ready for intense activity.

If you haven’t been a regular exerciser, begin with moderate activity. Hard workouts can feel unpleasant and may increase your risk of injury.

How to Start Working Out After Weight Loss Surgery

After weight loss surgery, we recommend easing into activity. Walking is an ideal way to gently improve endurance. Soon after your procedure, you’ll get up and walk while still in your hospital room. 

After you return home, you’ll want to work up to about 30 minutes of walking or another low-impact, gentle activity. When your doctor gives you the go-ahead, you can move on to longer or more vigorous workouts if you prefer.  

On days when you don’t have 30 minutes, try to fit in at least one 10 minute walk. If you can, do three 10-minute walks spread out throughout your day. You might find that staying active throughout the day improves your mood and energy. A boost in energy could motivate you to do a little more.

Besides helping with weight maintenance, your workouts will regulate blood sugar, decrease high blood pressure and improve arthritis. You’ll also get an immediate and noticeable lift in your spirits.

Contact us to learn if you’re a candidate for weight loss surgery.

The post The Power of Short Workouts appeared first on Oregon Weight Loss Surgery.

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Oregon Weight Loss Surgery | Lap-Band Su.. by Oregon Weight Loss Surgery - 5M ago

Our patients have tried more diets than you can name. Mostly, two things happen: they see an immediate drop, and then the weight gradually comes back on; or, they see zero results at all.

The chief misconception here is that people blame themselves. They chalk up their weight gain to lack of willpower. This is simply not true.

The fact is, many people have tried many diets, and hardly any of them produce long-term results. This dire track record begs the question: do diets actually work?

The ‘Honeymoon Stage’ of a diet

Don’t get us wrong, diets do produce results in terms of dropped pounds. The stories we commonly see on TV though are just the beginning of the diet; they hardly account for the decades that follow.

This is why we see ‘craze diets’ come and go: they are often aimed at giving people a ‘quick fix’. Weight is dropped quickly and suddenly, and then biology reasserts itself and the pounds come roaring back.

Most diets are unsustainable over a long term

The Washington Post published a fascinating article chronicling the book, “Secrets from the Eating Lab”, written by Traci Mann, a psychologist at University of Minnesota.

In her Post interview, she described how biological, hormonal and neurological changes affected by a diet indicate that diets are unsustainable, if not impossible:

  • When dieting, your brain becomes overly responsive to tasty-looking food. Basically, you imagine a slice of pizza as tasting far better than how it really is.
  • When you lose body fat, your hormonal changes make you feel hungrier more often, and conversely it becomes more difficult to feel full.
  • When your metabolism slows down, your body finds a way to run off fewer calories, while the ‘leftover’ ones are stored as fat.

Essentially, Mann proposes that these urges and changes make it “practically impossible” for a dieter to keep weight off for a long time.

What diet actually works?

Two Yale researchers compared major diets of the last several decades, which was covered by Atlantic Monthly. The study concluded:

“A diet of minimally processed foods close to nature, predominantly plants, is decisively associated with health promotion and disease prevention.”

Basically, a diet of plant-based and natural foods is the best way to lead a healthy life. But most people already knew that.

It’s too hard to say that any one diet works

Researchers and nutritionists can recommend best eating habits to minimize your risk for diseases and health issues, but they can’t name one definitive method for dropping weight and sustaining it.

One option for those who haven’t seen results from years of dieting is to explore surgical procedures. These are non-invasive, and an effective tool for starting down a healthier path.

If you’d like to learn more, you can read success stories from others who have experimented with diets, and why they made their decision to go with a weight loss procedure.

The post Do Diets Even Work? appeared first on Oregon Weight Loss Surgery.

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Every decision of your day contributes to your overall health. Consciously and subconsciously, you are constantly telling your body how you want it to look and feel.

Year after year, studies have proven that if you treat your body right, you’ll reap some amazing benefits. We are seeing examples of how you feel on the inside determines what happens on the outside. For that, you truly can’t put a price on living a healthy lifestyle.

What is a healthy lifestyle?

A lifestyle includes what you eat, who you socialize with, how you dress, and more.

The operative words here are balance, discipline and responsibility. We all have impulses and cravings. When you choose a healthy lifestyle, you make your decisions with your future in mind. You consider that things may feel good in the moment, but they are not wise for your long-term health. Yes, even eating that one extra cookie!

How does a well-rounded lifestyle translate to good health?

First there’s your physical health, for which benefits are obvious. The American Medical Association found it was true for both men and women – individual lifestyle factors are directly linked to risks of heart disease and heart failure.

Then there’s the mental side, and for this we can’t say enough. When you exercise, you produce endorphins. These are magical receptors in your brain that improve mood function and decrease stress. They are said to have similar effects to opiates, but they’re naturally produced! Those who exercise often also see improvements in cognitive function and decreased levels of stress. Imagine what this can do for your professional life.

On the other side of that is sugar. A 2012 study at UCLA showed high intake of fructose (sugar) can hinder communication between brain cells – i.e., it literally slows down your brain. We know sugar is delicious, but remember one of the operative words…balance.

The whole process builds upon itself. Once you’re in better moods, you’re more inclined to socialize and go out more. Human beings are social creatures, after all. We function better when we’re more social, as proven by a study by University College of Dublin.

Your lifestyle is about far more than just what you eat. That’s just the start. There’s also your exercise, moderation and socializing. Remember, each part of your health is not exclusive – one thing affects the other. The healthier you eat, the more inclined you are to exercise, as you have more energy.

Your health is the foundation of your life. It affects everything around you. The good news? You are in charge of it. This is your story, and you have the opportunity to determine its course.

We can help. Non-invasive weight loss procedures are the best way to get a head start on your life’s transformation. See the results our other patients have had, or explore our different procedures.

The post You Can’t Put a Price on a Healthy Lifestyle appeared first on Oregon Weight Loss Surgery.

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Once you have done your research for the best type of gastric surgery for yourself, you will want to meet with your doctor and go over the procedure, the recovery, and any post surgical changes you will need to make to get the biggest benefit.

Once you have covered all that, you may be considered a strong candidate for the Vertical Sleeve Gastrectomy. This procedure has many benefits, not to mention the success stories your doctor and their staff will share with you.

Now the big question: how much is it?

That’s a great question. Let’s take a look at some numbers so you can get an idea.

  • The average cost of Vertical Sleeve Gastrectomy in the United States is: $19,000.00 before insurance, final discounts, and financing options.
  • The total price for this surgery can fluctuate in the United States by as much as $5,000-$10,000, based on these factors:
  • Cost of living in the area
  • Local competition of surgeons
  • Local medicare population
  • For-profit or non-profit status of the hospital you plan to use
  • The average out-of-pocket cost after insurance is $2,000 with these considerations:
  • The chosen hospital
  • Insurance plan and benefits
  • Special discounts
  • Financing options

Here’s the Good News!

Although the overall cost of this surgery is expensive, most major medical insurance companies, based on doctor recommendations, generally cover it. In Oregon, at www.oregonweightlosssurgery.com, we have financing plans and discounts available to those who qualify. We know this is a big decision, and undergoing surgery is never an easy choice. However, if your doctor recommends this procedure, we will work with you to understand all of the costs, the coverage of the procedure by your insurance company, and all of the associated costs with the hospital, surgical team, and other associated costs.

We will go over this in detail with you before you make your decision and schedule the procedure in a timeframe that works best for you. If you have questions or would like additional information, feel free to contact us today. One of our surgical specialists will be happy to discuss the procedure and all of the associated costs and options with you.

The post How Much Does Vertical Sleeve Gastrectomy Cost in Oregon? appeared first on Oregon Weight Loss Surgery.

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A new clinical study reports that for diabetic patients, weight loss surgery can help improve blood sugar levels more than any lifestyle changes or pharmaceutical intervention. Weight loss surgery may even help with long-term remission. The study appeared in Diabetes Care, a journal of the American Diabetes Association, endorsed by 45 professional societies around the world. Type 2 diabetes is a very serious disease and it is often the cause of blindness, kidney failure, nerve damage, heart attack, stroke, and more. Even with diet changes, exercise routines, and prescription drugs, only about 50% of people with diabetes can effectively control their blood sugar levels. 

How Weight Loss Surgery Can Help

Bariatric or weight loss surgery can be completed in several different types of procedures. For example, gastric bypass surgery involves reducing the stomach to a small pouch and connecting it directly to the intestine. Over the past 10 years, several randomized clinical studies have shown dramatic results for diabetic patients that have undergone weight loss surgery. Approximately 80% of the patients with type 2 diabetes went into remission after their surgery, or were more effectively able to stabilize their blood sugar through medication, exercise, and diet.

How It Works

The positive effects of surgery on diabetic patients isn’t just because of weight loss, but also due to several other factors that are still being explored. Surgery has been shown to impact the amount and timing of gut hormone secretions, which can influence how insulin is produced. In addition, surgery can also help increase the production of bile acids that make cells more insulin-sensitive. It can also increase the intake of glucose by the gut cells, which can result in reduced blood glucose levels.

The results that have been compiled from these clinical trials and experiments make a compelling case that links weight loss surgery to diabetes treatment and healing, yet the concept of weight loss surgery to help diabetic patients will require a change of mindset for doctors, researchers, as well as patients themselves. Having surgery is not a small decision and it isn’t always the best option for some patients. Before you decide if surgery is right for you, be sure to talk in depth to your doctor and discuss the positive and negative effects of what the procedure involves. Discuss if there are any less invasive interventions that may be more effective for your situation.

If you or anyone you know is considering weight loss surgery, talk to the experts at Oregon Weight Loss Surgery. We can help you navigate the decision-making process and decide if weight loss surgery is the right option for you.

  1. Rubino, Francesco. “Medical Research: Time to Think Differently About Diabetes.” Nature.com. May 24, 2016. Accessed online May 21, 2016. https://www.nature.com/news/medical-research-time-to-think-differently-about-diabetes-1.19955

The post Groundbreaking New Type 2 Diabetes Research Links Remission to Weight Loss Surgery appeared first on Oregon Weight Loss Surgery.

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If this is the year that you’ve decided to make a lifestyle change and lose weight through bariatric surgery, congratulations! This is a big step and something that requires dedication. Once you’ve had surgery, the hard part begins: following through with new eating habits and keeping promises to yourself to look better and feel better. Keeping the weight off can be achieved and you can do it by living by some simple rules. Here are five rules to help you keep the weight off, for good.

Have a Strong Support System

Staying in touch with your surgeon and nutritional team will help keep you accountable and on track. In addition, finding a great bariatric support group will provide you with a community of people who have been through the same experience. Find a friend to be your accountability partner, or even better, your workout or grocery shopping partner.

Be Realistic

If you set unrealistic goals for yourself, you are more likely to break them. So, instead of saying that you will never touch another piece of chocolate or another fast food hamburger again, be realistic and set a goal that is manageable. Set goals you’re excited to meet so you’re not continually frustrated at having setbacks.

Share

Don’t keep your weight loss goals to yourself. Share your endeavors with friends and family. This will give you the opportunity to engage with a natural support system that will keep you on track.

Reward Yourself

Have you been staying on track, working out, and eating well? Reward yourself. Treat yourself to something you enjoy. Whether it’s a movie with a friend or a trip to the salon, reward yourself for your hard work with something that makes you happy.

Stay Active

To maintain weight loss, you must be physically active. Walking is a great way to get the blood pumping and walking 30 minutes a day is a great way to get your physical activity in. It’s ok to break it up into smaller chunks as long as you are engaging in aerobic activity on a regular basis.

Remember that you aren’t perfect and on occasion, it’s ok to make mistakes in your journey to keep the extra weight off. It’s okay and you shouldn’t beat yourself up about it or obsess about the mistake. Focus on taking each day one step at a time and be patient. You’ve made it this far and if you are persistent, the payoff will be well worth it.

Interested in learning more about bariatric procedures? Contact our team at Oregon Weight Loss Surgery! We are here to support you through the entire process, from pre to post-op, and beyond.

The post How Can I Maintain My Weight Loss? appeared first on Oregon Weight Loss Surgery.

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