Loading...

Follow The New York Times - Pottery and Ceramics on Feedspot

Continue with Google
Continue with Facebook
or

Valid

The chef and slow-food pioneer has picked up antique cups from around the world — which now remind her of her travels.
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

The Swiss maker hopes its new ceramic models in the architect’s distinctive palette will draw young buyers.
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

At this year’s fair, ceramics that tell tales of history and an ancient coin are among the highlights.
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

There is a reusable ceramic straw printed with elaborate designs.
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

A roundup of things our editors — and a few contributors — are excited about in a given week.
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Containers for blooms can stretch the imaginations of designers and florists alike.
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Ehren Tool wants his visually brutal stoneware cups to start conversations about the grief and suffering of armed conflict. But his work can’t be bought.
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Ron Nagle helped pave the way for clay artists to be taken seriously — but he still has a sense of humor. Ahead of a new solo show, he discusses his work, his dog and his TV habits.
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

These married architects are democratizing the 3-D printing process, using materials destined for the trash heap — like curry powder and coffee grounds — in place of drywall and foam.
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

The beloved craft store/wedding ring hub was one of the last of the original hippie institutions along Seventh Avenue. But the neighborhood has changed, the people are ‘goo-goo,’ and it’s time to move on.

Read for later

Articles marked as Favorite are saved for later viewing.
close
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Separate tags by commas
To access this feature, please upgrade your account.
Start your free month
Free Preview