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The lingual frenum connects the tongue to the floor of the mouth.  Sometimes, the lingual frenum can run all the way to the tip of the tongue, causing a person to be “tongue-tied.” Tongue-tie (Ankyloglossia) is a congenital oral developmental anomaly of the tongue characterized by a short, thick lingual frenum resulting in limitation of tongue movement. The tongue becomes tied down and cannot move as freely as it should.

A short lingual frenum can sometimes obstruct normal function. Tongue-tie can affect a baby's oral development, causing problems that interfere with eating, speaking or reaching the back teeth. An early diagnose in a friendly kid’s dentist office is necessary to avoid trouble with breast-feeding and speech problems.

  • Signs and symptoms of tongue-tie include: Difficulty lifting the tongue to the roof of the mouth or moving the tongue from side to side. Trouble sticking out the tongue past the lower front teeth. A tongue that appears flat, square or heart shaped instead of pointy when extended. The tongue can't poke out past the lips.

In some cases, a simple surgical procedure should be considered for correction. A frenectomy is simply the removal of a frenulum, a small fold of tissue that prevents an organ in the body from moving too far. Frenectomy is performed under the tongue, it is also called lingual frenectomy. It is a very common dental procedure that is performed on infants, children, and adults. A lingual frenectomy should be considered if a child is having trouble eating, swallowing, or speaking.

A Pediatric Dentist near me can help you to get a better evaluation your kid will need. Schedule your kid dental appointment as soon as see any sign or symptom of tongue-tie.

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Tooth decay is a disease known as dental caries that's caused by specific germs, spreads easily within families, and can last a lifetime. In the United States, cavities are common in very young children and teenagers. By age 5, about 60 percent of U.S. children will have experienced tooth decay, according to the “State of Little Teeth Report,” a 2014 American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry document based on a survey of 1,000 parents.

Baby front teeth stick until around age 6. Baby molars are there even longer, until around 10. Your child won't have all his or her permanent teeth until around age 12 or 13 excluding wisdom teeth. Tooth decay in primary (baby) teeth affects permanent (adult) teeth too. The developing adult or permanent tooth is growing directly under the baby tooth. If the decay is extensive the bacteria in the cavity can spread down to affect the developing adult tooth under it.

The signs and symptoms of cavities vary, depending on their extension and location. When a cavity is just beginning, you may not have any symptoms at all. As the decay gets larger, it may cause signs and symptoms

  • Toothache, spontaneous pain or pain that occurs without any apparent cause.
  • Tooth sensitivity.
  • Mild to sharp pain when eating or drinking something sweet, hot or cold.
  • Visible holes or pits in your teeth.
  • Brown, black or white staining on any surface of a tooth.
  • Pain when you bite down.

Brushing and flossing are fundamental for helping kids. It is also recommended visit a Pediatric in Dentist West Palm Beach when the first teeth appear or by the child’s first birthday, whichever occurs first.

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Cavities don't always cause symptoms. Sometimes children don't know they have one until their Pediatric Dentist in West Palm Beach finds it, but your child may feel pain in the area around the tooth. If the decay gets large enough, part of the tooth may fracture off, leaving a large visible hole, and the tooth may be sensitive to biting pressure.

There are some factors that can increase risk of getting cavities:

  • Tooth location. Decay are most often in your back teeth (molars and premolars). The molars and premolars crush the food and have lot of grooves and pits as well as multiple roots that can collect food particles. Due to their location in the mouth they're hardest to reach and keep clean than the front teeth.
  • Diet. Avoid too much sugar. Unfortunately, candy, along with other foods that contain carbohydrates (starches and sugars), such as soda pop, ice cream, milk and cake, even some fruits, and juices may contribute to cavities. Foods that cling to the teeth for a long time are more likely to cause decay than foods that are easily washed away by saliva.
  • Bedtime infant feeding. A bottle of sweetened liquids or those with natural sugars (like milk, formula, and fruit juice) can expose teeth to sugar for extended periods of time, increasing the risk of tooth decay. Also, children whose pacifiers are frequently dipped in sugar or syrup are more in risk. Giving an infant a sugary drink at nap time or nighttime is particularly harmful because the flow of saliva decreases during sleep.
  • Inadequate brushing. Brushing teeth properly and consistently helps to remove most dental plaque If you don't clean your teeth soon after eating and drinking, plaque forms quickly and the first stages of decay can begin.
  • Fluoride, a naturally occurring mineral, helps strengthens the enamel of the teeth and prevents tooth cavities and can even reverse the earliest stages of tooth damage. Because of its benefits for teeth, fluoride is added to many public water supplies. It's also a common ingredient in toothpaste and mouth rinses. But bottled water usually does not contain fluoride. Once your child has a tooth, it is recommend that your child receive fluoride varnish treatments in the dental pediatrician's office to help prevent tooth decay.

Schedule your child’s first dental appointment before their first birthday or after his or her first baby tooth is visible, whichever comes first. This visit is like a well-baby visit with your pediatrician.

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Gum disease, also known as periodontal disease, affects the tissues around the tooth. The plaque bacteria can infect your gums and teeth, and eventually, the gum tissue and bone that support the teeth will be impacted. The three stages of gum disease — from least to most severe — are gingivitis, periodontitis and advanced periodontitis. Regular cleaning and checkup with a pediatric dentist near me can help reverse the damages that can occurred.

Kid’s Dental professionals now know that periodontal disease has a direct impact on general health. This is a chronic infection that can result in several health problems:

Respiratory: The bacteria in the mouth can move to the lungs and can cause infections such as pneumonia.

Heart: Research indicates that having periodontal disease may increase your risk of cardiovascular disease. People with gum disease are almost twice as likely to suffer from coronary artery disease.

Cancer: People with periodontal disease may be more likely to develop kidney, pancreatic, and blood cancer.

Diabetes: Research has suggested that severe periodontal disease can increase blood sugar, contributing to increased periods of time when the body functions with a high blood sugar. People with diabetes increases risk for diabetic complications.

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Flossing is very critical to prevent tooth decay and the buildup of plaque. Most people believe that brushing alone will remove the necessary plaque that has accumulated, but this is not the case. By only brushing only about 40% of plaque is removed. Brushing cleans the surface of the teeth but flossing cleans the side of the teeth where nasty bacteria loves to hide.

It is important to teach good oral hygiene at a younger age because children have more energy and more willing to learn. These techniques can also help them in the future. This will not only benefit the child but the parents as well, saving money later on with fillings and crowns. Although teaching such advanced techniques can be difficult there are numerous ways to help make this learning process easier.

Teaching your child to floss depends mostly on the type of floss you will use and how your child learns. Most children are visual learners and learn just by observing, other children learn better with music or by creating a song about the process. Using traditional floss may be more difficult to teach younger children, therefore floss picks designed for children are recommended by Pediatric Dentist in West Palm Beach.

Children usually mimic what they see and hear around them. Making flossing an important activity for the entire household will increase the child’s likelihood of wanting to floss on their own. Allowing your child to watch you while you brush your teeth and floss will help them get a better idea of what having good oral hygiene is. A children dentist can guide you with the most important information you should know about flossing in kids.

To really get your child excited about flossing try to switch up the routine a little. One day they can watch you floss, the next day you show them how to properly floss their teeth, and then the following day they can floss your teeth. This will help them learn faster and it will benefit them for their entire life.

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Craving and chewing ice (pagophagia) is often associated with iron deficiency, with or without anemia. Also, it can be a sign of an eating disorder. It may even harm your quality of life. Chewing ice can also can lead to dental problems.

While tooth enamel is among the hardest substances in our bodies, it is not meant to be used to chew on anything other than food. Chewing ice provokes dental damages in different ways such as:

  • Wears down the enamel on the teeth and leaves them susceptible to tooth problems like cavities, chipping, and sensitivity.
  • Cracks and chips teeth. It can cause microscopic cracks in the surface of the enamel that can become in larger fractures and even broken teeth.
  • Damages crowns, fillings, and other dental work done. Expands fillings, so, they last for a shorter period of time.
  • Increases tooth sensitivity. Teeth become extremely sensitive to hot and cold drinks and foods.
  • Damages the gum tissue.
  • Causes sore jaw muscles. It puts stress on the joint that holds your jaw to your face.

The American Dental Association recommends not chewing ice. Visit a pediatric dentist to evaluate any damage the kid’s teeth enamel could have.

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Sodas have negative effects on the smile, potentially leading to cavities and even visible tooth decay. The sugars soda contains interact with bacteria in the mouth to form acid.

Drinking sugary drinks can cause tooth decay, but another cause of cavities is the dental erosion that occurs when teeth are exposed to acid. Acids can soften the enamel of the teeth, increasing the risk of cavities and tooth decay.  Juice and sodas have a high content of phosphoric acid and citric acid that affect enamel hardness. Diet sodas, 100-percent citrus fruit juices, and other sugar-free drinks can be surprisingly bad for the teeth.

In a friendly kid dental office, you can find the specialized staff that will help your kid be free of cavities and decays and keep good oral hygiene.

How to Help Reduce Negative Effects
  1. Drink soda in moderation 
  2. Use a straw to keep the sugar away from your teeth. 
  3. Drink water instead of soda or juice, especially fluoride ones.
  4. Eat calcium-rich foods.  
  5. Brush with an enamel-strengthening toothpaste.  
  6. Avoid foods and drinks that stain enamel. 
  7. Brush your teeth twice per day for two minutes at a time and floss once per day to remove debris between the teeth.
  8. Rinse with water for 30 seconds after drinking sodas and fruit juices to dilute the acid and sugar if brushing your teeth is not possible.
  9. Visit a pediatric dentist every 6 months for cleaning and check-ups.
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Children will develop 20 primary teeth by the time they are 3 years old. Teething can begin in infants as young as 2 months of age, even though the first tooth usually does not appear until about 6 months of age. The emergence of teeth is generally symmetrical with the left and right teeth appearing at similar times.

Typically, the first teeth to come in (erupt) are almost always the lower front teeth, also known as the central incisors. They're usually followed 4 to 8 weeks later by the four front upper teeth (central and lateral incisors) and a month later, the lower lateral incisors. Next to come in through are the first molars, follow by the canines and ending with the second molars.

Child's 20 baby teeth, usually fall out in the same order they came in. The exact timing of when teeth come in ("erupt") and fall out ("shed") may vary, but there are typical age ranges for each tooth.

The American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry recommends your child should see a pediatric dentist in West Palm Beach when the first tooth appears, or no later than his/her first birthday.

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When a tooth is so decayed it can't support a filling the American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry (AAPD) recommends restoring the tooth with a stainless steel crown especially if the tooth has received pulpal therapy. As baby molars are constantly exposed to chewing and grinding, silver stainless steel crowns may be a better option.

Stainless steel crowns are metal caps used by pediatric dentist to repair a decayed baby molar (back tooth) and prevent it decaying further. Silver caps cover the whole tooth. They are made to fit the exact size and shape of a child's molar,

They protect weak teeth, restore broken teeth, prevent cracked teeth from breaking further, and support teeth that have large fillings. It is the most economical and durable solution until the tooth falls out and is replaced with the permanent (adult) tooth.

The advantages of stainless-steel crowns are:

  • Durable but inexpensive.
  • Full coverage protection for the tooth.
  • Very little sensitivity.
  • Less likely to need retreatment.
  • More successful than metal fillings in children under four years old.
  • Good choice for children who need general anesthesia.
  • Often used as an attachment for a space maintainer

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The permanent teeth in children are starting to develop at age 3. If the child is receiving fluoride drops and is drinking fluoridated water, they may get fluorosis on the permanent teeth due to excess fluoride.

Dental Fluorosis isn't a disease and doesn't affect the health of your teeth. It is a cosmetic developmental defect of enamel that can occur when a higher than optimal amount of fluoride is ingested while the permanent teeth are developing, before they have erupted.

There are different types of fluorosis, and they have different symptoms and side effects.

  • Mild: The most widespread form of fluorosis and the least detectable. They look like small white spots on the teeth. They can either be easily noticeable or can be so faint that only a pediatric dentist near me is able to detect them.

  • Moderate: In some cases, the teeth develop yellowish or brown stains, giving the teeth a dull or even translucent appearance.

  • Severe: The rarest and most extreme type of fluorosis not only has severe staining, but also causes several pits or small holes in the surface of the teeth. Teeth with severe fluorosis are usually structurally weak and can even be poorly formed.

In mild cases of fluorosis, no treatment is required. However, in more severe cases there are several fluorosis treatment options aimed at improving the appearance of affected teeth.

Regulars visits to a children dentist can help you to prevent dental fluorosis in your kids.

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