Loading...

Follow myhrtoolkit | HR & Business Management on Feedspot

Continue with Google
Continue with Facebook
or

Valid

Myhrtoolkit has appointed Fiona Sanderson as Marketing Manager and Camille Brouard as Marketing Assistant to head up our marketing projects and support our plans to become the number one HR software provider for small to medium sized businesses in the UK.

Fiona Sanderson, Marketing Manager


Fiona, whose previous positions includes Head of Marketing for a leading events company based in London and Senior Marketing Manager for a South Yorkshire digital marketing agency, will play a key role in the development and delivery of the firm’s marketing strategy to support the continued growth of myhrtoolkit, driving new customers and supporting its existing client base. Outside of work Fiona enjoys running on the fells, a spot of gluten free baking and jumping in muddy puddles with her two-year-old son.

Camille Brouard, Marketing Assistant

Camille will be bringing specialist SEO, social media marketing, and content writing skills to her new role with myhrtoolkit. Her past experience includes working as an SEO Executive at a digital marketing agency and full-mix marketing for a national hair and beauty wholesale company. When she’s not immersed in keyword research or thinking up puns for email subject lines, you’re likely to find Camille ambling in the Peaks, catching up on her favourite podcasts, finding new veggie eateries in Sheffield, or playing board games and tabletop RPGs.

Looking forward in 2019

Myhrtoolkit’s appointments of Fiona and Camille reflect upon the company’s recent successes and continuous growth. In November 2018, Managing Director Jon Curtis completed a management buyout of myhrtoolkit, allowing him to focus all his time and energy on the business, assisted by fellow directors Bob Teasdale and Kit Barker.

Jon said of the new marketing team: “Fiona and Camille’s appointments come at an exciting time in myhrtoolkit’s journey and we’re delighted to have them on board. They will play a key role in not only growing our customer base but dedicating more time to our existing customers and partners”.

We now employ sixteen staff in Sheffield, work with a growing number of fantastic reselling partners across the country, and serve over 50,000 employees across the UK and Ireland who subscribe to our cloud-based HR software. If you’d like to find out more about our software and the features we can offer for your HR function, get in touch.

The post Say hello to our expanded marketing team appeared first on myhrtoolkit.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Presenteeism in the workplace is a growing concern for business owners, managers, and HR professionals across the UK. It’s important for organisations to tackle presenteeism to encourage productivity and help staff avoid the physical and mental effects of not taking sick days when they need them.

What is presenteeism?

Presenteeism can refer to a few different things. In its original meaning, presenteeism occurs when employees come into work when they are unwell instead of recuperating at home. This can lead to illnesses spreading throughout an organisation, as well as unwell employees taking longer to recover.

Other types of presenteeism in the workplace

The definition of presenteeism has become more wide-reaching over time, as research has shown the pervasiveness of the issue beyond people electing not to take sickness absence. The term has since started to cover cases such as:

  • Habitual voluntary overtime: people may habitually stay at work for longer than they need to due to feelings of job insecurity. This is despite longer hours leading to tiredness and less productivity.
  • Disengagement: presenteeism can also refer to situations where employees consistently turn up to work but aren’t fully engaged or motivated.
  • Technological presenteeism: some employees are regularly responding to emails and checking company updates outside of their working hours. It’s becoming harder to fully switch off and take a break with constant access to laptops and work phones.

In all these cases, employees are prioritising simply being present over their health and wellbeing. It’s a common problem; according to a Chartered Institute of Personnel Development (CIPD) survey published in 2018, presenteeism has more than tripled since 2010. 86% of survey respondents observed presenteeism in their organisation within a 12 month period. Despite this, only 25% had taken steps to discourage it.

Absenteeism and presenteeism

Absenteeism (unnecessary absence) has long been identified as a problem for business productivity and revenue. This is understandable, as absence can put strain on other staff members and lower morale. There are many types and lengths of absence to keep track of too (including the genuine absences); due to this, we’ve created absence management software to help organisations monitor absences in general and identify patterns of absenteeism if they arise.

Despite most employers’ awareness of absenteeism, the connected issue of presenteeism has historically been paid much less attention. Unfortunately, presenteeism in the workplace can lead to a rise in absences that can be just as damaging.

Why is presenteeism a problem?

Presenteeism can have long-term repercussions to health and wellbeing, particularly employees’ mental health. In addition, presenteeism is very difficult to manage and requires a considerable degree of experience and empathy to manage properly. The legal risks can be high; employers may find it difficult to ask someone to go home if they are potentially at work (being paid) and sending them home (unpaid) is the only other option.

There is an added complexity when the reason for the illness is a disability; sending someone home instead of letting them stay at work could amount  to unfavourable treatment i.e. discrimination. Organisations should consult both medical and legal advice for such cases.

Presenteeism is also very hard to track and monitor. This is particularly true in the case of mental illness, where employees may feel obliged to turn up to work when ill because of the stigma surrounding mental health problems.

Presenteeism and mental health

The connections between presenteeism in the workplace and mental health can’t be understated; presenteeism is both caused by and a cause of stress and ill mental health for many working in the UK.

For instance, research links presenteeism to increases in stress, one of the main causes of long-term sickness absence in the UK. Regularly working longer hours and going to work while ill can take a toll over time. According to the Mental Health Foundation, almost 15% of people experience mental health problems in the workplace and 13% of all UK sickness absence days are connected to mental health issues. In contrast to this absence statistic, many UK workers are avoiding taking sick days for mental illness. This is in part due to the stigma attached to mental health problems, as well as other motivators for presenteeism.

Addressing the causes of presenteeism in the workplace

In order to properly address presenteeism in the workplace, it’s important to understand the underlying causes. Consider the following aspects:

Reviewing your absence policies

Company absence policies may be designed to reduce absences, but if they’re not handled right you may just get a rise in presenteeism instead, particularly for employees with financial burdens. Taking a kinder and less discipline-based approach to absence policies and enforcing them will help reduce the culture of uncertainty and insecurity that can fuel presenteeism. For instance, offering a number of paid sick days per year may reduce the financial burdens of employees who cannot only rely on or do not qualify for Statutory Sick Pay.

Considering workloads and skillsets

Are employees feeling more pressure to always be present because nobody else can cover the nature of their work? Is there someone with a workload that nobody else can take on? Making sure that your organisation has enough people to cover the work and the necessary skills is essential for reducing presenteeism.

Making the justifications for sick leave clearer

Help your staff understand the thresholds for taking sick leave by providing guidance including specific examples – for instance, someone with a mild cold may come into work but more prominent symptoms such as a fever, coughing and sneezing may justify – or require –  taking leave.

Setting the tone through senior staff

Employees look to their managers to figure out how ‘acceptable’ sickness absence is; if managers battle through work despite being ill, people they manage are likely to feel more pressure to do so. Make sure that staff at senior levels understand the importance of tackling presenteeism in the workplace, even in themselves. This will help ensure healthier attitudes towards absence across your organisation.

Scrapping attendance incentives

Rewarding employees for good attendance may have the negative side-effect of encouraging presenteeism. Even without rewards attached, employees may also aim to achieve perfect attendance to show loyalty. It’s important to counteract this by placing emphasis on employees’ personal health and wellbeing, instead of focusing on perfect attendance as the ultimate goal.

Providing constructive feedback and goals

Are you regularly giving staff feedback including positive encouragement and quantifiable goals to shape their day-to-day work and personal development? It’s important to have the right appraisal and feedback processes in place to ensure staff are engaged and motivated, instead of turning up to work just to countdown until home time.

Tackling mental health stigma

When employees know they’re in a working environment where their mental health and wellbeing are important, they will be more likely to disclose stress and mental health issues instead of suffering in silence due to the fear of judgement. This means managers can monitor employees’ welfare more effectively. Plus, employees can then take the steps they need to improve their mental health, whether that involves taking time off and/or adjusting other aspects of their work.

Offering mental health days

Employees may feel that taking time off for mental health issues isn’t comparable to a physical illness with similar effects. To tackle this, a small number of organisations offer their employees a set number of mental health days per year. This can help relieve some of the burdens of work-related stress and mental illness. For example, the Mental Health Foundation offers their staff three ‘wellbeing days’ a year for stressful periods. You could limit this to employees with mental health issues to have more control over resulting absences.

Limiting communications outside of work

Are your employees finding it difficult to switch off outside of working hours? Making it clear that employees don’t have to respond to work queries outside of their working hours may help staff maintain better health and wellbeing with clearer lines between working and non-working hours.

Presenteeism Resources

To find out more about how to tackle presenteeism in the workplace, see the following resources:

The CIPD’s ‘Health and Well-Being at Work’ survey (May, 2018): https://www.cipd.co.uk/Images/health-and-well-being-at-work_tcm18-40863.pdf

The Institute for Employment Studies’ report ‘Presenteeism: A review of current thinking’ (February, 2016): https://www.employment-studies.co.uk/system/files/resources/files/507_0.pdf

The post Presenteeism in the workplace: how can you address it? appeared first on myhrtoolkit.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

The myhrtoolkit HR software team will be heading to London on May 15th and 16th to exhibit at The Business Show. This show is the UK’s largest B2B convention, which attracts more than 25,000 businesses annually from a variety of sectors.

We’re looking forward to presenting our staff management software to a wide audience of business owners and fellow SMEs. We’ll also be catching up with current customers who are heading along to the ExCeL convention centre for the show.

Tickets for the event are free. Do come along to catch up with us and find out how our software can help streamline your HR function! You can register for tickets on The Business Show’s website.

The Business Show

The 2019 edition of The Business Show will be a fantastic event. There will be hundreds of exhibitors from a wide range of industries and a diverse range of keynote speakers; last year’s speakers included thought leaders, entrepreneurs, motivational speakers, and inspirational company founders. These feature talks will be scheduled among a variety of masterclasses and seminars for attendees from industry experts.

After our successes exhibiting at shows including CIPD Manchester and the HR Software and Recruitment Show (now part of the CIPD Festival of Work), we’re anticipating intrigue and interest from Business Show attendees about how HR software can help a variety of small and medium-sized businesses thrive with staff management and HR processes.

More about myhrtoolkit

Myhrtoolkit is a leading HR software provider chosen by over 50,000 people in the UK and Ireland. The myhrtoolkit system provides staff holiday management, absence tracking, training management, HR reporting, and more. Our customers appreciate the simple yet secure accessibility of our GDPR-compliant platform, as well as our unparalleled levels of customer care and support.

Our cloud-based software is ideal for self-service use, whether an employee needs to access and update their information or book a holiday in-office or remotely. Account controllers and designated managers have higher levels of access, in order to record absences or approve holidays. This means everyone only has access to the information they need.

If you’d like to explore the features our HR system can offer in more depth, you can contact us to speak to an advisor and also to book a demo.

The post Come see our staff management software at The Business Show in London appeared first on myhrtoolkit.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Statistically, the first Monday in February is the day when most people phone in sick, with up to 350,000 employees taking the day off across the UK. This particular Monday has since been dubbed ‘National Sickie Day‘. The day has become fairly notorious in the past few years; it has been widely reported to cost the economy approximately £45m in lost productivity.

Of course, it wouldn’t be accurate to conclude that anyone who is ill on this day is ‘pulling a sickie’. In many cases, people will have genuine reasons to take the day off. They may have caught one of the ever-present winter bugs or feel burnout from stress or mental ill health.

In fact, recent research from The ELAS Group suggests that this day’s significance seems to have waned over the years. The company first reported on the National Sickie Day phenomenon back in 2011. In 2018, they stated that there is a more general trend for sickness days on Monday rising over the winter months. This is rather different to noting rises in sickness on particular days, such as National Sickie Day or Blue Monday. Such research indicates that addressing sickness trends in your organisation will require a more nuanced approach than scrutinising a particular day of the year.

Considering the underlying causes of sick days

Rather than using National Sickie Day as a one-off test for staff absence, it’s better to consider the underlying reasons why certain times of the year may be harder for employees, and indeed why staff may feel the need to take time off.

Consider the following questions: are you offering a supportive environment for your employees to thrive within? Are some members of your organisation being spread too thinly and feeling the pressure? Are you putting workplace wellbeing practices in place for your staff?

According to research from the CIPD, 43% of employees wouldn’t feel comfortable disclosing poor mental health to their manager. These communication barriers mean organisations tend to overlook stress and mental health issues. Unfortunately, this can contribute to a rise in sick days as employees feel the effects of a lack of support.

Having the right health and wellbeing structures in place within your organisation will help reduce absence levels over time, particularly those related to mental health. Thus, it’s worth making sure your employees aren’t dealing with too much stress and that they feel they can get genuine support and understanding about mental health issues. Furthermore, organisations can make the effort to signpost and celebrate healthy choices for staff.

How to manage absence in your organisation

When it comes to absence management, software can do a lot of the heavy lifting for you; for instance, the myhrtoolkit absence management feature can help you identify staff attendance patterns, so you can take steps to reduce absence levels. This includes automated sick pay calculations and the ability to attach back-to-work documents and sick notes to absence records for full attendance management.

In addition, you can add welfare tags to employee files to provide managers with more context about health issues and related information when investigating rises in employee absence. This is a great way to ensure managers can sensitively address absence issues with important information at hand.

Determining the underlying causes for absence is key for effective staff management. From taking clear steps to eradicate mental health stigma in your organisation to tackling absence issues sensitively when they do arise and offering support in getting employees back to work, there’s plenty we can do to make days such as ‘National Sickie Day’ truly a thing of the past.

The post National Sickie Day: creating a more nuanced approach to absence management appeared first on myhrtoolkit.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Myhrtoolkit are proud to announce that we have become a gold sponsor for youth mental health charity Golddigger Trust’s 2019 Fundraising Dinner and Auction. Golddigger Trust has been working with young people in Sheffield since 2005 on boosting their self-esteem and wellbeing and also provide specialist training on these issues throughout the UK.

The second annual Fundraising Dinner and Auction will be held on May 10th 2019 at the Megacentre in Sheffield. It’s set to be a fantastic evening with a red carpet drinks reception, live music and entertainment, a three course meal, and exciting auction opportunities with holidays, celebrity donated prizes, and once-in-a-lifetime prizes available for bidders.

“We are delighted to welcome Myhrtoolkit as a sponsor for the second year running. Myhrtoolkit have gone above and beyond to help Golddigger Trust in its mission to ‘unearth value’ in vulnerable young people; from providing pro-bono business mentoring and free subscription to their excellent HR management software, to their sponsorship of our key fundraising event of the year, Myhrtoolkit have made a real impact on how Golddigger Trust serves the young people of Sheffield and beyond.

“The funds raised at this event are vital in keeping Golddigger Trust’s services open and accessible to all young people, providing the right help at the right time. It is an honour to have the Myhrtoolkit team with us on the journey as we see young people’s lives transformed, and horizons expanded.”

– Beth Stout, Golddigger Trust CEO

At last year’s event, the charity raised £9,000 – this year will be even bigger and better, as the trust are aiming to raise £15,000 in order to expand the services they can offer for vulnerable young people to help them reach their full potential.

Our MD Jon Curtis is thrilled to sponsor the charity:

“It’s such a privilege to support a charity like Golddigger and also Beth as a great third-sector CEO. Mental health is such a challenging issue for young people these days and anything the business community can do to help, it should. I’d like to see Golddigger double in size and capacity and making this funding dinner into a roaring success would be a great start”.

Sponsorship packages are available for helping this grassroots charity expand on their impressive work across Sheffield and the UK. If your company is considering corporate sponsorship and you would be interested in supporting an amazing charity who provide unique self-esteem and positive wellbeing services for young people, you can find out more about sponsoring the event here.

About Golddigger Trust

Since its inception in 2005, Golddigger Trust has worked with thousands of young people on a variety of projects designed to strengthen their confidence and social connections. The services they offer include drop in sessions, mentoring and befriending, a Managing Emotions course, sexual health support and advice, and the self-esteem courses Made of More and I’m The Girl I Want to Be.

The mission statement of Golddigger Trust is to help young people to ‘unearth’ the value in themselves. The charity promotes self-esteem and emotional wellbeing through helping children and young adults find out more about themselves and increase their confidence. The team also responds to young people’s needs as they arise, focusing on issues such as sexual exploitation, self-harm, and suicidal thoughts within a supportive and understanding environment.

Though they are a Sheffield-focused charity, Golddigger Trust have also responded to the needs of other organisations throughout the UK working with young people. So far, the trust has trained up and resourced 21 teams throughout England and Scotland to be able to work with young people more effectively within the areas of self-esteem and wellbeing. The charity also regularly works with schools, council organisations, and the NHS in the South Yorkshire area.

Charity Sponsorship Opportunities

Though they are a small voluntary organisation, Golddigger Trust have managed to do so much for young people within South Yorkshire and across the UK. We’re proud to sponsor this charity to enable them to continue their incredible work – and we invite any interested parties to consider sponsoring them too.

If your company is considering corporate sponsorship and you would be interested in supporting an amazing charity who provide unique self-esteem and positive wellbeing services for young people, you can find out more about sponsorship opportunities for the upcoming fundraising dinner and auction here or call Golddigger Trust on 0114 327 1191.

The post Myhrtoolkit sponsors youth mental health charity Golddigger Trust fundraiser appeared first on myhrtoolkit.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Is it possible to turn negative press coverage about the ‘worst day of the year’ and workplace absenteeism into something more positive and useful?

Now that the New Year is upon us, we’re edging closer to the day known as ‘Blue Monday‘, which this year falls on Monday January 21st. Blue Monday has touted by the media as the most depressing day of the year. It originates from calculations made for a travel company press release back in 2005. Though the formula has since been debunked as pseudoscientific, the concept of Blue Monday has nevertheless gathered steam in the last few years, and is a staple topic for puff news pieces.

It’s easy to see why the idea of Blue Monday has a certain appeal. The short and cold days of winter can be dispiriting; plus, getting back into work mode after time off for Christmas means that January isn’t typically everybody’s favourite month. Blue Monday is the culminating moment of the January blues, a shorthand we can use to sum up feelings of disappointment or demotivation that can occur during this month. There is no doubt that the festive season, with its costs and family pressures, are a significant pressure for many people. For those who suffer from mental health issues even more so.

Could we use the Blue Monday concept to initiate more meaningful conversations about mental health in the workplace?

Brew Monday: Starting mental health conversations

More awareness of the impact of poor mental health in the workplace is desperately needed; in 2018, the CIPD found that poor mental health is the most common cause of long-term sickness absence from work in the UK. Despite this, only 49% of employees reported feeling supported by their employers with regards to mental health. Furthermore, many reported that they are reluctant to speak about mental health or disclose conditions.

Blue Monday could be used to spark positive conversations about mental health if approached in the right way. Such conversations shouldn’t be limited to one day of the year, of course, but opportunities to address the growing issues surrounding poor mental health and stress in the workplace are golden, not blue. Other such days include Time to Talk Day and World Mental Health Day.

The mental health charity Samaritans, for instance, have turned Blue Monday into ‘Brew Monday‘, using the connection between this day and mental health as a conversation starter and fundraising opportunity. On their website, the Samaritans recommend Brew Monday as a day to “get together with your friends, family or workmates […] have a cuppa, raise vital funds for Samaritans and beat the January blues!” Such initiatives are a great way to open up conversations about mental health and make an active difference.

Discussing mental health in your workplace

The familiar idea of Blue Monday could be a great stepping stone to starting conversations about mental health in the workplace and showing employees and colleagues that you can offer them support. Given that mental health can be a sensitive topic, such conversations should be approached with planning and forethought from a HR perspective.

The CIPD and charity Mind have published mental health at work guidelines for employers and managers, to help organisations facilitate conversations about wellbeing and promote better mental health for employees. Why not read up on how to better handle mental health in your workplace as a New Year’s resolution? With a better understanding of how work can affect mental health, we can look upon ‘Blue Monday’ each year with a more proactive and positive approach.

To turn Blue Monday into a more celebratory affair this year, here at the myhrtoolkit office we’re going to start the week right with some nice teas, coffees and pastries. Here’s to a better approach to mental health in 2019.

The post Blue Monday 2019: can it be a force for good? appeared first on myhrtoolkit.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Many organisations are talking about wellbeing.  It is perhaps the current ‘must have’ feature of the employee engagement mix.

With high levels of mental ill-health impacting most organisations, similarly high degrees of change in almost every business and sector and the continued challenge of low employee engagement globally, it isn’t surprising to find organisations looking to solutions – and wellbeing may well seem to fit the bill.

The challenge for HR and leaders is not to simply do wellbeing, but to do it well – how to make wellbeing activities meaningful and impactful.  How to get beyond free fruit and exercise classes, to genuine, systemic initiatives that will have a positive impact on all employees within the organisation.

First things first – what do we mean by wellbeing?   The World Health Organisation describes wellbeing as each individual being able to realise their own potential, to be able to cope with the normal stresses of life and to be able to work productively and fruitfully and make a contribution to their community.  It is also described as a dynamic state in which people can develop their potential – a balancing of body, mind and spirit. 

When we talk about wellbeing in the work context, often people focus on that well known phrase ‘work-life balance’.  The inherent challenge with this term is that it is binary – there is work and there is life, pitched as opposing sides of a single coin.  For most of us, that isn’t really the case.  Work and life are blurred, integrated.

Wellbeing is perhaps best thought of as something that encompasses many aspects; physical health, emotional health, mental health, nutritional health, social health and financial health.  Employers can have a role to play in each of these elements in the workplace.

There are two main areas of focus for leaders and HR; helping people to stay well at work and supporting those who are not.

In relation to the former, there is much that organisations can do to keep people feeling good and functioning well. Research by the New Economics Foundation suggest five drivers for personal wellbeing; connecting with others, giving, taking notice, learning and being active.  Encouraging more of each of these elements, building them into ways of working will help employees stay well at work.

In tackling ill health HR need to ensure that managers know how to have spot the signs and symptoms of potential ill-health (especially mental health) and then how to have appropriate and sensitive conversations.  This needs to be coupled with timely occupational health and supported return to work programmes.

When it comes to workplace wellbeing there is a huge spectrum of activity that takes place in practice. Some organisations are firmly in what I sometimes refer to as the ‘Zumba Zone’.  They are offering activities and initiatives, but these are often around topics like exercise or mindfulness.  In comparison at the other end of the spectrum are those organisations taking a much more in-depth approach – tackling the systemic and structural issues that can impact on the wellbeing of their people.  The latter is a much harder, much longer term place to play.  That said, there is nothing wrong with offering fitness classes, free fruit and awareness-raising events.  They all help to set the permission for the wellbeing conversation and can pave the way to changes in culture.

Employee wellbeing is a challenge for all organisations.  So will this be the year that wellbeing goes mainstream and becomes a strategic priority?  It is very much in the hands of HR to make the case.  But if we do, our aim must be to move past the early, initiative stage, resist the instinct to approach it as a standalone project, and build it into the fabric of everything that we do.

About the author

Gemma Dale

Gemma Dale is an experienced HR Director, a Chartered Fellow of the CIPD, and a regular speaker and writer on a variety of HR topics including employee engagement and social media, who currently runs The Work Consultancy writes about how to work towards getting the most effective people policies for your organisation. 

The post 2019 – Time for wellbeing to go mainstream? appeared first on myhrtoolkit.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

It seems like everything is ‘cloud-based’ now, but what does that actually mean? And what benefit can you gain from using cloud-based HR software?

The term ‘Cloud-based’ describes software or services that run on hardware you don’t manage. You don’t even need to know anything about it! It still exists somewhere and is every bit as real as the data stored on your hard drive, but it’s not managed by you.

Many cloud-based services use technology such as replication to store data in more than one location. Myhrtoolkit replicates all customer files across multiple locations. This redundancy makes your files more available and resilient.

Why is moving to the cloud important or useful for you?

Lower cost – as you’re not responsible for the hardware or software, there’s no hefty initial outlay. With monthly payments and no long-term contracts, there’s very little financial risk.

Less hassle – you don’t need to manage the software or the hardware. We ensure your data is as secure as possible, and available whenever you need it. We also have friendly customer support staff to help you with whatever you need.

More effective – HR can be complex. We review and update our application to ensure that it reflects the needs of our customers. We also make sure it complies with applicable UK legislation. By using a cloud-based product you get far more bang for your buck.

To see for yourself how myhrtoolkit can benefit you, please complete our contact form. Alternatively, you can call our friendly sales team on 0345 225 0414.

The post What is Cloud-based HR? appeared first on myhrtoolkit.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

It has arrived!!! The “silly season” of year-end functions, award ceremonies, team gatherings, scrambling for corporate gifts to clients and employees, coupled by fighting the activity battle between urgent to do lists and important to do lists.

Among the chaos, do you think your workforce plan is ready to kick into gear come 02 January 2019?

I’m taking a calculated guess that the answer is more of a “nay or a “meh”, than a yeah…..

The cliché of “fail to plan, is planning to fail” does have a twin brother called “failing to plan strategically, guarantees failing to succeed operationally”.

DEFINING SWP – STRATEGIC WORKFORCE PLANNING

The concept of Strategic Workforce Planning revolves around the integration of business management and people management merged into a holistic, organisational process.

According to Accenture’s Insights Report, this entails strategical planning in line with operational supply and demand as to avoid talent shortages or surpluses during the course of the year.

In a nutshell: SWP means striking the perfect balance between a company’s resource requirements and employee deliverables (skills, experience, competence) to achieve strategic objectives in terms of production, performance and profit.

NEITHER TO SMALL NOR TOO LARGE

A strategic workforce plan is crucial to organisational longevity whether you are a mom-and-pop shop with five employees, or a multinational corporation with thousands of workers. These are the reasons why:

  1. Avoiding Surprises

The more efficient your people management strategy, the less likely you are to fall into the traps of panic hiring or impulsive layoffs.

  • Workforce planning provides Human Resources and Management Execs with the means to facilitate recruiting, retention, redeployment, leadership development and worker skills enhancement to boost company growth and performance.
  • With the correct SWP management is always aware of who is going on holiday, who will be retiring, who is going on maternity leave, who is up for promotion, who are serving their notice periods, new product launches, increased capacity requirements, expansion projects and pending restructuring
  1. Staying In Sync

All businesses are subject to cyclical periods of growth and retraction which may cause havoc if they manifest unexpectedly and talent planning initiatives are lagging a few months behind.

  • An effective workforce planning strategy will assist HR to identify business cycles timeously by recognising specific patterns or trends and being nimble enough to react to them and course correct the talent ship if needed.
  • The people management strategy must be co-dependent on the business strategy to sync talent pipeline with growth spurts, pauses or contractions and lessen the negative impacts thereof.
  1. Accurately Predicting

Hiring obesity (over-hiring) or recruiting anaemia (under-hiring) are general pitfalls in the absence of a workforce planning strategy.

When your SWP is on point utilising the correct tools, no crystal ball, gut feeling or subjective managerial opinions need to be ‘’entertained’’, because data will accurately predict potential scenarios.

  • Estimating increases or reductions in company growth, production, and revenue.
  • Highlighting changes in talent needs resulting from growth or constriction periods by the number of employees, required in which position and for what area in the company.
  • Projecting future vacancies and available talent in-house and assessing external talent supply in the marketplace
  1. Smoke Detection & Prevention

Plan for the worst and hope for the best is the most practical approach in the disruptive nature of today’s business realm.

Sound workforce planning practices will attribute to problem identification, long before the ball drops and chaos erupts.

  • With a sufficient ‘’smoke detection’’ HR system in place, minor problems can be dealt with, before they turn into catastrophes.
  • Talent gap analysis which forms part of an SWP assist in preventing issues of skills shortages or competency voids from transpiring.
  • Organisational development planning, another critical component of SWP, prevents employee disengagement which reduces staff turnover because employees are continually groomed for internal opportunities that match their capabilities and career prospects.
  1. Carpe Diem

A workforce planning strategy worth its salt simplifies admin intensive processes and provides sufficient lead time for HR to briskly take advantage of opportunities in the talent landscape.

  • If HR staff are in constant firefighting guise, forced into reactive instead of proactive mode, talent sourcing opportunities are often overlooked.
  • Efficient management of HR resources (thanks to your SWP) will free up time for them to build passive candidate pipelines, improve the company’s candidate experience and establish a strong employer brand within the prospective candidate and job seekers communities.

THINKING BEFORE LEAPING

Implementing new workforce planning mechanisms may become a deadly feat if you throw the baby out with the bathwater in an attempt to start the New Year afresh. Any ideas of innovation, improvement and advancement without properly hashing out the details are doomed for failure.

Most people are inherently resistant to change. Thus, your first consideration should be to work with what you got regarding the current staff complement, before scouting for those new kids on the block.

Otherwise, you may just be spending your time doing exit interviews and desperation hiring by January 31st.

The post STRATEGIC WORKFORCE PLANNING: A MUST HAVE 2019 NEW YEAR’S RESOLUTION appeared first on myhrtoolkit.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

As the year draws to a close, it provides the opportune moment to reflect on the past 12 months, and the lessons we’ve learnt in the HR world.

From each lesson, we see new trends emerging; from the #MeToo campaign shaping workplace accountability, to the impact of transparency in the recruitment process. Here’s some of the biggest issues we’ve seen this year and the trends that have followed from them…

#MeToo

If 2018 is remembered for anything, it will be the #MeToo movement. The powerful stories that have emerged have shone a light on unacceptable workplace behaviour, and sexual harassment, and the industry has responded. This has forced Online HR teams to encourage ways of reporting inappropriate behaviour and sharing workplace guidelines, as well as implementing training where needed. Most of all, it has forced HR to review the way that complaints are investigated and handled, for the safeguarding of all employees.

Social Media Vetting

Online HR teams will tell you that vetting candidates online is nothing new. However, in response, we’ve all become very savvy about how we manage our online data. With the GDPR policy updated this year and with Facebook’s apparent breach of personal information, the issue of how personal data is used and kept has become a hot topic. From this lesson, the Online HR world has seen an impact on the way social media profiles are now managed. Rather than completely removing all tweets and Facebook posts, prospective employees are now using online reputation tools to remove potentially contentious content, while keeping some presence online.

Blind Hiring

In response to the times we live in, blind hiring has emerged as a forward-thinking way of recruiting candidates. It removes any opportunity for bias or prejudice to seep in to the process. As such, only the essential skills and information needed (no personal details) are presented to HR teams for consideration. With the public demanding more transparency than ever, this is set to be one of the biggest lessons we have learnt from 2018 and trends to grow in the coming year.

Health and Safety Wellbeing

In 2017, we learnt that wellbeing played an important role in the workplace, and was given the platform it deserved. Fast-forward to this year, and the impact it had can be widely seen throughout companies. The Reward & Employee Benefits Association report said referred to workplace wellbeing as the “solid underpinning” to allow workforces to withstand the “huge revolution” in working practices that we are already starting to see. It’s about “giving staff autonomy over how they work and where they work… so as to be energised when they are at work.”

Which brings us to the next point…

Flexible Working

It’s certainly not new, but flexible working has returned to the agenda with even greater force in 2018. Once reserved for return-to-work-parents, flexible hours have seen growing interest in mature age groups too. Just a few weeks’ ago a report found that the vast majority (78%) of the over 50s believe that flexible hours should be introduced to keep them in employment longer. And with the retirement age constantly pushed back, this is only set to become one of the new ways of working for an aging population.

The post THE TOP FIVE HR LESSONS FROM 2018 appeared first on myhrtoolkit.

Read Full Article

Read for later

Articles marked as Favorite are saved for later viewing.
close
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Separate tags by commas
To access this feature, please upgrade your account.
Start your free month
Free Preview