Loading...

Follow H I Adventures » Mountain Bike Tours Worldwide on Feedspot


Valid
or
Continue with Google
Continue with Facebook
How to master the attack position

THE
MTB
MIN
UTE

Learn how to master the attack position

Whats the secret to going fast on the trail? Well, the truth is there is no one quick fix to make you ‘fast’ but there are lots of techniques and tips that will always help to increase your speed.

One of the most important of these is mastering a good attack position; that pose where you are balanced, at one with the bike and ready to take on whatever the trail launches at you.

Perfecting this technique will take years but in this episode of the #MTBminute our lead Scottish guide Chris Gibbs will do a fine job of giving you the basics to get you on your way to finding some real trail speed.

How to master the Attack Position | The #MTBminute - YouTube
8 easy steps to mastering the attack position
  1. Position your weight evenly over centre of bike
  2. Level your feet to position the cranks horizontally
  3. Dip your heels slightly
  4. Stand tall with knees slightly bent and open
  5. Keep your head up and look down the trail
  6. Slightly bend your arms to and keep your elbows wide
  7. Maintain a straight back down to your hips
  8. Always keep one finger covering each brake
Tick, tick, tick, tick…

What can you learn in a minute? Well, quite a lot as it turns out…

From changing a gear cable to mastering the attack position, in the #MTBminute we take on some of the most pressing questions around your mountain bike life and attempt to show you the key stages in just 60 seconds!

Using decades of collective guiding, riding and mechanical experience we’ve carefully created each minute-long video to give easy-to-follow, practical tips that will instantly demystify skills and techniques. They might still take a lifetime to master but with the #MTBminute at least you’ll be off to a solid start.

Enjoyed this?

If our video has inspired you to tackle a brake bleed on your bike, why not take a look at our other #MTBminute videos or sign up to our newsletter to receive regular updates from our expert guides who are bringing the Art of Adventure to life!

The post MTBminute Attack Position appeared first on H+I Adventures.

Read Full Article
Visit website
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 
How to Bleed Shimano Brakes

THE
MTB
MIN
UTE

LEARN HOW TO BLEED SHIMANO BRAKES

There’s no surer way to knock your confidence than dropping in to some flowy goodness and finding you’ve got spongy levers and your brakes aren’t doing their job.

Having the ability to keep your brakes at their punchy best is essential for happy riding, and in this edition of #MTBminute, our lead Scottish guide Chris Gibbs shows you they key stages of bleeding your Shimano brakes – without getting into a mess!

How to Bleed Shimano Brakes | The #MTBminute - YouTube
10 Easy steps to bleeding a Shimano brake
  1. Remove wheel from the calliper you plan to work on
  2. Leave the brake pads in when pushing pistons back
  3. Remove pad retaining pin
  4. Insert pad spacer and secure with the pin
  5. Level the brake lever to avoid unwanted air bubbles entering the system
  6. Carefully insert the bleed bucket ensuring not to over tighten the bucket
  7. Remove any air bubbles from the syringe
  8. Depress syringe whilst watching the bucket until the mineral oil runs clean and bubble free
  9. Flick the brake lever a few times with bucket still attached to force any remaining unwanted bubbles out of the system
  10. Clean and insert new brake pads
Tick, tick, tick, tick…

What can you learn in a minute? Well, quite a lot as it turns out…

From changing a gear cable to mastering the attack position, in the #MTBminute we take on some of the most pressing questions around your mountain bike life and attempt to show you the key stages in just 60 seconds!

Using decades of collective guiding, riding and mechanical experience we’ve carefully created each minute-long video to give easy-to-follow, practical tips that will demystify skills and techniques. They might still take years to master but with the #MTBminute at least you’ll be off to a solid start.

Enjoyed this?

If our video has inspired you to tackle a brake bleed on your bike, why not take a look at our other #MTBminute videos or sign up to our newsletter to receive regular updates from our expert guides who are bringing the Art of Adventure to life!

The post MTBminute Shimano Brake Bleed appeared first on H+I Adventures.

Read Full Article
Visit website
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 
Our top tips for how best to spend 24 hours in Trieste

Now that you’ve booked onto your mountain bike tour in Croatia, it’s time to start thinking about travelling to the Istrian coast starting point of Trieste on the Italian border.

We always recommend that you arrive at least one day before your adventure begins to allow for any travel or luggage delays. It’s also good to acclimatise to local time and recover from your journey before you start turning the pedals.

You’ll have a day to acclimatise and indulge in the relaxed pace of Italian life before heading over the border into Croatia, we’ve compiled a few handy tips to help you make the most of your time in Trieste.

Morning

Trieste is a bustling port city filled to the brim with culture and architecture. It’s also the home of Illy (the coffee company!) so this is a good starting point for your day. Head to the thriving Piazza Unità d’Italia and perch up at a cafe to watch the world go by.

After a nip of caffeine it’s worth taking the short walk to the Canal Grande and exploring the waterfront as well as the vast array of stunning architecture on offer – don’t forget your camera! There are plenty of museums and churches that can be accessed throughout the city if you feel the temptation.

Afternoon

Those feeling a little more adventurous can discover some of the delights a little further afield such as Miramare Castle or the landscape and nature of Carso Triestino. Trieste has a good bus service for getting around, head to the local transport company’s website for more information.

You’re in Italy. You have to take advantage of the food, and you certainly won’t struggle to find a worthy location. You could even get properly into the Italian swing of things and have an aperitivo (an early evening drink and snack). Urbanis near the piazza is a good place to start.

Evening

Italians typically have dinner pretty late, around 9pm. If you’re after a bit of atmosphere during your meal it is worth holding off… Also a little hunger isn’t a bad thing as you won’t be left hungry when eating here! Buffet da Pepi in the centre of Trieste serves up typical local cuisine and is laid back, Scabar is a bit more upmarket serving great seafood – it may be worth catching a taxi to though!

5 Local Phrases

Buongiorno!; Good morning!

Ciao’; Informal hello and goodbye

Per favore; Please

Grazie; Thank you

Parla inglese?; Do you speak english?

Trieste Transport Links

Trieste is a small port city and once you’re in the main hub you’ll be able to negotiate most of the city on foot. If you’re travelling to Trieste by train, bus or plane, here’s how to get to the city centre:

Train – If you arrive to Trieste by train (from Venice, for example) then luckily you’ll already be in the city centre and all our recommended hotels are only a short walk away.

Air – Trieste airport is only a few miles from the city centre and is well served by train (Trenitalia) and bus links (SAF, Flixbus) and taxi services (GoOpti). If you are arriving into Venice Marco Polo Airport you can take a GoOpti transfer or train to Trieste.

Enjoyed this?

Read more of our stories for great travel tips, skills and adventure inspiration…

The post 24 Hours In Trieste appeared first on H+I Adventures.

Read Full Article
Visit website
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 
The Developing Croatian MTB Scene

RB:

Heading to the Istrian coastline of Croatia our photographer Ross Bell discovers a pleasantly surprising local mountain bike scene beginning to blossom.

There’s more to Croatia’s riding than first meets the eye

Think of riding destinations in Europe. What comes to mind? Well, let’s say there’s a definite hotspot in the Alps; places like Morzine and Verbier. Then there’s the fashionable places such as Finale Ligure and Madeira that have shot to fame through racing and clever marketing.

If I asked you about the riding in Croatia, though, chances are you’d have few words to say. The majority of visitors are lured to Dubrovnik and the south, which is incredibly beautiful, but chasing imaginary dragons and bloodshed from the ‘Game of Thrones’ TV series with thousands of others isn’t exactly my idea of fun.

Croatia is generally overlooked when it comes to riding. Often people have an image of it being too rocky and, sure, there are plenty of rocks (and other-worldly trails!) at the coast, but there’s far more to it than meets the eye.

Our destination was the Istrian coastline on the country’s northern tip, an area steeped in Roman, Venetian, and Austro-Hungarian history. I’ll admit to being a little reserved in judgement when we pulled up at the first riding spot of Grožnjan, but after spotting a few signs left over from a recent SloEnduro Series I began to be lured in with intrigue. It felt like I was in a game of Packman as we rumbled down the narrow cobbled streets, through ancient archways and in-between the towering houses, barely a handlebar’s-width apart. Eventually we spring out of the village maze and, after a few minutes’ pedalling on the open road, pull up at a dusty snake of singletrack slithering off into the dense undergrowth. Time to get stuck in.

Our guide Danijel leads the charge as he reveals through plumes of dust the undulating, high-speed rollercoaster of rises and turns which, by the time we were spat out at the bottom, didn’t satisfy my cravings as such, but just unleashed a whole new thirst!

The wheels were swiftly pointed uphill for another lap. Riders of all abilities will be left grinning from ear-to-ear here. Those less experienced can pick their way down and build up confidence, whilst the more seasoned rider can play or attack, changing the whole character of the trail. There’s a reason an Enduro race was held here; a fairly swift and direct uphill was the source for a whole delta of trails, which we savoured until the sinking sun called us back to our base for the night in the medieval hilltop village of Motovun. Better still, we had the trails to ourselves the whole day…

Feasting in the hotel courtyard on a whole host of local dishes was the perfect ending to our first Croatian riding experience, it set a high standard for the days following. 

Next on the hit list was to head south to the island of Krk, a stone’s throw from neighbouring Lošinj which is set to welcome the DH World Cup in the coming month. The fact that Croatia has managed to tempt the UCI to pastures new speaks volumes; with racers, media, and the world’s leading bike brands set to descend on the Croatian coast gives the region the potential to explode onto the scene. Although different islands, Krk and  Lošinj share a lot of similar traits.

Arriving in the dark to a place you’ve never visited before creates a lot of questions to be answered by a gaze out the window at first light, when I was happy to see some big looking hills thrusting out of the Adriatic. The green of the rolling Grožnjan countryside had been swapped for the blue of the coastline; two wildly different landscapes juxtaposing each other just a short drive apart. Would the riding offer the same contrast?

Clawing at the pedals we begin the ascent up an old Austro-Hungarian military road which has stood the test of time, almost a better surface than some of the UK’s roads! The uniform pine trees try their best to hide the carpet of rocks dancing in the dappled morning light but we are already beginning to get a taste for the island’s trails. The tree line stops abruptly as we clamber over a wall and apparently onto the surface of the moon. We stare in bewilderment as our eyes adjust to the mesmerising textures and details, the millions of rocks scattering the hillside making for one trippy visual experience. On top of the plateau we do our best to avoid any encounters with UFOs or space creatures, and eventually the double track funnels into a singletrack where almost instantly the rocks disappear and the vegetation shoots up; travelling from the moon, we had landed in the south of Spain by the looks of it. Croatia was offering up a medley of varying trail personalities, not only short drives apart but mid-ride too. The gradient is pretty gradual giving us what feels like a lengthy descent into the lunch stop on the sea front town of Baška, refuelling on pizza and coffee with the turquoise waters rolling over the pebbles below us. There is a brief but consistent flash of XC bandits powering along the water front, it’s the week prior to the ‘4 Islands Race’ and some of the competitors are here already settling into the venue. It’s another sign of Croatia’s growing interest and attraction for biking, especially when you consider how the race year-on-year is expanding at a rate of knots, bringing hundreds of people to the area.

After fuelling the fire with a nip of caffeine we head out for an afternoon lap on the other side of the valley and hot on the trail of parts of the race course, although at a little more relaxed tempo.

The rocks of this morning were back with a vengeance keeping us on our toes as our wheels began to point towards the sea and setting sun, flanked by two mammoth walls of stone either side of the trail. Demanding attention throughout, any lazy line choice would put you at risk of a pinch flat… Something I found out the hard way! Luckily not before we’d branched off from the main trail and taken the right turn onto the ‘DH’ option on a very homemade looking sign. The track still retained the rockiness but added in another different flavour to our ride with some swooping berms and nicely shaped doubles. Towards the bottom we came across the young locals who’d been putting in the graft on the trail, testing out one of their new features. Through a little cracked English we chat briefly about the trail they’re digging, luckily Danijel was there to fill in the missing words but an impression was definitely made on us. It was pretty old-school, raw, and behind the curve of many places, but it was great to see a smile-filled group of local riders not only enjoying their trails, but also helping the growth of the sport in that area.

It was a nice sentiment to finish our trip on. The trail quality and massive diversity leaves little to be desired. Throw into that the scenery, culture, cuisine, and massively hospitable locals and you have a riding experience that’ll leave a lasting impression.

Croatia’s riding scene is youthful which isn’t a bad thing. The ingredients are there and it is emerging slowly for the moment, but with Lošinj set to enter the global stage next year with the World Cup it might just set the cat amongst the pigeons for European riding destinations.

Enjoyed this?

Read more of our stories for great travel tips, skills and adventure inspiration…

The post The Developing Croatian MTB Scene appeared first on H+I Adventures.

Read Full Article
Visit website
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 
International Yeti Tribe Gathering New Zealand In Photos

RB:

New Zealand is the destination atop most mountain biker’s bucket list making it a must-do location for the International Yeti Tribe Gathering.

Yeti freaks let loose on the land of the long white cloud

For the International Yeti Tribe Gathering’s third incarnation, it was the turn for the land of the long white cloud to take centre stage and host the 24 strong crew assembled for some two-wheeled action in the southern hemisphere summer. Meeting in Christchurch we shook off the jet lag with a spin in the Port Hills that ended with a dip in the Pacific before starting our 13-day adventure that would take us into the heart of the south Island, ending up in the mountain bike paradise of Queenstown. 

The diversity of New Zealand’s landscapes runs parallel with the trails that flow through her hills and mountains, from the almost eery but ever enchanting beech woods, to the temperate rainforest of the Old Ghost Road, to the golden tufts of grass on Coronet Peak in Queenstown. New Zealand has a trail portfolio so great in depth and quality that few could touch. The fun didn’t stop after the bikes were downed for the day, refreshing swim spots, watching the sun rise and set from above the tree line and clouds, and having dinner with the oh so imposing Mt Cook hanging over.

Take in the full 13 days of Kiwi action and lifestyle that went down on the International Yeti Tribe Gathering:

Fancy joining in the fun? The International Yeti Tribe and Beti Tribe are heading for the Highlands of Scotland later this year for whisky-fuelled adventures, antics, and some of the finest singletrack around.

Enjoyed this?

Read more of our stories for great travel tips, skills and adventure inspiration…

Read Full Article
Visit website
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 
Our Top 10 Mountain Bike Trails Around The World

RB:

Our favourite trail gold from across the globe!

Our tours stretch far and wide across various corners of the world with each country sharing a different flavour of trail with us. There are a lot of good trails out there but what makes a great trail? Well, the truth is they’re probably subjective to you as an individual, but more often than not a great trail will have the whole group smiling from ear-to-ear. From the temperate rainforest of New Zealand, to the blooming alpine meadows of Colorado and the breath-taking fjords of Norway… We’ve compiled a few of our favourites!

The Old Ghost Road – New Zealand

The Old Ghost Road is not just a trail but a journey. This 85km point-to-point will have you climbing for a day through the green of the temperate rainforest before bursting above the tree line with views of rolling hill, after hill, after hill. We then stop for a night under the stars at Ghost Lake Hut, an experience you won’t forget. After watching the sun burst over the horizon you’ll get your teeth stuck into the first descent of the day as you jump back into the rainforest. You’ll be rewarded with long and thrilling descents as well as plenty of mile munching up, along, and out of the jungle before a refreshing cold beer at a quirky village pub.

Mefjellet – Norway

Waking up aboard your floating hotel, “Gåssten”, the towering peak of Mefjellet is almost a daunting prospect as you stare upward, bobbing on the turquoise waters of the fjord far below. You’ll earn every one of the 1100 metres as you bike and hike your way skyward atop the glacier carved ridge line surrounded by snow capped peaks. Once your wheels are pointing downwards with gravity on your side you won’t be needing to crank your pedals much! Tearing down the open mountainside over rock slabs and a ribbon of singletrack which changes taste once it reaches the woods, becoming filled with flow and features. Once ridden, never forgotten! You’ll pop out at the water’s edge where your lift back to the Gåssten awaits. 

Lupra Pass – Nepal

In the depths of the Himalayas you’ll be surrounded by some of the world’s tallest mountains which will leave you lost for words, and breath! The high altitudes will leave you gasping for air but you’ll reap the rewards in the country often dubbed as the “Roof of the World”. After a 300m scrabble to a lofty height of 4100m through the Lupra Pass you’ll be rewarded with a solid vertical kilometre altitude dump filled with fast, flowing, dusty singletrack – all in a surreal surrounding. After a series of steeper switchbacks you’ll traverse a long suspension bridge before taking to the dried up river bed for some rubbly riding to your lunch spot in Jomsom, perhaps having to dodge a yak or two! You’ll then finish off your ride to the overnight stop of Marpha through some ‘urban’ Nepalese trail taking in alleyways and farmland… Far from your average day on the bike!    

401 Trail – Colorado, USA

There’s more to the old mountain town of Crested Butte than its chilled and relaxed atmosphere, you’ll take in some real classics whilst here that will set your pulse alight. The fact that Crested Butte has hosted an EWS speaks volumes about its trail calibre. Taking to the high backcountry you’ll be left somewhat humbled by the silence and remoteness where true trail gold lies in wait. Reaching deep into the valley floor before peeling into the trees, you’ll wind your way up before popping into the open in an explosion of colour from the flower meadows. You’ll then engage in an unavoidable fist fight with the flowers as your bars brush through the blur of yellows and purples. A rollercoaster of rises and falls that will have you hooked before spitting you out right by the van. A true Colorado Classic.

Achnashellach – Scotland

It’s not only the US that has a wild west! Scotland’s rugged west coast is certainly a wild place, although granted, is lacking in cowboys. The dramatic scenery and weather make a mythical environment which contains plenty of challenging trails which are tough and technical. There’s no shortage of rocks! Our personal favourite is Achnashellach in the heart of the Torridon mountains. A true test of bike and rider alike. A tough climb marooned deep in a glen sets the tone for the day, the Scottish trail gods don’t give away their offerings easily. Once crested you’ll take on the burly and brutal rock ride over smooth glacier-shaved slabs and teeth-chattering rock gardens, a descent that’ll keep you on the edge of your seat, or rather saddle, the whole way. This is also only the first descent of the day!

‘Cheese Man’ (unofficial title!) – Slovenia

You can expect Slovenia to rocket into the media when the EWS visits later this summer and for good reason. The trail atop our list starts on the fringes of the Italian border. Whilst climbing you’ll shoot for the high alpine pastures overlooking the Julian Alps and the Soca river below before stopping to sample some cheese delicacies with the local shepherds. Now, get ready for action. In front of you lie 15km of diverse trail taking you from the alpine pastures with grazing cattle, into the trees which switch from your classic evergreen Alpine forest, into the orange hues of the beech woods, floating through loam and hero dirt before some tricky limestone outcrops appear just to add that little bit of extra zest to your day! Pitching up by the emerald flow of the Soca river for a refreshment will give you a moment to savour and appreciate what you’ve just experienced.

Top of the World – BC, Canada
Read Full Article
Visit website
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 
Nepali guide RJ a National Geographic 2018 Adventurer of the Year

Our Nepali guide RJ gains international recognition from National Geographic

Congratulations to our Nepali guide RJ!

We’re really proud of our Nepali guide RJ (Rajesh) Magar who has been nominated a National Geographic 2018 Adventurer of the Year. This is a huge, and well-deserved accolade for 21-year-old RJ, who is not only a great guide, but also one of the top mountain bike racers in Asia.

According to National Geographic it was RJ’s “phenomenal talent, infectious energy and unexpected story…” that made him a 2018 Adventurer of the Year.

Back in December, adventure videographer and Yeti ambassador, Joey Schusler spent some weeks out in Nepal filming a documentary about RJ, which fuelled National Geographic’s interest in the young Nepali rider.

Joey’s film is due to be released soon, but in the meantime, here’s a short trailer of what’s to come…

On the up going down

From building a ‘Franken-bike’ from cobbled-together spare parts costing $25 only a few short years ago, RJ now boasts over a dozen titles (and medals) to his name, testament to his growth and prowess as a downhill racer on the Asian scene.

RJ’s sights are now set on international race titles and he’s working towards entering a number of races in the US and Europe this year, and hopefully bringing back another haul of medals to Nepal in the process!

We’re incredibly proud to have RJ on our guiding team in Nepal and can’t wait to see everything he achieves in the next race season too.

Enjoyed this?

Read more of our stories for great travel tips, skills and adventure inspiration…

The post RJ ‘RIPPER’ – A National Geographic Adventurer of the Year 2018 appeared first on H+I Adventures, mountain bike tours worldwide.

Read Full Article
Visit website
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 
Pre-Season Scout on Skye – Mountain Biking the Quiraing

RB:

We escape the snow at our Inverness office and head for the Isle of Skye, mountain bike the Quiraing before the season kicks off.

Riding the world famous Quiraing on the Isle of Skye

A solitary raven hangs contentedly in the fierce breeze punched skywards by the abrupt cliffs, a wind so fierce you could watch it scrape the moisture from your eyes. The Quiraing is normally a hot spot for hikers and sightseers but is deserted today, the Isle of Skye at the tail end of February perhaps not having the same draw as the “summer” months. Clouds pace in and out, causing the sun to slice through patches of blue sky and briefly bathe the desaturated landscape in a burst of colourful hues, offering us a little warmth and respite from the relentless windchill.

We hadn’t ridden the Quiraing for a few years and with the rest of the country being hit by some wintry weather driven down from Siberia we thought we’d take advantage of the west coast’s apparent sun and blue skies… Who’d have thought it?! My scepticism was just about quenched having left Inverness in a dusting of snow this morning, this is as good as you’re going to get it at this time of year. A gaze left shows towering peaks and craggy pinnacles, whilst a gaze right reveals the kind of exposure that turns your whole body rigid. The animal track-esque trail gives way to a boulder and scree field forcing bikes to be launched on shoulders and marched to the summit, the craters and crags we are in the midst of are otherworldly, feeling like they belong on the pages of a fiction novel.

“the craters and crags we are in the midst of are otherworldly, feeling like they belong on the pages of a fiction novel”

Waterfalls are frozen in motion off the shear rock face above whilst sheep graze undeterred and uninterested by our presence. We find a trio of German hikers pondering a plot in paths, we pointed them in the right direction although they stressed this was against the bus driver’s advice… Given there were no rucksacks to be seen and they were clad in chinos we politely gave them a nudge in the direction of the car park instead of the snowy plateau they were eying up. Ditching the hiker highway we opt for the road less travelled and launch down a descent snaking off between the glacier- and river-carved mounds. Flowing turns lead into eroded rock gardens where a tentative point, shoot, and hope for the best was the only option – made that little bit more interesting with the random ribbons of ice strewn on the trail. Leaving the Quiraing behind the coastline becomes our target, by now we are treated to a wide vista over the rippled sea surface across to the snow dusted Torridon mountains. I hang back and watch Chris and Ella dropping the vertical towards the blue of the Atlantic, after traversing a short ridge line they disappear out of sight into the hollow of a corrie.

“Leaving the Quiraing behind the coastline becomes our target, by now we are treated to a wide vista over the rippled sea surface across to the snow dusted Torridon mountains.”

By the time I reach them again they are waiting impatiently at the gate, not wanting to hang around in the wind. The van is a short aero-tuck and road roll away, offering the draw of warmth and potential for hunting out a dinner location… Which we found to be tricky on Skye in the depths of winter, 4th time lucky and we were tucked into a marginally cremated pizza which was more than edible after a day in the cold. Looks can be deceiving! Crossing back onto the mainland at Kyle of Lochalsh with a temperature reading well below minus we were already dreaming of returning in the warmer and prolonged daylight hours of a not-so-sunny Scottish summer!

Enjoyed this?

Read more of our stories for great travel tips, skills and adventure inspiration…

The post Pre Season Scout on Skye – Mountain Biking the Quiraing appeared first on H+I Adventures, mountain bike tours worldwide.

Read Full Article
Visit website
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 
Experience the Art of Adventure
Get a taste of the Art of Adventure in our new video

What do we mean by ‘the Art of Adventure’?

Well, until you’ve experienced it for yourself, it’s a difficult concept to describe. For us, it’s about painstakingly crafting every aspect of your adventure. Working with local experts across the globe – craftspeople in their own right – to consider every moment of your tour, carefully orchestrating extraordinary experiences that you’ll cherish for a lifetime.

We believe that there’s a real art in blending all the ingredients of a mountain bike tour, some of which you may not even notice, but together they harmonise like the soundscape of a movie, heightening the senses and enhancing your experience.

To paint a fuller picture, here’s a short edit of video footage from some of our adventures in Southern Spain, Chile + Patagonia, the Julian Alps in Slovenia and the fjords of Norway to give you a flavour of the Art of Adventure

This is the Art of Adventure - Vimeo
Experience our artistry for yourself

If our video has inspired to get out and travel the world with your mountain bike, take a look at our calendar of international mountain bike tours and join us to experience the Art of Adventure this year!

Enjoyed this?

Read more of our stories for great travel tips, skills and adventure inspiration…

The post The Art of Adventure video appeared first on H+I Adventures, mountain bike tours worldwide.

Read Full Article
Visit website
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 
At Home With Our Local Guides: Erin Greene, Queenstown

RB:

We add a Kiwi twist to our series ‘At Home with our Local Guides’ and explore the tasty trails of Queenstown, New Zealand with Erin Greene

The mountain biker’s Mecca!

When it comes to dream places to live as a mountain biker few locations can hold a candle to Queenstown, it’s up there with the likes of Whistler for being an mtb mecca. It has been the location for countless photos and videos over the years and for good reason, the trails and scenery are other-worldly.

Our Kiwi guide Erin is lucky enough to call the trail paradise of Queenstown home and we were lucky enough to have her show us the local’s lines whilst out in New Zealand for the International Yeti Tribe Gathering. There’s so much depth to the Queenstown trail portfolio that we barely scratched the surface…

The gentle hum of a chairlift is always a good start to your morning, feet hanging freely in the air as you surge uphill cheekily with zero effort. We began our few days of Queenstown shredding a stone’s throw away in Cardrona Bike Park, sifting through deep dust in the summer sun. The park has plenty of lines to play on, including a few more with a rockier and natural feeling as well as the usual bumps, jumps, and berms of a typical bike park. After a morning’s play we grabbed some lunch and headed straight into some of Queenstown’s classics, taking in the aptly named ‘Roots’ which, yes you guessed it, features an abundance of roots no less! We ascended up the steep fire road which traverses through the bike park, somewhat tortured watching some DH pros enjoying their off season and floating, oh-so-effortlessly over the tables and gaps.

After a bit of of a slog in the late afternoon heat we pop out of the trees, revealing the summit and views over the lake stretching out below. Hanging around just long enough to catch our breath we dive into the teeth rattling and chain chattering ‘Roots’ with plooms of dust hanging heavy in the afternoon glow before cutting into the bike park and joining the rollercoaster of turns back into town for dinner. The place just has a certain buzz you don’t get many places, it’s easy to see why people come here on holiday and never leave!

Meet Erin Greene, your local NZ mtb guide

“I grew up in Dunedin, lots of rain, next to no trails… I used to race cross country and the odd downhill race when I was a junior on my wee cross country hardtail. Bouncing my way down stuff, and just getting away with it at times! I used to work the winter ski season in Queenstown, then I met my now husband Tom and he was keen to be here year round. I made the move and haven’t really looked back! I’ll go home to see the family now and then but I’m pretty happy here, it’s good for heaps of adventures and it’s all on your back door. 5 minutes and you’ve got awesome pedalling, trail running, swimming – heaps of trails! There is always, always, a new trail popping up every summer and always something to challenge yourself on. I’ll never be able to ride all of the trails here. Never!”

“I’m just about to do an expedition-length adventure race non-stop. I’ve got 10 days to get through the course in Fjorland which will be a challenge with that terrain and the weather, and the sandflies! It’ll be real tough. Last time it was in Queenstown and it was probably one of the easiest ones that have been around for a while, everything was pretty close to town so you had lots of supporters that you’d see out on the course so when you come across people it’d always give you a bit of a lift seeing people that you know, them telling you that you are doing awesome even if you’re not! We’re probably not going to see anyone for 5 or 6 days this time so we’ll just need to get on pretty well as a team! The places I go to I’d probably never end up going to otherwise, so that’s pretty cool. The friendships you make with your team mates and the stuff you go through together… It’s pretty hilarious some of the conversations and things that start happening. Then when you go and look at a map and see where you’ve been and the time you’ve done it in… you feel pretty stoked with yourself! “

“I guess Queenstown feels really transient when you are here for a short period of time. As soon you’ve been in Queenstown for a while you meet up with all these other people who have been here for the same amount of time or longer, everyone is really open to letting new people into their friendships pretty quickly. That’s a pretty nice feeling when you get into meeting a decent crowd straight away, all being into the same kind of adventures. I’m always just keen for an adventure, if I can go to some crazy and different country to ride there then I’ll go do it. If I can go somewhere new and ride I’ll go do it. I haven’t been back to too many of the same places because I’d rather go and experience something new than go back to something I’ve already ridden. I’ve been riding in Vietnam, Italy, Mongolia, Malaysia…”

Enjoyed this?

Read more of our stories for great travel tips, skills and adventure inspiration…

The post At Home With Our Local Guides: Erin Greene, Queenstown appeared first on H+I Adventures, mountain bike tours worldwide.

Read Full Article
Visit website

Read for later

Articles marked as Favorite are saved for later viewing.
close
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Separate tags by commas
To access this feature, please upgrade your account.
Start your free month
Free Preview