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Between all the exceptionally tailored silhouettes we keep seeing, like the classy jumpsuits and inventive suiting separates, it’s clear that sharp fashion has become a major trend this season. It comes as no surprise, then, that the newly iconic Blazer Dress has been powering its way to the forefront of everyone’s wardrobes! And really, who doesn’t want to feel empowered by the way they dress? Bringing a fresh new take on the ‘Women in Menswear’ trend, the Setaria Dress sewing pattern is as versatile as they come. Easily construct it with a sleek suiting fabric for a blazing look that will transition effortlessly from a day at the office to a night out with pals – or even make it a bit more flirty with a painterly floral twill!
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For full pattern instructions, please visit the original post here.  All seam allowances are 1/2″ unless otherwise stated. See chart below for sizing specifications. Note, this specific pattern is available up to a size 30.

The only change I made to the original pattern was the button-up sleeve detail. Cape sleeves have been huge, but sometimes it’s a bit tricky to work runway fashion into your everyday wardrobe. With a button-up inseam, your sleeve can be worn closed for a classic look, or open for some subtle high fashion vibes – especially in the summer!

To do this to your own Setaria Dress, simply pin 10 two inch loops of elastic every inch from the hem of your main fabric sleeve. Place your lining layer on top, fabric faces touching. Sew along the bottom of your sleeves and up both sides, stopping 5″ from the top. Clip the corners of your seam allowance, turn right side out and press.

Individually, sew up the remainder of the lining and main fabric sleeve inseam. Set your sleeve into your blazer, sewing only your main fabric layers. Once the rest of your blazer is completed, following the original instructions, slip-stitch your sleeve lining to the rest of the lining at the armscye.

Will you be giving this alteration to the Setaria Dress a try? Let me know your design plans in the comments!

The post Setaria Dress Redux – Free Sewing Pattern appeared first on Mood Sewciety.

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Although it may seem a little counter intuitive for the beach, long sleeve swimsuits have been popping up more and more for the 2019 season. As someone who starts burning the second she goes outside (thank you, Irish ancestors), I’m a huge fan of the extra protection from the sun; and when paired with Mood’s UV protective and aloe-infused tricots, our new Abelia Swimsuit becomes a must-have for any beach-goer. You can even get a bit unconventional with a stretch lace or foil knit for a bodysuit that can easily transition into your Fall wardrobe! However you choose to create the Abelia, you’ll be ready to seas the day in elegant, summer style.

Purchase Materials Used Below:

DOWNLOAD YOUR FREE PATTERNSimply fill in the form below, verify your email address
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All seam allowances are 1/2″ unless otherwise stated. See chart below for sizing specifications. Note, this specific pattern is available up to a size 30.

Ideally you’ll have at least a 9″ plastic molded zipper to pair with your suit, but I spotted this one in Raspberry Sorbet and couldn’t pass it up since the color matched so wonderfully.

If you’re working with a shorter zipper, all you need to do is add a small rectangle of fabric at the end of it, just as wide as the zipper, and long enough that it reaches to the bottom of your center front bodice piece. (Note, this zipper opening is how you put your suit on, so the smaller you go, the more difficult it may be to get on.  I don’t recommend shortening your zipper for sizes over 12.)

Next, place your zipper in between your center front bodice pieces and stitch with fabric faces together, like you see above.

You may notice that some of my seams have some additional piping sewn into them. This piping isn’t included in the pattern, but it’s not difficult to create your own. For this project, I wanted 1/4″ of the piping to show, which meant cutting 1.5″ strips of pink knit. Once full inch was for seam allowance, and the other 1/2″ is what you see as the piping. Folded in half, I was left with the 1/4″ I wanted!

Sew the top portion of your front bodice to your lower front panel, fabric faces together. If using piping, include it in between your fabrics when sewing this seam.

When adding your side front panel next, you can also include piping if desired. Attach the panel along the vertical seam first, like you see below. At the bottom corner, clip your seam allowance at a 45 degree angle toward your stitch line. This makes it easier to match up the bottom seam and sew.

The front of your suit has been completed!

Luckily, the back of the suit goes together much more simply. Attach your side back panels to the center back panel and it is complete!

Sew the front and back of your swim suit together at the side seams and shoulders before moving on to your collar.

Technically, you should attach one layer of your collar to your garment before facing it, but I wanted to be sure the scalloped were edged correctly before attaching.

Sew the two collar pieces along the scallops, faces together. Rather than your typical 1/2″ seam allowance, used 1/4″. Notch the seam allowance, like you see below and turn right side out. Attach one layer to the neckline of your garment and then edge-stitch around the scallops with a wide stitch. Slip-stitch the bottom of the collar facing down.

Connect your scallop facings at the side seams and then attach then to your suit along the scalloped hem, again using a 1/4″ seam allowance. Notch and turn right side out, like you did with the collar. Use a wide stitch to edge-stitch along the scallops. Finish the facing with a zig-zag stitch or serger and then tack to seams inside.

Set in your sleeves and finish your sleeve hems similarly.

Will you be trying the Abelia Swimsuit? Let me know what fabric combinations you’re considering in the comments!

The post The Abelia Swimsuit – Free Sewing Pattern appeared first on Mood Sewciety.

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Mood Fabrics by Natalia Luna - 1w ago

Have you ever wondered how many types of swimsuit silhouettes there are? Or what kind of swimsuit would suit your body type and preference? My motto for the perfect summer “beach bod” is simply this. Just put on your swimsuit, and ta-da! You have the perfect beach bod, instantaneously. Pretty easy right? So why not use the latest lush neoprene and tricot fabrics Mood has, to create your next masterpiece! 

With Memorial Day weekend fast approaching, and beach bum days becoming more frequent, I’m sure you’ll do your best to be at the beach every weekend to get your healthy dose of vitamin D!  With so many colors and silhouettes, you may have a tough time choosing just one. So here are 7 swimsuit silhouettes and their origin, for you to peruse over for your next unique and inclusive swimsuit collection!

The One Piece was made generations after society dictated swimsuits were a necessity. In the past, women would jump in the sea with bloomers, stockings, and even weigh the hems of their skirts with lead to keep from showing their legs! Modesty reigned over functionality. Most women were only able to wade in the water, and not swim. Once society realized that in order to swim better, they would have to use less fabric, the one piece was born! But not before hem lines slowly became higher from previous years. So around the late 1920s is where we saw the first collective debut of the one piece, also called a maillot, named after the French fashion designer in the 1920s. It was a one piece bathing suit with high cut legs, that looked like shorts on a romper. It was also customary to wear matching swim caps to protect your hair, and add a decorative flair and style. Women were liberated politically to vote, and through the clothing they’d wear! If you’d like a more covered and modest look, you can bring back this vintage look with ease. Nowadays, there are no shorts, and one pieces are generally more triangular towards the bottom to cover your pelvic area. With time, designs change, and the one piece has been no different!

The Vintage High Waisted Two Piece was a silhouette originally intentioned to be a groundbreaking design as a two piece bathing suit. However, in hindsight, it was a more modest version than its successor. The two piece swimsuit was made by a French designer named Jacques Heim in 1932. Cutely named “Atome” in French, it was a nod towards the scientific term “atom”, the smallest particle known to man. It would only make sense to name the smallest bathing suit after it! It was the first of its kind, but did not become popular until many years later. It’s design was primarily to aid war relief efforts, by trying to use as little fabric as possible, since using more fabric was considered a luxury. Perfect for hiding a tummy, and cinching your waist!

The Triangle Bikini was created by yet another French designer named Louis Réard, who shortly released his own version of today’s modern day two piece Bikini in July 1946. The more risque version of it of course! Imagine three little triangles to cover your breasts, pelvic area, and buttocks. It exposed large portions of women’s belly buttons, and large areas of their rear. So much so, that no model at the time would wear it. And look how far we are now! This collection was named after the Bikini Atoll, which was a nuclear test site where the US tested a nuclear bomb for the first time in public only 4 days before the collection launched. It was advertised as “Smaller than the Smallest Bathing Suit in The World!” to poke fun at Jacques’s previous design. It was definitely meant to be explosive with how little coverage it had. Also, not just any bathing suit was not considered a genuine bikini by the way. Louis Réard maintained a public mystique about his collection, stating that a bikini wasn’t genuine unless you could pull it through a wedding ring!    

The Monokini was originally designed by fashion designer Rudi Gernreich in 1964, in the height of the era of sexual revolution! They were originally designed to be the world’s first topless bathing suits, upstaging each of its predecessors, only being held up by shoe-string thin straps! But so much controversy surrounded the product, that Gernreich was urged to make monokinis more commercial and palatable to the public. Thus Monokinis grew in popularity, a little time after the one piece and bikini.

Thigh Cut bathing suits were intensely popularized when Pamela Anderson wore the iconic red one-piece on the hit TV show Baywatch in the late 1990s. It’s just right for people who want to show a little more leg, and look a little taller! Modern day bikinis in 2019 show that this is a highly popular bathing suit trend still to this day, also advertised by models and influencers on all platforms of social media. Who wouldn’t want to show off your curves while running across a beach to save a life? I sure do!

The Tankini is a simple silhouette that has a coverage from the top of the swimsuit, that covers your navel and torso. It is essentially a two piece, with a bikini bottom! It can have apt coverage for those looking for a more secure top, since integrating a push-up into this type of swimsuit is easy. It is now more popular for children’s beachwear, due to it’s simplistic design. It was popularized in the 1990s, to model after the bathing suits women would wear in the 1920s. Fashion is always evolving and changing, but it would be remiss of me to not mention it’s original design inspiration!

The Burkini, or also known as a Burqini, are full coverage swimsuits that only show the hands, face, and feet. Designed by fashion designer Aheda Zin in 2003, this type of swimsuit was made for those looking to display modesty while respecting the religion of the Islam culture. Although, not limited to religion, some people have also reported wearing the burkini to protect themselves from the sun! In a way, it is a very freeing way for women to enjoy hot climates while still wearing lighter fabrics that are able to get wet, while also actively participating in water sports. They are typically made with anywhere from 2-4 separate pieces that include a hood, tunic, shirt and bottom with snaps to keep the fabric from floating up. If you’d like a swimsuit with the most possible coverage, this bathing suit is for you!

I hope this guide helped you figure out what kind of bathing suit you would want to wear! Did you learn anything new about these swimsuit origins, and which one are you going to make? Let me know in the comment section below!

The post Types of Swimsuit Silhouettes appeared first on Mood Sewciety.

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Creating the perfect dress can be the best feeling in the entire world – especially when it’s on trend and fits your figure perfectly! What more could you ask for? As I’m sure you know, getting a great fit doesn’t always come easily. You may have started sewing together a lovely summer dress with, say, a smooth woven linen, and upon trying it on, you realize (in horror!) that it’s a little more roomy than anticipated. But, don’t let this stump you! You may have simply overestimated the amount of fabric you used in your pattern, and need to adjust your hips to take it in a bit. At other times, you may find yourself in the predicament where you need more room in your pattern – because, believe me, that happens too. And that’s okay, everything takes practice! Mistakes will happen, but with our guide, you’ll be able to breeze through your hip adjustments – in no time at all – and finally get the perfect dress (every time)!

In order to begin the process of adjusting your hips in your pattern, be sure to measure yourself beforehand. To get the correct measurement of your hips, place your measuring tape along the fullest area of your buttocks. For those who have a hard time finding where that is exactly, it’s generally 7 inches below your natural waistline (your belly button)! With these measurements, you’ll discover if you have narrow, or wide set hips. Use these measurements to compare against your pattern, and plan your pattern adjustment accordingly, following the steps below!

To adjust a pattern for narrow hips, you will need to take in the pattern to reduce the amount of fabric that will be used. Instead of slashing and spreading, we’ll be pinning and tucking exactly where we need to, to get the desired look of a well fitted garment! So begin by adding dart legs by your armholes, and another extending to the bottom hem of your bodice. Additionally, mark another line going from the top of your skirt, to the hem as well. Pin and tuck, and sew with ample seam allowance. Simple right? Tape down the tucks in your paper pattern, and use this going forward if you have narrow hips! Problem solved.

If you happen to have wide set hips, you will need to slash and spread the pattern for more room. Simply follow the same lines as indicated above for the narrow hip section, and spread the pattern to pivot at the end of their points. Add your additional pattern drafting paper beneath it, and pin and tape the the additional sections where more room is needed in your garment. Use this wide set hip pattern for all of your creations going forward!

I hope this guide helped you figure out what to do if you ever found yourself in this kind of predicament! What will you be planning on making for this summer? Let me know in the comment section below!

The post How to Alter a Pattern for Wider or Narrower Hips appeared first on Mood Sewciety.

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Pleated pants, often remembered for their stint in (bad) ’80s workplace fashion, are making a gorgeous stylistic comeback with their new and freshly redesigned details. Showcasing a high waist, accentuated by two pleats, our Aster Pants are so adorably chic, they’re wearable for both business and pleasure! While we chose a nautical-inspired print from Mood’s (New and Exclusive!) St. Tropez Collection, the Aster Pants free sewing pattern can be rocked at full length in a solid suiting fabric for your on-the-job look, or as a cropped pant in a precious printed voile for a summertime-look that’s shore to impress. Whether you style yours with a billowing chiffon blouse or a crisp cotton button-up, sewing your own pair of Aster Pants ensures that putting together your summer wardrobe is all smooth sailing.

Paired here with The Melia Blouse, also available for free download!

DOWNLOAD YOUR FREE PATTERNSimply fill in the form below, verify your email address
and you’ll be sent a link to download our free Pattern.
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All seam allowances are 1/2″ unless otherwise stated. See chart below for sizing specifications. Note, this specific pattern is available up to a size 30.

The best part about this pattern is that both views go together the exact same way! Once you choose whether you’d like full-length pants or cropped capris, cut your pattern at the desired cut line, and then you’re ready to start sewing.

Begin by following the guidelines on your pattern to create the two pleats in the front panels of your pants. Pin them into place.

Create 8 belt loops – my fabric pieces measured 1″x1.75″, and pin two of them in between your front pleats like you see below. Stay-stitch them into place along with the pleats, faces together. Split the remaining 4 belt loops and tack them to the back panels of your pants similarly.

Fabric faces together, place one layer of each of your pockets along the outer edges of your front pants panels. Align the top of the pocket with the waistline of your pants, like you see below. Stitch into place.

Place your zipper face down on the right pant leg, aligning with the center front. The bottom of your zipper should hit 1/2″ above the bottom of the fly facing. Stitch into place along the right side of the zipper, like you see in the top right image below. Fold the raw edge of the fly facing inward and edge-stitch, like you see in the lower images.

Lay your other front pants layer on top, face down, and sew along the opposite side of the zipper. Stitch your front pant legs together starting at the bottom of your zipper, down the remainder of the front rise. Fold the right pant leg back to create the front fly, and stitch down, like you see in the two lower images below.

Add the second layer of your pockets to your back pants panels, much like you did with the front. Connect your rear panels at the back rise, and then sew the front and back of your pants together at the inseam and outer seams. For the outer seam, be sure to go around the edge of your pocket, like below, and then pin your pockets toward the front of your garment.

Add your waistband along the top of your pants. Before edge-stitching your waistband closed (like I stupidly did below!), add your magnet above your zipper. Edge-stitch the waistband closed, and add your hook & eye for extra support.

Hem the bottom of your pants and they’re ready to wear! Which will you be making – full-length or cropped?

Be sure to check out The Melia Blouse for the perfect free shirt pattern to pair with your new pants!

The post The Aster Pants – Free Sewing Pattern appeared first on Mood Sewciety.

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Some of my most enjoyable projects have been creating adorable outfits for my daughter, and yet surprisingly, I’ve never made “Mommy and Me” matching outfits for us to wear together. It didn’t cross my mind until the day my sweetheart said: “Mommy, I want to have a dress just like you!” And just like that, she had me melting like chocolate in her little hands! Just in time for Mother’s Day, Mood Fabrics brings you the Cypress Dress free sewing pattern! From the crisp shawl collar and self-covered buttons, this stunning A-line dress is just as flattering on me as it is on Jordyn! Mood’s Exclusive Ile des Orchidees printed cotton sateen gives this matching ensemble a high-end luxury feel, perfect for tea parties or enjoying a day of beauty with your princess. Try this look in rich velvet for the Holiday season and stand out in family portraits! Where do you and your little one plan on wearing the Cypress Dress? Happy Mother’s Day!

Purchase Materials Used Below:

DOWNLOAD YOUR FREE PATTERNSimply fill in the form below, verify your email address
and you’ll be sent a link to download our free Pattern.
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All seam allowances are 1/2″ unless otherwise stated. See chart below for sizing specifications. Note, this specific pattern is available up to a size 30. Girls Sizes 4, 5, 6, 7, 8

The children’s pattern begins on page 37.

You can follow along with these steps for both patterns:

First, sew in your darts on the fronts and backs of your bodice pieces. Next, pin your front bodice pieces together at the collar center back seam.

Sew your backs together at the center back seam. I used bias tape to add a nice finish to my exposed seams.  All other seams are finished using French seams.

Prepare the collar facing by attaching both pattern pieces at the center back seam. Press, seam flat.

With right sides of the fabric together, pin the front and back bodice together starting at the shoulder seam. Pin the collar along the neck opening.

Start at the shoulder and continue sewing the collar across to the other shoulder. Clip into the corners to fit the collar as needed.

Pin the facing to the collar along the front of the bodice and sew in place.

Trim excess fabric from the seam allowance and make sure to clip into the curved areas. Turn the facing in and press collar flat.

Finish by applying the bias tape along the inside of the collars raw edge.

Let’s set the bodice aside for a moment and work on the skirt.

Follow the directions on the pattern and fold over the pleats on each front skirt pattern. Pin the pleats and tack in place with a basting stitch.

Fold over the button plackets on each side of the skirt front and press. Apply bias tape to the raw edge of the placket.

Attach your skirt front to the skirt back at the sides and finish with French seams.

Once your skirt is done you can attach it to the bodice at the waist. Finish exposed seams with bias tape.

Prepare the sleeves by sewing a basting stitch about 1/4″ away from the edge of the cap. Slightly gather in the cap of the sleeve creating a small amount of ease.

Pin the sleeves to the armhole opening and set in the sleeves using a French seam.

On the inside of the sleeve, pin the cuff with the right side of the fabric facing the wrong side of the sleeve. Stitch in place. Turn and fold over cuff to create the “rolled” cuff look. Add your button tab to the side of your cuff to finish.

Once your belt is done, secure it in place with simple chain stitch belt loops at the side seams.

Use the button kit to cover all buttons. Finish the dress by adding your buttons and buttonholes.

That’s it! Your Cypress is dress is done! I hope you enjoy making these dresses as much as I did!

The post The Cypress Dress – Free Sewing Pattern appeared first on Mood Sewciety.

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Sometimes making a pattern to fit over your bust is frustrating. You may have the perfect rayon twill or sateen for the job, but ill-fitting moments are still happening: creasing under your shoulder blades, tightness where your bust just doesn’t fit, and even wrinkling at your torso too – I totally get it! Shopping off the rack doesn’t always guarantee a flattering fit either, as picking out a top is never really the end of the road for us large chested gals. Needless to say, fashion doesn’t consistently acknowledge that big busted girls exists, and as a result, we’re regularly exposed to thinner models on the runway and in the media – but we’re here! Now, fear not because with our handy guide, you’ll be able to adjust any pattern to fit your bust – whether prominent or not. If some fabric needs to be taken in for a smaller bust or extra room is needed for the girls, we’ve got you covered – literally!

As with any pattern adjustment, you should always begin by retaking your measurements. To measure your bust, measure at your apex, the fullest part of your breast. I also recommend measuring your underbust to ensure that your garment fits snugly. When taking your measurements, wrap the measuring tape slightly loose around yourself, and do not hold it too tight or you’ll get a wrong measurement. Be sure to compare the measurements against your pattern, to see where any discrepancies may arise. Then, add or subtract from the pattern accordingly by following the instructions below!

To take in the bust, you simply will need to pin across the chest, and add darts to your pattern towards your armhole. The method here is to reduce fabric around your chest, where it’s too loose. Simply mark where you’ll be taking the fabric in! Begin with a line for your side seam darts, pivot, and then add another line going down towards the hem of your pattern. Then from the bust point, add a line going towards your armscye. These lines are to ensure you have a nice shape when you take in your pattern! Cut where you’ve marked your pattern, and tape down to reduce the surface area of your pattern. It should be significantly smaller! Use this newly adjusted pattern when creating your next masterpiece.

To let out space in your bust, slash the pattern according to the figure above, and use pattern drafting paper to fill in the additional space needed. It should look similar to when we’re taking fabric in, but this time we’ll be adding more pattern paper! Sew along the slashed lines, and be sure to have this turned inside out for the garments you are making, if you’re not to keen on having the seams visible. With this kind of alteration, it’s also smart to have muslin to practice with.

Did you find this guide helpful? I hope so! I know there are so many different ways to adjust a pattern for your bust, so how do you guys do it at home? Let me know in the comments below!

The post How To Alter a Pattern to Adjust Bust appeared first on Mood Sewciety.

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Mood Fabrics by Molly Hannelly - 2w ago

For every red carpet, every runway, after party, and Instagram Live, there are winners and there are losers. The 2019 MET Gala is no different, proven by the over-the-top ensembles and underwhelming gowns. The theme? Camp. The definition? -that depends on who you ask. For me, camp is everything fashion is and everything it shouldn’t be, amplified and extrapolated into something no one would wear in their right mind. Is that what we got? Let’s take a look.

Yes, Gurl, This is CAMP

To be camp is to be kitsch, and to be kitsch is to be fashion. Aquaria sported a tattered dress paired beautifully with some over-the-top nails, or rather, claws, which featured a stunning array of jewels. Cardi B’s Thom Browne gown in blood red utilized 30,000 feathers and was completely hand-embroidered. Kacey Musgraves’ leather moto dress gave extreme Barbie-vibes, while Katy Perry channeled famed fashionista Marchesa Casati in her lightbulb extravaganza by Moschino. Lupita Nyong’o went psychedelic with a stunning rainbow explosion, paired with a collection of well-placed, golden afro-picks. Violet Chachki truly grabbed our attention with her glove gown, and Zazie Beetz of the phenomenal show Atlanta showed off her two faces with a tuxedo… and a dress. Zendaya’s gorgeous Cinderella gown was a performance in and of itself, lighting up with the literal wave of a wand.

Kacey Musgraves lovely maxi moto dress utilizes pink pleather, but could also be made from denim for a more casual style, or even a sateen. The Xyris Dress on Mood Sewciety is an excellent alternative for her dress, since it’s a more casual garment. Lupita Nyong’o’s dress was made of a variety of tulle, and a variety of laces, like guipure, would be perfect for the bottom of the dress!

  1. Metallic Gold All Over Foil Knit Pleather Substitute
  2. Estate Blue Silk Charmeuse
  3. Black Circles Embossed Stretch Velour
No, Honey, This isn't Camp, But You Tried

Some people missed the mark this season, aiming for camp and simply hitting extravagence. Awkwafina and Emily Blunt both showed this off well in gorgeous golden gowns that were definitely extreme, but not quite camp. Celine Dion admitted in an interview that she didn’t totally understand camp, but she got close enough with a stunning fringe ensemble and Vegas-showgirl style headdress. Gigi Hadid’s gold and white suit featured some lovely feathered fringe, but wasn’t as bold as it could have been, while Joe Jonas and Sophie Turner went for a more abstract style. Jeremy Scott, self-proclaimed King of Camp was merely a prince in a tuxedo lined with jewels, paired with Bella Hadid in a matching gown. Kim Kardashian’s lovely Thierry Mugler dress has taken the internet by storm, but is it camp? Wet, yes. But, camp? not quite. Saoirse Ronan took the approach that many on the pink carpet did, by wearing something loud and hoping no one would notice that they didn’t understand the assignment (we’ve all been there, girl). Serena Williams kicked it up a notch by pairing a blooming yellow down with some Nike sneakers,  and Yara Shahidi wore a darling romper and tights befitting the Grown-ish star.

Take a chance at Jeremy Scott’s and Bella Hadid’s bejeweled ensembles with any fancy beaded trim, or recreate Celine Dion’s stellar fringe ensemble with any longline fringe. Emily Blunt’s ensemble would be perfect for prom, made of any number of sequins, especially in gold. Mood features a variety of 3D fabric, ideal for Serena William’s beautiful blooming gown.

  1. Blue, Silver, and Gunmetal Fancy Jeweled Trim
  2. Metallic Stretch Lame
  3. Natural Beaded Fringe
No, Gurl, this is not Camp

If fashion was high school, the MET Gala wouldn’t be prom (@ all of the Jenners). It’s final exams and some people did not understand the assignment. These are all gorgeous, gorgeous ensembles that designers put hours of work into, and each person looks stunning. But this is the MET Gala, an event that many people (myself included) would do a number of things to get to, and if you’re not going to at least try to take the challenge seriously, maybe let someone else go. Like me, I am the walking definition of style and the next MET Gala should be me themed. Alexa Chung sported a lovely Parisian ensemble with a beret I will covet for the rest of my life, while Hailey Baldwin Beiber the third of Hollywood-shire wore a simple silhouette that sported a bedazzled thong poking out the back. Kate Moss was a disappointment to me, a major fashion model that could’ve taken much more of a risk. That being said, I would love to see a prom dress inspired by her glamorous gown. The Jenner sisters, Kylie and Kendall, wore some colorful couture, another set of models that I think could’ve had more fun with camp, especially since they come from such a Kampy family. I love Lucy Boynton’s bedazzled cape dress with feathered fringe, but I wish she could’ve (swan) dove headfirst into Bjork style swan-dress. Miley Cyrus, a contender for the coveted Queen of Camp, lost out on a chance to go big with a simply structured striped cocktail dress, and a nice piece of arm candy to boot. Nicki Minaj had her Barbie bliss stolen from her by Kacey Musgraves while wearing a simple high low gown with an ultra extended train that fell flat when compared to Cardi B’s red ensemble. Rachel Brosnahan’s pretty in pink rose gown would be another top tier choice for prom, but wasn’t quite what we’re looking for when it comes to kitsch.

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Mood Fabrics by Molly Hannelly - 2w ago

Spring 2019 may have well been Resort, for all the beachy themes that made their way down the runway. Both Markus Lupfer and Chanel created entire runways of sand, you could practically hear the ocean and feel the sea spray off of their fresh ensembles. From oceanic overtones to boardwalk border prints, let’s take a look at the Nautical Notions that designers have been showing off for 2019.

Beachy Ensembles

Beach landscapes, maritime prints, and rope belts have made their way onto garments this season, the ideal ensembles for brunch by the sea or cocktail hour on the boardwalk. Altuzarra’s coral dress features straps galore, perfect for soaking up the sun, while Anna Sui’s v neck tunic and pants look ideal for relaxing at a late night bonfire. Custo Barcelona’s wrapped dress features a quilted pattern and a slinky silhouette that could be seen from the Jersey Shore to Santa Monica, and Gucci’s Merman pants look like something Aquaman might wear to a job interview. Rachel Antonoff’s darling shrimp dress is the true star(fish) of the sea, perfect for grabbing some fish tacos and enjoying an evening on the ocean.

Altuzarra | Spring 2019 Ready-to-Wear

Anna Sui | Spring 2019 Ready-to-Wear

Custo Barcelona | Spring 2019 Ready-to-Wear

Gucci | Spring 2019 Ready-to-Wear

Rachel Antoff | Spring 2019 Ready-to-Wear

Bring on the beach with these fabrics:

Mood Exclusive Tropical Trellis Stretch Cotton Sateen

Mood Exclusive The Island’s Palms Stretch Cotton Sateen

Cover-Ups

The itsy bitsy teeny weeny yellow polka dot bikini is fine for the beach, but sometimes you need a little more fabric to grab a drink at the boardwalk bar or grab some cheese fries at the local diner. That’s where the cover-up comes in. Alessandra Rich’s cover-up is perfect for those looking to get a tattoo without getting stabbed since the sun will do it for you. Altuzarra’s lovely cover-up looks like it came straight off the set of Grace & Frankie, while Barbara Bui’s loose maxi cover-up is the ideal ensemble for a post-ocean cooldown. Blumarine goes for gold with a stunningly regal cover-up that’s perfect for relaxing on a beach in Nice, and Chanel’s guipure pants are perfect for late night strolls along a peaceful beach.

Alessandra Rich | Spring 2019 Ready-to-Wear 2

Altuzarra | Spring 2019 Ready-to-Wear

Barbara Bui | Spring 2019 Ready-to-Wear

Blumarine | Spring 2019 Ready-to-Wear

Chanel | Spring 2019 Ready-to-Wear

We’ve got you covered with these fabrics:

Mood Exclusive Run the World Burnt Salmon Cotton Voile

White Geometric Lace with Finished Eyelash Edges

Navy

Nautical navy has hit the runway like the ocean waves swarming the beaches on a sunny summer afternoon. Barbara Bui’s flowing set is reminiscent of those swelling ties, as it billows out beautifully behind the model. Etro’s crocheted dress is hippy chic, while Gabriela Hearst’s pleated pants and basic tank look like they’re heading to a beach-side bistro for a sure to be sensational seafood meal. L’Agence utilizes a Versace style print for a simple shirt dress, and Stella McCartney’s fit and flare ribbons out from the waist like the tiny waves in a tidepool.

Barbara Bui | Spring 2019 Ready-to-Wear

Etro | Spring 2019 Ready-to-Wear

Gabriela Hearst | Spring 2019 Ready-to-Wear

L’Agence | Spring 2019 Ready-to-Wear

Stella McCartney | Spring 2019 Ready-to-Wear

Get on the navy train with these fabrics:

Italian Black and Lapis Double Faced Double Knit

Sanremo Indigo and White Two-Tone Linen Woven

Ocean Landscapes

Can’t make it to the beach? Than BYOB! Bring your own beach, that is. Oceanic landscapes have taken over the runway, seen in Alessandra Rich’s stunning beach bomber jacket. Cynthia Rowley’s tropical maxi dress is reminiscent of coral reefs, while Emilio Pucci’s piece looks perfect for relaxing in a beach-side cabana. Etro’s stunning wrap dress features a pop of prints on the wrong side.

Alessandra Rich | Spring 2019 Ready-to-Wear

Cynthia Rowley | Spring 2019 Ready-to-Wear

Emilio Pucci | Spring 2019 Ready-to-Wear

Etro | Spring 2019 Ready-to-Wear

Make waves with these fabrics:

Blue and Green Tropical Border Printed Viscose Batiste

Mood Exclusive Sunset Palms Cotton Voile

Sailor Styles

Navy, stripes, and statement buttons are all staples of the sailor silhouette. Alessandra Rich displays this with poise, pairing a sailor style bodysuit with chunky knit trousers. Gucci’s sailor suit features quilted pants and bold gold accents, while Lela Rose showed high waisted shorts with daisy buttons. Rachel Antonoff’s red jumpsuit is ready for work, and Tommy Hilfiger’s striking striped bodysuit features a lovely collar and deep v neckline.

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As a plus size girl, some silhouettes scare me. Dresses with drop waists are pretty much right at the top of that list. However, I’ve had my eye on the Ulmus Dress with it’s adorable ruffles since it’s release last summer, and after finding the perfect lemon print to pair with it, I decided to give it a try. I couldn’t be more in love. The stripes of the sateen that I chose show off the billowing sleeves and skirt ruffle beautifully. Personally, I can’t wait to wear this look to a summer party, but I could easily see it at a Sunday brunch or out for a stroll through the botanical gardens. Let me know how you’d style your Ulmus Dress!

Purchase Materials Used Below:

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All seam allowances are 1/2″ unless otherwise stated. See chart below for sizing specifications. Note, this specific pattern is available up to a size 30.

Here’s how to sew:

Following the guidelines on your pattern, begin by adding the darts into the front bodice pieces.

Sew the front and back bodice pieces at the side seams, and press your seam allowances. The bodice part of this dress is lined, so you should have four layers of what’s show below: two main fabric layers, and two lining layers. Personally, I lined mine with the same fabric as my dress.

Sew your lining to the main fabric along the top curve of the bodice. Clip your seam allowance, like you see below, turn your bodice right side out, and press.

Set your bodice aside for the time being to take a look at your sleeves and neckline. Along the outer curve of your sleeve pieces, sew a small rolled hem.

Take your front and back neckline pieces and match up the notches on the one short end. Sew along the edge to create your shoulder seams, like the lower right image. Like your bodice, the neckline is also line, so you should have four layers of this as well.

Next, aligning your shoulder seam with the center, attach each of your sleeves to one layer of your neckline along the small unfinished curve, like below.

Take each of the neckline pieces that you attached your sleeves to, and pin them to your bodice, like you see below. With the fabric faces together, start by matching up the bottom of the front neckline to the bottom of your front bodice. Repeat with the back neckline and bodice. Stay-stitch into place.

Take the lining layers of your neckline and sew them along the long edge of your main neckline layer. Press the lining toward the inside of the garment, and then press 1/2″ of the raw edge inward. Tuck all of your raw edges inward from your bodice and neckline and pin them into your neckline lining. Slip-stitch the lining down.

Set the top part of your dress aside for the moment and take a look at your skirt. Sew the darts into your front and back upper skirt panels, following your pattern guidelines. Take your skirt ruffle and give the outer curve a small rolled hem, similar to your sleeves.

Sew your back upper skirt panels to the front upper skirt at the side seams. Since this part of your dress is unlined, I recommend French seams here. Once your upper skirt is assembled, it can be attached to the bodice of your dress.

Add in your zipper and then sew down the remainder of the center back seam.

Lastly, attach your skirt ruffle along the bottom of your lower skirt. The front ends overlap, so be sure to start from the center back of your dress and working your way toward the front while pinning.

Will you be giving the Ulmus Dress a try? Let me know what kind of fabric you’d love to use in the comments!

The post Ulmus Dress Redux – Free Sewing Pattern appeared first on Mood Sewciety.

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