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SAN JOSE — The Sharks traded Justin Braun to the Philadelphia Flyers on Tuesday for a second-round selection (41st overall) in this weekend’s NHL Draft and a third-round pick next season.

Braun is set to make $3.8 million this season, the final one of a five-year, $19 million deal he signed in Sept. 2014.

The deal leaves the Sharks with roughly $16.3 million in salary cap space for next season.

“Justin has been an important part of our organization since we drafted him in 2007 and over that time, we have seen him develop not only as a player on the ice but as a man,” Sharks general manager Doug Wilson said in a statement. “He has played a large role in our team’s success since joining the Sharks roster, including appearing in three Conference Finals and competing for the Stanley Cup in 2016.”

In 607 NHL games with San Jose, Braun had 154 points (24 goals, 130 assists) and 226 penalty minutes. He leaves ranked sixth on the franchise’s all-time list in games played amongst defensemen.

Braun played in 84 Stanley Cup Playoff games with San Jose (second in franchise history amongst defensemen), with 13 points (three goals, 10 assists) and 40 penalty minutes.

Braun also played in 43 games with the Worcester Sharks from 2009-2012 to begin his professional career.

Please check back for updates.

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By Scottie Andrew and Brian Ries, CNN

(CNN) — Oregon wildlife officials say they were forced to kill a friendly young black bear after it grew too familiar with people who regularly fed it and took selfies with it.

Since the beginning of June, Oregon police received frequent calls about the bear, usually seen near its favorite boat ramp at Henry Hagg Lake, about 15 miles west of the Portland suburbs.

On Wednesday, the Washington County Sheriff’s Office posted a Twitter warning to stay away from the area as deputies tried to encourage the animal to leave the ramp. Shortly thereafter, they tweeted that it had wandered into the woods.

But the next day, the bear had returned. It was seen next to a pile of trail mix and sunflower seeds that appeared to have been left behind intentionally by some passersby.

Wildlife officials concluded the bear had grown too habituated to human interaction and could pose a threat to people’s safety, so they made the decision to shoot and kill it.

The 100-pound bear was 2 or 3 years old and could have been relocated if it hadn’t grown so accustomed to human contact, Rick Swart of the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife told CNN.

The sheriff’s Twitter feed was flooded by commenters outraged that an alternative solution hadn’t been pursued, but the officials insisted that relocation wasn’t an option.

Wildlife biologist Kurt Licence said: “This is a classic example of why we implore members of the public not to feed bears. While the individuals who put food out for this bear may have had good intentions, bears should never, ever be fed.”

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It’s illegal in Oregon to lure an animal by scattering food or leaving garbage.

The-CNN-Wire & © 2019 Cable News Network, Inc., a Time Warner Company. All rights reserved.

Deputies are working to get this bear cub near Hagg Lake to go back into the woods… please stay away from the area near Boat Ramp A. pic.twitter.com/tI8m5yTbyk

— WCSO Oregon (@WCSOOregon) June 13, 2019

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MOUNTAIN VIEW — Google on Tuesday announced a stunning $1 billion commitment to ease the Bay Area’s housing crisis, pledging to add about 20,000 homes across the region.

It is the largest single commitment from a tech company to fight the housing shortage that threatens to stall the economic engine of Silicon Valley, as even well-paid workers must wrestle with escalating rents or finding a home to buy.

The initiative comes as Google faces enormous pressure to alleviate the impact of its rapid growth, particularly as it plans a transit-oriented mixed-use campus in downtown San Jose where 15,000 to 20,000 of its employees would work.

“For several months, we have encouraged Google to make a bold commitment to address our region’s affordable housing challenge,” San Jose Mayor Sam Liccardo said in a statement to this news organization. “We look forward to working with Google to ensure today’s announcement manifests itself into housing that will benefit thousands of San Jose residents struggling under the burden of high rents.”

Other tech companies have made financial contributions to housing, but nothing on this scale.

In January, the Chan Zuckerberg Initiative, the San Francisco Foundation, Facebook, Genentech, and others announced a new $500 million fund to build or preserve more than 8,000 homes in five Bay Area counties over the next five to 10 years. Microsoft has committed $500 million to build affordable housing and tackle homelessness in the Seattle area, and Wells Fargo recently said it would spend $1 billion for affordable housing as part of a broader national philanthropic push.

But Google, in an unusual turn, said in a blog post it would spend $750 million to build housing on its own land.

Aimed at freeing up land for 15,000 homes, this process could take up to 10 years. Google would work with cities to rezone land that is mostly designated for office or commercial uses. In 2018, a scant 3,000 homes were built in the South Bay, Google noted.

The tech titan also will create a $250 million investment fund that will enable developers to build at least 5,000 affordable housing units across the region, according to the blog post from Sundar Pichai, Google’s chief executive officer.

The announcement comes as groups like Working Partnerships USA, a labor-backed organization focused on addressing inequality and poverty in Silicon Valley, have raised concerns that Google’s foray into San Jose could trigger gentrification and displacement.

In a report published last week, Working Partnerships pressed Google to commit to helping build more than 17,000 homes in San Jose to help ensure tenants won’t be saddled with an estimated $235 million in rent hikes by 2030, the approximate completion date for Google’s transit village near the Diridon train station.

“Today, more than 45,000 of our employees call the Bay Area home,” Sundar Pichai, Google’s chief executive officer, wrote. “Across the region, one issue stands out as particularly urgent and complex: housing.”

The problem is intensified among those least equipped to tackle the skyrocketing and stubbornly high home prices and residential rental costs, Pichai asserted in the post.

“The lack of new supply, combined with the rising cost of living, has resulted in a severe shortage of affordable housing options for long-time middle- and low-income residents,” Pichai said.

The initiative arrives at a time when the internet giant, through a head-spinning array of property purchases and rental deals, has dramatically widened its footprint in the Bay Area. Beyond San Jose, Mountain View-based Google also owns properties in cities such as Palo Alto and Sunnyvale. It wasn’t immediately clear which Bay Area sites might become residential projects.

In San Jose alone, Google’s deals could bring the Bay Area’s largest city 22,000 to 27,000 new tech jobs.

In addition to the neighborhood near the Diridon train station in the city’s downtown district, consisting of office buildings, homes, shops, and restaurants, the search behemoth has plans in north San Jose. There, near the city’s airport, Google has leased four big office buildings where another 3,600 could work. And near San Jose’s Alviso district, the company has bought five office buildings where 3,500 more could be employed. Google also has bought three giant industrial buildings near Alviso.

“We’re really excited about their commitment to housing,” said Leslye Corsiglia, the executive director of SV@Home, a nonprofit that advocates for affordable housing and has worked with Google throughout Santa Clara County.

The announcement could help satisfy a commitment the company made to San Jose to include affordable housing in its development near Diridon Station. But it doesn’t absolve Google of other commitments. For instance, If the city passes a commercial impact fee — a fee paid by companies to help fund affordable housing — Google would still be obligated to pay that fee.

“It definitely stands out as a big investment,” Corsiglia said, adding that she appreciates that the company is helping offset some of the impact of the jobs it is creating. “That’s not something you see every day.”

And while San Jose’s planning department has resisted some attempts to rezone its shrinking supply of industrial land, Liccardo has also called for some 25,000 units of housing to be built in the city in the next several years.

“The housing crisis is the effect of the Bay Area being an economy that is the envy of the world,” said Jim Wunderman, president of the Bay Area Council. “It’s reasonable that we are seeing major institutions like Google stepping up to the next level to help.”

Google said that it hopes the first new homes can be quickly launched.

“Our goal is to get housing construction started immediately, and for homes to be available in the next few years,” Pichai stated. “In Mountain View, we’ve already worked with the city to change zoning in the North Bayshore area to free up land for housing, and we’re currently in productive conversations with Sunnyvale and San Jose.”

Google also said it would provide $50 million in grants through Google.org to nonprofits focused on the issues of homelessness and displacement.

“Solving a big issue like the housing shortage will take collaboration across business, government and community organizations,” Pichai wrote in the blog post. “We look forward to working alongside others to make the Bay Area a place where everyone who lives here can thrive.”

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Get ready for the Oxbow RiverStage.

It’s a new festival-style concert venue in downtown Napa, which will be run by the Blue Note Entertainment Group and the Bay Area’s own Another Planet Entertainment.

The outdoor venue will be located at the Oxbow Commons, right next to the popular Oxbow Market and all of its fantastic eateries.

“I’m looking forward to partnering with Another Planet at the Oxbow,” says Steven Bensusan, president of Blue Note Entertainment Group. “I greatly admire what they have accomplished as an independent promoter in Northern California for the past 15-plus years. Together we have the ability to obtain the very best talent to perform in Napa on the Oxbow RiverStage.”

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The first act to perform at the new venue will be Rock and Roll Hall of Famers Steve Miller Band on Aug. 25. The show will also feature country great Marty Stuart and His Fabulous Superlatives.

“I know it is going to be one of the best musical pairings we’ve ever done and an amazing evening of great American music,” Miller says. “Marty is one of the finest musicians in the world…it’s an honor to have him join us this summer for an unbelievable evening of original American music.”

Tickets for Steve Miller Band and Marty Stuart and His Fabulous Superlatives are $59-$250 and go on sale at 10 a.m. June 21, www.OxbowRiverStage.com, www.Ticketmaster.com.

That show will open the venue’s 2019 season, which will feature a mix of both ticketed and free concerts. More shows will be announced on July 9.

The maximum capacity for the venue will be 4,000, with some shows being “seated or standing, or a combination of both based on the performance and genre,” according to a news release.

“We have produced a number of shows in the North Bay counties over the years, but have never found a permanent home up here,” said Gregg Perloff, CEO and Founder of Another Planet Entertainment, promoters of the Outside Lands Music and Arts Festival. “Oxbow RiverStage will be Another Planet Entertainment’s first exclusive venue in the region and we couldn’t be more excited to bring world class music to Downtown Napa.”

Promoters are reportedly already looking ahead to the 2020 season and beyond, “with a focus on 5 free shows and 15 ticketed shows spread out between June and October,” according to a news release.

“Our goal at Oxbow RiverStage is to create an atmosphere combining really cool elements you might find at both standard outdoor concert venues and music festivals,” says Ken Tesler, owner of Blue Note Napa. “We will focus on bringing quality events and the best experience to attendees and to the local community in downtown Napa.”

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HAYWARD — Officers opened fire early Tuesday in an incident that included a chase into Oakland, where one suspect was arrested.

At least two suspects involved have not been caught, police said.

Few details of the shooting have been released, but police in a statement said it happened around 12:45 a.m. in the 2500 block of West Winton Avenue.

Police said they detained one person involved in the incident after pursuing the people involved to Oakland. They did not say how many people were involved.

The search continued past 8:30 a.m. Tuesday.

No residents or officers were injured, police said.

Police promised more details as the investigation and search continues.

Check back for  updates.

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A gas explosion “basically” blew the roof off a Union City home Monday night, an Alameda County Fire Department division chief said. Chief Alan Evans said firefighters got called at 8:03 p.m. to a medical situation on Elizabeth Way.

On their way, crews received an update and the fire captain determined an explosion had occurred.

When firefighters arrived they found a man with burns who is now fighting for his life.

Four other people were at the home and one suffered minor injuries. Evans said the home sustained major damage and likely will be marked uninhabitable at least until repairs are made.

“It was a massive explosion,” Evans said.

He said it blew out exterior windows, blew sheetrock off walls and ceilings. Some exterior walls are bowing out, he said. Interior doors were blown off the doorjambs.

Evans said nothing caught fire because the explosion was so large.

The blast was sparked by a three and a half gallon container of refrigerant inside the home that found an ignition source, Evans said. The refrigerant contained butane.

Firefighters only know that gas was coming out of the container not why.

He said it’s not normal to have these containers inside. He compared them to propane tanks for barbecue grills, which are typically five gallons in size.

Evans said both Union City police and the bomb squad from the Alameda County Sheriff’s Department responded. He doesn’t believe police found anything criminal.

The bomb squad removed the containers from the home.

The family is going to live in a recreational vehicle on the property for now, Evans said.

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There’s a reason that Keanu Reeves is this summer’s internet icon.

The actor, 54, is handsome, funny, humble and self-deprecating in both his official and unofficial public appearances. But he also has roles in three much-buzzed about movies, two of which — “John Wick 3” and “Always Be My Maybe” — have already been released and earned him much praise for his undeniable screen presence.

Reeves’ third film this summer is the highly anticipated “Toy Story 4,” which hits theaters Friday. The latest installment in Pixar’s animated series is likely to further prove his pleasurable range as an actor. Reeves provides voice work for the film, playing Duke Caboom, a gung-ho Canadian motorcycle daredevil with a glaring Hulk Hogan-like mustache.

"Duke Caboom" TV Spot | Toy Story 4 - YouTube

Granted, Duke Caboom is a supporting role to Tom Hanks’ Woody and Tim Allen’s Buzz Lightyear. But Reeves, as usual, took the opportunity to co-star in the “Toy Story” franchise pretty seriously, director John Cooley said in an interview last week at the film’s Hollywood premiere.

In fact, Reeves took the role so seriously that he submitted to a blind audio test. Once he secured the role, he traveled to Pixar’s Emeryville campus to meet with Cooley and the producers. He wanted to come to an understanding of Caboom’s identity and inner sense of self, producer Mark Nielsen told the Hollywood Reporter.

“(Reeves) was like, ‘What is this guy about? What is he afraid of?'” Nielsen said. “He really wanted to dig deep into this character.”

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During a lunch meeting, Reeves also worked with the group to develop some of Caboom’s signature moves, including his compulsion for doing action-hero-type poses, Nielsen explained. In fact, Reeves got into serious improv mode.

LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA – JUNE 11: Keanu Reeves attends the premiere of Disney and Pixar’s “Toy Story 4” on June 11, 2019 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Kevin Winter/Getty Images) 

“He climbed on a table and was striking poses in the middle of the atrium and we thought, that is Duke Caboom!” Nielsen said.

Perhaps Caboom is another heightened version of the action-hero characters Reeves has become famous for playing in “Speed” and “The Matrix” and “John Wick movies.”

But Reeves already launched a thousand Twitter memes this summer playing a heightened, pretentious and aggressive version of his own person in Randall Park and Ali Wong’s Netflix rom-com “Always Be My Maybe.” Here’s just a sampling of memes inspired by Reeves’ slow-motion walk that introduces his character to the film:

smooth – santana ft. rob thomas pic.twitter.com/zDjAJx2NYO

— keanu reeves walking to music (@keanuwtm) June 10, 2019

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If there’s one event that captures the eclectic spirit of the Bay Area’s music scene, it’s the Garden of Memory happening set for the summer solstice at Chapel of the Chimes. This thriving musical extravaganza founded in 1995 by pianist Sarah Cahill is a living mosaic of wide-ranging performance. It only happens once a year, and this weekend, another cornucopia of musical talent — composers, singers, instrumentalists and ensembles — will take their places in the chapel’s multilevel columbarium for a day of exuberant music-making.

The lineup promises a fantastic array of acoustic and electric works, installations and interactive events, with attendees free to move through the gardens, alcoves and antechambers of the always-alluring Chapel.

The schedule includes appearances by composer-vocalist Shelley Hirsch, Kevin Robinson’s KREation Ensemble, Paul Dresher and Joel David, the TransMission Duo with Beth Custer and Stephen Kent, and the Rova Saxophone Quartet. The Lightbulb Ensemble, joined by the Friction Quartet, will perform a new piece by Brian Baumbusch, and Cahill will play works by Terry Riley and Theresa Wong, along with Percy Grainger’s arrangement of John Dowland’s “Now, O Now I Needs Must Part.”

Details: 5-9 p.m. June 21; Chapel of the Chimes, Oakland; $5-$20; tickets available at the door, and at www.brownpapertickets.com.

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OAKLAND — On Tuesday afternoon, a federal judge is expected to sentence a Pleasanton man who in 2014 took a flight to the United Kingdom to marry a 14-year-old girl, who later told police he molested her during the two days they spent together.

David Telles was convicted of child enticement and other charges related toa 14-year-old girl he met through Clash of Clans. (Northern District CourtRecords) 

David John Telles Jr., 43, was tried and convicted last year of child enticement and traveling to meet a minor for illicit conduct. Authorities say he brought an engagement ring on his trip to meet the girl, that he planned to marry her in Scotland, and that the two met and began chatting through the online video game Clash of Clans.

Defense attorneys say that Telles’ conduct, as well as his bizarre behavior during trial — including fainting spells and attempts to dissuade others from cooperating with police — is due to his lifelong battle with mental illness. In a sentencing memo, they describe Telles as a, “lonely human being with no friends, no happy future, and no ability to conduct himself in normal behavior.”

Federal prosecutors, though, describe Telles as a predator who spent a month “grooming” his victim before taking the extreme step to meet her in person, and that a judge found Telles’ erratic behavior in court was a “charade.” Prosecutors asked for a sentence of 25 years in federal prison.

In June 2014, Telles convinced the girl to run away with him. After he flew to the UK and she ran away from home, they spent two days in hotels around the country before British authorities tracked them down. The girl later told police she had sex with Telles, who was 38 at the time, and that she didn’t want to but saw no other option, since they were alone in a room.

Telles spent two years in a UK prison before being brought to the United States to face trial.

During his U.S. trial, Telles, “engaged in calculated attempts to obtain a mistrial,” prosecutors wrote, adding that he was exaggerating his mental illness as a last-ditch effort to duck responsibility in the case.

“When the Minor Victim finished testifying, (Telles) stood up, took off his jacket, threw himself to the floor, and pretended to be unconscious, which greatly rattled and distressed the Minor Victim, and caused the jury to be immediately ushered out of the courtroom,” prosecutors wrote, describing one of several disruptions during trial.

Defense attorneys counter that Telles actually fainted, and point out that he was later transferred to a hospital and outfitted with a catheter and “other painful stimuli tests,” after he spent six days there without responding to anyone. They added that Telles was not a predator, but a delusional man who grew up with: “no concept of social behavior. He stuttered and dressed oddly. He had terrible reading abilities and was inarticulate, no social graces, never dated, never drank, never went to parties. He was never intimate with a woman until his marriage.”

“He believed he was saving the life of this young English woman from molestations from a parent and teachers,” defense attorneys Michael Stepanian and Jennifer Naegele wrote, later adding that Telles had been molested as a kid.

Telles’ sentencing hearing has been set for 1 p.m. before U.S. District Judge Jeffrey S. White, in Oakland.

Check back for updates on White’s decision Tuesday afternoon. 

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By Isaac Stanley-Becker | The Washington Post

“Beating the odds.”

That was the all-caps headline in the Boston Globe on April 2, 1995, that announced Gina Grant’s acceptance at Harvard. In addition to being a straight-A student, captain of the tennis team and a mentor to underprivileged sixth- and seventh-graders, the 19-year-old was also an orphan who lived on her own in Cambridge, Massachusetts.

“Like Gina Grant, there have always been kids who, in the absolute worst of circumstances, do better than just hang on,” affirmed the glowing profile.

But it soon became clear that the circumstances of Grant’s upbringing were far worse than she had led admissions officers at the Ivy League university to believe. She had served six months in a juvenile detention facility after pleading no contest to killing her mother in 1990, striking her over the head at least 13 times with a lead crystal candlestick at their handsome brick home in Lexington, South Carolina.

Prosecutors called it a calculated murder. The juvenile called it a desperate effort to protect herself from an alcoholic parent. Harvard, after receiving news clippings about the case, called it an unforgivable omission that the student had not disclosed the crime and the punishment in her application. Within a week, the university had revoked its offer.

Grant’s experience was highly unusual. Yet she is not unique in gaining entrance to Harvard – thereby beating the odds – only to be turned away before matriculating.

The same fate has now befallen Kyle Kashuv, 18, a survivor of last year’s shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida, who became a prominent and provocative spokesman for gun rights, earning him an audience with President Donald Trump. That set him apart from many of his classmates, who lobbied for tighter controls on guns.

He wrote about his experience in his college applications, which landed him a spot at Harvard in March. It would be a fleeting offer.

The teenager announced on Monday that his acceptance had been rescinded because of racist and vituperative comments he had made online when he was 16, months before the shooting that would leave 14 of his classmates dead.

In a Google Docs study guide that doubled as a freewheeling chat room, Kashuv repeatedly wrote the n-word, adding that he was expert at typing the slur because “practice,” he said, “makes perfect.” He also made crude comments about women in private messages that were disclosed to the national media.

When the remarks surfaced last month, as he was preparing to graduate, he said the “callous and inflammatory language,” used when he was a high school junior, was “not indicative of who I am or who I’ve become in the years since.” Kashuv is the former high school outreach director for Turning Point USA, a conservative group roiled by accusations of racial bias.

The decision by Harvard, which declined to comment on the case, poured fuel on an explosive debate over college admissions, personal accountability, race and the Second Amendment.

Critics of the university’s position saw in its treatment of the teenager a “major victory for the online mobs of cancel culture” – evidence that elite institutions would not brook differing political opinions. “Welcome to the future,” wrote Seth Mandel, the executive editor of the Washington Examiner. “It’s a social sewage treatment plant.”

Others observed that Harvard, as a private institution, enjoys the right to set its own standards of individual responsibility. They noted that the selective university is entirely out of reach for scores of students who face structural disadvantages, made stark recently by the admissions cheating scandal. They predicted that Kashuv would land on his feet, emphasizing that he had already emerged from frightful circumstances – if not the “absolute worst” invoked by the Boston Globe’s profile of another Harvard admit – to become a darling of right-wing media.

Kashuv argued that Harvard was denying the possibility that people could change, noting that the university’s “faculty has included slave owners, segregationists, bigots and antisemites.” His indignation was countered with the argument that deploying racial slurs should have consequences – especially during the years of a young person’s life that form the basis of a college application.

Over the years, Harvard has dropped a number of admitted students for a range of legal and ethical lapses, from accusations of sexual assault to revelations of plagiarism to participation in the online exchange of sexist and bigoted memes.

“An offer of admission may be rescinded if a student engages in behavior that brings into question his or her honesty, maturity, or moral character,” a university spokeswoman told the Harvard Crimson, the undergraduate newspaper, in 2015. A sharp, and unexplained, descent in academic performance may also do the trick.

The range of rescinded offers illuminates the difficulty of deciding what sort of conduct – at what age – should endanger educational opportunities and prohibit participation in a community designed not just to transfer skills but also to cultivate a certain set of values. The trail of commentary that young people leave online makes the question of what can be forgiven especially acute.

The most recent, high-profile example was Harvard’s decision two years ago to revoke offers to 10 incoming freshman who had allegedly participated in an online chat group where racist and sexist memes were traded. An offshoot of the official Harvard College Class of 2021 Facebook group, the messaging forum was at one point named “Harvard memes for horny bourgeois teens,” according to the Crimson.

The basis for reversing offers of admission has not always been activity directly pertaining to the college.

Owen Labrie, who was found guilty in 2015 on several misdemeanor counts for having sex with a 15-year-old girl when he was a senior at St. Paul’s School in Concord, New Hampshire, was no longer listed as an admitted student at Harvard by the fall of 2014. The university would not say whether it had revoked his acceptance or whether he had withdrawn.

In 2003, Harvard rescinded an offer to Blair Hornstine after reports surfaced that she had plagiarized material in articles for her local paper. The prospective student – who faced long odds because of a disability that required her to take many of her courses from home – made national headlines for suing to block officials at her school from naming multiple valedictorians. She won that case, convincing a federal judge to order her school district in Moorestown, New Jersey, to make her the sole valedictorian of the class of 2003. But she lost her spot at Harvard.

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Even the episode involving matricide – at the extremity of possible wrongdoing – was not clear-cut. The mystery of what unfolded between the 14-year-old and her mother was never fully resolved. In completing her Harvard application five years later, Grant had answered “No” to the question of whether she had faced “serious or repeated disciplinary action.” But the question covered only “the last three years,” and four had elapsed since she walked free.

“I deal with this tragedy every day on a personal level,” Grant said in a statement at the time. “It serves no good purpose for anyone else to dredge up the pain of my childhood. I’m especially distressed that my college career may now be in jeopardy.”

Columbia and Barnard followed Harvard in revoking their offers. Only Tufts stood by its decision to admit her, and she enrolled at the campus in Medford, Massachusetts, in the fall of 1995.

Views differed about whether she belonged there. A conservative student magazine distributed leaflets assailing administrators for admitting her. She lived in a dormitory, in a single bedroom.

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