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Besides marking the unofficial start of summer, Memorial Day is just that—an opportunity to honor those who have died while serving in the U.S. armed forces, dating back to the Civil War.

Add some extra meaning to your long weekend R&R with Josh Cellars Military Salute Edition Lodi Reserve Cabernet Sauvignon. For every bottle of wine purchased, $1 will go to Operation Gratitude, a nonprofit that sends letters and packages containing food, hygiene essentials, entertainment, and handmade items to troops serving abroad.

Josh Cellars Lodi Reserve Courtesy Image

The Cabernet Lodi Reserve wine itself is delicious, with notes of red fruit, berries, chocolate, and coffee. It goes well with anything you put on the barbecue (meat, fish, vegetables, and even fruit). Rest assured it’s the perfect, easy-sipping wine to suit a variety of taste buds whether you’re hosting a party or want to bring a gift to a backyard cookout or Memorial Day soirée.

You know what else it pairs well with? Sending a care package or a hand-written note to troops, veterans, and first responders. There’s also an Operation Gratitude’s Amazon Wish List, meaning you can make a huge difference this Memorial Day (and any day) in just a few clicks.

Josh Cellars Operation Gratitude Lodi Reserve 60 - YouTube

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No one needs to tell you the benefits of getting outside—you can feel them for yourself when filling your lungs with a gulp of crisp mountain air and breaking a sweat while scrambling over rocks and tree limbs. Studies show that just walking outside can lower your risk of mental health issues, and that getting even a little bit of sun can lead to a surge in endorphins (those feel-good hormones).

The 50 Best Hikes

But for most people, just being outdoors isn’t enough to get their heart rate up. They crave escape and adventure, too. Maybe that’s why the percentage of people hiking has jumped from 10 percent to over 15 percent in the past decade, according to the 2018 Outdoor Participation Report. And while taking your fitness endeavors outside is typically about unplugging and disconnecting—even for just a few hours—these apps can help you make the most of your hike.

1. AllTrails

With over 75,000 hand-curated trail guides all over the world, AllTrails is a no-brainer for even the most casual hiker. You can filter options by length, rating, and difficulty level, as well as scope trail reviews and photos from the 10 million hikers, mountain bikers, and trail runners using the app. And that’s just the free version. For $2.99 a month, you can create custom trail maps, access your exact GPS location even when you’re offline; share status updates with safety contacts; and view real-time map overlays with info on things like air quality, satellite weather, and fire history. Available on iOS and Android.

Price: basic, free; premium, $29.99/year

10 Best National Park Hikes 2. PeakFinder

Ever get to a viewpoint and wonder what exactly you’re looking at? PeakFinder can identify more than 650,000 peaks: The app uses your camera to capture a panoramic view, then the embedded elevation program brings up the names of all the visible mountains and peaks. You can touch any of the names for more info, use the “telescope” function to zoom in and find smaller mountains, or touch the arrows to “fly” over the mountain range and see what’s behind it. The app works entirely offline, so you can learn more about where you are even in the more remote spots. Available on iOS and Android.

Price: $4.99

3. Hiking Project

It makes sense that Hiking Project—an app that shares full GPS route info, topographical maps, and elevation profiles for more than 74,000 trails covering 204,000-plus miles across the world—is backed by REI. What two audiences go better together? Especially considering that the majority of the info on the app (including routes, reviews, and photos) is crowd-sourced, then vetted by the experts at Hiking Project. The result is a living guidebook that’s constantly updated as more and more people take advantage of its community-based expertise (as well as offline navigation technology) and add their own. Available on iOS or Android.

Price: free

The 50 Best Trails 4. Gaia GPS

You could use the free version of this app, but if you really want to get the lay of the land before going off the grid, it’s worth springing for a premium subscription. Then, you get access to topographical, road, and satellite maps across the world, including the NatGeo Trails Illustrated map series. This kind of info is crucial for the kind of backcountry navigation the app champions (search and rescue personnel, firefighters, and wilderness guides are known to use it). Of course, it still does basic GPS tracking while measuring pace, distance, and elevation, too. Available on iOS and Android.

Price: basic, free; member, $19.99, premium, $39.99

5. Cairn

No matter how experienced you are, safety should be at the forefront of every hiker’s mind. Cairn crowdsources data from its users to help provide that safety net for you: Within the app’s maps (which are available offline), you can see where people who’ve hiked before you have found cell coverage on a trail, just in case you need to make an emergency call or need to check in. Even better, you can set an emergency contact pre-hike and the app will automatically notify them when you start and finish your trek, or if you don’t check in by a certain time—a super helpful tool for solo explorers. Available on iOS.

Price: basic, free; premium, $26.99/year

The 8 Most Challenging Hiking Trails in America 6. MapMyHike

Just like its sister apps, MapMyHike is a workout-based program that tracks your route, average pace, distance covered, calories burned, and more while you’re on the trail. And because the app is owned by Under Armour, you can even sync it to the brand’s shoes (like the UA HOVR Phantom and Sonic) to get more detailed data like stride length and cadence. You can also use it to find popular local routes or DIY your own path. With the premium version, you can track fellow hikers in real time or take advantage of audio coaching on the go. Available on iOS and Android.

Price: basic, free; premium, $29.99/year

7. Spyglass

In addition to providing the standard GPS tracking toolkit, Spyglass offers an augmented reality view of your hike. By overlaying images or maps with real-time data, The app turns your phone into a hi-tech compass, speedometer, altimeter, sniper’s rangefinder, coordinate converter, sextant, inclinometer, angular calculator, zoom camera, and even an astronomical object finder. It also makes storing locations—from where you left your car to that awesome viewpoint to the star cluster you spotted at night—as easy as tapping the screen. Available on iOS and Android.

Price: $7.99

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Arnold Schwarzenegger is back for another ride in the new Terminator: Dark Fate trailer, and he’s bringing an old friend along. Linda Hamilton is returning as the iconic Sarah Connor in the new Terminator sequel, picking things up after the events of the action classic Terminator 2: Judgement Day. Paramount Pictures released the new trailer for the film, and a featurette going behind-the-scenes of the making of the film with producer James Cameron and the cast.

‘Terminator 6’: Everything You Need to Know About the New ‘Terminator’ Sequel

This time around, the story is set two decades after T2 and finds a young girl Dani Ramos (Natalia Reyes) being chased by a new, liquid-transforming Terminator (Gabriel Luna), who was sent back in time to kill her. Ramos has protection in the form of Grace, a Terminator-like soldier who is a human-machine hybrid and one of the good guys.

Eventually, Grace and Dani cross paths with Sarah Connor, who blows the hell out of the Terminator and offers them protection. That of course leads Connor and the gang to the O.G. Terminator himself, the T-800 “Model 101” played by Schwarzenegger. After the last two Terminator films failed critically and commercially, producer James Cameron (director of T2) and director Tim Miller (director of Deadpool) are hoping to get the Terminator franchise back on track. This trailer is a very good start.

The ‘Terminator’ Series: 15 Amazing Facts About the Arnold Schwarzenegger Action Classics

Take a look at the trailer:

Terminator: Dark Fate - Official Teaser Trailer (2019) - Paramount Pictures - YouTube

Terminator: Dark Fate, directed by Tim Miller, will be released on November 1, 2019.

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Kyle Chandler, now starring in Catch-22 and Godzilla, lives for the open road. Partway between Austin and L.A., he shares his rules for a long-ass drive —and by extension, life itself. 1. GO THE LONG WAY

“Welcome to my hovel,” says Kyle Chandler. Wearing a frayed chambray shirt, well-worn khakis, and dusty cap-toe boots, he’s standing beside me inside his gleaming aluminum 16-foot Airstream Sport, which he has affectionately named Tookus. He’s hauled the trailer up a serpentine road to a campsite near the 9,000-foot peaks of the Organ Mountains, outside of Las Cruces, New Mexico, behind his manual-transmission Ram pickup, because— well, why not?

The 53-year-old actor is three days into a weeklong, 2,800-mile out-and-back drive from his home near Austin, Texas, to Los Angeles, for a photo shoot and some other business. It’s a route Chandler has driven countless times, often with Kathryn, his wife of nearly 25 years, and his daughters Sydney, 23, and Sawyer, 17, photos of whom bedeck the walls. But his sole companion on this trip is Geronimo, an 8-year-old mixed-breed rescue dog who’s recovering from cancer surgery and shedding white hair in tufts.

The Best Road Trips in America

After a walk-through of his travel totems and movie-set mementos and a tour of the rig, which requires just a pivot—“there’s the shower, which I actually used today,” Chandler says—we’re back in the sun of southern New Mexico. I ask the obvious: Why not just fly? “I do fly every once in a while, when I have to,” he says. “But I’d much rather do it this way. I mean, look at this.” He gestures to the valley a couple of thousand feet below. It’s an active artillery range, currently airbrushed with a super-bloom of cadmium-yellow poppies. Behind us is a steep wall of mountain, with a light breeze coming down the pass. I get his point.

Jeff Lipsky

For the past day, Chandler and Geronimo have been soaking up the severe silence of this $7-a-night campsite. He’s been doing a bit of work, too: Last night, the actor read two scripts while pondering the real Friday night lights— fiery pink clouds hovering over the high Chihuahuan Desert.

He’s already made some friends at the campground. There goes Bliss, recently retired, been on the road for two months. There’s Don, who wired his RV with both AC and DC power so he can plug in more kitchen gadgets. A guy in a Phoenix Suns jersey comes up to ask for change for the fee box—he only has a 20. After each interaction, the campers’ eyes linger for a half- beat, perhaps trying to place Chandler. Maybe they’re taking in those familiar eyebrows, which sometimes cock to an angle that’s like the pitch of a doghouse roof. Isn’t that the guy from… Bloodline? The Wolf of Wall Street? First Man? Manchester by the Sea? Friday Night Lights?

Basketball-jersey guy walks away, and Chandler remarks that he shares these folks’ sense of wanderlust. It’s why he’s here. “All these people here have a sense of adventure,” he says. “And they’re trying to fulfill it in one way or the other.”

2. STEER INTO THE UNKNOWN

We head over to a picnic table set between a few alligator-bark juniper trees. Chandler has grilled up jalapeño sausages, onions, and baked beans on a tabletop charcoal grill. He throws down some enamel plates and pops the tops off a couple of bottles of Guinness. As we take in the desert panorama, I tell him that the desk clerk at my hotel told me that this is one day of two every year when you can drive right up to the Trinity Site, where the U.S. Army set off the first atomic bomb, in 1945, somewhere down in the distance to the north.

Mathematician Calculates That We’re All Using the Wrong Glass for Guinness

“Well shit! Why didn’t you text me? I’da been all over that!” says Chandler, who says he’s all about roadside oddities. I tell him it would have required meeting at the local high school parking lot by 7:30 a.m.

“Got it. Damn. Well, we’da just got irradiated anyway. Cheers.”

He shares a few tales from his current trip, which include overnighting on the shores of a spring-fed lake he found in West Texas, at a campsite five miles down a dirt road. “Paradise in the middle of nowhere,” he says. “I’ll go back.”

Chandler’s ease and equanimity are easy to understand: He’s in that coveted place where nearly all actors want to be, with a pair of projects out this month that cover the spread: from a blockbuster payday in Godzilla: King of the Monsters to prestige TV, with Catch-22, a limited series on Hulu. Check one for commerce, one for art.

Preparing to battle a giant lizard in Godzilla: King of the Monsters. COURTESY WARNER BROTHERS.

In the former, Chandler co-stars in the reportedly $200 million monster movie, sharing screen time with Millie Bobby Brown, Vera Farmiga, and, of course, a giant lizard with atomic breath. He says he can’t wait to watch the thing on a big screen. With the latter, George Clooney’s production company takes on a six-episode adaptation of Joseph Heller’s 1961 novel about an Air Force bombardier (Christopher Abbot) wrestling with the fringes of sanity on a sun-soaked Mediterranean island base during World War II. It’s a taut, dry, soulful, hilarious, absurdist riff on the insanity of war and capitalism’s ties to it.

The series also addresses, in writer Luke Davies’ words, “lunatics in positions of power who should not be in those positions of power.” Chandler plays one of those lunatics—Colonel Cathcart, a barking, insecure bureaucrat who jeopardizes his troops as he thirstily aspires for a promotion to general. Originally, it was Clooney’s part, until the actor wanted to step into a smaller role that would afford him more time to focus on producing and directing.

I WAS SCARED TO DEATH. BUT MY CAREER HAS BEEN FULL OF THESE SITUATIONS WHERE I GET OPPORTUNITIES THAT I CAN’T SAY NO TO.

Clooney called Chandler in Texas, but the actor took some convincing. “First off, making remakes of certain things is beyond the pale,” he says, citing Mike Nichols’ 1970 film adaptation. “And Catch-22 is such a historic book. Then there’s the fact that Cathcart is incredulous—the things that he says and the things that he’s doing are almost cartoonish.”

Chandler is known for subtler characters, men who dwell in the zone between authority and empathy. But he still took the part. “I was scared to death,” he says, “But my career has been full of these situations where I get opportunities you can’t say no to.”

To prepare, Chandler worked out of the Airstream, parked at home, for a month, marching up and down the driveway, going back and forth over chunks of dialogue, trying to find the right pitch. According to Clooney, the approach paid off.

Starring as Colonel Cathcart in the upcoming Hulu series Catch-22. PHILIPPE ANTONELLO/HULU

“He’s one of my favorite actors,” Clooney says. “He’s the only guy I know who could’ve taken Cathcart from a vindictive buffoon to, by the end, a guy you have sympathy for.”

I relay this to Chandler—being one of Clooney’s favorite actors is not nothing, right? “I probably owe him a check now,” Chandler says. “I’m just good at making an ass of myself. I never thought it would pay off, but I guess it has.”

3. FIND THE RIGHT CO-PILOT

Before his Emmy-nominated role and the critical success of the Netflix series Bloodline, and before he took parts in films helmed by Martin Scorsese and J.J. Abrams and Kathryn Bigelow, came the actor’s career-defining role: coach Eric Taylor, on NBC’s Friday Night Lights. The drama is still talked about not just for the veracity of its portrayal of life and high school sports in far west Texas, but because of its realistic depiction of marriage and the chemistry between its leads: Chandler and Connie Britton, who played Tami, a guidance counselor, principal, and Eric’s wife.

So how did the pair hash out that relationship? On the road, of course.

“We’d drive from L.A. to Las Cruces to Marfa and then into Austin, where we were shooting,” says Chandler. “I’d ride my motorcycle, and Connie would drive her ’72 Mustang. One year I drove behind her, and that car was running so lean, I was stoned the whole time from the fumes.”

Britton says that the first time they caravanned, Friday Night Lights executive producer Peter Berg was sure the pair would sleep together and cause havoc for the production. “That did not happen,” says Britton. “But it was such a great way to bond and also to just sort of leave Hollywood behind and really drive into the world that we were gonna be inhabiting. On those road trips, we were creating our own dynamic.”

How to Rent an Airstream

The pair’s dialogue, much of it improvised, has a push-and-pull rhythm that makes the couple’s conversations seem ultrareal, like something that you’d hear over the fence, or, if you’re lucky, inside your own house. Both got Emmy nominations—Chandler won in 2011. “I knew that if I fell backward, she’d always grab me right before I hit the ground, and vice versa,” he says. “I would start getting after her, and she’d back up in the defensive, but she always knew I’d give her room to come back at me.”

Chandler says that the scripts served as road maps—dirt roads they’d improvise off of. The series was shot on Super 16 film with handheld cameras in natural light, in real restaurants and other venues, with real people as extras. Actors would just wander into scenes and start saying lines, no “action” needed—just like walking into a room. “It was alive, and that’s what I think made that show so great,” Chandler says. “I’ve taken that to everything I’ve done.”

The results of that approach resonated. People still shout “Coach!” at Chandler in public, whether in San Marcos or Santa Monica. Yesterday in a Las Cruces grocery store, a kid asked Chandler for life advice. “Just give me anything,” he’d said. Forced to come up with something, the actor shared a staple: “Nobody is any better than me. I’m no better than anyone else.”

4. YOU’LL GET THERE EVENTUALLY

Chandler’s kinetic nature might be a result of a childhood spent on the road, bunking in a motor home overhead. He was born near Buffalo, New York, the last of four siblings by a wide margin—an unexpected addition after a wild New Year’s Eve, according to an old family tale—and spent his early years in Lake Forest, near Chicago. His father was a traveling pharmaceutical salesman; his mother’s passion was breeding Great Danes. By the time he was 8, Chandler and his parents would road trip for a month or more at a time, entering their dogs in shows across the country.

Compared with his siblings— they’d left the house by then— Kyle’s upbringing was hands-off. At the dog shows, the Chandlers would park their motor home in a sea of RVs. Kyle’s dad would hand him a few bills and the kid would wander off, reconnecting with the strange friends he’d made on the dog-show circuit. “There’d be thousands of people around, hundreds of motor homes,” Chandler says. “Over the course of a weekend I’d inevitably get lost. I’d come back to the show ring where my parents were supposed to be, but they weren’t; I’d look and they’re not in the motor home, either. ‘Where are they?’

“My old man had this laugh, and it was a fuckin’ belly laugh. I learned to stop and close my eyes and just wait and wait, and eventually every time, I swear, I’d hear it, and I’d start heading that way, and I’d find the old man.”

When he was 11, the family moved to Loganville, Georgia, and Pop bought him a dirt bike. “Imagination, freedom, boom,” says Chandler. His lifelong infatuation with wheels had begun.

In 1980, when Chandler was 14, his father died of a heart attack. Kyle was devastated. He entered a dark period, replete with totaled cars, arrests, soul-searching drives through the South. One quarter, Chandler took his tuition check for the University of Georgia from his grandparents and cashed it to buy a Yamaha. Vision 550 motorcycle. Later, back at school, he ran into some drama students tripping on mushrooms in a Waffle House parking lot and he decided he had found his new calling.

“Some time later I drove home in the middle of the night and dragged my mom out of bed,” he says. “I said, ‘Mom, I figured out what I want to do.’ She looked at me, and she said, ‘Well, you know, it doesn’t surprise me. For God’s sakes, don’t not do it. You don’t want to regret your life.’ ”

Chandler had started to listen to the echo of his dad’s voice. “His favorite saying,” Chandler says, “was ‘Play it by ear.’ I can still hear him saying it.”

5. BE WILLING TO DITCH THE ITINERARY

Chandler walks back to Airstream and comes back with a couple of more beers. I ask why he and his family decamped for Texas after 20 years in Los Angeles. His answer? You guessed it: road trip. Chandler warns me that he’s told the story before but carries on and still gets choked up in the retelling. He met Kathryn, a writer and veteran advocate, in the early 1990s, after the ABC drama Homefront had jump-started his career. They married in 1996, settled in Topanga Canyon, and had two daughters. Things, by all accounts, were going very well.

In 2009, during the fourth season of Friday Night Lights, he’d planned to ride his motorcycle back to Austin, but Kathryn decided to come at the last minute. They took his Porsche Boxster. “I think it was the second day,” Chandler says. “I remember very distinctly. We were both still smoking. The top was down. It was a beautiful day. Out of nowhere, she just turned to me, and said, ‘Are you happy where we are?’ I thought about it for a minute and said, ‘I’m not. I’m really, really not.’ Kathryn felt the same way. “I get emotional just saying this,” Chandler says. “It was a moment that changed everything.”

During the rest of the drive, they ripped up their old plans. They considered moving to Wyoming or Nevada before passing through a town outside Austin. Kathryn went back to location-scout their new life a few days later.

FROM AUSTIN TO L.A.
Some scenes Chandler snapped during his drive (below). Highlights included a stopover near Balmorhea, Texas, home to the world’s largest spring-fed swimming pool; and Whit Sands, New Mexico, where you’ll find 275 square miles of stark white-gypsum sand dunes.

Courtesy of Kyle Chandler Courtesy of Kyle Chandler Courtesy of Kyle Chandler

Nearly a decade later, the family still lives there, on a big spread, with five miniature donkeys, two dogs, and “a barn that I use for creating things that fall apart quickly,” Chandler says. Once an overgrazed site, he has tried to re-wild the scene into a native grass- and wildflower-filled prairie, seeding 10 percent of it a year. Kathryn particularly loves May, when the Texas heat comes and dries out the wildflowers and their seeds pop like Rice Krispies, because it means that Kyle will finally mow the mess.

The whole Texas ranch deal seems pretty appropriate for a man who, in a way, appears to have stepped in from yesteryear. When I ask about his road-trip soundtrack, he says that it’s dialed to either classic rock or the 1940s channel on satellite radio—where the hottest tracks are by Glenn Miller and Al Jolson. His taste in movies skews similarly: He grew up watching the comedies of the ’30s and ’40s, and is “still sort of stuck in it,” he says. So maybe it’s no surprise that George Clooney describes Chandler as a pairing of “Spencer Tracy’s everyman with Larry Storch’s nuttiness.”

“WHEN I’M SHOOTING, I HAVE CRAZY NERVES. BUT ONCE I LEAVE THE SET, I DON’T THINK MUCH ABOUT IT.”

A few years ago, Chandler read the book Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can’t Stop Talking. He dropped cable, curtailed his time online, ditched most of his gadgets, and worked to leave the “echo bubble.” He hasn’t gone full Luddite: He is addicted to a military-spec night-vision scope he was turned on to by one of Bloodline’s camera operators. “I wait till it gets pitch dark, and I walk my property,” he says. “It’s amazing. Through the scope, I see blue and white herons grabbing fish from the water tank. The donkeys are freaking out, because they know something’s out there but don’t see me. The raccoons are up in the trees, maybe a ringtail. My goal is to one day sneak up on a deer close enough to just tap it on the ass.”

He makes a flicking motion. “And when you point it upward,” he says, “you can see 500 times more stars than the naked eye.”

6. NO U-TURNS

The shadow of the peaks behind us is approaching, and it’s already a half-hour past the time that Chandler had planned to get back on the road: He’s aiming to pull up to a park 30 miles west of Phoenix before its gates close.

As he starts to break down camp, Chandler reflects on the past few years, unsolicited. “I don’t look back too much, to be quite honest,” he tells me. “I knew you were going to ask me things about the last few years in this interview, and last night I had to go on my IMDb and look up what’s happened, because I sure as shit don’t remember. When I’m shooting, I’ve got crazy nerves and am constantly worried about doing a good job, and time flies, and I love it. But once I leave the set, I don’t think much about it.”

CHANDLER WEARS: SHIRT BY BUCK MASON, PANTS BY ORVIS (HIS OWN), BOOTS BY CORCORAN. WATCH BY MWC

As he’s talking, I glance at my notebook to look for orphaned questions. I ask Chandler if he has any rules of the road.

“Just…I’ve found that if something feels uncomfortable, do it. Stop at the weird cafe, talk to the person there. If a road looks interesting but you think..

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With summer right around the corner, we’re already grabbing our keys and getting ready to hit the road. But this year, we’re going global.

For our new June issue—out on newsstands everywhere this week—we scoured the map and selected the World’s Greatest Road Trips, covering ground and upping the mileage from a South African beach cruise to a journey across Patagonia to The Everest of Road Trips—all embracing the spirit of adventure. As Men’s Journal editor-in-chief Greg Emmanuel puts it: “Driving in the U.S. has a lot to offer, but when you go where the signs are different, the rules of the road are different, and even the snacks are different, it really ups the ante.”

But we’re not the only ones you can probably find out on the highway this season. A few days into his epic 2,800-mile trek from Austin, Texas, all the way to Malibu, we caught up with our new June cover guy, Kyle Chandler, star of the new blockbuster, Godzilla: King of the Monsters, along with Chandler’s road trip buddies: his rescue, Geronimo, and his 16-foot Airstream Sport he named Tookus.

COVER STORY: KYLE CHANDLER'S RULES OF THE ROAD

Aside from Godzilla, Chandler also appears as Colonel Cathcart in the new Hulu series, Catch-22. “I was scared to death,” Chandler told us about taking the part. “But my career has been full of these situations where I get opportunities you can’t say no to.” Chandler acts alongside George Clooney, who also produced and directed the series.

“He’s one of my favorite actors,” Clooney told us. “He’s the only guy I know who could’ve taken Cathcart from a vindictive buffoon to, by the end, a guy you have sympathy for.”

Read the entire cover story here to find out more about Chandler’s new role, his memories traveling with Friday Night Lights’ co-star Connie Britton, and his rules of the road.

Want more? We’ve got interviews with George Clinton and Aubrey Plaza, a profile on crime-fiction provocateur James Ellroy, along with gear guides for picking the right commuter bike, campsite cooking, and the perfect gift ideas for Father’s Day.

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Boots and sneakers can leave feet looking, well, a little rough. If you’re contending with dry, flaky skin and deep calluses, there are quick and easy ways to condition your feet and so they’re healthy and looking their best. Put simply, you need a tool to help you exfoliate the skin, and something to moisturize your feet. Here are the best callus products to get them close-up ready.

The Best Yoga Positions for Hikers and Trail Runners

First, use a pumice stone or callus file to gradually smooth down thick and rough areas. Skip the metal-toothed tools as they often cut too deep into the foot, says Alan Bass, a podiatrist in Manalapan, New Jersey. But don’t go nuts: Leave some callus behind, since they help protect against blisters while running.

Courtesy Image

To smooth out rough spots, we like the Gehwol Wooden Pedicure File.

Get it

[$25; amazon.com]

Fix Your Nasty Feet Courtesy Image

Second, apply a water-based moisturizing lotion, morning and night, to reduce friction. Try the unscented Brickell Deep Moisture Body Lotion.

Get it

[$25; brickellmensproducts.com]

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Could we love Taylor Stitch any more? It’s always been one of our favorite menswear brands. But today, Taylor Stitch  doubled down on its responsible sustainability platform with the groundbreaking announcement of Restitch, a bold buyback program to give your clothes a second life and keep them out of landfills.

“Restitch is our response to the clothing industry’s overproduction issue,” says Mike Maher, CEO and co-founder of Taylor Stitch. “85 percent of all apparel ends up in landfills …. Through Restitch, there is no end of life—only end of use.”

Restitch is quick and seamless. Just download a shipping label at taylorstitch.com or visit a Taylor Stitch retail store to drop off your old Taylor Stitch clothes. You earn Common Club credit for every donation, from $15-$25, which you can then put towards the purchase of new Taylor Stitch gear. Your old TS gear is then reconstructed into fresh, one-of-a-kind garments that are resold at a fraction of the price as part of TS’s Vintage Collection.

How Does Restitch Work?

To kick off the program, Taylor Stitch tapped its devoted community, and received nearly 1,500 garments across outerwear, denim, shirting, knits, footwear, and accessories. From that first batch, the team has selected 42 pieces for its first ever Vintage Collection. Each item is a one-of-a-kind garment. From jeans to Henleys to Chore Coats to chinos, the Vintage Collection is awesome—and it’s already selling out. But never fear. Thanks to Restitch, it’s only a matter of time before the vintage Collection is restocked with more diamonds in the rough.

Since its launch in 2008, Taylor Stitch has been committed to making the world’s best clothing in a way that is kind to the people who make it, the places they make it in, and the planet. The company deploys a hybrid selling model, the Workshop, to bet big on proven winners and mitigate making things that ultimately end up as landfill. Restitch is a continued expression of this in that the program ensures the promise of clothing built to last for the long haul, while also dramatically reducing the company’s carbon, waste, and water footprint.

To shop the Vintage Collection and learn more about the Restitch buyback program, visit Taylor Stitch today. And remember to join the mailing list to take 20 percent off your first purchase.

Check out some of our favorite Taylor Stitch gear below.

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When it comes to gadgetry, you’re an early adopter. So why not give your grooming routine the same high-tech treatment? A new generation of techy grooming products promises to make keeping your hair, beard, and skin in shape way easier than before. Here are the grooming products that will get you looking fresh, faster.

The Best Haircuts to Try This Spring, According to Experts Courtesy Image

Quick Dry

The typical hair dryer takes forever to do its job, and it damages hair in the process. The Dyson Supersonic dries using a jet of air, so it doesn’t have to get so hot. That means it leaves your hair healthier, shinier, and less frizzy—in half the time.

Get it

[$400; dyson.com]

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Power Exfoliation

Dab face wash on the Foreo Luna 2 for Men and let the sonic pulses excavate dirt and oil from pores while also rubbing away dead skin. You can also use it before shaving for a smoother result. It’s shower safe, and one charge lasts about seven months.

Get it

[$199; foreo.com]

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Tidier Trim

Anywhere there’s hair, the Braun MGK5080 Grooming Kit has got a solution. (It even has an ear and nose trimmer.) And with 13 length settings, you can change your hair or beard gradually—or all at once.

Get it

[$60; braun.com]

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THE BARBELL. It’s perhaps the original fitness tool. You’ll never skill out of it, it’ll challenge your whole body, and there’s something deeply satisfying about picking up a weight and putting it down. But it’s possible your go-to routine has gotten stale, which means you might be missing out on certain areas, or are limiting your movement patterns. So we asked Adam Aguilera of CrossFit Sprag, outside Austin, Texas, to put together a set of moves you maybe don’t do. They emphasize functional movement patterns as well. (You can hoist a weight, but can you move it forward and to the side?) Aguilera has put a spotlight on flexibility, as well as greater depth of movement, to improve strength and help stave off injury. The first couple of times doing this workout, keep the weight lighter and find a good tempo, Aguilera says. If you want to load up at the end for a nice deadlift, nothing’s stopping you.

Get to Work

Load plates (the bar is usually 45 pounds) and do 4 sets of a move; rest 1 minute between sets. For each rep, take 5 seconds to move the weight, and hold 5 seconds at the end range of the movement.

Expert Tip: Super-Set Your Workout

While challenging, these movements are fairly straightforward, unlike, say, hang cleans. That’s by design. You can load on more weight, go slow, and focus on strength. Or ease up on the plates, aim for speed, and add in supersets. For instance, pepper in the warmup cardio movements between sets, or slot in flexibility/stability exercises (think Superman holds and bird-dogs). That’ll help maintain mobility through the workout, and it’ll also mean you can breeze through a post-lifting stretch session.

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We’ll tell you something you probably already know: Polo shirts aren’t just a uniform for the golf course. The simple three-button collared shirt is now available in more fabrics, patterns, and styles than ever before, and brands are experimenting with new interpretations of the menswear staple. Whether or not they’ve been in your rotation before, the latest crop of men’s polo shirts are making a strong case for spot in your dresser.

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But as you’ll see below, there are lots of great options to choose from. Picking the right polo for you depends on a few different variables, so we reached out to stylists for guidance on what to look for. First off: Make sure you pick one that fits. Size up if the buttons are pulling, says Lisa Cameron, stylist to celebs like Queer Eye‘s Karamo Brown, and make sure you have enough length to cover your stomach if you raise your arms up. But don’t go too baggy—a trimmer polo can accentuate your physique. “If you want to make your arms look a bit bigger,” says stylist Patrick Kenger, “find a polo with some ribbing around the end of the sleeves, which will hug your arms and help them ‘fill out’ the shirt sleeve.”

In addition, try to avoid shirts with lots of branding or big logos. “Keep it clean,” Kenger says.

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Stylists agree the polo is a versatile shirt, and you can wear it with quite a few different outfits. For starters, try using it as a replacement for your usual T-shirt.

“One of the best ways I’ve heard it put is that a polo is a gentleman’s T-shirt,” explains Kenger. “If you want to bump things up from the usual T-shirt and jeans outfit, then a polo is a great substitute.”

It also looks great with a suit. You can opt for a monochromatic look by matching your polo with the suit’s color, or go for a complementary color scheme, like a navy suit and pink polo, Cameron advises. You can also try pairing a polo with a bomber jacket, or wearing it with a simple pair of chinos and some sneakers.

Feeling inspired? Here are some of the best new polos to mix up your look this season.

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