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Melanoma Network of Canada by Melanoma Network Of Canada - 2w ago
Keira Brodie – Running for Hope

My name is Keira Brodie, I am currently finishing my fourth year at Western University. In October 2018, I was diagnosed with malignant melanoma. Before the diagnosis, I was planning on running my first full marathon in Vancouver in May 2019. I have always loved to run – it’s a great way to be alone with your thoughts, listen to your new favourite song repeatedly, and to justify that second bowl of pasta! I had always wanted to try running a marathon, so when my parents moved to British Columbia from Burlington, Ontario in the summer of 2018, I thought there was no better time to do it than in a new city.

That same summer, I noticed a strange-looking mole on my back. Initially, I didn’t think much of it, but after a few concerned comments from my parents and friends, I decided to have it looked at. I had the mole removed at the end of September and was told it was most likely a wart. This was great to hear, so I didn’t give it a second thought. Then in the middle of October I was told to come back into the doctor’s office and was informed that I had malignant melanoma. I was told I would need to undergo a wide local excision and sentinel lymph node biopsy surgery to find out if the cancer had spread.

There were so many things thrown at me at once, including hearing medical terms I had never even heard before. But waiting without further answers was the hardest part of this journey; my surgery was scheduled for November 21. My surgeon was great and my parents made the trip out to support me during my surgery, which I was so incredibly thankful for. I also had support from the best friends a girl could ask for, all the way from the east coast to right here in Ontario. The recovery from surgery was tough, but after a few days I was back to attending all my classes.

On December 13, I found out the cancer had spread to two lymph nodes on my right side and that I had stage 3 melanoma. I felt as though my entire life was going to change. But I was determined that it wouldn’t change for the worse. I had an incredible support system and was lucky enough to be given the greatest parents and family anyone could ask for. I was also blessed to have a best friend who has come to every appointment with me, as well as the occasional Wendy’s stops afterwards – because sometimes you write your own prescriptions with a side of fries.

I had a follow up PET scan after my diagnosis where they found a travelling lymph node on my left side that was also cancerous. My incredible surgeon managed to remove this as well. I was referred to the London Cancer Centre, and since I am BRAF-positive, I was eligible for a year-long clinical trial that would involve taking dabrafenib and trametinib daily. I started the trial in January and am incredibly grateful to be partaking in this clinical trial, as well as for all the medical staff I’ve encountered on this journey.

Throughout everything I still looked to running as an outlet, and I remained determined to try and run the marathon. I wanted to prove to myself that I could still do it, but I now had an even bigger reason to run: I could run to raise awareness for melanoma. Before my diagnosis I knew very little about melanoma and since I cannot sit still for very long, sun tanning was not exactly something I enjoyed.

This diagnosis took me by absolute surprise, as I am sure it does many others. If I could just open people’s eyes to the dangers of sun exposure or how to take preventative measures, that would be an accomplishment.

When I asked my oncologist if I would still be able to run the marathon this May, he said we would have to see how I was feeling after the first month of treatment. Throughout the good and bad days, as well as the side effects I have experienced over the first three months of treatment, I still can’t help but feel there is no better time to run this marathon.

I want to run this marathon not just for myself, but for my parents, family, friends, and everyone who has supported me and given me strength. I also want to run it for anyone who has been affected by melanoma and want to give them strength and hope as well. I want to thank the Melanoma Network of Canada for giving me the backing to spread this message and supporting me with this.

If you want to support Keira in raising awareness for MNC as she runs the Vancouver Marathon, you can contribute to her fundraising efforts here: https://www.crowdrise.com/o/en/campaign/melanoma-network-of-canada.

The post Melanoma Patient Spotlight appeared first on Melanoma Network of Canada.

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Health Canada issues Notice of Compliance with Conditions (NOC/c) for LibtayoTM (cemiplimab), the first and only biologic for the treatment of advanced cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (CSCC) Français

NEWS PROVIDED BYSanofi-Aventis Canada Inc. 

Apr 11, 2019, 14:43 ET

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Source: Sanofi (EURONEXT: SAN) (NYSE: SNY)

* CSCC is the second most common skin cancer in Canadai

TORONTO, April 11, 2019 /CNW Telbec/ – Sanofi Genzyme, the Specialty Care Business Unit of sanofi-aventis Canda Inc, announced today that Health Canada has issued a Notice of Compliance with conditions (NOC/c) for LibtayoTM(cemiplimab) for the treatment of adult patients with metastatic or locally advanced cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (CSCC) who are not candidates for curative surgery or curative radiation. The market authorization is conditional pending the results of studies to verify its clinical benefit. LibtayoTM is a fully-human monoclonal antibody targeting the immune checkpoint receptor PD-1 (programmed cell death protein-1) and is the first and only biologic treatment specifically approved and available for advanced CSCC in Canada.

“Today’s Health Canada decision is great news for patients with advanced CSCC, who previously had no approved treatment options,” says  Dr. Joel Claveau, M.D., dermatologist specialized in the diagnosis and treatment of melanoma and skin cancers, and Associate Professor with the Department of Medicine at Le Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Québec, Hôpital Hôtel-Dieu, Quebec City. “Libtayo  is an important new immunotherapy option for Canadian physicians to help address a significant unmet need in this patient group.”

CSCC is the second most common form of skin cancer accounting for approximately one-fifth of all skin cancer cases in Canadaii. When CSCC invades deeper layers of the skin or adjacent tissues, it is categorized as locally advanced. Once it spreads to other distant parts of the body, it is considered metastatic.iii

“Canadians living with metastatic cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma are in urgent need of access to new therapeutic options to treat this elusive yet serious skin cancer, especially in the case of advanced disease,” says Kathy Barnard, Founder of Save Your Skin Foundation. “We applaud Health Canada’s approval of Libtayo, which provides new hope for patients and their loved ones.”

Annette Cyr, Chair of the Melanoma Network of Canada, agrees:

“Patients with advanced metastatic CSCC face significant life threatening challenges, not to mention the physical and emotional impacts of this disease. Beyond surgery and radiation, there hasn’t been many options,” she says. “Today’s approval of Libtayo by Health Canada provides a treatment option that gives our patient community and their families reason to hope.”

Prior to today’s announcement, in 2018 LibtayoTM(cemiplimab-rwlc) received FDA approval under Priority Review and was granted Breakthrough Therapy Designation status for the treatment of patients with metastatic CSCC or locally advanced CSCC who are not candidates for curative surgery or curative radiation.Breakthrough Therapy Designation was created to expedite the development and review of drugs that have the potential for substantial improvement in the treatment of serious or life-threatening conditions.

“The approval of Libtayo represents Sanofi Genzyme’s commitment to the CSCC community, who have been suffering the burden of their condition,” states Marissa Poole, General Manager, Sanofi Genzyme Canada. “This treatment provides hope for Canadian patients living with advanced CSCC as the first approved biologic treatment to address the debilitating impact of this devastating disease and fills a critical treatment gap.”

About LibtayoTM
LibtayoTM is a prescription medicine used to treat people with a type of skin cancer called cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (CSCC) that has spread or cannot be cured by surgery or radiation. LibtayoTM is manufactured by Regeneron, and jointly developed and commercialized globally by Regeneron and Sanofi.

The Health Canada Notice of Compliance with conditions (NOC/c) of LibtayoTM was based on a combined analysis of data from an open-label, multi-center, non-randomized Phase 2 trial known as EMPOWER-CSCC-1 (Study 1540) and two advanced CSCC expansion cohorts from a multi-center, open-label, non-randomized Phase 1 trial (Study 1423). Together, the trials represent the largest prospective data set in advanced CSCC.

About Cutaneous Squamous Cell Carcinoma (CSCC)
CSCC starts in squamous cells of the skin, which are flat cells found in the outer part of the epidermis.

When CSCC is found very early and only in the epidermis, it is called CSCC in situ. It isn’t usually life-threatening because it is an early form of CSCC. CSCC in situ may turn into invasive CSCC if not treated. This means that the cancer can grow into nearby tissue or deeper layers of skin.

The leading cause of CSCC is frequent sun exposure. People with fair skin, light hair, and blue, green, or gray eyes are at the highest risk.iv

The symptoms of CSCC include:

  • Warts that grow and crust or bleed occasionally.
  • Scaly red patches, with irregular borders, which sometimes crust or bleed.
  • Sores that are open, and bleed and crust for weeks.
  • An elevated growth with a central dip that occasionally bleeds.

If lesions are untreated, they may continue to grow, causing damage to the surrounding tissue. This damage could cause the lesion to spread to other parts of the body.v

About Sanofi

Sanofi is dedicated to supporting people through their health challenges. We are a global biopharmaceutical company focused on human health. We prevent illness with vaccines, provide innovative treatments to fight pain and ease suffering. We stand by the few who suffer from rare diseases and the millions with long-term chronic conditions.

With more than 100,000 people in 100 countries, Sanofi is transforming scientific innovation into healthcare solutions around the globe.

In Canada, we employ close to 2,000 people. In 2017, Sanofi companies invested $123 million in R&D in Canada, creating jobs, business and opportunity throughout the country.

Sanofi Genzyme focuses on developing specialty treatments for debilitating diseases that are often difficult to diagnose and treat, providing hope to patients and their families. To learn more about our company, visit www.sanofi.ca or follow us on Twitter @SanofiCanada.

________________________________________________
iMelanoma Network of Canada, Non-melanoma Skin Cancer. https://www.melanomanetwork.ca/skincancer/
iiCanadian Cancer Society, Types of non-melanoma skin cancer.
http://www.cancer.ca/en/cancer-information/cancer-type/skin-non-melanoma/non-melanoma-skin-cancer/types-of-non-melanoma/?region=on
iiiSkin Cancer Foundation, Treatment Options, https://www.skincancer.org/skin-cancer-information/squamous-cell-carcinoma/scc-treatment-options
ivCanadian Cancer Society, Types of non-melanoma skin cancer. http://www.cancer.ca/en/cancer-information/cancer-type/skin-non-melanoma/non-melanoma-skin-cancer/types-of-non-melanoma/?region=on
vMelanoma Network of Canada, Non-melanoma Skin Cancer.
https://www.melanomanetwork.ca/skincancer/

SOURCE Sanofi-Aventis Canada Inc.

For further information: Nadia Rahman, Tel: +1 (514) 296 4665, nadia.rahman@sanofi.com; Maggie Wang Maric, Tel: +1 (416) 667 2955, Maggie.wangmaric@sanofi.com

Related Links
https://www.sanofi.ca/

The post Cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (CSCC) appeared first on Melanoma Network of Canada.

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With Melanoma on the rise across Canada, Melanoma Network of Canada seeks to expose current knowledge and behaviours to ensure sun safety is practiced amongst the most vulnerable Population.

OAKVILLE, ON, March 26, 2019 /CNW/ – A new study from the Melanoma Network of Canada uncovered that large gaps exist in the understanding of melanoma and impacts of sun exposure on the skin as well as in the knowledge and attitudes towards sun safety and protection efforts in youth aged 15-29.

Two-thirds of Ontario youth (65%) acknowledge that while they know sun safety is important, they don’t always take the appropriate steps to protect themselves. Furthermore, fewer than half report they regularly take steps to protect their skin from the sun, even during the sunny summer months. 

A history of sunburn and tanning is an important risk factor for melanoma and with 59% of survey respondents noting that they have experienced a severe sunburn before, the potential for new incidences of melanoma is jarring.

“It is estimated that 7,600 Canadians will be diagnosed with melanoma this year, and it is one of the most commonly diagnosed cancers among youth aged 15-29. Yet it is also one of the most preventable cancers – but only if individuals are practicing proactive, early prevention tactics, said Annette Cyr, Founder & Chair of the Board of the Melanoma Network of Canada and a three-time melanoma survivor. “Protecting your skin from harmful UV rays and regularly checking your skin for signs of melanoma should be part of an overall wellness strategy.”

The survey also revealed that Ontario youth lack confidence in their knowledge about melanoma and how to detect it. Fewer than half (45%) of youth feel confident in their ability to recognize melanoma and only three in ten (30%) check their skin monthly, while 25% do not check their skin at all.

“Improving knowledge of sun safety and melanoma is important to increasing the frequency of sun protection behaviours,” said Dr. Elaine McWhirter, Staff Medical Oncologist at the Juravinski Cancer Centre and Associate Professor at McMaster University. “We need to arm our youth with greater knowledge of sun safety practices, so they themselves can regularly engage in sun safety behaviours.”

According to the survey, which polled respondents across Ontario, Canadian youth are surprisingly mixed in their knowledge of melanoma and sun protection efforts:

  • Misconceptions exist about sun safety among youth
    • Six in ten (60%) believe exposure to the sun is the best way to get vitamin D
    • Half of youth think sunscreen can include ingredients which are harmful to the environment (55%) or their body (49%)
  • Most youth do not regularly apply sunscreen regardless of the season
    • During the sunny summer months, four in ten (39%) report they regularly apply moisturizer/ make-up with SPF in the morning while only one-third (34%) apply sunscreen. Considerably fewer do so in the summer when it is cloudy (31% and 27% respectively) or in the winter months (27% and 17%) even though UV exposure from sun is still a very real risk.
  • Youth are not confident in their knowledge about skin cancer and melanoma and how to detect it
    • 50% of respondents noted they didn’t know that the rates of melanoma were on the rise and 42% weren’t aware that melanoma was the most aggressive (and potentially deadly) form of skin cancer
  • Youth want to learn more about sun safety
    • Seven in ten (69%) want to learn more about how to prevent skin cancer and two-thirds (64%) want to learn more about pre-mature aging.

The Melanoma Network of Canada is committed to educating youth and the general public about sun safety and has developed the Screen MeTM Sun AwareTM camp program in partnership with the Douglas Wright Foundation, a likeminded organization that aims to raise awareness and advocate for early melanoma detection and preventative measures. Together, both organizations collaborate to educate and protect children and teens from skin cancer and melanoma. Launched in 2014, Screen MeTM Sun AwareTM focuses on providing camp councillor training, education materials and resources on the dangers of sun exposure and promotes sun safety behaviors across Ontario.

For more information, please visit https://www.melanomanetwork.ca/sun-safety

Survey Methodology
From December 17th – December 31st 2018 an online survey of 1,000 randomly selected Canadian youth who are Ipsos Online Panelists was executed by Ipsos Public Affairs. For comparison purposes, a probability sample of this size has an estimated credibility interval (which measures sampling variability) of +/- 3.5%, 19 times out of 20. The sample was stratified, and weighting applied to ensure the final sample is representative of the actual Ontario population (15-29 years old) by age, gender, and region.

About Melanoma Network of Canada (MNC):
The Melanoma Network of Canada (MNC) provides support services, information and programs for individuals whose lives have been changed by melanoma. MNC provides the leading national voice for melanoma patients in Canada for early detection and improved treatment access and works diligently to prevent more Canadians from developing melanoma through public awareness and youth and adult education on sun safety.  For more information, please visit www.melanomanetwork.ca. Charitable Registration number: 854913050RR0001

SOURCE Melanoma Network of Canada

https://www.newswire.ca/news-releases/sun-misconceptions-new-study-reveals-ontario-youth-are-misguided-in-their-understanding-of-melanoma-sun-safety-and-protection-efforts-864459980.html

For further information: or interview requests, please contact: Ashley Agueci, Melanoma Network of Canada, 416-580-0204, ashley@aguecipr.com

Related Links

www.melanomanetwork.ca

The post Sun Misconceptions: New Study Reveals Ontario Youth are Misguided in their Understanding of Melanoma, Sun Safety and Protection Efforts appeared first on Melanoma Network of Canada.

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Skill LevelEasy
Preparation Time10 minutesTotal Time20 minutes
Servings4Cost Per Serving$1.97

Share this RecipePrint

Ingredients
4Eggs
1Green Onion, finely sliced
1/4 cupMint or Cilantro, finely chopped
10Cherry Tomatoes, ​halved
1 tbspButter or Olive Oil
2English Muffins, halved (optional)
1/2 tspSea Salt

Avocado Sauce

1/2Avocado
1/2 cupCilantro
1/2 cupWater
1Lime, juice and/or zest
1/2 tspSea Salt
1 tbspOlive Oil

Directions
  1. Season tomatoes in a bowl with a pinch of salt, 1 tsp of olive oil and some of the fresh herbs. Set aside.
  2. For the avocado sauce, place everything in a blender or food processor and puree until creamy. Add more liquid if necessary to get a desired dressing consistency.
  3. For your eggs, add butter or olive oil to a skillet over medium high heat.
  4. Whisk eggs really in a bowl until airy. Season with some salt, add your green onion and fresh herbs.
  5. Add to your hot pan. Stir gently with a spatula bringing the mixture together to create folds.
  6. When the eggs are still slightly runny, remove the pan from the heat.
  7. Place a spoonful of tomatoes on your English muffin, top with some of the scrambled eggs, and cover with a little of the avocado dressing. Serve.
Nutrition

PDF of NFT for Spring Egg Scramble with Avocado Sauce

  • ​Is your mouth dry? Dry mouth (xerostomia) is a common side effect of radiation treatment to the head or neck. For most people, it will slowly improve within a few weeks or months after treatment. In some cases, the feeling of dry mouth may never go away completely. To help, choose soft and moist foods such as stews, soups, puddings or yogurts. 
  •  ​​​No rules, eat whenever! Eating enough protein can sometimes be challenging especially when dealing with difficulties chewing and swallowing. There are no rules about when to eat. So, if breakfast foods like frittata or scrambled eggs are well tolerated, prepare them for lunch or dinner! Two large eggs provide 12 grams of high quality protein, which help build antibodies and repair muscles. And, they give you 100% of your daily requirement of vitamin B12, which helps protect against heart disease.
  • Did you know? Avocados can be subbed for butter in a hollandaise sauce to get a creamy and better-for-you version. Each serving of an avocado, 1/3 medium (50 g), contributes 5 grams of monounsaturated and 1 g polyunsaturated fats to your diet. These are “good” fats that help raise “good” HDL cholesterol and reduce “bad” LDL cholesterol, which may help lower the risk of heart disease. They’re also loaded with folate, a B vitamin that may reduce the risk of some types of cancers.

The post Spring Egg Scramble with Avocado Sauce appeared first on Melanoma Network of Canada.

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ANNETTE CYR Three-time melanoma survivor, Chair & Founder, Melanoma Network of Canada

There is welcome news to start off We are making progress to bring access of both the targeted therapies and immunotherapies to fully resected stage III and IV patients (previously only available for metastatic atients).Thanks to all of you who participated in the patient surveys this past fall which helped us greatly with our submissions. MNC is a significant contributor on behalf of our patient community to bring awareness of the unmet need for adjuvant treatment for stage III and IV, in the hopes of preventing a recurrence of disease in a significant portion of these patients. We have also worked closely with many families to access interim treatment options.

We have received an early positive recommendation for use of adjuvant nivolumab (Opdivo) from pCODR, (the pan-Canadian Oncology Drug Review), subject to a final recommendation. Price negotiations between provinces and the manufacturer are still pending the final recommendation, but for some of you with private insurance, you may
have access now. For others, the manufacturer is providing interim compassionate access – please check with your oncology team for details. There are a few more hurdles along the way to having provincial coverage, but this is welcome news. We are also waiting for recommendations on the targeted therapy combination of dabrafenib (Tafinlar) and trametinib (Mekinist) for adjuvant use, as well as pembrolizumab (Keytruda) monotherapy for use in the adjuvant setting. We will provide updates on our website and via email as information becomes available

We are also optimistic that a new treatment is on the horizon for another form of skin cancer called cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (CSCC). CSCC is the second most common form of skin cancer in Canada (next to basal cell carcinoma). In certain cases it can be devastating if it becomes metastatic, potentially resulting in death. Cemiplimab (Libtayo) is a new immunotherapy drug known as a checkpoint inhibitor. It works by blocking a protein called PD-1 on certain immune cells and is for the treatment of patients with metastatic CSCC or locally advanced CSCC who are not candidates for curative surgery or curative radiation. We are hopeful that this new therapy will become available shortly for this patient population, which is lacking effective treatment options.

Advances in treatments continue to be welcome news for all of us. If you
or your family member is in need of further information or support,
please contact us directly toll free at 1-877-560-8035. Please remember to always consult your physician or oncologist for specific treatment questions and recommendations. We hope to see you or speak with you at one of our many patient events in 2019.

Chair & Founder, Melanoma Network of Canada

The post Message from the Chair Annette Cyr – Winter 2019 appeared first on Melanoma Network of Canada.

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Melanoma Network of Canada by Melanoma Network Of Canada - 3M ago

During my visit to a dermatologist’s office in 1982 for treatment of an acne condition, the doctor noticed moles on my arms and warned me that I was at risk of developing melanoma. I learned that I satisfied all of the risk factors, e.g. light complexion, blonde hair, green eyes, many moles, Anglo-Saxon ancestry, and a history of occasional cases of sunburn (almost everyone from my age cohort fits that criterion). Those moles were excised and found to be benign, but ever since then I have been examined on at least an annual basis for skin cancer. Over the next three decades I was fortunate enough to be diagnosed only with the far milder affliction of basal cell carcinoma. I was usually fairly diligent with respect to the precautions that you all know should be taken.

Despite this lengthy period of smooth sailing, thankfully I never let my guard down.

Fast forward to the fall of 2012, when I observed on my right cheek one of the signs of cancer – that fabled sore that would not heal. I scheduled a series of visits to my regular dermatologist as well as another local dermatologist, but the result of the first four visits was watch and wait. The diagnosis was missed because I had developed a rare form of melanoma called the oxymoronic amelanotic melanoma that lacks the tell-tale, conspicuous pigmentation.

Eventually as the sore appeared to be growing, my regular dermatologist kindly agreed to excise it on my fifth visit in March of 2013. He had to dig deeper into my cheek than he expected, and was concerned that it had grown. Nevertheless, when I asked him whether it was melanoma, his response was negative.

Seven days later he telephoned me at my office and delivered the terrible news contained in the pathology report. It was an ulcerated nodule almost 12 mm deep with microsatellites. One might say that my persistence paid in a somewhat macabre fashion. “This is a very serious diagnosis” he declared, but he also said “Of course there is hope for you”. Within two days, I saw the top head and neck surgeon and the top melanoma specialist at the Ottawa Regional Cancer Centre. Nine days earlier, I had a cancer-free mindset. The long-term survival statistics that they revealed to me were well south of 50%, but that information was useful for choosing a course of treatment. Easter of 2013 was not a happy time.

The first bits of good news started to trickle in. Surgery was scheduled after the results of a bone scan and CT scans of the neck, chest, and abdomen were negative. Five weeks later, I underwent surgery that transformed me from “cancer-face” to “scarface.” In mid- May, the pathology report came back. The same surgeon who was not optimistic announced before removing the sutures that a) the excision was “free at the margins.” and b) ALL of the lymph nodes were clear. My condition was stage 3c rather than stage 4. I was temporarily in a state of reverse denial; it seemed to be too good to be true.

When my wife and I met with the melanoma specialist a few days later, he mentioned the possibility of participation in clinical trials as well as the “watch and wait option.” At this point my wife intervened. Having done an enormous amount of research in the medical literature, she knew the nitty-gritty of my pathology reports, and knew something about how the system operated. She politely insisted that I did qualify for one of the trials, specifically immunotherapy involving ipilimumab (“ipi”). The doctor consulted his notes and concurred. As long as the results of a full-body PET scan and a head MRI were negative, I would be in the trial. Then providence intervened again, notwithstanding my pessimistic outlook. I was randomly selected into the treatment arm of the trial as opposed to the interferon arm.

Over the course of the spring and summer of 2013, I underwent four rounds of immunotherapy. For every single visit to the Cancer Centre for any reason, my wife accompanied and supported me. There were certainly setbacks related to the inevitable side effects. I had to cease treatment after the fourth round. In November of 2013 I was hospitalized after suffering an adrenal crisis, as a result I will be dependent on steroids for the rest of my days. As far as the cancer is concerned, however, the only bad news that I ever received was the initial diagnosis. I am so grateful to my wife Catherine, the team at the Ottawa Cancer Centre, my dermatologist, Bristol-Myers Squibb, the Ottawa Hospital Foundation and Lady Luck for showing no evidence of metastatic disease for over five years. – David Gray

Read More Melanoma Patient Journeys




The post Stage IV Melanoma Patient Story appeared first on Melanoma Network of Canada.

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Skill LevelEasy
Preparation Time10 minutesTotal Time20 minutes
Servings4Cost Per Serving$1.97

Share this RecipePrint

Ingredients
4Eggs
1Green Onion, finely sliced
1/4 cupMint or Cilantro, finely chopped
10Cherry Tomatoes, ​halved
1 tbspButter or Olive Oil
2English Muffins, halved (optional)
1/2 tspSea Salt

Avocado Sauce

1/2Avocado
1/2 cupCilantro
1/2 cupWater
1Lime, juice and/or zest
1/2 tspSea Salt
1 tbspOlive Oil

Directions
  1. Season tomatoes in a bowl with a pinch of salt, 1 tsp of olive oil and some of the fresh herbs. Set aside.
  2. For the avocado sauce, place everything in a blender or food processor and puree until creamy. Add more liquid if necessary to get a desired dressing consistency.
  3. For your eggs, add butter or olive oil to a skillet over medium high heat.
  4. Whisk eggs really in a bowl until airy. Season with some salt, add your green onion and fresh herbs.
  5. Add to your hot pan. Stir gently with a spatula bringing the mixture together to create folds.
  6. When the eggs are still slightly runny, remove the pan from the heat.
  7. Place a spoonful of tomatoes on your English muffin, top with some of the scrambled eggs, and cover with a little of the avocado dressing. Serve.
Nutrition

PDF of NFT for Spring Egg Scramble with Avocado Sauce

  • ​Is your mouth dry? Dry mouth (xerostomia) is a common side effect of radiation treatment to the head or neck. For most people, it will slowly improve within a few weeks or months after treatment. In some cases, the feeling of dry mouth may never go away completely. To help, choose soft and moist foods such as stews, soups, puddings or yogurts. 
  •  ​​​No rules, eat whenever! Eating enough protein can sometimes be challenging especially when dealing with difficulties chewing and swallowing. There are no rules about when to eat. So, if breakfast foods like frittata or scrambled eggs are well tolerated, prepare them for lunch or dinner! Two large eggs provide 12 grams of high quality protein, which help build antibodies and repair muscles. And, they give you 100% of your daily requirement of vitamin B12, which helps protect against heart disease.
  • Did you know? Avocados can be subbed for butter in a hollandaise sauce to get a creamy and better-for-you version. Each serving of an avocado, 1/3 medium (50 g), contributes 5 grams of monounsaturated and 1 g polyunsaturated fats to your diet. These are “good” fats that help raise “good” HDL cholesterol and reduce “bad” LDL cholesterol, which may help lower the risk of heart disease. They’re also loaded with folate, a B vitamin that may reduce the risk of some types of cancers.

The post Spring Egg Scramble with Avocado Sauce appeared first on Melanoma Network of Canada.

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The call for a national, universal pharmacare plan has been getting louder in the last few years, but there is currently no consensus or national understanding on what shape a national pharmacare program should take.

Recently, the CanCertainty Coalition took part in a consultation hosted by the Advisory Council on the Implementation of National Pharmacare to discuss models and implementation.

We reinforced our position that early efforts to improve pharmacare across Canada should focus on cancer drugs.

In 2016, CanCertainty conducted a survey of 1,155 Canadians that revealed that not only do the majority of Canadians believe health care is the most important government spending priority, but that within health care, cancer care is the highest priority. Cancer was also identified most often as the disease that presents the greatest risk to a person’s financial future.

The western provinces, the northern territories, and Quebec have all developed mechanism–offer universal access to take-home cancer treatments regardless of one’s age. However, Ontario and Atlantic Canada lag behind with respect to universal access to these treatments. We believe national pharmacare should prioritize these very serious cancer drug access problems for patients in Ontario and Atlantic Canada. Doing so would address the number one priority identified by Canadians and bring all provinces in closer alignment in the delivery of drug programs.

The CanCertainty Coalition also weighed in on the issue of leaving private drug insurance plans in place, at least in the short term, and structuring pharmacare improvements to address the needs of Canadians with no (or
poor) drug coverage. This approach has been called the close the gaps approach and stands in contrast to a universal single public payer model where government would take over much of the costs of drugs currently covered through private insurance plans and out-of-pocket spending.

While the CanCertainty Coalition recognizes the merits of universal single public payer models, the costs associated with taking over the reimbursement of drugs currently paid for by private insurance are massive. A cautionary tale about moving too quickly to assume the costs of private insurance is OHIP+.

Earlier this year, the (previous) Liberal Ontario government implemented the OHIP+ program to extend provincial drug coverage to those age 24 and under. In doing so, it positioned Ontario as the first payer, meaning the government would assume the costs of all drugs on the Ontario drug formulary for this age group, even if individuals previously had
drug coverage under a private plan.

The cost estimates for this pharmacare expansion were $465 million, however external experts have estimated the costs to be much higher. Subsequently, the recently elected Progressive Conservative government announced a rollback of the OHIP+ policy, shifting the province’s role to that of second payer with the program now focusing on those who do
not have existing prescription drug insurance.

The CanCertainty Coalition believes that early improvements to pharmacare should focus on Canadians who have the greatest need – and that movements to shape pharmacare into a universal single payer system should be aspirational and tackled after the most urgent drug access issues of Canadians have been remedied.

Article provided by Robert Bick robertfbick@gmail.com

The CanCertainty Coalition is the united voice of 35 Canadian patient groups, cancer health charities, and caregiver organizations from across the country, joined together with oncologists and cancer care professionals to significantly improve the affordability, accessibility and safety of take-home cancer treatments in Ontario and Atlantic Canada.

The post First Focus Should Be Cancer Drugs – National Pharmacare appeared first on Melanoma Network of Canada.

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Melanoma Network of Canada by Melanoma Network Of Canada - 3M ago
Who is a good candidate for adjuvant therapy?

Adjuvant therapy is used for specific patients with advanced melanoma-generally stage III or IV who have had surgery that has completely removed their tumours. Adjuvant therapy may be offered to potentially prevent a recurrence of disease in this higher risk patient group.

What types of adjuvant therapy may be considered?

There are various types of therapy, but the two major ones you’ll likely be considering for adjuvant therapy are immunotherapy and targeted therapy. These therapies stimulate the immune system to destroy cancer cells and are very effective and well tolerated in most patients. These therapies are
not the same as chemotherapy which has very different side effects and which is now rarely used to treat melanoma.

How do we determine which adjuvant therapy to use?

Your oncologist and care team will review the options with you. Currently, these therapies are still very new and some are still pending approval for use as adjuvant treatment. Knowing whether to use targeted therapy or an immunotherapy will depend on the characteristic of your tumour and whether or not is has a specific genetic mutation – called the BRAF mutation. Your oncologist will make the recommendation based on what therapy is currently available and based on your individual health needs, preferences and profile.

What are the side effects of adjuvant therapy?


Knowing the potential side effects are important. Each therapy has its own potential side effects. These should be discussed in detail with your oncologist and your oncology team will guide you in your treatment.

How is the drug administered and how long will I
have to be on treatment?

Your adjuvant therapy will depend on your specific medical situation but for adjuvant therapy you’ll most likely be on treatment for about a year. Ask your oncologist about what type of follow up and monitoring will be required, the frequency of administration of the drug therapy, including
what tests will need to be done, so you know what to expect.

Targeted therapy is usually delivered orally, while immunotherapy drugs are given through an IV. This is useful to know as targeted therapy can be taken at home, and the latter will require regular visits to a hospital or infusion center. Talk to your doctor about medication schedules and also whether side effects or dosage will change during the course of treatment.

How will I know if the adjuvant therapy is working?

Adjuvant therapies for melanoma are used to significantly reduce the risk that melanoma will return, which is different from treating metastatic disease where there is detectable disease present. When it comes to a recurrence of disease, no one can predict with certainty that the disease will return. However, with adjuvant treatment, clinical data from drug trials have shown a significant portion of people have not had a recurrence of melanoma.

The future of treatment for melanoma is looking very positive
and we are hopeful that many will receive treatment that may prevent future recurrence of disease, thus reducing the number of metastatic patients and deaths from melanoma.


By Annette Cyr, Three-time melanoma
survivor, Chair & Founder, Melanoma
Network of Canada

The post Considerations for Adjuvant Therapy appeared first on Melanoma Network of Canada.

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Melanoma Network of Canada by Melanoma Network Of Canada - 5M ago

bristol Myers Squibb (BMS) has just announced that they will extend the “Melody” compassionate access program for those patients with metastatic melanoma to allow patients access where there is limited or no private insurance coverage until April 1st, 2019. While we are patiently waiting for final price negotiations to conclude and then potential provincial listing and coverage, this extension will help a significant number of metastatic patients. Thank you to BMS, Annette Cyr and everyone who worked hard to allow Canadians equal access to this life saving drug treatment.

The post Drug Access Update Nivolumab (Opdivo) appeared first on Melanoma Network of Canada.

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