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Hannah is the Association Sales Executive for Convention Edinburgh - but comes from a totally different background. She writes about the stigma of job-hopping, as well as the many under-considered positives! Happy reading!
It is a truth universally acknowledged that job-hopping gives employers a bad impression. But, with 70% of millennials moving on from jobs within two years, job-hopping – the phenomenon of an employee swapping roles every 12 to 36 months – is on the rise in the UK. And given that by 2025, us millennials will make up 75% of the workplace, it looks like it will be here to stay.
I am a prime example of a job-hopper, with a resume which could seem a little erratic. A graduate in Ancient and Medieval History, I went on to work in the food and beverage sector after university before taking on my current role with Marketing Edinburgh. For some, working for three different companies in as many years, would set alarm bells ringing – and to an extent I can understand why. Yet, the more I am in the work place, the more I have come to realise that my varied experience is a pro, not a con, and has taught more than I might have gained by staying in one place for the three and half years I’ve been working.
Whilst I am not for a minute recommending we all change jobs just for the sake of it, I think it is time to recognise that there are plenty of positives to be had if that is the way things fall. The very definition of ‘millennial’ means that our age group has grown up during the economic crisis, a rapidly changing workplace thanks to technology and the hiking of tuition fees. It is a time of increased job uncertainty. It really shouldn’t be a surprise that we’re moving around in our jobs more than ever before – whether or not by choice.
Whilst I recognise there are always going to be negative aspects to job hopping, I don’t think this millennial trend should be tainted with the same brush. For those whose job moves were out of their control, let’s start to recognise the potential in varied experience and realise that this is our USP. After all, it means we each have a unique skillset. I didn’t think my medieval history degree would be too relevant at a convention bureau, but it came in handy on a recent fam trip to Edinburgh when I was able to answer a client’s questions about the city’s past; broadening knowledge can never be a bad thing.
And for those who actively choose to move on every 18 months, I think it’s time different questions start to be asked. Are employees leaving to gain more experience in a different field? Are they looking for a company with a good culture fit? Are they hoping to find a different role with more chances of progression? I see these all as positive points, and think employers should too. To have the determination and courage to take these moves proves that we are driven and ambitious; we’ll put our all in to a role and take any opportunity you can throw at us.
Job-hopping essentially opens the doors to more experience. It provides opportunities to explore different management styles, workplaces and even industries, and to collect huge amounts of knowledge and skills along the way. It also enables making new connections and contacts. From an employer’s point of view, a millennial job-hopper is likely to be innovative, connected and disruptive – full of new ideas and perspectives. Some companies have already recognised this potential and are actively seeking out job-hoppers for the benefits a fresh pair of young eyes might bring.
But even if you’re not looking to be disruptive, job-hopping allows you to explore career opportunities and to work out what you’re looking for from a role and what you enjoy. All of which means that when you do find a job you enjoy and a company you like working for, you may be more likely to stick around for longer.
All I’m asking is that we stop seeing colourful CVs as a negative and start to recognise the huge potential job-hopping can bring. It allows us create our own experience and put our own spin on things. Also, as an added bonus, when we do find a job we like, we will have a sense of place and purpose which we wouldn’t have achieved without all of the job-hopping along the way. The time has come for millennials to stop being ashamed of our chequered pasts, and start to embrace our unique skillsets.
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Guest post from Laura-Roxana Nucu, Event Management Student at Bournemouth University conducting research on millennials in the MICE industry.
Much has been written about millennials in the last few years. Once this generation gained its powerhouse recognition, thought to be redefining every social, political, demographic, technological and economic part of life, many industries became interested in gaining an insight into the “millennial mindset”. This resulted in an abundance of speculations and stereotypes which treated this generation in a homogenous way.
In the meetings, incentives, conferences and events industry, there has been very little academic research aimed to understand millennials perspective. Therefore, as a final year Event Management student, working on my dissertation, I have decided to find out more about this generation’s attitude towards learning, engagement, networking, environment and technology in the context of meetings and conferences.
I am hoping to gather a more holistic view of what millennials expect from their meetings and conferences, and I’m hoping that this research will help businesses craft their meetings and conferences differently.
If you are part of this generation and you are keen to participate in this research, I would appreciate if you could please fill in a short questionnaire.
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By Jonathan Soon - Marketing & Communications Manager, Sarawak Convention Bureau
CNBC reported that millennials have a 5-second attention span. A goldfish has 9.
As offensive as it may sound, there is some truth in it. We are drawn by great headlines, but most of us would not actually follow through with the content. Even for this article alone - some of us may not finish reading it.
And then those who do? They would likely speed read it without digesting the content, and the content would be forgotten in less than an hour.
Why so? Because we are now living in a time where a gazillion more articles are waiting to be read. Millennials are conditioned to access any possible content much faster than naming out loud the four clusters of MICE.
Because of this, the media has begun to adapt. Mass productions of brief, compelling copies. Bolder, sharper advertisements all in a bid to hold our attention. Videos that promise larger-than-life experiences.
We end up having much more content than ever before - but with the same amount of time to digest it. As a young professional in the meetings industry, between chasing documents for winning bids or frantically reaching the AV technician in the middle of a conference, time is a luxury we may not afford to have.
Let's lay down the cold hard truth...
Millennials do not need to be engaged more.
We need to be engaged right.
And it can start with 3 simple rules:
#1 Content that is exclusive
We can smell generic content a mile away, simply because we are the generation that made Google into a word. So, do not even try.
But if there is something that has not been made available online yet, we are hooked. It can be real-life lessons from unique circumstances. Extraordinary challenges which may have emerged in your environment, the solutions, as well as preventive measures that should have been put in place.
#2 Content that makes us cry
In Malaysia, Petronas is one of the biggest players in the oil & gas industry. But they are also famous for their early tv commercials that hit right where it matters. The commercial itself speaks nothing of what the company does, but instead, it shows an acute understanding of its consumers, what moves them and delivers it with an excellent story.
Millennials are very receptive to this. We want content that moves us. Either creating the warm fuzzy feeling which reminds us of home, or sparking an inspiration to try something new, content that drives our emotions like a roller-coaster will win major brownie points.
#3 Content that reminds us why we (still) do what we do
Granted, we are in one of the most exciting sectors out there. We get to meet wonderful people. Tasks so diverse that boredom doesn’t exist. And we get to travel for work!
Beneath it all, we still want our work to matter. To make a difference to someone else’s life. Has the CSR initiative we championed broaden the horizons of rural communities? Has our marketing campaigns changed perspectives of what our destination truly is?
More often than not, Millennials care about legacy impacts. And also we play a major role in driving them.
We are fortunate to have some of our trade media who welcome and appreciate millennials. Publications and coalitions who have taken an active role in engaging our generation and showcase what we can bring to the industry.
There we have it - the 3 simple rules of engagement. And if you are still reading this, we may have actually busted CNBC’s 5-second attention span myth.
What was that they say about goldfish again?
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Guest Post by Rosie Ashman, Marketing Assistant at IMEX Group.
Starting my job with IMEX was just the start of a number of opportunities that have come my way since. I get to work with an amazing team who encourage me to grow every day and I’m able to meet with people from all over the world. But best of all I get to travel to places I’ve never been before – attending our trade show in Las Vegas was my first time in America! For a more in-depth look into life at IMEX take a look at the blog I wrote below.
If you can picture yourself in a company like this, email recruitment@imexexhibitions.com to find out about career opportunities at IMEX.
At 22 years old, I’m a millennial, on the cusp of generations Y and Z, and I’m the youngest member of the IMEX team – the baby, if you will. Millennials may have an unfair reputation for being selfish, immature and glued to our phones, but we’re still the generation everyone wants to reach. Last year, I experienced my first ever trade show at IMEX America, and my first introduction to the meetings industry. Would you like to know what I thought of it? I promise I’ll be honest!
Social interaction isn’t so scary after all
Social media has defined my generation as the primary means of contact, causing us to lose the ability to communicate effectively in person. However, the first thing that struck me upon walking the aisles of the Sands was how friendly people were. Handshakes, hugs and contact details were happily exchanged between friends old and new. The prevalence of associations such as MPI and ICCA gave way to introductions, icebreakers and immediate mutual interests. This sheer volume of social interaction overwhelmed me at first, but by the last day of the show I grew to value how good it felt to talk to people face-to-face.
Bleisure travel is awesome
With gap years almost becoming a rite of passage for my generation, it may come as no surprise that millennials love to travel in our spare time. Yet the opportunity to travel on the job is equally as important, as observed by Huffington Post, “we’re seeing millennials base their entire career decisions around the ability to travel generating a completely new concept – bleisure travel”. The meetings industry provides the chance for young people to see the world by attending conferences, trade shows and events. I can vouch for how valuable this is, as my new job allows me to travel to countries I’ve never been before. Business travel provides a safety net that solo travel doesn’t, allowing you to advance in your career while gaining new experiences.
Technology buzz
Some may think the meetings industry is only just catching up with technology trends, but IMEX America was actually my first experience of several new innovations. In the lead-up to the show I saw what goes into creating an event app, and wrote about our experience of using chatbots (a form of artificial intelligence). Best of all, during IMEX America I had the chance to try out new technology in the form of virtual reality – if you haven’t tried it yet, you must! This was my first glimpse of what the future looks like.
Sustainability is a top priority
Forbes notes that one characteristic of the millennial generation is our loyalty to socially responsible brands. The sustainability efforts showcased at IMEX America made me happy to align myself with my employer – from attendees donating books to help Nevada’s schoolchildren to read, to exhibitors recycling unused materials. I truly believe IMEX are doing all they can to use their position in the meetings industry for good.
You never stop learning
Millennials are a highly educated generation with about 61% having attended university compared to 46% of generation X. This thirst for knowledge is encouraged by the education on offer within events in the meetings industry. At IMEX America I had the chance to attend sessions on social media strategy and supporting women in the industry, and both have benefitted my work since. Although I have left university behind me, I’m so glad to be in an industry that supports my continuing development.
To sum up, my first experience of the meetings industry at IMEX America was a hugely positive one. It seems that the key to attracting and retaining millennials is to keep moving forward, especially in terms of technology and social responsibility. The benefits of travel and education appeal to younger generations as they enable us to grow professionally as well as personally. But regardless of my generation’s fondness for social media over real-life interaction, nothing beats a good old-fashioned face-to-face meeting for getting things done.
If you’ve got serious FOMO after reading this, register for IMEX in Frankfurt 2018 now!
This blog was originally posted on the IMEX Blog.
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Meetings Millennials by Gráinne Ní Ghiollagain - 3M ago
The ICCA UK & Ireland Chapter in association with Emirates are offering one lucky Millennial the opportunity to attend the ICCA World Congress in Dubai this November. The lucky winner will win a direct Emirates flight to Dubai and registration to the ICCA World Congress – worth over £1500!!
To be in with a chance to win –
The participant must be a millennial (born between 1982 and 1995)Must be attending ICCA World Congress as a First Time AttendeeMust work for a company who are members of ICCA UK&I ChapterMust have the support from their company to enterYou or your company must be willing to pay for your own accommodation, any additional meals not covered in the registration, and transport to/from the airport for your direct flight and any personal additional expenditure.
To enter simply email Grainne (gnighiollagain@crokepark.ie) for the application form - the application includes a letter (max 500 words) addressed to yourself one year from now, highlighting all the benefits and insights you achieved by being a first time attendee at the ICCA world Congress in November, and a 2 minute video, highlighting ‘Why me?’.
All pieces need to be sent to gnighiollagain@crokepark.ie or L.Tully@manchestercentral.co.uk by no later than the 27th of April.
Winner will be announced at IMEX in May. Best of Luck!
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Today, you might have seen five generations combine their skills and traits to work together as a team. You’ve probably been exposed to traditionalists, baby boomers, Gen X, Millennials, and Gen Z, but in the near future, millennials will soon dominate a workplace. When this happens, recruitment firms, hiring managers, and HR teams should start to understand the way they work.
An essential factor in a workplace is the employees who help a business reach their goals. But to do this, you must know how to treat your workers fairly and provide them what they need. You should be aware of what motivates them, their work preferences, how they deal with challenging roles, their technological expertise, and much more.
The infographic below illustrates the difference between millennials and Generation Z and help you on the things you can adjust in your business to make sure that they are comfortable and motivated to work.
For example, millennials rely on digital communication tools, while Generation Z prefer face-to-face discussions. Understanding your employees can help you use their traits and skills to the maximum potential, especially when working in a team.
They could be the key to a successful future for your business, especially with their technological expertise. Both generations are more than familiar with digital media, as millennials are digital pioneers where they are quick learners to technology, while Generations Zs are digital natives and can work well with mobile and desktop devices. Both of which are great advantages to any business with the constant changes and improvements in technology. Consequently, it will mean less training for your business.
The illustrations will show you how much each generation has a lot to offer. They can give your business fresh and creative ideas, which will benefit your business in the long run. So, use this infographic to guide you when hiring or dealing with these generations.
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The last dreary weekend in January, I found myself facilitating a scientific and organising committee meeting for our upcoming 33rd International Epilepsy Congress which will take place in Bangkok in 2019. Sitting around a dinner table in Kensington, London, I was feeling rather smug after having been able to spell ‘epileptic encephalopathies’ without assistance in our meeting earlier that day. My ears burned a little however, as I overheard the president of one of our associations remark in conversation that I had cows and horses at home, ‘a real ranch girl’. I let this observation slide with a smile, as a Canadian he isn’t expected to know that hailing from the west and rural coast of Ireland it’s not so much ‘ranch’ but rather more ‘bog’. In that moment however, I thought I was really rather a long way from home and wondered how I had got there…
An arts degree under my belt at age 20, I took the questionably logical decision to pursue a Masters in Marketing to ensure I was ‘employable’. From there, I found myself in the Association and Events industry quite by chance. Working part time in a role that found me via LinkedIn while I finished my Masters, I am still here, almost four years later.
Now 25 years old, I have worked my way up from chief tea and coffee maker to the International Project Manager for Epilepsy Congress. In our main capacity we serve as the Congress Secretariat for two international organisations, the International League against Epilepsy and the International Bureau for Epilepsy, organising six biennial events internationally. With no events and medical background or knowledge about epilepsy, it was a struggle to start. The lingo, the structure, the politics! To be honest, there are days where I still struggle with the ever evolving agendas.
I have often wondered but doubt that I speak only for myself when I say that the Association and Events industry had never been presented to me as a career option in school or university. In fact the aptitude tests we were subjected to by guidance counsellors declared I was destined to be a publicist. Recalling how I described my current job role to my mother, she announced it sounded like it was made for me. ‘Use your transferable skills and don’t forget to smile’ she exclaimed at the time. As a result of this, I have come up with my own formula for working in this industry, at its core it is comprised of really good organisational and even better people skills.
As a millennial in this industry, one can often find themselves somewhat disregarded and subject to disinterest due to their ‘lack of experience’. Often I have to remind myself that age does not necessarily equate to common sense or life experience in context. When meeting a stranger on a trade show floor or at a networking event, not one of us knows what the other has experienced irrespective of age. This links inherently for me to the idea of leadership and how can youth lead? I remember a conversation I had with one of our past presidents in relation to the fact that he was pleasantly surprised at how capable I was after my first international programme meeting. To let you in on a secret, so was I, but I didn’t tell him that! Why did he underestimate me? Why did I underestimate myself? Was it my lack of perceived ‘experience’? Was it my age? Why should any of these be relevant to whether or not I would be capable to complete the task I had been assigned. I am privileged that I am now in a position where my committee know me. They appreciate that I now have a proven track record in this field and hence, I can lead them in discussion and guide them to complete tasks, my capability, in this respect is no longer questioned as a matter of my age.
The topics of personal development and leadership are being increasingly emphasised at workshops and meetings within this industry. We need to apply ourselves to cementing our foundations in both of these in order to consolidate our futures. Signing off I’d like to impart some of my millennial wisdom with you, if not for your benefit than rather as a reminder to myself…
Have faith in you and in your work. Don’t ever underestimate the attributes that you have to offer. Maximise your transferable skills and garner new ones through listening and engaging with content and people who do sometimes know better than you. Shrugging off this entitled reputation we seem to have acquired, I think millennials are marching to the fore of this industry and I for one am ecstatic to be a part of it!
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As our council members plot and plan for the year ahead... we thought we'd share some personal updates with you and what we have planned for the year ahead.
Have you set goals for 2018?
UPDATE from Anne:
The first meeting in my calendar in January concerned our sustainability strategy and planning; talk about putting new year’s resolutions in action straight away! Within the association, particularly focused on our annual conference – we have several goals for the year, sustainability being one of those I especially look forward to learning about and working on the coming year. I am curious to see how we can go beyond the obvious wins and put more long term goals in our plans.
On a personal level, I want to continue developing my knowledge and skills regarding the association side of things – beyond the event on its own but really being able to place it in the context of a member-led organisation. Being able to partake in the ASAE Next Gen Summit end of 2017 was a great kick-off for this goal.
The longer I think about what 2018 might be able to offer – and what I would like to get out of it – the more comes to mind. So I would say, bring it on 2018 – we are ready for you!
UPDATE from Grainne:
2017 is going to be a hard year to beat. Last year when I sat down and wrote what I hoped to achieve in 2017, no way did I think I would be where I am now – in my ideal job, living with my ideal man – cliché I know, but its true – 2017 was brilliant!
So here I am again, thinking about what I want to achieve this year and how I want to grow both personally and professionally. This year, I want to invest more time in learning about revenue management, forecasting, budgeting – all those things that people normally hate about sales…. The numbers! I love numbers, always have and although I love my job currently, I want to branch more into the strategic sale side of things! Fortunately I have a fantastic manager who is delighted to help me learn more – I finished a brief short course in Revenue Management in college last year, so I really want to build on this and see how I can implement an overall revenue management strategic plan!
Time management is something that I say every year I am going to work on, so yet again, it is on my list! I’m actually attending course on project management and prospecting next week, so hopefully that will point me in the right direction… again!
In relation to Meetings+Millennials, I want to put more time aside to concentrate on making great connections, gathering some great content and blogs from other millennials in our industry and building our profile! while we have had a fantastic 1st year, it can be hard to find the time and patience to invest in something like this, especially when work and life takes over! So hopefully 2018 will be the year!
When it comes to the personal side of my life, 2018 is already looking like it might top 2017! So bring it on!
UPDATE from Aoife:
2018 is going to be BIG and I am ready for it. I am feeling very privileged to be working on a new & exciting project with SoolNua as we lead the new SITE Marketing team into 2018. I will be undertaking the role of Director of Digital & Social Media Marketing - I am really looking forward to working more in the "I" in our MICE world - Incentives!
SoolNua recently moved office to Terenure, which is closer to home for me. I am going to try use the car less this year and walk the 25minute commute to our new working-home. I am lucky enough to have colleagues that don't mind dogs... so Nova gets to come to work with me too.
I work in all things social and digital after studying Advertising & Marketing in college, I am going to further my knowledge base in the coming year and I have enrolled in a professional diploma - back to the books!
I'd like to develop the networking opportunities within Meetings+Millennials and draw us all closer as a community to share knowledge and ideas.
I am in my 5th year in the same company and every year my role has evolved and our client base changes. I am always happy and excited to be doing the work I am doing and coming up to the office door every day... so here's to 2018 bringing more happiness!
What your goals, thoughts and reflections on the year ahead? Tweet us @MICEmillennials
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Many of us are familiar with ICCA as an industry organisation and with the events, they organise. Last month they hosted their 56th annual congress with a record attendance of almost 1300 participants. Several council members were able to attend – and we were curious to see how many YPs get the chance to do so, in what ways they are present at the event, and what their experience is like. On top of YP attendants and speakers, this year ICCA tried something new to attract and showcase young potential within our sector, which we were very happy to see!
‘The future belongs to us’ was a competition with a jury of YP-peers, allowing young professionals to envision a congress session that they think is worth attending, that is well set-up and treats a relevant topic. Thanks to the 6 brave souls who took charge of the young professionals’ meeting industry future by jumping on stage at the ICCA congress, by showcasing their potential and their vision for next congresses!
Meetings+Millennials spoke to several young colleagues who attended the congress, including colleagues who participated in the ICCA contest. We asked them about their experience, their views on how they can project their voice in the industry – and their ideas about the future. Happy reading!
M+M: What motivated you to participate in the ICCA contest?
Sezen Elagoz, Business Development Executive, Kenes Group:
Like many Millennials, I am competitive by creation. I am a firm believer of continuously developing and even reinventing myself and enjoy the process. Challenges like this competition are great tools to achieve this goal.
Karin Hagemann, Head of Convention Bureau, Montreux-Vevey Tourisme:
I started looking into it as different industry friends encouraged me to. I believe that we learn and grow most when leaving our comfort zone, similar to what Sezen expresses, so I thought it would be a great opportunity for me.
Amalie Andersen, Senior Project Manager – Events, Wonderful Copenhagen:
Agreed! I also aimed to challenge myself and meet likeminded YP’s.
M+M: The pattern of ‘challenging yourself’ as well as connecting with others seems to come to the forefront with 3 of our colleagues who participated in the contest. Do you recognise this as a participant of the congress as well as the session?
Vikas Tembhare, Meeting Media Group (Headquarters Magazine):
For me industry events are the platform to listen, share & learn. I try to meet all kind of professionals (all ages). However, meeting and spending time with young professionals does have an added advantage. We connect very fast, we share more and do not hesitate to open mind and thoughts; we ‘Learn together and grow together’. The ICCA competition was a good try to facilitate opportunities for young professionals.
M+M: What has been the response to your participation in the contest? Did you get any fun, crazy, bad, good, feedback? (or a job offer?;)
Sezen: I received many congratulations from people I know and people I don’t know. Even though I did not win I did develop myself on the way- which was my aim.
Karin: I was very surprised from the responses I got actually! I knew some familiar faces were in the room who would give me feedback but I was surprised by how many amazing remarks I received from people I did not know!
Amalie: I also received very positive responses from both known and unknown peers. Furthermore, we received a master class in public speaking from David Becket as well as a 15 min alone session with him to improve our pitch. Public speaking is not everyone’s favourite game, but nonetheless if you want a voice then you have got to ace that game. So that was a great prize in itself!
Karin: I agree! It was a fabulous opportunity to get a personal coaching session with David.
M+M: Great to hear that the contest was set up in a way that everybody would ‘win’ from competing! We think this is key to making these kind of opportunities work – well done to the ICCA team! On that note, do you guys feel that there are sufficient ways for young professionals to engage/be visible/share in our industry?
Karin: There are different organisations that organise programs for YPs, such as 20 in their Twenties by PCMA or the Forum of Young Professional by ICCA. So I definitely recommend all the YPs to apply to those events as they are great platforms to meet new industry colleagues and grow your network. But you should also connect with more experienced industry friends as you can learn a lot from them.
Amalie: I am not so sure that we should aim things to be particularly around Millennials only. However, I think congresses and conferences should acknowledge that this generation is here and things should be designed for both Millennials and the other generations.
Vikas: I see there are many ways to engage as a YP. Also group activities and sessions give chance to share your experience and know about other experience from different geography.
Sezen: There are some meetings/forums, however I feel participation in most industry events for the Millennials is not that easy as it is difficult to show ROI and the lack of content aimed at Millennials. Education doesn’t have to be different for different generations, good professional practice stays same across ages. Yet some focus on networking events and more opportunities like the competition we have participated in could help create a platform for us to gather around.
Side note from the M+M team; For those of us that are in the association sector, ASAE also hosts an amazing yearly event for young professionals (not fully event specific); ASAE NextGen Association Summit.
M+M: we are happy to hear such a cross-generational approach with many of you, as this is what we stand for also! However, lastly – just to get our point across – why do you think its important you and the rest of our ‘generation’ in the industry are heard and seen?
Karin: YPs often bring new ideas or point of views, so that is the reason why I believe it is important everyone should be put in the same rooms, as all generations have something else to offer and by working all together we will be more efficient and find new solutions.
Sezen: Most Millennials have come to professional maturity, in terms of age. We are in a period in our lives where we have experience, knowledge and energy and drive which hopefully leads to actions and result. I feel this is why our generation is being put under the magnifying glass: We are keen, motivated, want to make a difference, have a purpose, share etc. Just look how the world’s consumption habits have changed; we are not interested in ownership anymore. If we want to listen to a song, we subscribe to an app, we don’t buy albums. The millennial age is already here, it is just natural that millennial ideas are heard too.
M+M – that sounds like a beautiful statement to close this conversation: The millennial age is already here, its just natural that our voice gets heard! Thanks to Karin, Vikas, Sezen and Amalie for their willingness to share with us.
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Meetings Millennials by Gráinne Ní Ghiollagain - 6M ago
One of our sponsors, SoolNua, write a monthly musings Newsletter where they share advice and suggestions to enliven your weeks ahead. I was delighted to contribute some practical business advice new ways of looking at and understanding workplace culture. Here is my contribution below:
In 2012, after 5 long years of studying pharmacy to a master’s level, I finally graduated and started my career as a community pharmacist. Fast forward 5 years, and here I am working as the Business Development Manager in one of Dublin’s most unique venues. A very obvious transition… right?
Some people called me mad, crazy or stupid for turning my back on a career that I spent 5 years studying for – a career that was stable, consistent and well paid. However, I call myself fortunate. I was brave enough to throw myself into something entirely new, something that stimulated and motivated me in a very different way.
Yes, I took a pay cut at the beginning. But at the end of the day, happiness and ensuring I was learning and meeting new people every day was worth more to me than a few extra euros in my pocket. Now I am the Business Development Manager at Croke Park and my career is evolving. The people, pace and the passion of this industry are what motivates me and I am lucky that my ‘mad idea’ paid off.
So what’s my advice? Don’t be shoehorned into a specific job because you ‘studied the course in college’ or because you have experience in it – if something interests you, explore it and find a way to incorporate it into your life somehow. The same goes for managers looking to hire new employees, look beyond the applicant's experience and qualifications – see the potential and the passion they have, and use it.
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