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This week on the “Marketing Today,” podcast, Alan talks with Tim Matthews, CMO of security software company, Exabeam, and author of “The Professional Marketer”, a handbook that can teach marketers the critical skills they need to get the job done. Exabeam uses machine learning and analytics to track the complete timeline of a cyber-crime so that security teams catch criminals in the midst of their attack.

In this episode, Matthews, discusses his own journey to the marketing industry which started first in computer science and then sales. His ability to break down technical issues and simplify them was good for sales, so he scaled this skill into a successful marketing career.

Matthews believes that “you can build a good marketer” when he talks about the fundamental skills, such as curiosity and commitment, that he looks for in people as he grows his marketing team.

Highlights from this Marketing Today conversation include:
  • Matthews says his technical background has helped him in marketing: “Good marketers really understand their products and their buyers.” [2:46]
  • Matthews encourages marketers to figure out a way to get into the field to understand what makes buyers tick: “You really don’t understand your business until you witness a sale” [3:17]
  • Matthews on what drove him to write The Professional Marketer: “I was looking for a handbook that could teach marketers the critical skills they needed to do the job.” [5:10]
  • Matthews’ handbook was inspired by a handbook given to professional chefs at the Culinary Institute of America: “They don’t teach you recipes…it teaches you fundamental skills and you put these building blocks together.” [7:10]
  • Matthews: “I would encourage anyone who is thinking of writing a book to write a book!” [7:55]
  • Matthews says it took 5 drafts to get to a finished result he was happy with: “The first draft wasn’t great.” [9:22]
  • Matthews shares his thoughts on hiring people remotely and in different regions to compete with Silicon Valley behemoths: “I’ve become more open-minded” [11:02]
  • Matthews provides a recent case study to illustrate the power of curiosity in buyer persona research [13:30]
  • Matthews provides a recent case study to illustrate the power of curiosity in Conversion Rate Optimization (CRO) [15:15]
  • Matthews sets a realistic cadence for his team by breaking the annual marketing plan up into 12 monthly plans: “The team likes to be able to cross stuff of their list” [18:20]
  • Matthews says his summer jobs developed humility in him and hardened him to better withstand the bad days: “I can still feel the heat” [25:06]
  • Matthews on lessons learned early in his career: “I probably could’ve failed faster” [28:10]
  • Matthews on how his competitive drive fuels him: “I want as big a piece of that (TAM) as possible” [29:20]
  • Matthews shares his respect for the branding and marketing tactics of brands like Tesla, Chipotle & The Ocean Cleanup [30:50]
  • Matthews shares his thoughts on the future of marketing [34:05]

Other Resources:

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This week on Marketing Today, Alan speaks with Bill Macaitis, a man that needs no introduction. He has been involved in 5 highly successful tech industry exists with companies such as IGN, Salesforce.com, Zendesk, and Slack. He now enjoys teaching tech founders how to grow and scale their business via sophisticated MarTech stacks and a customer-centric approach to marketing. Macaitis’ mindset is that B2B marketers should be innovating the go-to-market strategy on the marketing side as much as they do on the product side.

Macaitis recognizes that many B2B companies feel the need to play it safe and take a very bland approach to branding, and this a great opportunity for those willing to take risks to stand out. He tells stories of how his teams at Zendesk and Slack disrupted conventional customer branding opportunities by making simple things such as logos, loading messages and release notes fun and whimsical.

According to Macaitis, “Your brand is the sum of all the little experiences that someone has with your company. Optimizing around each of these experiences, coming up with the right metric, and pivoting” are what leads to a successful recommendation of your product/service.

Highlights from this Marketing Today conversation include:
  • Macaitis’ first startup experience in the B2C space was a great lesson in bootstrapping ([1:40])
  • Macaitis brought a Consumer DNA to Salesforce.com ([3:20])
  • Macaitis’ team disrupted the basic pricing and packaging model at Slack ([5:40])
  • Macaitis encourages B2B companies to take risks to develop an emotional connection with their users ([9:30])
  • “Everyone does the basics…I like going a few steps further:” Macaitis on using more sophisticated marketing tech stacks (predictive lead scoring, multi-touch attribution, multivariate testing, net promoter score (NPS), etc.) ([11:56])
  • Macaitis discusses tips for improving multi-touch attribution models ([15:15])
  • It’s a really fun debate: Macatais on brand marketing vs performance marketing ([17:42])
  • Macaitis on how the B2B space needs more Customer Centricity ([22:34])
  • Macatis tells us what he loves about helping companies grow ([25:15])
  • Macaitis discusses qualities he looks for in a Founder ([26:35])
  • “Be opportunistic:” Macaitis gives sound advice from his career ([29:39])
  • Macaitis says the focus should be on lifetime revenue and customer centricity ([34:30]) 
Other Resources:
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This week on “Marketing Today,” Alan talks with Amy Fuller, chief marketing and communications officer for Accenture. Fuller has built a career working on world-class brands like Kraft, IBM, Kimberly-Clark, Verizon, and Deloitte while working on both the agency and the client side. Before joining Accenture in 2017, she spent time in various leadership roles at Deloitte, MasterCard, Y&R, and Ogilvy & Mather, among others.

During the course of their discussion, Fuller breaks down the complexity and challenging scope of serving as the chief marketer for a company the size of Accenture while offering observations and thinking that can be applied to an organization of any size. And she discusses formative experiences — from spending time throughout her childhood on an off-the-grid river island between the U.S. and Canada and earning a liberal arts education at Bryn Mawr College to learning how to “thrive with scarcity” while working on the agency side and her experience with the Posse Foundation, which helps diverse groups of college students find academic success — that have influenced her thinking and career.

And Fuller offered her take on the future of marketing: “How you reach people, how you measure your efficacy in doing so, are technical,” says Fuller. “And they’re very real and very important. But the human part is not going away. And, if anything, it is getting more important.” Fuller goes on to add, “The more technical we become, the more important the human element becomes. And I think that is the future of marketing — it is the marriage of both.”

Highlights from this week’s “Marketing Today” podcast include: 
  • “Lots of responsibility and no resources, which is the definition of how you learn.” How Fuller’s first job helped prepare her for a career in marketing. ([1:33])
  • Working with world-class brands is the thread woven through Fuller’s career. ([2:50])
  • Fuller: “Understanding what you’re really trying to solve — not what you’re being told to solve, necessarily, but boring into the true business problem — is the only way you can succeed in marketing. ([4:45])
  • Fuller discusses the complexity and massive scope of her responsibilities at Accenture. ([6:39])
  • Fuller: “What Accenture is extremely good at is doing the kind of analysis that builds business cases.” ([13:52])
  • The why and how of taking a stand on causes in this polarizing time. ([17:35])
  • Fuller on the articulation of the talent brand at Accenture. ([20:17])
  • Simple advice for any new CMO: Ask questions and listen to the answers. ([24:40])
  • Growing up, Fuller learned resiliency and innovation during summers spent on an off-the-grid island on the St. Lawrence River. ([26:50])
  • What Fuller wishes she’d discovered earlier in her career: Asking for advice and coaching is a sign of strength — and a lot less stressful. ([29:19])
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This week on the “Marketing Today,” podcast, Alan talks with Ty Shay, global chief marketing officer for Norton LifeLock, which was acquired by Symantec two years ago for $2.3 billion. Shay’s career as a marketer began somewhat unconventionally. After earning a degree in accounting and serving a brief stint in investment banking, Shay returned to the classroom for a Stanford MBA. After cutting his marketing teeth at P&G, Shay subsequently served in chief marketing roles with SquareTrade and Hotwire before joining LifeLock. He also currently serves on the board of directors for the Ad Council.

During the course of their discussion, Shay explains his concept of marketing jiujitsu and why, sometimes, it’s a good idea to “turn off” your marketing efforts. He also talks at length about performance storytelling — its key elements and how it can be successfully implemented — and the impact of losing his father at an early age.

Shay also offered his perspective on the future of marketing: “I think it’s going to continue to be about accountability,” said Shay. “I think it’s going to continue to be where if you don’t really have first-party data and can’t really own your data and your customers, I think you’re going to be in trouble. So I think you’ll continue to see that evolution of marketers.  Really, I think, the successful marketers will have to be able to not choose between being a brand marketer or a performance marketer. I think you’ll have to be a performance storyteller going forward.”

Highlights from this week’s “Marketing Today” podcast include:
  • Ty Shay’s unconventional path to a career in marketing. ([1:23])
  • “Let’s just turn the marketing off and see what happens.” — Shay explains the secrets of marketing jiujitsu. ([5:21])
  • Is Ty Shay a marketing Jedi? ([12:57])
  • “I thought the story they were telling was overly complex.” — Shay on how he utilized performance storytelling when he joined LifeLock. ([18:17])
  • The three-step framework of performance storytelling. ([22:20])
  • The two core competencies necessary for successful performance storytelling. ([25:47])
  • Shay embraces a growth mindset. ([37:44])
  • Just Do It: Shay admires Nike’s work featuring Colin Kaepernick. And he thinks Southwest Airlines and Geico are two brands that “really know who they are.” ([42:45])
Links to other resources mentioned:

Mindset: The New Psychology of Success (Book Mentioned)

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This week on the “Marketing Today,” podcast, Alan talks with Minter Dial, author of “Heartificial Empathy: Putting Heart into Business and Artificial Intelligence,” which is his third book. Previously, he co-authored “Futureproof: How To Get Your Business Ready for the Next Disruption,” and he is the author and filmmaker of “The Last Ring Home,” the story of the grandfather he never knew, who died as a POW during World War II.

Prior to his career as a speaker, consultant, filmmaker, and author, Dial spent 15 years with L’Oreal, where he ran the Redken business in addition to serving in other marketing roles there. During the podcast, Dial talks about his latest book, which he says he didn’t really intend to write, and he shares his perspective on what exactly empathy is, how it can benefit businesses, and the implications for its use in artificial intelligence.

And he had this to say about the future of marketing. “With all the opportunities and tools that are out there, making your brand come alive is going to happen through people,” says Dial. “And so there’s probably a whole lot more work that needs to happen on the attitudes of the people you recruit, as an entirety in the company, and figuring out ways to make your brand more congruent, to have this greater empathy idea and integrity. And this is going to change the way we do marketing because you can’t just focus on ROIs and click-throughs.”

Highlights from this week’s “Marketing Today” podcast include:
  • “I want to tell stories, connect the dots, and elevate the debate.” –Minter Dial ([1:25])
  • Dial is inspired to make business more empathic to benefit people. ([3:15])
  • How Dial thinks about empathy in all its different forms. ([4:53])
  • For businesses, the benefits of empathy start from within. ([10:08])
  • “I’m going to miss you, JJ.” — The empathic bot experiment. ([18:53])
  • “First of all, artificial empathy does not exist — today.” –Minter Dial ([25:03])
  • Dial’s “journey of identity” to learn more about the grandfather he never knew led to a book and a documentary, both called “The Last Ring Home.” ([28:55])
  • Advice Dial would give his younger self: “Always be open to the experience; never say no.” ([34:18])
  • “There’s never been a more exciting time to be in marketing.” –Minter Dial ([44:18])
Links to other resources mentioned:
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This week on “Marketing Today,” Alan talks with Nick Cromydas, founder and CEO of Hunt Club, a new type of talent company. Cromydas and his company have built and utilize a network of influencers and, through proprietary technology, they refer people from that network to fill positions at high-growth companies, as well as at larger enterprises.

During the course of their conversation, Cromydas, an investor and entrepreneur, talks about the driving force behind Hunt Club, how his life in tennis has been a key influence in his career, and the kind of talent companies must have to thrive.

Conversely, Cromydas also points out how talent looking to join fast-growth companies can jump off the page. “If you’re looking to join a fast-growth entrepreneurial environment,” says Cromydas, “and you have relationships you can leverage and can actually introduce those to the company, or help them and consult for free in certain areas that they need some help with that they don’t have the dollars to pay you right now — really thinking about a give-first mentality — the more I think you’ll find the world will be opening up from an opportunity perspective.”

Highlights from this week’s “Marketing Today” podcast include:
  • First rule of Hunt Club: It’s OK to talk about Hunt Club. Cromydas relates the idea behind Hunt Club and how his life in competitive tennis helped him discover recruiting is imprinted in his DNA. ([1:28])
  • What Cromydas learned from losing at tennis. ([4:26])
  • Cromydas explains the core premise behind Hunt Club: “The best talent lives in our network, and our job is to use technology to power that.” ([6:43])
  • Adaptability and the ability to learn: Cromydas on the type of people high-growth companies seek. ([11:02])
  • Cromydas: “Companies and large organizations really need to rethink what types of things they’re offering talent in the digital community.” ([14:59])
  • The cultural shift necessary in bringing the spirit of entrepreneurship to big companies. ([19:34])
  • Cromydas: “I love the idea of a give-first mentality.” ([22:55])
  • Do you hear that? Cromydas on the power of the customer’s voice. ([34:01])
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During the Adobe Summit, Alan had the opportunity to sit down with Donna Tuths, global head at Cognizant Interactive. Equal parts disruptor, pioneer and, innovator, Tuths also spent time at Accenture, Ogilvy & Mather, Organic, and Y&R Wunderman prior to her arrival at Cognizant.

During her conversation with Alan, Tuths talks about her focus on helping clients make the shift from marketing to experience as part of her role in driving solutions at Cognizant Interactive. They also discuss the changing face of creativity, her company’s focus on strategy and design, and why Cognizant Interactive found itself making movies on location at the Summit along with their content experts, Mustache.

Highlights from this Marketing Today conversation include:
  • Cognizant Interactive believes you need humans to understand humans. (:29)
  • Tuths explains the Cognizant operating model. ([2:26])
  • Lights! Camera! Action! Cognizant Interactive’s Hollywood treatment at Adobe Summit provides a deeper understanding of their capabilities. ([3:56])
  • An eye on the future: Tuths talks about delivering on “living” experiences. ([9:17])
  • Tuths on what creativity looks like today. ([13:41])
  • Tuths discusses motherhood and her career. ([16:32])
  • A bit of both: Tuths finds peace in the design of her home — and a little frustration, too. ([19:52])
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As chief product officer at Dun and Bradstreet, Anudit Vikram oversees the company’s audience solutions business that utilizes the more than 300 million offline business records in its database for digital marketing and online advertising use cases. As part of building this product for Dun and Bradstreet, he is responsible for overseeing the company’s data-driven audience targeting, deterministic data, and verification of audiences in programmatic advertising. Prior to joining Dun and Bradstreet, Vikram spent time at Merkle, nPario, Yahoo and Microsoft, among others. 

During this episode of Marketing Today, Vikram talks about the nuance behind the numbers in the offerings of Dun and Bradstreet, the issues of privacy and data protection, as well as how, on a personal level, he tries to never get too high or too low in keeping up with the pace of change.

Highlights from this Marketing Today conversation include:
  • Vikram talks about his role at Dun and Bradstreet and provides detail about the audience solutions business. (:29)
  • Vikram discusses the simplest way of getting to intent and what sometimes gets missed in the process. ([4:46])
  • The implications of privacy and data protection for Dun and Bradstreet. ([6:53])
  • “It depends.” — Vikram’s take on the not-so-simple task of bringing marketing and media functions in-house. ([8:59])
  • Vikram provides perspective on B2B marketers and the data economy. ([13:03])
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At the Adobe Summit, Alan sat down with Alan Schulman, managing director and chief creative officer at Deloitte Digital US. Schulman discusses Deloitte Digital’s scope of capabilities and offerings: everything from a customer strategy and applied design capability to help clients imagine products and services they don’t have but might need to designing and prototype building to its advertising and e-commerce offerings.

In the course of their conversation, Schulman talked about the modern relationship between CMOs and CIOs (“The way you run marketing versus the way you engage the customer is really a team sport.”); the dawning of the age of AI; how being a jazz musician has informed his career as a creative leader; and the velocity of technological change and its impact on culture, content, and creativity. 

Highlights from this Marketing Today conversation include:
  • Schulman details Deloitte Digital’s considerable breadth of offerings. (:48)
  • In tandem: How CMOs and CIOs now have to work together. ([5:24])
  • Siren song: the seduction period of AI and where creative fits in its world. ([9:16])
  • Ready for your solo? Schulman’s jazz background informs how he builds creative teams. ([13:17])
  • Schulman talks about “content at the speed of culture.” ([17:46])
  • Schulman: “People say content is king. I say, context is king.” ([21:14])
  • Three key things for Schulman: purpose, point of view, and personality. ([24:11])
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At the Adobe Summit, Alan had the opportunity to talk with Kelly O’Neill and Bill Connolly of Monotype, a foundry that is home to some of the most-recognized fonts in the world, among them are Arial, Gill Sans, and New Times Roman. At Monotype, O’Neill is senior director of product management and Connolly is director of content.

During this conversation, O’Neill and Connolly discuss Monotype’s heritage, its evolution into a brand company, and the challenges and opportunities emerging technologies, VR and AR in particular, have provided. They also discuss their companies acquisition of Olapic and how that company aligns with them strategically.

Highlights from this Marketing Today conversation include:
  • The Monotype story: its history, its evolution into a brand company, and the challenges it faces in new environments. (:51)
  • Monotype’s strategic alignment with Olapic. ([3:16])
  • Monotype has its eye on AR and VR. ([8:01])
  • Connolly and O’Neill discuss advice they’ve received, their reliance on LinkedIn for information, and their love for the creative process and contagious passion. ([12:24])
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