Loading...

Follow Leapfrog 3D Printers on Feedspot

Continue with Google
Continue with Facebook
or

Valid

Fujitsu Spain produces a range of different products that are designed for the automotive market. This includes electronics for vehicles, from display setups to the airbag system in vehicles. Being in the automotive industry means they are faced with a varied selection of competitors and the demands to remain at the top of the market are increasing.

These changes include the  need to be faster from design to production, especially with the nature of the global economy where competition comes from multiple geographic locations.

Being in such a challenging industry, Fujitsu needed to adapt and change the way they designed and manufactured their products. They needed to streamline production and improve their processes to both keep costs down, but to also be faster and agile.  They choose to dive into the additive manufacturing process with the Bolt Pro 3D printer.

Fujitsu faced the challenges both in their internal processes but also the cost of their previous rapid prototyping processes. We sat down with Luis de La Jara about their experiences and the reason that they acquired the BOLT PRO to gauge their experiences with the printing process.

Why the Bolt Pro?

Luis de La Jara is the coordinator in the engineering department at Fujitsu Ten and he stated the following reasons that the Bolt Pro was chosen. Firstly, most of the designs that are required can easily be 3D printed and the Bolt Pro offered the option of up to 16 different materials. Furthermore, the Bolt Pro is an open system that gave Fujitsu the versatility to print with materials from all vendors, which allowed them to get from design to prototype faster.

Fujitsu ergonomic 3D printed tool

Secondly, they purchased the Bolt Pro for tooling purposes. Previously , in order to get tooling , it was costly and time consuming. The products were heavy to use over hours of operation and weren't ergonomically well designed for their specific needs. If a problem was discovered with the tool then a redesign would have taken months to implement. With the Bolt Pro , they can easily change designs on request and test it within hours. Further still, by bringing all the production possibilities internally, they have made savings which were recuperated within 6 months.

3D printing is a technology that used correctly can achieve highly valued returns for organisations and the Bolt Pro was designed to be such a machine. With independent dual extruders, a wide selection of materials and reliability means it is the optimum tool to improve product design and tooling.

Is your organisation considering 3D printing? Download our free whitepaper on 3D Printing and Rapid Prototyping

Are you curious about the durability of 3D prints? CONTACT US and request a FREE, PERSONALIZED sample.

  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 
3D Printer Parts
  1. 3D Printer Extruders

3D printer extruders are a crucial component that makes up a 3D printer. In simple terms, the extruder is the tool that holds the filament in place and controls the amount that is feed into a Hot-end.  One key point is to highlight that Hot ends are not the same as an extruder, but rather they are attached to extruders.

Extruders come with a stepper motor that allows for the filament to be feed through, they also include a fan in some cases, a heat sink for better temperature regulation and the hot end.

3D printers extruders can come as a dual setup or as a single extruder. Dual extruders give the option of printing with a support material which is used to hold up certain designs that need support, such as bridges to stop the unsupported parts from deforming due to heat. Additionally, a dual extruder system can be independent or dependent. This means that with an independent system, you have the additional option of being able to print with multiple materials within a single object.

There are two types of extruders that are used in the 3D printing industry. These are Direct Extruders and Bowden. The main difference between the two is that in Direct Extruder systems, the motor that drives the filament and the hot end is directly attached to the extruder body. Bowden, on the other hand, includes a separation tube between the extruder and hot end, where the extruder, including the motor and other components, can be attached to the printer chassis.

Each type has its own drawbacks and benefits.

Direct

Advantage: Can print with a wider variety of materials because the hot end and extruder are close, this gives better control with the extrusion process.

Disadvantage: Because both parts are attached, this leads to issues when printing at high speeds since the overall mass is higher.

Bowden

Advantage: Lower issues due to less mass needing to be moved.

Disadvantage: Problems with printing with certain filaments like flexible materials.

  1. 3D Printer Print bed

A 3D printer print bed is the part that the 3D printed object rests on during the printing process.  As each layer is extruded, the print bed moves down to allow for the next layering step. Although being simple, a print bed is an important part of a 3D printer. Although a relatively easy process, 3D printing does require some careful calibration to ensure that you get a perfect print without deformities. Therefore, the most important step is to ensure that you print the first layer accurately.

The first layer is important because any mistakes in this layer will be magnified to the overall structure of the intended part. The first layer indicates if the print bed is levelled correctly, it indicates that you have the correct extrusion settings such as amount, temperature and more.

A print bed should provide sufficient adhesion to the molten material, ensuring the object adheres to the bed. This is key because the extruders are moving components and if the plastic doesn’t properly attach to the bed, the movement will create many issues to your first layer as it cools. Additionally, due to cooling, the plastic can deform which is known as warping, by peeling away from the bed floor.

Which type of print Bed?

Print beds can come in a number of materials but the two most common are aluminium and glass. These both offer a smooth surface for the object to rest on, however, because of the surface, this can cause adhesion issues. To combat this, 3d printer print beds can come heated or a user can apply a glueing agent to help with bed adhesion which is strong enough to hold the object but also allow for easier removal once printed.

Glueing agents come in various forms, from a standard glue stick, hairspray and special sheets you attach on to the print bed. These options are all relatively cheap and it is recommended to always use some form of an agent to reduce issues that can occur.

Heated print beds reduce the chance of the object warping since they provide heat to the first layer, ensuring no random pockets cool faster than others. Aluminium beds offer the most uniform heat distribution, but aluminium itself expands significantly as its temperature increases which can cause problems. Glass, on the other hand, doesn’t expand easily but it doesn’t offer the same temperature distribution meaning some areas are cooler than others. One way to circumvent these potential issues is to use a print bed with both materials, where the aluminium rests below the glass, providing uniform heat throughout the glass plate, which doesn’t expand as much as the aluminium.

  1. Hot Ends

A hot end is where the filament is melted then extruded through a nozzle. Hot ends come in many forms but the standard ones consist of a feed tube, a heatsink, thermal barrier tube with a heat-break, heat-block and the nozzle in that order.

The feed tube guides the filament from the extruder, down through the heatsink and thermal barrier tube. The purpose of the heat sink and thermal barrier tube is twofold. The topmost part of the thermal barrier tube is located within the heatsink and feeds the filament through. The bottom section of the thermal barrier tube is connected to the heat block where the filament is melted. Just before it, however, the thermal tube is thinner and this area is called the heat-break. This is all done to ensure that before the filament reaches the heat block, that the temperature is lower, to prevent melting of the filament before it reaches the heat block by a process called heat creep. The heat-break creates a sudden change in temperature so as to better have control of the melting process.

  1. Enclosure

An enclosure is having a sealed printing environment for the 3D printing process. The reasoning for this is for safety but also to create better temperature management to ensure better printing results. Due to the nature of utilising high-temperature processes, issues with overheating plastics can create fumes on select printing materials, such as ABS. An enclosure ensures you have fewer particles in the air, but additionally, a printer can include a HEPA filter that can reduce these dangerous particles and allow the printer to be used safely in for example an office environment.

Further, still, an enclosure ensures that the internal ambient temperature of the printer is stable which plays a major roll in reducing printing issues such as warping and cracking.

  1. Filament

The filament in the context of Filament Fused Fabrication (Fused Deposition Modelling) is a coil of thermoplastic or a composite that comes in various diameters. The filament is fed through the printer and then into the extruders where it becomes melted then extruded. Unlike other 3D printing techniques, the filament is solid and the cheapest, safest and the reasoning why FFF is the most popular 3D printing method.

Materials that are available are various plastics, like PLA, PETG and composites where plastic is mixed in with other materials like wood to allow for a variety of possible 3D printing parts. FFF has the largest selection of materials and each year, more materials are added to the roster. This gives FDM a greater edge than other 3D printing techniques in terms of versatility. However large the selection of materials, currently there isn’t a major easily metal filament available and the ones that require extra steps like sintering to finish a metal 3d printed part. Additionally, these “metallic’’ filaments are a composite of other materials.

3D Printing Process Terms
  1. Layer height in

Layer height is the thickness of each 3D printed layer of an object. This can also be called the Z Resolution which is referring to the process of creating each layer as the print bed moves down to allows for another layer.

A smaller layer height yields better quality objects with stronger strength properties. This is due to better interlayer adhesion, reducing gaps and creating a smoother overall finish for the object. This is most apparent when printing curves, where you can see the stepping of the edges.

Smaller layer heights, however, require more printing time, therefore the selection showed have careful thought before the printing process begins.

  1. Print Speed

Print speed refers to the travelling speed of the extruders as they travel during the printing process. It is express in mm/s and also determines the print quality of an object. A balance must be met in terms of print speed when making the adjustment before the printing process because it does affect other settings. For example, faster speed will require more temperature awareness since increasing the speed will usually reduce the quality of the print. As a side note, we must not confuse print speed with travel speed, which is the speed at which the extruders when not directing printing.

Software Terms
  1. Slicer

Slicing software is a category of 3D printing software that is used to convert a basic 3D computer object into something that the printer can understand and print accurately. There are various options of slicing software but they all work with the same output. They can take a 3D object, convert the surface into miniature triangles, that come together to make the object. The amount of these triangles also determines the accuracy and detail in the 3D object that can be printed.  Within the application, you can get detail controls about the printer, how to print the object, orientation, material settings and all settings possible for the 3D printer.

After setting the desired parameters, the slicer software can then slice the 3D object into the desired layer height and visualized the printing process. When this is completed, the object file is then converted into G-code, which a data type used in many manufacturing processes that stores information about how to print or in the case of CNC machine, how to mill an object. This G-code is what drives the extruders in the 3D printer to accurately create the object.

  1. Infill

Slicing software gives you the option to print a fully solid object, or a hollow one and everything in-between. This is accomplished by setting the infill amount. This is usually how the internal structure of an object is to be printed and the settings range from 5% infill to 100%. Furthermore, you get four main infill pattern types which are honeycomb, wiggle, rectangle and triangular.

Honeycomb offers the greatest strength with minimum material, triangle offers better lateral load strength, which gives the outer shell of the object better strength to handle horizontal forces applied to the object. Wiggle is mainly used for flexible materials and rectangular doesn’t have any specific advantages.

  1. Skirts and Brims

Brims, skirts and rafts are parts that at are used to create better bed adhesion for the 3D printed object before the printing process and to check that everything is set up correctly.

A skirt is an outline of the print area of the object but doesn’t directly touch the object. It is used as a primer, to check whether there is excess material in the nozzles, that they are calibrated correctly and to ensure consistent material flow.

A brim is directly attached to the object, but goes a little further out and involves more outlines than the skirt. Its main purpose is to hold the object and to ensure the first layer is printed correctly.

Common Troubleshooting Terms

  1. Warping

Warping can be described as the shrinkage of a 3D printed object at the corners of the base, mainly attributed to temperature changes. Warping is due to the process of non-uniform cooling where certain printing layers cool faster than the heated parts. When this occurs, the cooler layers end up distorting the geometry of the object since cooling causes shrinkage and this action affects the immediate molten layers. As the areas cool and harden, they pull on other layers as cooling increases. The main reason for warping is heated thermoplastics need uniformed cooling after being extruded to allow an object to accurately settle while maintaining the desired geometry. If the printing bed is not heated or the ambient temperature of the print chamber is not modulated then this leads to different cooling rates.
To prevent warping issues, ensure that the FFF 3d printer has a heated bed with a metal plate. This distributes the heat throughout the bed and means a more uniformed temperature distribution. This will minimize the effects of warping in the first layers of the object. 

  1. Cracking

Cracking is caused by the same issue as warping, being the non-uniform cooling of a printed object. The difference of cracking from warping is cracking occurs at different locations in the printed object. This is a possibility in the printing of the Catalina wing, where cracking can occur in the extremities of the object. To offset the possibility of cracking, a printer with an enclosure allows eliminating the ambient temperature fluctuations that may occur that could lead to cracking of a 3D printed object.

Is your organisation considering 3D printing? Download our free whitepaper on 3D Printing and Rapid Prototyping

Are you curious about the durability of 3D prints? CONTACT US and request a FREE, PERSONALIZED sample.

  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 
Background

Sander Mutsaers, general manager at Roxal Nederland BV has only a few requirements when he is about to make a purchase of a tool for his industrial metal fabrication design firm. These requirements are quality, ease of use and finally great after purchase support. Roxal Nederland B.V. produces an array of different products, from digital information terminals for Utrecht University to high-quality instalments for the Rijksmuseum.

Source: Roxal.com "Rijksmuseum display piece"

The jobs require different disciplines and tools during the development process. The usual methods such as injection modelling and CNC machining though accurate are subtractive in practice, meaning they produce waste and suitable mainly for final product manufacturing. Additionally, for complex designs, the machining process requires accurate preprogramming on the machine which requires time. Further still many complex models will require multiple machining runs in order to get the correct final design.

The challenge and the solution

Roxal needed to be able to rapidly test different component configurations and proof of concepts constantly. Due to the fast-paced need for redesigns and iterations, Roxal realized they needed a tool to improve their prototyping process and to increase efficiency. Mr Mutsears had already heard about Leapfrog 3D printers from our various marketing efforts and after understanding the Bolt Pro’s capabilities, he quickly signed up and purchased a Bolt Pro.

The Bolt Pro is the flagship 3D printer from Leapfrog designed specifically to tackle bottlenecks that arise in product development and testing. The challenges that Roxal faced were that they needed to produce rapid prototypes but were hindered by the standard methods which were expensive according to Mr Mutsaers. The astronomical pricing of producing a standard CAD model that was no bigger than a coffee cup could take weeks and the cost could not be justified. A challenging example of this was Roxal needed to quickly fabricate a model wheel which requires two materials to print. The wheel model included both the rubber and a rim.

Although being a simple standard object in the modern world, the difficulty of producing one model is the expense. His standard production methods would have taken weeks to produce such a model. With the Bolt Pro, Mr Mutsears can produce the model with two materials in-house quickly at a fraction of the cost.

The Bolt Pro gives organisations versatility and options in production and this is another case of the value that additive manufacturing can bring to any industry.

Do you want to know how 3D printing can HELP you and your business? Talk to our experts about a FREE, PERSONALIZED solution suitable for your situation!

  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Looking at the media landscape, there are many predictions that foresee 3D printing as the future of manufacturing and many are correct. A friction point, however, arises when that vision doesn’t match with our current reality. People have been hoping to gain the ability to manufacture products in their own homes easily for years, but progress in the consumer sector has stalled, but in industry, 3D printing is thriving.  This is because like many technologies before it, most of the innovations begin in large institutions and then as the proliferation of the technology grows, economies of scale come into play. One can look at the history of computing itself to see this trend. The first machines were large and clunky and as time went on, more and more developments lead to cheaper methods of production which in turn caused production costs to decrease and finally, the computer became affordable to the average home.

In terms of current historical comparison, we are at the organisational stage in the technologies development, where the largest adopters of 3D printing technology are institutions. Being a product that is catered to the manufacturing field, this is the logical focus of the market, where despite there being many hobbyists, the largest focus for 3D printing manufactures is catering machines to larger organisations.

3D printing industries by value
So, why are so many companies adopting 3D printing?

There are a number of reasons and the biggest is when we look at the concept of economies of scale (where savings are generated by the more you produce). We see that 3D printing has lowered the minimum efficient scale of production, which is a game-changer for manufacturers.

The minimum efficient scale in manufacturing can be surmised as the lowest amount that an organisation needs to manufacture but still being able to benefit from economies of scale by being able to offer the product at a competitive price. A simple example would be, if a car company were to produce a small number of vehicles, the average cost of a car would be immensely high because of fixed costs, such as labour costs, rent and others.  If the car manufacturer were to produce a large number of vehicles, then the cost per unit would be lower since fixed costs are spread across the larger number of units.

To better understand this, we also need to then look at the relationship between unit average cost and marginal costs. Marginal costs put simply is the cost associated with producing one extra unit and the change it produces to total costs for that product.  Expanding on the car manufacturing industry example, a car company factory at full capacity would need another production line to produce one extra car if it had an increase in demand. This would mean that the new production line that would be required would be considered as a marginal cost. By adding the extra line, the cost of producing extra cars would decrease due to economies of scale. This is a key important figure for many manufacturers because it helps them determine the optimal production number for their business.

So, how does 3D printing relate to this?

3D printing is a technology that has a lower efficient scale due to a few properties. Firstly, 3D printing reduces labour costs because it can be highly automated, where a small team can run a line of printers easily without overseeing each element, affording them to work on other tasks. Secondly, 3D printing can produce highly complex geometric parts in a single process. What does this mean? Looking at standard production methods, such as injection modelling or CNC machining, many of these technologies require multiple steps to produce items that have complex shapes and in many cases, these technologies cannot achieve the same complexity as 3D printing. Many parts would require multiple production runs to get the desired results which would increases costs. Additionally, to be able to create these objects, organisations need highly trained staff which also adds to their fixed costs. 3D printing can produce parts, allow for changes without requiring extra tools or equipment in comparison to other methods. The future possibilities are exponential and this is why the world is fixated on the technology.

3D printing goes completely against standard manufacturing processes, which makes it a great disruptor in the manufacturing space. Its process is simple, linear and costs are low. It can produce nearly any part using the same machine and as the technology develops, it will only become more versatile and adaptive.

Is your organisation considering 3D printing? Download our free whitepaper on 3D Printing and Rapid Prototyping

Are you curious about the durability of 3D prints? CONTACT US and request a FREE, PERSONALIZED sample.

  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 
Maintenance, Repair & Operations

The aircraft repair industry faces many engineering challenges that standard solutions cannot address. To better address them, KLM Engineering and Maintenance has adopted 3D printing to enhance their operations. They use 3D printing to test new designs and for tooling. This is due to the versatility that 3D printing offers, such as speed and cost reduction.

Challenges in the MRO industry

A standard passenger plane has over 30000 components that at any point can fail. This can occur either due to damage or obsolescence.  The biggest challenge faced by KLM E&M is the issue of unplanned repairs. Unplanned repairs occur over 50% of the time during inspections in a given year in the industry.   This means that in most cases, companies are forced to react to these challenges or have a large inventory of spare parts. If a company cannot quickly access spare parts or test components quicker, then it will lead to delays. Additive manufacturing was the direction that KLM E&M took to gain an advantage over their competitors.

Above is an example tool that KLM produces with our Bolt Pro 3D printer. It is a tool holder used while performing fluorescent penetrant inspections on aircraft engines. 

Leapfrog and KLM moving forward

5 years ago KLM bought a Leapfrog Creatr 3D printer to improve their rapid prototyping lead times for internal tooling.  They used the Creatr for tooling and to print cabin components to test before production. This was the first step that they took to address the issue of unplanned maintenance. Additive manufacturing gave KLM an advantage that improves lead times across the company. After using it for years, KLM reported that they were extremely satisfied with the 3D printer.

KLM recently purchased our latest machine, the Bolt Pro to further develop their production capabilities. KLM understood that Leapfrog built upon the great foundation laid by the Creatr series and improved upon it. The Bolt Pro has two independent extruders that can print with two materials and the ability to print two identical parts at once. This feature allows KLM to faster deploy their parts and tools across their company. Additionally, the Bolt Pro has the ability to print with high-temperature engineering materials that KLM needs for their operations, which requires parts that are highly durable.

Implementing 3D printing is one of the most cost-effective means of eliminating long lead times in manufacturing. Companies that outsource spare parts face issues in the supply chain which can cause delays.  Moving rapid prototyping task in-house at a fraction of the cost of traditional methods like CNC machining adds to the competitive advantage for KLM E&M. Furthermore, having an in-house 3D printer means proprietary designs can remain within the company.

KLM E&M works with over 5000 staff in this field alone, all working on various tasks from prototyping, testing components, and ensuring that all planes are fit for travel. The main goal is to certify quality while keeping costs low. Having more control over the development stages in all key areas means that KLM E&M can provide a complete end to end quality assurance system. This also includes rapid prototyping tasks, where tooling and components need to be designed, built and tested internally without any delays in the company’s operations. 3D printing is a technology that has rapidly developed to achieve those needs.

Is your organisation considering 3D printing? Download our free whitepaper on 3D Printing and Rapid Prototyping

Are you curious about the durability of 3D prints? CONTACT US and request a FREE, PERSONALIZED sample.

  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

The aircraft repair industry faces many engineering challenges that standard solutions cannot address. To better address them, KLM Engineering and Maintenance has adopted 3D printing to enhance their operations. They use 3D printing to test new designs and for tooling. This is due to the versatility that 3D printing offers, such as speed and cost reduction.

A standard passenger plane has over 30000 components that at any point can fail. This can occur either due to damage or obsolescence.  The biggest challenge faced by KLM E&M is the issue of unplanned repairs. Unplanned repairs occur over 50% of the time during inspections in a given year in the industry.   This means that in most cases, companies are forced to react to these challenges or have a large inventory of spare parts. If a company cannot quickly access spare parts or test components quicker, then it will lead to delays. Additive manufacturing was the direction that KLM E&M took to gain an advantage over their competitors.

5 years ago KLM bought a Leapfrog Creatr 3D printer to improve their rapid prototyping lead times for internal tooling.  They used the Creatr for tooling and to print cabin components to test before production. This was the first step that they took to address the issue of unplanned maintenance. Additive manufacturing gave KLM an advantage that improves lead times across the company. After using it for years, KLM reported that they were extremely satisfied with the 3D printer.

KLM 3D printed tool holder for Fluorescent Penetrant Inspections on aircraft engines.

KLM recently purchased our latest machine, the Bolt Pro to further develop their production capabilities. KLM understood that Leapfrog built upon the great foundation laid by the Creatr series and improved upon it. The Bolt Pro has two independent extruders that can print with two materials and the ability to print two identical parts at once. This feature allows KLM to faster deploy their parts and tools across their company. Additionally, the Bolt Pro has the ability to print with high-temperature engineering materials that KLM needs for their operations, which requires parts that are highly durable.

Mr Ottevanger a Process Engineer at KLM stated “The Bolt Pro is much more reliable than the first 3D printers on the market. Though 3D printing it is still not entirely plug and play, the majority of the prints produced by the Bolt Pro are flawless the first time. The dimensional accuracy of the prints is very good.”

Implementing 3D printing is one of the most cost-effective means of eliminating long lead times in manufacturing. Companies that outsource spare parts face issues in the supply chain which can cause delays.  Moving rapid prototyping task in-house at a fraction of the cost of traditional methods like CNC machining adds to the competitive advantage for KLM E&M. Furthermore, having an in-house 3D printer means proprietary designs can remain within the company.

"I certainly recommend the Bolt Pro because of its rigidity, its large print bed and the two print heads which double the print speed once more similar parts are needed. I think the Leapfrog Bolt Pro is very suitable for Engineering in prototyping and even produce small series of plastic parts" Mr Ottevanger

KLM E&M works with over 5000 staff in this field alone, all working on various tasks from prototyping, testing components, and ensuring that all planes are fit for travel. The main goal is to certify quality while keeping costs low. Having more control over the development stages in all key areas means that KLM E&M can provide a complete end to end quality assurance system. This also includes rapid prototyping tasks, where tooling and components need to be designed, built and tested internally without any delays in the company’s operations. 3D printing is a technology that has rapidly developed to achieve those needs.

  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

There is an enormous amount of 3D modeling programs which make the search for the right one complicated. For 3D printing an object you will need a slicing software but also a software for creating this 3D object.

To create a 3D object, a digital 3D object is needed first. This is commonly known as a CAD file and can be made with a lot of different programs like Tinkercad, SketchUp or Solidworks. A 3D scanner can also be used to create a digital 3D model. The CAD file can be converted to a printable file using the right software on your computer. Then, the file can be built with a material which you can load into your 3D printer.

Tinkercad

A lot of the 3D modeling programs that are currently available require a lot of practice and experience to use. On the contrary, Tinkercad is an easy to grasp program which still provides freedom in its design possibilities.

In our online course, we provide the tutorial on how to use Tinkercad. Click here to start learning.

SketchUp

SketchUp owns a patented “Push and Pull” method. It is an intuitive 3D modeling application that allows you to create and edit both 2D and 3D models. ‘’Push and Pull’’ method gives you an opportunity to turn any flat surface into 3D shapes. SketchUp is a program used for a wide range of 3D modeling projects like architectural, interior design, landscape architecture, and video game design, to name a few of its uses.

Solidworks

By using SolidWorks 3D CAD software provides its users with efficient 3D design, supplier compatibility, and short learning curve.

Interested in slicing software?  Check out our versatile and powerful Leapfrog 3D Printing Software: SIMPLIFY3D and CREATR SOFTWARE BY MATERIALISE.

  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Leapfrog and Kyocera have joined forces to offer the flagship Bolt Pro exclusively in the Australian and New Zealand markets. This partnership has been in development for a long time and the opportunity to combine the strategic networking knowledge of Kyocera with the 3D printing knowledge of Leapfrog means that the Bolt Pro will be readily available in those markets.

“Our companies have already formed a close working relationship and we are looking forward to further collaboration to support the growth plans of both companies to deliver advanced 3D technology to new and existing markets.” Mark Vella, Head of Marketing and Strategy at Kyocera Document Solutions

Kyocera will be focusing on marketing and deploying the Bolt Pro in a select few segments. These are:

  • Education
  • Engineering/Industrial design
  • Manufacturing
  • Architecture
  • Healthcare
1. Education

3D printing is a being increasingly implemented in the education system for a number of reasons. Firstly, it allows students to explore design challenges, solve design or engineering projects easily and cost-effectively. Being an industrial strength FDM printer, the Bolt Pro is the perfect device for the education system. The first benefit is the ease of use of FDM 3D printers. This is especially true for material handling. The Bolt uses a solid coil of filament that is easy to store and is relatively cheaper than other 3D printing technique materials.  This is a major point that is crucial in the education system where you require safety precautions for a large student body. Furthermore, due to the lower operational costs and printer cost, the deployment of an effective 3D lab is feasible for larger educational institutions and smaller ones.

2. Engineering and Industrial Design

In order to meet engineering requirements, Leapfrog developed the Bolt Pro to be a workhorse in any department. The frame is sturdy and the printer can operate constantly, night and day to meet most deadlines. Additionally, industry-wide, new filaments are being developed to offer various properties that are required by engineers. These properties include heat resistance, toughness, flexibility and much more. One popular material that Leapfrog ensured that the Bolt Pro could print is polypropylene. This a plastic that is already being used in many industries and has many properties that make it perfect in the engineering field.

3. Manufacturing

The adoption of 3D printing in the manufacturing field is steadily increasing as printers become more accurate and newer materials being created. Two fields in manufacturing that 3D printing has been heavily utilised in are the automotive industry and Aeronautical industry. Leapfrog has both worked with Rolls Royce and Volkswagen to offer the Bolt Pro to solve their engineering challenges. In manufacturing, the Bolt Pro is used for rapid prototyping and internal tooling. It allows manufacturing departments to create prototypes accurately, quickly and cost-effectively. With the advancement in material science as mention before, the use of 3D printing to directly manufacture products will only be feasible as time goes on.

4. Architecture

The use of 3D printing in Architecture is highly beneficial to the industry in a number of ways. The architectural process involves the creation of many models, many due to design reiterations. This means that usually many models are required per project. The previous method of model creation was expensive and slow and produced a lot of waste. Due to the nature of additive manufacturing, 3D printing does not produce waste when compared to other methods. Secondly, the speed of printing objects is faster than traditional methods. The benefit of other features such as printing with two materials, the complexity of objects that can be printed and the cost, 3D printing is a perfect fit for architecture.

5. Healthcare

One important area that 3D printing has had a major impact is in the healthcare system. Leapfrog already has worked with the Mackay Hospital in Queensland and we hope Kyocera will allow us to reach more health institutions.  At the Mackay Hospital, the Bolt Pro is being used to print 3D image scans of patient’s broken bones. This is done to explore the feasibility of operations and also to practice the medical operation in order to ensure that patients receive the most successful outcome. This is a very important field that Leapfrog is proud to offer quick and cost-effective solutions.

Leapfrog believes this partnership will allow for the successful adoption of 3D printing in many industries in Australia. Kyocera's experience and business acumen will be a major advantage in reaching the right users that need 3D printing as a solution to their challenges. If you require any information regarding the Bolt Pro, please contact us.

  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

3D printing is quickly evolving into an important tool in various fields. The ease of use and relative affordability of FDM 3D printing has meant many companies and institutions are capable of realizing their manufacturing and prototyping needs. The following are ten great examples of how 3D printing is being adopted in many different fields.

1. Personalized oral drug delivery device

A recent journal published explored the use of a 3D printed mouth guards as a delivery system for medication. 3D printing was used because it offers the promise of personalized treatment for many patients. The study covered how to effectively produce a mouth guard that uses a specialized mechanism to release medication dosages that are specifically tailored to the patient. This is a major issue in the medical field where dosing is a major cause of complications.  The study focused on using an FDM printer mainly due to its relative safety since it only requires solid filament coils which are easier to store and handle.

You can read more about the paper at Science Advances

2. Education

In education, 3D printers are being used in a number of universities to explore the possible future applications. Many engineering courses have 3D printing labs to supplement the learning experience and to allow students to easily print concepts quickly. FDM 3D printing has a major advantage because it is the most affordable both in terms of the materials and the printer. Another benefit is it offers large print volumes meaning organizations can print relatively cheaply a multitude of 3D objects in a variety of materials. This is especially a major advantage for large departments that have large student bodies that require the use of a 3D printer.

A great example of this was our collaboration with Delft Univerisity in the production of long-range drones, which has a possible application in the medical field.

3. 3D printing assisting surgery

3D printed Acetabular (hip socket) and 3D printed bone for study

3D printing is increasingly being adopted by hospitals globally for diagnoses. One example of this is at the Mackay hospital in Australia where doctors are using one of our 3D printers to help treat patients. The advantage of using 3D printing is that it allows doctors to practice complex surgeries before treatment. This is crucial due to its ability to offer personalized treatments for patients. Using advanced imaging techniques, a 3D model of a patient’s fractured bone can be created, then printed. Doctors can then test the optimal treatment plan and how best to approach the surgery. This method allows doctors to easily find solutions for their patients quickly at a fraction of the price of many other modern methods.

4. Construction in Eindhoven

The municipality of Eindhoven, together with the Eindhoven University of Technology and four other companies are planning to build the first commercial livable 3D printed concrete houses in 2019. This is a very innovative project since the houses will be the first livable 3D printed houses in the world. The method can be called FDM on steroids. It utilizes a large extruder mechanism to layer the concrete similar to standard FDM printers. The goal is to improve the process which will allow the building of houses at a fraction of the time while minimizing costs.

Tips about 3D printing for Architecture

5. Electric racing motorcycle

The team of Nova Electric Racing uses a Leapfrog 3D printer to build an electric racing motorcycle for the MotoE championship. The Bolt Pro 3D printer allowed to reduce the costs of using expensive CNC equipment. From that moment the team had something in their hands, without the long production time. Useful parts of the motorcycle were printed overnight. The 3D printer made it easier just to design and produce the desired object and see if it fits.

6. 3D Glasses

If you find it hard to find the perfect glasses shape, customize and create your own 3D glasses! These nylon glasses were 3D printed specially for eyewear collection created by Pekka Salokannel, a Finnish designer.

Source: ''www.eye-wear-glasses.com''

7. Musical instruments

That may challenge conservative views on classical music, but 3D printing steps into the musical area. Eight 3D printed musical instruments coming to Ottawa Symphony Orchestra (Canada). 3D printed musical instruments make them cheaper, more accessible, customizable and modern.

Source: ''www.smartsolution247.com''

8. Prosthetics

Since each prosthetic is different yet they are made in large numbers, this is an ideal case for manufacturing using 3D printers. In addition, using a multi-material 3D printer such as the Leapfrog Bolt makes it possible to print soft padding on the areas where the patient’s bone touches the prosthetic, resulting in highly increased comfort and reduced impact and risk of injury.

9. Shoes

Wooded or plastic - doesn't matter! Now you can just 3D print your own shoes or clogs. Clogs were a valuable part of the cultural heritage of the Dutch. 3D Printing wood filament is possible with our Leapfrog Creatr HS 3D Printers.

10. Cars

The last but not least - 3D printed cars. We already mentioned the possibility of 3D printing some parts for racing motorcycles. Nowadays it is even possible to 3D print the whole car as one object from the ground up. Local Motors 3D printed a car in front of a live audience at the International Manufacturing Technology Show (IMTS) in Chicago. Future is here!

Source: ''www.3dprintingindustry.com''

Interested to start 3D printing yourself? CONTACT US and request a FREE, PERSONALIZED sample.

  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Leapfrog and Kyocera have joined forces to offer the flagship Bolt Pro exclusively in the Australian and New Zealand markets. This partnership has been in development for a long time and the opportunity to combine the strategic networking knowledge of Kyocera with the 3D printing knowledge of Leapfrog means that the Bolt Pro will be readily available in those markets.

“Our companies have already formed a close working relationship and we are looking forward to further collaboration to support the growth plans of both companies to deliver advanced 3D technology to new and existing markets.” Mark Vella, Head of Marketing and Strategy at Kyocera Document Solutions

Kyocera will be focusing on marketing and deploying the Bolt Pro in a select few segments. These are:

  • Education
  • Engineering/Industrial design
  • Manufacturing
  • Architecture
  • Healthcare
1. Education

3D printing is a being increasingly implemented in the education system for a number of reasons. Firstly, it allows students to explore design challenges, solve design or engineering projects easily and cost-effectively. Being an industrial strength FDM printer, the Bolt Pro is the perfect device for the education system. The first benefit is the ease of use of FDM 3D printers. This is especially true for material handling. The Bolt uses a solid coil of filament that is easy to store and is relatively cheaper than other 3D printing technique materials.  This is a major point that is crucial in the education system where you require safety precautions for a large student body. Furthermore, due to the lower operational costs and printer cost, the deployment of an effective 3D lab is feasible for larger educational institutions and smaller ones.

2. Engineering and Industrial Design

In order to meet engineering requirements, Leapfrog developed the Bolt Pro to be a workhorse in any department. The frame is sturdy and the printer can operate constantly, night and day to meet most deadlines. Additionally, industry-wide, new filaments are being developed to offer various properties that are required by engineers. These properties include heat resistance, toughness, flexibility and much more. One popular material that Leapfrog ensured that the Bolt Pro could print is polypropylene. This a plastic that is already being used in many industries and has many properties that make it perfect in the engineering field.

3. Manufacturing

The adoption of 3D printing in the manufacturing field is steadily increasing as printers become more accurate and newer materials being created. Two fields in manufacturing that 3D printing has been heavily utilised in the automotive industry and Aeronautical industry. Leapfrog has both worked with Rolls Royce and Volkswagen to offer the Bolt Pro to solve their engineering challenges. In manufacturing, the Bolt Pro is used for rapid prototyping and internal tools. It allows manufacturing departments to create prototypes accurately, quickly and cost-effectively. With the advancement in material science as mention before, the use of 3D printing to directly manufacture products will only be feasible as time goes on and in some cases, it already is.

4. Architecture

The use of 3D printing in Architecture is highly beneficial to the industry in a number of ways. The architectural process involves the creation of many models, many due to design iterations. The usual method of model creation was expensive and slow. Due to the nature of additive manufacturing, the use of 3D printing means that it is the least wasteful method. The Bolt Pro, which has dual extruders and the ability to print with multiple materials is a perfect fit for the architectural industry. Users can experiment with different combinations and with the dual extruders, users can print in sync. This allows two models to be printed at once for internal use or for clients.

5. Healthcare

One important area that 3D printing also has a major impact is in the healthcare system. Leapfrog already has worked with the Mackay Hospital in Queensland and we hope Kyocera will allow us to reach more health institutions.  At the Mackay Hospital, the Bolt Pro is being used to print 3D image scans of patient’s broken bones. This is done to explore the feasibility of operations and also to practice the medical operation to ensure that patients receive the most successful outcome. This is a very important field that Leapfrog is proud to offer quick and cost-effective solutions.

Leapfrog believes this partnership will allow for the successful adoption of 3D printing in many industries in Australia. Kyocera's experience and business acumen will be a major advantage in reaching the right users that need 3D printing as a solution to their challenges. If you require any information regarding the Bolt Pro, please contact us.

Read for later

Articles marked as Favorite are saved for later viewing.
close
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Separate tags by commas
To access this feature, please upgrade your account.
Start your free month
Free Preview