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Inductive sensors are a particularly versatile type of sensor that can be found everywhere from wind farms to machine shops. One of the most common applications for inductive sensors, however, lies in automated assembly operations. In plants where consumer electronics, automobiles and other goods are assembled by robotic automation systems, these sensors are used to ensure that each component is correctly aligned and ready for the next step in the assembly process.

Take the C23 Full Inox inductive sensors from our long-time distribution partner Contrinex, for example.

By virtue of their corrosion-resistant stainless steel construction and long operating distance, these inductive sensors are ideal for a wide variety of automated assembly applications, including food-safe settings. C23 inductive sensors are small enough to fit in tight spaces, but robust enough to withstand exposure to harsh chemicals. They can also be easily integrated into plant-wide control systems thanks to their digital IO-Link interface, which allows them to communicate wirelessly without the need for additional cabling.

Interested in learning more about how these or any of the other sensors we offer at Locon can make your operation more efficient and reliable? We can work with you to design a custom sensor solution that is ideally suited to meet the needs of your business. We can also help you find effective replacement options for your existing sensor systems as well. To get started, feel free to contact us online or give us a call at our toll-free number today!

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Looking for an inductive sensor that can be mounted in tight spaces, operate over long distances and function effectively in harsh environments? This might seem like a tall order, but we now offer C44 inductive sensors from Contrinex that can meet all these demands and more. Contrinex recently outfitted these popular sensors with an IO-Link interface that makes them even more versatile and compatible with Internet of Things (IoT) applications.

The C44 line of inductive sensors features a rotatable sensing face that allows the sensors to be mounted in five different directions. They also offer a long operating distance of up to 40mm. By virtue of these two unique characteristics, C44 inductive sensors can operate effectively in tight spaces where other sensors might be subject to mechanical damage. You can find these sensors in a variety of settings, from conveyor systems and automotive plants to port facilities and amusement park rides.

Thanks to their IO-Link interface, C44 inductive sensors can now be networked to improve system-wide reliability and data availability. Best of all, this IO-Link functionality comes at no extra cost to consumers.  In the event that a user doesn’t require IO-Link connectivity, they can simply choose to operate the sensors in conventional mode instead.

At Locon Sensor Systems, we can work with you to develop a custom sensor solution that’s tailored to the unique environmental conditions and space restrictions of your operation. To get started, feel free to give us a call at our toll-free number or contact us online today!

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In high-volume packaging operations, products are typically packaged and prepared for transit in a few distinct stages. Take potato chips, for example. First, the chips are sorted and sealed in the single-serving bags you might see in a grocery store or vending machine. Next, the bags are packed in the cardboard cartons that get sold to retailers. Finally, these cartons are stacked and shrink-wrapped for palletization so that they can be efficiently shipped in large quantities.

During this last stage of packaging, factory operators need a reliable way to monitor the plant’s production throughput as the shrink-wrapped stacks of cartons travel along fast-moving conveyor systems. Manual counting methods are prohibitively slow and costly, so many packaging plants rely on long-range photoelectric sensors instead.

In this type of application, a photoelectric transmitter and corresponding receiver are mounted on either side of the conveyor system, just past the shrink-wrapping station. As each carton passes between the transmitter and receiver, a light beam is broken and the sensor signals a plant-wide control system to update the item count.

Long-range photoelectric sensors are particularly ideal for high-volume packaging plants because they can function effectively even when the sensors and transmitters are separated by conveyor systems and other large pieces of equipment. Some of these photoelectric sensors offer through-beam ranges of up to 50 meters.

Interested in learning more about these or any of the other custom sensor solutions we offer at Locon? Feel free to give us a call or contact us online today!

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When industrial machine shops use automated mills, lathes and grinding tools to shape metal products, they rely on robust sensor equipment to detect the metal objects as they travel along conveyor systems. First and foremost, the sensors must be moisture-resistant so that they can operate reliably in an environment where they are regularly doused in liquid coolant. They must also be able to detect metal objects without being disrupted by the flying metal chips that are inevitably generated by machining processes.

This second consideration calls for a special kind of inductive sensor that can effectively detect metal objects without triggering false signals due to interference from abrasion debris. For this type of specialized application, we recommend the chip-immune series of inductive sensors from our distribution partner Contrinex.

The chip-immune series of sensors employs a modified version of the proprietary Condet® technology, which measures the inductive voltage returned from pulsed currents in the coil to generate useful signals. This allows the sensors to detect metal objects without being disrupted by chips of iron, stainless steel, aluminum, brass, copper or titanium. The modified Condet® method is so effective that it eliminates the need to regularly spray water on the sensors to remove stray metal chips. The chip-immune inductive sensors also offer a wide operating temperature range from -13°F to +185°F (-25°C to +85°C).

Interested in learning more about these inductive sensors or any of the other custom sensor solutions we offer at Locon? Feel free to give us a call or contact us online today to speak with a representative!

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Conventional photoelectric sensors are great at detecting fast-moving reflective objects, which makes them ideal for packaging operations that must count and sort thousands of items a day. Depending on the target material and composition, detecting transparent objects like glass and plastic bottles may pose a challenge. This is because transparent objects absorb very little visible light, which can contribute to false signals when not using a photoelectric sensors suited to this particular type of target detection.

Recently, however, our distribution partner Contrinex released a new type of photoelectric sensor that offers an elegantly simple solution to this problem.

The new TRU-C23 photoelectric sensors use polarized UV light instead of visible light to detect the presence of transparent objects on assembly and packaging lines. Although transparent glass and plastics don’t absorb much visible light, they do absorb a great deal of polarized UV light. By using this quirk of the electromagnetic spectrum to their advantage, the engineers at Contrinex were able to create a photoelectric sensor that is perfectly suited for detecting transparent objects when partnered with the specially-designed reflector.

These sensors also offer an impressive operating range of about 1000 mm, as well as an industry standard IO-Link Interface. Their housings are also compatible with any of the sensors in the C23 series.

Locon also offers a solution in our Universal Heavy Duty Photoelectrics.  These sensors function reliably particularly in environments that present the challenge of dust or moisture accumulating on the lens.  There are special modifications we can suggest to meet the demands of specific application requirements.

Interested in learning more about these or any of the other specialized sensor solutions we offer at Locon? Give us a call or contact us online today to speak with a representative!

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In manufacturing plants, inductive sensors are typically used to detect the presence or absence of metal components, thereby preventing errors in fast-paced automated processes. These sensors are virtually essential in automotive assembly plants, for example.

But the applications for inductive sensors aren’t confined to the manufacturing sector. They’re often used in hardware testing environments as well.

Have you ever purchased replacement control knobs for the stereo system in your home or vehicle? If so, you may have noticed that the plastic knobs contained metal washers that keep them securely fastened to the stereo. Without these washers, the control knobs would simply fall off the shafts they’re connected to, effectively rendering them useless. That’s why the companies that make these control knobs need a reliable testing system to confirm the presence of a washer in each assembly.

Inductive sensors make it possible to test whole batches of control knobs at once, thereby ensuring each one includes a metal washer.

One such example of a control knob testing machine consists of a compact enclosure and a plastic tray that can accommodate up to 70 knobs at once. Inside the enclosure, inductive sensors are positioned directly beneath each of the knobs in the tray. If one of the metal washers in the knobs has been dislodged during the assembly process, the sensors can immediately flag the affected knobs for removal from the batch. This ensures the integrity of each knob, and eliminates the need for technicians to manually inspect each knob for the presence a washer.

Interested in developing your own custom sensor array for hardware testing applications? The team at Locon can work with you to design a sensing solution that’s tailored to the unique demands of your operation. Just give us a call or contact us online to get started.

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In fast-paced manufacturing environments, CNC mills and lathes are often used to machine industrial-grade products out of solid blocks of material. These computer-driven machines use precision cutting tools to make everything from automotive parts to aerospace equipment and more. To achieve optimal efficiency, the machines are typically equipped with automatic tool changers that swap out different cutting tools as needed. It might take a number of cutting tools to make a complex part like a cylinder head, for example. But how do these automatic tool changers manage to seamlessly exchange tools on a high-speed spindle without skipping a beat or causing damage to the machine?

This precise, reliable action is made possible thanks to miniature inductive sensors.

Inductive sensors are used to detect the position of the centering-disc mounted on the spindle’s motor shaft. These sensors are small enough to be mounted on a variety of machines, and precise enough to maintain positional accuracy better than 0.01 mm. They’re also capable of resisting the frequent shocks and vibrations associated with high-speed machining processes. Thanks to their hermetically-sealed design, they can even operate reliably when exposed to cutting fluids that are used as coolants in the machining process.

At Locon Sensor Systems, we offer a number of inductive sensor options that are ideal for automated machining operations such as these. To learn more about our inductive proximity sensors or any of the other sensor products we carry, feel free to give us a call or contact us online today!

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Looking for a versatile inductive sensor with an extended operating distance? Recently, Contrinex announced a new addition to its popular Classics line of M30 inductive proximity sensors that might be ideal for your needs. With a 25mm maximum sensing distance, this sensor has the greatest operating distance of any product in the Contrinex Classics family.  As a long-time, licensed distributor for all Contrinex product lines, Locon Sensors is pleased to offer this product to our customers.

In addition to its extended sensing distance, Contrinex’s new inductive proximity sensor offers a number of other attractive benefits as well.

First and foremost, these sensors offer IO-Link connectivity at no extra cost to consumers. This industry-standard connection allows the sensors to be easily integrated into plant-wide control systems that manage and maintain all the sensing equipment in a manufacturing or packaging operation. IO-Link connectivity makes these sensors particularly well-suited for businesses in the textile and automotive industries.

In addition to their applications in industrial settings, extended-range M30 inductive sensors are also popular options for elevators and escalators. Thanks to their nickel-plated brass housings and vacuum-sealed electronics, these sensors can operate reliably even in harsh, high-traffic environments.

If the extended-range M30 inductive sensors from Contrinex aren’t quite what you’re looking for, we offer a variety of affordable, effective alternatives. We can even work with you to design a custom sensor solution to accommodate the unique demands of your business. From high-temperature inductive sensors to miniature capacitive options, you can find a diverse selection of sensor products right here at Locon. Just give us a call or contact us online today to speak with a representative!

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At Locon, our custom sensor systems are utilized in a wide variety of industrial settings, from food packaging operations to automotive assembly plants. With these applications in mind, it might surprise you to learn that many of the same sensors can be found in amusement parks as well! Attractions such as rollercoasters and water rides rely on these sensors to deliver guests a thrilling experience without putting their safety in jeopardy.

Let’s take rollercoasters, for example.

These rides typically utilize a “block system” to maintain a safe distance between trains. The tracks on a rollercoaster are divided into different sections called blocks, each of which is separated by a brake point. These brake points prevent any two trains from being on the same block at the same time.

In order to track the position of passing trains, the brake points use a system of proximity switches, typically inductive sensors. If two trains do reach the same block at the same time, the inductive sensors signal the brake points to automatically bring the rear train to a stop. This way, each train can be closely monitored and managed without the need for human intervention.

Many water rides such as long flumes rely on a similar principle to ensure rider safety.

To address the concern of repeated exposure to water, we supply both inductive and photoelectric sensors rated to perform reliably in a wet environment – in addition to offering the possibility of a specific custom design for water rides. Thanks to the accuracy and versatility of modern sensor equipment, you can find these systems in all kinds of unexpected places.

Interested in integrating a custom sensor system into your own operation? The team at Locon can work with you to design a solution that’s tailored to your unique needs. Give us a call or contact us online today to get started!

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Thanks to their ability to function reliably in harsh operating environments, you can find inductive sensors in a variety of rugged industrial settings. From vehicle manufacturing to food processing, inductive sensors offer viable solutions to some of the world’s most demanding jobs. In recent years, they’ve also been utilized in the burgeoning renewable energy industry.

The towering turbines on wind farms might look pretty placid and peaceful from a distance, but these advanced power generators are exposed to severe weather conditions all the time. Some wind turbines are even located offshore, where salt air and water can cause components to corrode and wear out prematurely.

These unique demands have made inductive sensors a particularly popular solution for modern wind turbines. Inductive sensors are typically used to monitor the rotational velocity of the turbines in real time. If rotational speeds exceed a turbine’s safe operating parameters, the sensors can trigger safety cutoffs that prevent the turbine from self-destructing.

It’s especially important for wind turbines to have reliable sensing systems because they’re often located in fairly remote locations. If a turbine fails, it can be costly and time-consuming to repair. Inductive sensors can eliminate the need for frequent maintenance and repairs by detecting potential problems before they arise.

At Locon Sensor Systems, not only are we a long-time distributor of Contrinex products, we also specialize in developing custom sensing solutions based on very specific application concerns. Give us a call or contact us online today to speak with a representative!

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