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Welcome to the exploration and application part of Lecture 12. So, till now you have learnt a lot about the Plan view, elevation and 3D and isometric views… Now it’s the time to implement all that knowledge that you have gained till now in this Exploration and Application Exercise… Let’s begin with our Exploration Exercises…

Exploration Exercises

1.) Draw these objects in isometric view

  • Landline Telephone
  • Gas Stove
  • Two sitte4r sofa
  • Bed
Application Exercise

1.) This is the plan. Make an isometric view from the given direction –

2.) These diagrams are elevations. Create an isometric view for both of them and draw a plan on the same…

a.)

b.)

icon-arrow-left  Lecture 12

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So, after the completion of your 5th Lecture Here are some Exploration and Application Exercises… Do Complete these Exploration and Application Exercises seriously to gain the best of the knowledge that you obtained in all the lectures till now. For any queries, you are absolutely free to contact me

Exploration Exercises

1.) Make a list of your favourite spaces. Also, write why you like that space…

2.) This one is a Craft exercise to understand positive and negative spaces better.

Select one colour of paper and cut off 9″ x 6″ from it. Take another coloured paper and cut off 9″ x 12″.

Using the half sheet (9″ x 6″), draw and carefully cut out half of a picture or design along the 9″ length.

The full sheet (9″ x 12″) can be folded in half along the 9″ length to determine the centre of the sheet. The parts cut from the half sheet are arranged along the fold farming half the opposite those from which they were cut. Glue the parts down. Now you will have a positive image on one side of the full sheet and a negative image on the other.

3.) Arrange coins of Rs. 1,2,5,10 and notes of Rs. 10, 20, 50, 100 and 500 on as A3 sized sketching paper. Observe the arrangement and sketch it with correct proportions in your sketchbook. Give realistic light and shade.

Now, it’s time to go through the Application Exercises.

Application Exercises

1.) Using circles of radius 1 cm, 2 cm and 4 cm, make a symmetrical composition on an A4 sheet.

2.) Divide a 6″ x 6″ square into positive and negative spaces in the ratio of 40:50.

Do Complete these exercises and after this, you will have gained the complete knowledge about dots, lines shapes, and spaces with step by step guids and proper illusterations of interesting examples… For any further queries, feedbacks or any help you are most welcome to contact me.

  Lecture 5                                                                                                                      Lecture 6 icon-chevron-circle-right

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Welcome to the 5th lecture of this “Free Pro Drawing Course“. Till now you must have learnt about the use of Dots, Lines, and Shapes in drawing in detail. In this lecture, you will learn about the fourth element of drawing i.e. Space and what are 3D, 2D and positive & negative spaces. So, let’s start with our new lecture.

Elements of Drawing – Space: Lecture 5 5.1 SPACE

Space is fundamentally flat. But it can be in 2 ways –

Two-dimensional and Three-dimensional.

Two-dimensional spaces are made up of only height and width, but no depth.

For instance, the floor of your bedroom is what we refer to as 2D space.

However, there are a few visual tricks with which 2D spaces can be made to look 3D. Playing with perspective is one way to create 3D illusions from 2D spaces.

Unlike two-dimensional spaces, three-dimensional spaces are made up of height, width and depth.

Your bedroom, for instance, is what we refer to as a 3D space.

Technically speaking, physical spaces are often conceived in three-dimensional form.

As illustrated below X refers to the length, Z refers to breadth and Y refers to a height where length, breadth, and height make up the dimensions of space.

5.2 Three Dimensional Space

More often than not, we experience spaces in three-dimensional form.

Let us dig deeper, shall we?

Be it a matchbox, a room, a city or even nature in general, division of space is independent of size or shape.

Studying different examples below, observe:

1.) The space that a matchbox has  –

2.) The space that a room has –

3.) The space that a city has –

4.) the space that nature has –

Did you see how spaces vary?

How objects of different sizes and shapes all come under space?

Let’s study 2D spaces now!

5.3 Two-Dimensional Spaces

Like we studied earlier, two-dimensional spaces are made up of only height and width, but no depth.

Studying different examples below, observe:

1.) Space that a newspaper has

2.) space that a letter has

3.) Space that a photograph has

4.) Space that a postcard has

5.4 Positive & Negative Spaces

The two elements of drawing, space and shape work together to form a finished work of art. Like we studied in the earlier lectures. There are two kinds of spaces: positive and negative.

Positive spaces are those occupied by the main subject.

Negative spaces are the areas around and behind the positive spaces. Negative space can also be referred to as the background.

Positive and negative spaces have a relationship with each other that helps define the overall space. It is important to understand this relationship before we begin studying the principles of drawing.

5.4.1 Positive & Negative Spaces in 3D

Below are a few examples of positive and negative spaces in 3D. Let us see them –

Picture 1: A room with undefined positive or negative spaces.

Picture 2: The space in the room is occupied by a table (positive space). The remaining in the room is what we call negative space.

Picture 3: When we add a cupboard to the room, it also occupies positive space. So now, the cupboard and table are in a positive space, while the rest of the room occupies negative space.

5.4.2 Positive and Negative Spaces in 2D

Similar to positive and negative spaces in 3D, in the below examples, the black designs on white paper are referred to as positive spaces, while the background i.e. white paper is referred to as negative spaces.

Conversely, in the example below, the white design of the plant on the black background is what we call positive space, while black background on which the white plant is illustrated on is referred to as the negative space.

5.5 Positive and Negative Spaces (a deeper understanding)

The above examples prove that positive and negative spaces are not dependent on colour. All black spaces are not necessarily positive and all white spaces are not compulsorily negative.

What’s important is HOW space is distributed?

Studying the example illustrated below, we see that the right portion of the design, the red design is the positive space and the white background is the negative space.

While in the left portion of the design, the white design is the positive space and the red background is the negative space.

Easy to identify, isn’t it?

Exercise 5.5 - 
To understand positive and negative spaces even better - take a black paper,
draw something on it, cut it out and paste it on white paper. Now identify 
the positive and negative space in both art pieces.
5.6 Introduction to Distribution of Space

It is important to understand the distribution of space. See below examples of Space Distribution.

To understand the distribution of space, we can do the following exercises. We have a red square divided into 16 blocks. According to the given percentage of space mentioned below, we will distribute these blocks outside the square.

Exercise 5.6 - 
Using a 4x4 square create four different designs in the following different
percentages to understand positive-negative space distribution better.
i.)  40%-60%
ii.) 30%-70%
iii.) 25%-75%
iv.) 100%-100%

HINTS

1.) 50%-50%

2.) 33%-66%

3.) 50%-50%

4.) 100%-100%

Conclusion

So with this, you got deep and detailed knowledge about the fourth element of drawing i.e. Space,  What are 3D and 2D spaces and also about Positive & Negative spaces. You can now identify spaces everywhere all around your environment. You are now well aware of how space can be distributed in your pictures and sketches…

So Now, the question is, Can you now complete that Exercise 5.6 and create different designs using the space concept?

If Yes or if you have already completed that exercise, then share your posts in the comments so that many can have a look at your precious artworks…

Now let’s see,

With all the knowledge you gained with this lecture, Can you make beautiful sketches and paintings and prove that You are the most creative among all ??

Complete the exercises given in this Lecture and send your creative work to me… I’ll be highly grateful to review your work. If you have any other doubt or suggestion, feel free to contact us. We would love to hear it from you.

icon-chevron-circle-left  Previous Lecture                                                                                                    Next Lecture icon-chevron-circle-right

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Hope you have completed your Exploration Exercises. Now its time to apply your skills by doing these application exercises. These application exercises are made for you so that you are ready to apply the concepts and techniques learnt to solve actual questions. Application Exercises help you to increase your practical knowledge and help you to innovate numerous ideas in your mind about how to think about a design and draw it on paper.

1.) Make 15 different arrangements in 2″x2″ squares only using thin lines.

2.) Make 15 different arrangements in 2″x2″ square thick and thin lines.

3.) Using thick and thin lines shade a cylinder, sphere and cube.

4.) Draw a matchbox showing light and shade using thick and thin lines.

5.) In a 4″x4″ square, make an arrangement of geometrical shapes imagining them to be transparent.

6.) In a 4″x4″ square, make an arrangement of natural shapes imagining them to be opaque.

Do complete these exercises by applying of your skills and send me your answers...

  Lecture 3

  Lecture 4

The post Application Exercises for Lecture 3 & 4 appeared first on Learn2Draw.

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Hope, You have understood much about Lines and Shapes till now. Let’s solve some interesting Exploration Exercises now. These exploration exercises are a step to make you perfect in your drawing skills that you have and to better understand and recall the lectures covered so far.

1.) Look around your room. Try and identify different lines. Use these lines to make a drawing or some interesting composition. Repeat this exercise again when out in nature.

2.) Use threads, try and make an interesting pattern. You can use different colours of threads.

3.) Take a black piece of paper. Cut it into thick and thin lines. Paste the cut pieces on white paper to create illusions. Explain at least five such illusions.

4.) Take a piece of paper. Cut it randomly.

Pick each piece and draw outlines of them individually on another plain sheet of paper.

Arrange different shapes in different ways to create interesting designs.

5.) Take a magazine, cut out the various shape and make a collage.

 icon-star Do solve this exercise to improve your innovative and creative skills.
These exercises are as important as the lectures are. Send me your immense 
artworks and I'll surely help you out whereever you need any assistance. 
CHEERS!!

Application Exercises icon-chevron-circle-right

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Welcome to the 4th lecture of this “Free Pro Drawing Course“. You must have learnt a lot about Lines in Lecture 3. In this lecture of Elements of Drawing – Shape you will come to know about shapes, types of shapes and representation of a different figure or design with the help of shapes and some cool exercises.

Elements of Drawing – Shape

4.1 What is Shape?

A shape is one of the most important elements of design and art. An enclosed space bounded by lines, it is one of design’s most basic elements as well.

Whenever a line encloses itself, space is formed. This space is nothing but the shape.

Individually or in combination with other shapes or lines, shapes are very useful in communicating universal meanings and organizing information.

Study the shapes illustrated below. Observe how they are open one moment, and closed the other moment with a stroke of a pencil.

Below, the word SHAPE is written/illustrated only with shapes.

The spaces around the word SHAPE are called negative spaces.

While drawing, negative spaces are just as important as positive shapes.

Often, pieces are created that have no distinction between positive and negative spaces.

Other Shapes

Apart from abstract and typographical shapes, many other shapes exist as well.

Exercise 4.1 -

Draw as many free-hand shapes as you can(it doesn't have to make sense).
Colour the enclosed spaces black with a sketch pen, pencil, or poster colour
and send that to me.
4.2 Types of Shapes

There are three basic types of shapes. They are grouped as follows:

  • Natural Shapes (shapes derived from nature)
  • Geometric Shapes (symmetrical shapes)
  • Abstract Shapes (a simplified version of natural shapes)
4.2.1 Natural Shapes

Natural Shapes are those that are inspired by nature. Leaves, birds, flowers, insects, etc. are all natural shapes.

Natural shapes can be man-made shapes as well. An ink stain on your shirt, for instance, is a natural shape.

Natural shapes are mostly always irregular and free-flowing.

In the figure below, natural shapes are illustrated. Study them closely.

Exercise 4.2.1 -

Draw 10 natural shapes from your own imagination and send them to me.
4.2.2 Geometrical Shapes

Geometrical shapes make use of not only basic symmetrical shapes like squares, circles, triangles, etc. but also pentagons, cones and cylinders.

Below are some examples of Geometrical Shapes.

Below takes the combination of geometric shapes a step ahead by demonstrating how different patterns are born out of various combinations.

Exercise 4.2.2 -

Draw 10 geometrical shapes from your own imagination and send them to me.
4.2.3 Abstract Shapes

A simplified version of natural shapes is called abstract shape. Most symbols that make up a logo fall into this category. For example, shapes on public toilet signage are abstract shapes. Below are a few examples of abstract shapes.

Exercise 4.2.3 -

Draw 10 aesthetically beautiful shapes from memory and send your innovative
ideas to me.
4.3 Representing a subject through different types of shapes

For instance, a leaf could be a natural shape, geometrical shape or abstract shape. The same can be said for the sun, a butterfly, an elephant and a fish. A study of these objects is handy when you have to create graphic designs.

Transformation of natural shapes into various other shapes

Exercise 4.3 -

Represent the Following subjects in natural, geometrical, decorative and graphic form.

a.) Fire

b.) Apple

c.) Sunflower

d.) Parrot
Conclusion

So with this, you got deep and detailed knowledge about the third element of drawing i.e. Shape. You too came to know about the types of shapes and how to Represent different figures or designs with the help of shapes. You are now well aware of the need to identify the shapes to make sketches. I am sure you are now able to draw cool shapes and designs with your own imagination.

So, I want to ask you all whether you maintain a scrapbook where you draw cool shapes and designs on a daily basis?

If Yes, if a lot of designs come into your imagination and you too draw those designs in your diary or scrapbook, we all would love to see your artwork. Send us your artwork and I promise I will feature your work with all your details on my blog…

Now let’s see,

With all the knowledge you gained with this lecture, Can you make beautiful sketches and paintings and prove that You are the most creative among all ??

Complete the exercises given in this Lecture and send your creative work to me… I’ll be highly grateful to review your work. If you have any other doubt or suggestion, feel free to contact us. We would love to hear it from you.

Do solve your Exploration Exercises and Application Exercises after this lecture. Keep practising, Improve your imagination and innovation skills with us and you are free to contact me anytime you want for any help or suggestion.

 icon-chevron-circle-left  Previous Lecture                                                                                              Next Lecture icon-chevron-circle-right icon-chevron-circle-right

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Hereby, I welcome you to the third Lecture of this “Free Pro Drawing Course” i.e. Elements of Drawing – Line. I am glad that you have successfully finished the first 2 lectures along with some interesting exploration and application exercises… In this lecture, you will learn about Line, how it’s formed, how it’s used, what are its types and how the sketches are made with these lines.

Elements of Drawing – Line

3.1 How are lines formed?

When we draw a dot and keep adding more dots to its side, we get a line.

3.2 How are different types of lines created?

By gently applying pressure with the hand while moving our wrists we can create various types of lines.

Exercise 3.2 -

Identify different lines in the above picture. Draw the same lines in your
sketch book. Draw each one atleast 10 times.
3.3 Types of lines 1.) Vertical Lines

2.) Horizontal Lines

3.) Diagonal Lines

4.) Dotted Lines

5.) Curved Lines

6.) Spiral Lines

7.) Thin Lines

8.) Thick Lines

9.) Thin to Thick Lines

10.) Dashed Lines

11.) Zig Zag Lines

3.4 Drill Exercises to improve line drawing

Hand Postures required for sketching –

1.) Tradition Grip (Variable) – For short thin lines.

2.) Paint Brush Grip (For free work) – For long, broad strokes.

3.)”Tip Hard” Heavy Grip – For long, broad strokes.

4.) Drumstick Grip – For long, broad strokes.

5.) “Inverted” Grip (Braced Position) – For short thin lines.

Exercises 3.4 -

Study the lines drawn below. Practice on rough paper until your unsteady
lines turn steady. It is recommended to sketch the below lines at least once
a day. It will not only improve the quality of your line drawing, but also
free your hand and shoulder for bigger, bolder sketches.

3.5 Making different patterns by combining different types of lines

By combining line (types of lines that we saw in the previous section), we can create varieties of patterns.

Exercise 3.5 -

Combine the lines you sketched in the previous exercise and produce 10 more
variations of patterns.
3.6 Doodling with Lines

Doodles are simple drawings that can have concrete representational meaning or may just be abstract shapes.

For instance, different expressions are created using only one circle.

Example showing Doodling exercises.

Question: Some lines are given. Create interesting doodles from them and write the words in the given space that best name your doodles.

Answers: Random doodles from the above lines.

Exercise 3.6 -

As illustrated above, complete the lines in the boxes given below and write
suitable captions for each in addition.

Test the best of your imagination and draw creative figures. Mail your answers to me at Dilpreet@learn2draw.online for a guaranteed revert back…

3.7 Expressive Qualities of Lines

Many types of lines together create beautiful designs. While random placements of different lines create an abstract design, a well-planned arrangement of lines is commonly understood to carry certain kinds of information. For Instance:-

a.) Calligraphy

Many ancient languages like Arabic, Urdu, etc. were initially scripted in calligraphy. So, even though we do not understand the language, we recognize the representation of words as calligraphy.

b.) Maps

When jagged lines are used in maps, they usually denote the symbolic representation of a place and it’s borders.

c.) Blue Prints

An architectural map, Blueprints are commonly understood floor plans that describe a building through the adaptation of a number of horizontal, vertical, dashed and dotted lines as we studied above.

Exercise 3.7 -

Below are a few expressive representations of lines. Simple, yet efective.



Write a short message to your friend  (or me). Now, try to convey the same
message by using only lines. (You can write this on a paper and then send me
the picture of your work.)
3.8 Creating different tonal values and dimensions using Lines 1.) Creating Tonal Values

You look at an apple and you want to sketch it. But how do you turn your 2D apple into a 3D one? Here’s one way – Squint and look at the apple through almost closed eyes.

What do you see?

Are all colours cut out? Do you see a simplified and easy to see a pattern of black, greys and whites?

These different patterns are called tones (or values). Tones assess how light or dark an object is. Moreover, every object, even the sky has three types of tines – Dark, Middle and Light. There will often be a variety of these tones within any given object.

Tonal value is applied to objects through lines.

2.) Creating Dimensions

To give your sketch a third dimension with simple line strokes, fill the space within thin lines. This helps to achieve a lighter tone. As you gradually increase the thickness of the line, the space you are covering gradually increases as well – successfully giving your sketch the third dimension.

A more realistic result could be achieved with thick and thin lines according to the light falling on the object.

Example:

Tip: If your lines are drawn according to the shape of the object, you will get the effect of Dimensions faster. This effect can be achieved with slanted lines, vertical and horizontal lines provided you are following the shadow and light on the surface correctly.

Slanting Lines:

Horizontal Lines:

Vertical Lines:

Exercise 3.8 -

Add dimensions to the following objects using thick and thin lines only

a.) Pencil Box

b.) Book

c.) Coffee Mug
Conclusion

So with this, you got deep and detailed knowledge about the second element of drawing i.e. Line, how it’s formed, how it’s used, what are its types and how the sketches are made with these lines. You can now make beautiful sketches by combining a lot of lines together in certain ways.

Did you know what is Doodling or have you ever tried to make any sketch or cartoon with a doodle?

If Yes, send us your ideas and artworks to get them featured with all your details on my blog…

Now let’s see,

With all the knowledge you gained with this lecture, Can you make beautiful sketches and paintings and prove that You are the most creative among all ??

Complete the exercises given in this Lecture and send your creative work to me… I’ll be highly grateful to review your work. If you have any other doubt or suggestion, feel free to contact us. We would love to hear it from you.

icon-chevron-circle-left  icon-chevron-circle-left  Previous Lecture                                                                                               Next Lecture icon-chevron-circle-right icon-chevron-circle-right

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Let’s do some application exercises based on the knowledge that we gained in previous lectures.

These application exercises will help you use your artistic skills in your real life

1.    You have been asked to create one page of a book for kindergarten children to learn about basic birds, animals, fruits etc. Create drawings of 5 birds, fruits or animals using Stippling Technique (dots). The children have to connect these dots and complete the drawing. Use black ball pen.

Note: Use 5" x 5" squares for each drawing. Leave enough space in between the dots, so the kids can connect the dots to create the design.

2.  Using Stippling Technique, create a design for a Rangoli for Diwali festival. Use different sizes of dots and different colors. Also, you have to use ball pens, sketch pens and marker pens for creating your design.

Note: You can also experiment with varying the space between the design.

3.  Using Stippling Technique, create a design on one of your T-Shirt. You can proudly wear this T-Shirt.

Note: Use fabric colour and stick to create this design.

Send your work to me for guaranteed feedback.

Goto Lecture 1

Goto Lecture 2

The post Application Exercises for Lecture 1 & 2 appeared first on Learn2Draw.

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Here are your first Exploration Exercises to check your knowledge and skills you got from Lecture 1 and Lecture 2.

These exploration exercises will help you practice what you learnt and also give a lot more experience of drawing not only with pencil or colours but with many other things and materials present around you.

    1. Collect different types of food grains. Use them to create illustrations using the Stippling Technique.

Note: Instead of drawing dots, here you will be pasting the grains on a mount
board sheet.
  1.  2. Take a toothpick and use it to make holes on a tinted/chart paper (like dots). Create an interesting design. Hold it against the light and play with your design using light.
Note : You can use the same technique to create a homemade lamp.
  1. 3. In the environment around you, try to find examples of “Textures” made from dots. Take pictures of these examples, print them and paste them in your sketchbook. E.g. Leaves, Fruits, Insects, Objects etc.

4. Let’s try to make a product using dots. Get a card paper sheet and create 2 dices which you can use to play “Snakes & Ladders”. You can even make coloured dices.

Note : This will also improve your understanding of 3D shapes.

Send your work to me for guaranteed feedback.

  Lecture 1

  Lecture 2                                                                       Application Exercises for Lecture 1 & 2 icon-chevron-circle-right

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Let’s study the Elements of Drawing. Here you will learn about how just a dot can help you a lot in the drawing. A drawing will start and end with just that dot. Also just arranging the dots in certain ways can give you beautiful sketches.

Elements of Drawing – The Point or a Dot 2.1 Understanding Points/Dots around you
  • The point in the first and simplest elements of drawing. The beginning of any drawing starts with a dot.                        

Start with a dot 

Create a drawing

  • A point always attracts the viewer’s attention. Try playing darts or searching for a location in Google Maps, it’s always the point that draws your attention.

  • A series of points create visual movement, especially when they move close together

  • Dots can be used to create visual images. The images below have been created purely using dots.

Exercise 2.1 -

Lets try to create some simple shapes using the element "dot". From your
memory, create the shapes of:

a.) A Square
b.) A Circle
c.) A Leaf
d.) Your Name
2.2 Stippling Technique – Drawing with just DOTs

Stippling is the technique of creating a pattern using dots by using them in different ways. Let’s try to understand some concepts:

a.  When we draw a dot and keep adding more dots to its side, we get a line.

b.  When we continue that line and come back to the beginning dot, we get a shape.

c.  If we arrange these dots a little bit loosely, we get a lighter shade.

d.  If we arrange them a little closer, we get middle shade.

e.  If we arrange them a little more closer, we get a darker shade.

To create any design we need lines, shapes and different shades.

Now let’s try to use these Stippling Techniques to create a drawing of a flower.

Step 1 –     Start putting the dots close to each other to form a petal shape.

Step 2 –     In the middle, the flower is dark so we can create a darker shade.

Step 3 –     Use the above techniques and your imagination to complete the drawing of the flower.

Exercise 2.2 -

Till now you must be aware of what is Stippling Technique. Get a picture of
the face of your favourite cartoon character, e.g. Mickey Mouse, Spider-man.
Observe the picture. Using pencil dots, create a drawing of the picture.
Conclusion

So with this, you got deep and detailed knowledge about the First element of drawing i.e. A Dot.  Now, you are well aware of the fact that a dot is required to start a drawing as well as end it. You also know what is Stippling Technique and you can make beautiful pictures just by putting a lot of dots together in n number of ways.

Have you already made artwork using Stippling Technique on any of your T-shirts or shoes or anywhere else?

If Yes, send us your ideas and artworks to get them featured with all your details on my blog… Or you can also share it below in the comment box so that everyone can have a look at your innovative artwork.

Now let’s see,

With all the knowledge you gained with this lecture, Can you make beautiful sketches and paintings and prove that You are the most creative among all ??

Complete the exercises given in this Lecture and send your creative work to me… I’ll be highly grateful to review your work. If you have any other doubt or suggestion, feel free to contact us. We would love to hear it from you.

Practice makes a man perfect. So, practice more and more and complete these useful and interesting exercises to become a better artist. Send me your work and I’ll surely revert you back…

First Complete your Exploration and Application exercises for better
understanding of Lecture 1 and Lecture 2 before proceding to Lecture 3.

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The post Elements of Drawing – Point and Dot : Lecture 2 appeared first on Learn2Draw.

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