Loading...

Follow Ken Rudin's Political Junkie on Feedspot

Continue with Google
Continue with Facebook
or

Valid

Is Sen. Cindy Hyde-Smith (R-Miss.) in trouble in her bid for a full term?   Either way, it leads to this week’s question:  Who was the last Republican to lose a Senate race in Mississippi?

Submit your answer in the box below. We’ll pick a winner at random from the bunch. The winner will get a fabulous Political Junkie button. And don’t forget to sign up for our Political Junkie newsletter. You’ll get all the latest from Team PJ every issue.

Last week’s trivia question was:  When was the last time a member of the Cabinet quit or was fired the day after an election?

The answer?  2006.  On the day after Democrats won control of both the House and Senate, President Bush asked for and received the resignation of Defense Secretary Donald Rumsfeld.

The randomly selected winner is Nick Hildebrand of Greenville, Pa.  Nick wins the coveted Political Junkie button.

The post This Week’s Trivia Question appeared first on Ken Rudin's Political Junkie.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 
Ken Rudin's Political Junkie by Devin Maverick Robins, Ken Rudin - 5d ago

A week after the 2018 midterm elections and there’s still no shortage of uncertainty.  Susan MacManus of the University of South Florida reports on the suspicion and vitriol taking place in Florida, where races for the Senate and governor are too close to call and are now the subject of a recount — bringing back memories, mostly bad, of what took place in the Sunshine State during the Bush v. Gore recount in 2000.

And another race yet to be called is in Georgia, where Republican Brian Kemp holds a 58,000-vote lead over his Democratic opponent, Stacey Abrams.  Greg Bluestein of the Atlanta Journal-Constitution says that Abrams’ only remaining hope is not to overturn Kemp’s lead — which may be impossible — but to get him under 50 percent of the vote.  If that would happen, the two candidates would advance to a December 4th runoff.  And then, all bets would be off.

Finally, presidential scholar Stephen Hess has a new book out about his six decades in politics.  It’s called “Bit Player” (which Hess is decidedly not), and it goes from his role as a speechwriter for President Eisenhower in the 1950s, through his years with Richard Nixon, and where he is now, and has been since 1972, at the Brookings Institution.

Music used in this podcast:

Where Is My Mind by the Pixies

1-2-3 by Len Barry

How Can I Be Sure by The Young Rascals

Isn’t It A Pity by George Harrison

You Are The Only One by Toshi Reagon

The post Episode #252: Florida. Again. appeared first on Ken Rudin's Political Junkie.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

A recount in Florida?  Why, that sounds as familiar as … an easy ScuttleButton puzzle waiting to be solved!

How to Play
ScuttleButton, as you may know, is that weekly waste-of-time exercise where we post a vertical sequence of campaign buttons.  Your job is to take one word (or concept) per button and add ’em up to arrive at a famous name or familiar expression. Guess the correct phrase and you could be the proud winner of the coveted Political Junkie button!

Enter your submission using the convenient submission form below, or email your submission to scuttlebutton@krpoliticaljunkie.com. You must include your name and city/state to be eligible.

Good luck!

Last week’s winner:  Jane Grabenstein of Monroeville, Pa.

View the answer to the last puzzle

Submit Your ScuttleButton Response[contact-form-7]

The post It’s ScuttleButton Time! appeared first on Ken Rudin's Political Junkie.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

We’re still counting votes in this year’s Arizona and Florida Senate races.  But that doesn’t mean we can’t look ahead to the Senate class of 2020.  The following senators’ terms are up in two years:

REPUBLICANS (22): Lamar Alexander (Tenn.), Shelley Moore Capito (W.Va.), Bill Cassidy (La.), Susan Collins (Me.), John Cornyn (Tex.), Tom Cotton (Ark.), Steve Daines (Mont.), Mike Enzi (Wyo.), Joni Ernst (Iowa), Cory Gardner (Colo.), Lindsey Graham (S.C.), Cindy Hyde-Smith (Miss.)*, Jim Inhofe (Okla.), Jon Kyl (Ariz.)#, Mitch McConnell (Ky.), David Perdue (Ga.), Jim Risch (Idaho), Pat Roberts (Kan.), Mike Rounds (S.D.), Ben Sasse (Neb.), Dan Sullivan (Alaska), Thom Tillis (N.C.).

DEMOCRATS (12): Cory Booker (N.J.), Chris Coons (Del.), Dick Durbin (Ill.), Doug Jones (Ala.), Ed Markey (Mass.), Jeff Merkley (Ore.), Gary Peters (Mich.), Jack Reed (R.I.), Jeanne Shaheen (N.H.), Tina Smith (Minn.), Tom Udall (N.M.), Mark Warner (Va.).

*Hyde-Smith is facing Mike Espy (D) in a Nov. 27 runoff.

#Kyl has said he will not run in the special election for the seat he filled following John McCain’s (R) death.

The post Is It 2020 Yet? These Senators Are Up In Two Years appeared first on Ken Rudin's Political Junkie.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

In the wake of Jeff Sessions’ dismissal, here’s this week’s question:  When was the last time a senior member of the Cabinet quit or was fired the day after an election?

Submit your answer in the box below. We’ll pick a winner at random from the bunch. The winner will get a fabulous Political Junkie button. And don’t forget to sign up for our Political Junkie newsletter. You’ll get all the latest from Team PJ every issue.

Last week’s trivia question was:  What state has gone the longest since last electing a Democrat as governor?

The answer:  South Dakota.  In 1974, the voters re-elected Richard Kneip to the governorship.  That was the last time.

The randomly selected winner is Matt Fouracre of Washington, D.C.  Matt wins the coveted Political Junkie button.

The post This Week’s Trivia Question appeared first on Ken Rudin's Political Junkie.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

There are still some races from Tuesday’s midterms that have yet to be called, but right now that isn’t our biggest worry.  It’s trying to figure out which candidates these buttons represent.

As our fellow political junkies know, for some time now we’ve been showing photos of unknown buttons, arranged alphabetically by candidate names, for you to help identify.  We can’t make heads or tails of these candidates, most of whom we’ve never heard of.  And when we see a “Smith for Congress” or a “Jones for Senator” button, how do we know which Smith or which Jones?  So we’ve been posting pictures of these buttons, hoping you will have the answer.  Often, you have come through, which is most appreciated.

Thus far, we’ve completed the first 15 letters of the alphabet.  (Check out our previous “Who Dats”:  Unknowns beginning with the Letter A, Letter B, two pages for Letter C (here and here), Letter D, Letter E, Letter F, Letter G, Letter H, Letter I, Letter J, Letter K, Letter L, Letter M, Letter N and Letter O)  We even have one of buttons with pictures only — no names.  That’s even harder to decipher.

We now bring you to the Letter P.  Yes, we finally got up to P.  All you have to do is help with the identification of these buttons.  Thanks! 

The post Who Dat? – P appeared first on Ken Rudin's Political Junkie.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

It’s finally over.  The 2018 midterms, with all its rancor and charges and bitterness, are over.  But if it’s a referendum on President Trump, what’s the message if the Democrats did great in the House and the Republicans did great in the Senate?  NPR’s Ron Elving has the answers.

And we also hear from two former members of Congress, one Republican and one Democrat, both of whom have great insight.  Bob Livingston, a Louisiana Republican who once headed the Appropriations Committee, says that the elections were a mixed bag but should now lead to the two parties working together.  Vic Fazio, a California Democrat who once led the DCCC, says that focusing on impeachment would be a big mistake for his party, and suggests other issues should be paramount now that they have retaken the majority in the House.

Music used in this podcast:

Goodbye by Mary Hopkin

I Want to Break Free by Queen

Dr. Livingstone, I Presume by The Moody Blues

Tale As Old As Time from Beauty and the Beast

Power and the Passion by Midnight Oil

The post Episode #251: Not a Blue Wave, But a Purple Rain appeared first on Ken Rudin's Political Junkie.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

It’s the Political Junkie Midterm Election Special:  What’s at stake on November 6th and what to look for.  We hear from:

  • Republican strategist Vin Weber and Democratic pollster Anna Greenberg on the backdrop of the election, key races to watch, and their significance;
  • Kelly Dittmar of the Center for American Women and Politics at Rutgers, who assesses the record number of female candidates in 2018 and what it means for the future of women in politics;
  • Josh Douglas, a law professor at the University of Kentucky, on the rising instances of voter intimidation across the country; and
  • Greg Giroux of Bloomberg, with a quick history lesson about midterm elections during a president’s first term.

Music used in this podcast:

When The Battle Is Over by Delaney & Bonnie

A Woman’s Voice by Wendy Wall

Vote, Baby Vote by Deee-Lite

I’m A Happy Man by The Jive Five

The post Episode #250: The 2018 Midterm Election Special appeared first on Ken Rudin's Political Junkie.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

This week’s question:  What state has gone the longest since last electing a Democrat as governor?

Submit your answer in the box below. We’ll pick a winner at random from the bunch. The winner will get a fabulous Political Junkie button. And don’t forget to sign up for our Political Junkie newsletter. You’ll get all the latest from Team PJ every issue.

Last week’s trivia question was:  In the past half century, who was the most senior woman of the House to be defeated in her bid for re-election?

The answer?  Frances Bolton.   An Ohio Republican, she was first elected in a 1940 special election to succeed her late husband.  And she served until 1968, when she was defeated in her bid for a 16th term by Democrat Charles Vanik.

The randomly selected winner is Del Atwood of New Glasgow, Nova Scotia, Canada.  Del wins the coveted Political Junkie button.

The post This Week’s Trivia Question appeared first on Ken Rudin's Political Junkie.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Separate tags by commas
To access this feature, please upgrade your account.
Start your free month
Free Preview