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Kids First Aid by Kids First Aid Administrator - 2w ago

Fever is a common childhood illness accounting for almost 20% of the paediatric presentations to local Emergency Departments (ED). A recent study (Feb 2019), of almost two thousand children who presented with fever to an ED, found that most cases were not urgent (68%), 53% were aged between 13 – 24 months, and the months of June, July and August are the worst time of year. When interviewed, many parents chose to take their babies and toddlers to hospital out of concern that any fever may escalate to the more severe complications of fever such as seizures, brain damage or death (rare).

The following table, taken from the recent study, lists the breakdown of diagnosis for each child who had presented with a fever.

What does all of this mean for the worried parent who is sitting at home alone with a sickly child at 2 a.m.?

The first thing to say is that our bodies will naturally produce a mild fever as a defence which kills foreign bacteria and, in most cases, it does the job wonderfully. The best thing that you can do is to keep monitoring the baby’s temperature every 30 minutes. If your baby does not improve you can:

  • use medicines as recommended by your GP (i.e. Panadol or Nurofen);
  • keep the room cool by opening windows or using fans;
  • keep wiping their body down with a cool cloth;
  • hop into a tepid shower with your little one and let the cool water run over them; and
  • keep the fluids up to them because a dry nappy is a serious sign of dehydration.

The Journal of Nursing Research and Practice states that “Fever is an increase in body temperature to a level that is above normal. Normal body temperature is 37°C and one or more degree above this level is considered as a fever. However, body temperature varies between people and throughout the day. Circadian cycles influence the body temperature where it is lowest in the morning and rises to a maximum in the evening. This change of temperature is linked with the sleep wake cycle of an individual, and the range over which it fluctuates is normally 1.3°C in adults. Fever does not constitute a serious sign or symptom unless it rises to a significant level and remains persistently high. If a rectal measurement determines a temperature of 41.6°C or 107°F, then it is important to seek treatment and care. A temperature above 41.6°C may cause serious complications such as cardiac issues, dehydration, stroke, seizures, and sometimes death. Fever may occur as a defensive response to pathogens. These pathogens may not survive at a higher temperature and therefore they are killed or restricted from growth through an increase in body temperature. External pyrogens such as bacteria, viruses, fungal or parasitic infections are common causes of fever in children. Common conditions caused by bacterial infections that result in a fever are meningitis, occult bacteraemia, urinary tract infections (UTI), acute otitis media, pneumonia, gastroenteritis, and upper and lower respiratory tract infections.”

It is a tremendous help for Paramedics attending your home if you can do up a simple observation chart in the bedroom of each child – like they do in hospitals. This sort of information is extremely valuable in an emergency as you can often forget this level of detail. If you are taking your baby to the hospital you can take a quick photo to show the Nurses and Doctors. It is also a very helpful guide for someone who may be babysitting. You can do up your own version however some people have found the attached template helpful to print off and laminate. That way you can update it each month as your baby grows.

The post Fevers and your baby appeared first on Kids First Aid.

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Kids First Aid by Kids First Aid Administrator - 1M ago

Asthma Australia recently released updates to their national guidelines and these updates may have an impact upon the management of the disease for babies and toddlers with asthma. Please see below.

Did you know that there were 441 deaths due to asthma in 2017? It still happens. Would you know what to do in an emergency?

Some other facts include:

  • 1 in 9 Australians have asthma – around 2.7 million people.
  • There were almost 40,000 hospitalisations in 2014-15 where asthma was the main diagnosis.
  • Children under 15 are more likely to be hospitalised with asthma.
  • It’s more common in males under 15, but more common for females over 15.
  • The rate of asthma among Indigenous Australians is almost twice as high as that of non-Indigenous Australians.
  • Asthma is more common in people living in socioeconomically disadvantaged areas.
  • Only 57% of children (under 15) have an asthma action plan.

Causes of Asthma? People with asthma often have: a family history of asthma; eczema; hay fever; exposure to tobacco smoke (especially as a baby or young child); and obesity.

What are the symptoms of asthma? A person’s asthma symptoms can vary over time – sometimes they will have no symptoms, especially when their asthma is well-controlled. Symptoms often vary from person to person, but they are most commonly: breathlessness; wheezing; tight feeling in the chest; a persistent cough. The symptoms often occur at night, early in the morning or during/just after activity. They are caused by the narrowing of the airways.

Back to the recent Asthma Australia updates. The biggest change in the new guidelines concerns the management of asthma in children from 0-12 months. Asthma Australia advises that there may be many reasons for wheezing in a child <12 months and we should not assume that it is asthma in case. The other child specific updates are:

  • Diagnosis and management of asthma for children under 12 months is not recommended within the primary care setting.
  • If your infant is wheezing, your doctor should seek advice from or refer you to a paediatrician or paediatric respiratory specialist.
  • The recommendations are different for children aged 1-5 years compared to 6 years and over.
  • Please check with your GP that your child’s care is consistent with the new guidelines.
  • If your child has allergic rhinitis (hay fever), ask for allergen management advice.
  • Discuss allergen immunotherapy as a strategy for asthma prevention.
  • See your GP before your child returns to school each year. Back to school asthma is a known and serious risk and is firmly set out in the updated guidelines.

You may find this website is helpful to educate your youngsters about their respiratory disease.

In an emergency…

Please see the updated flow chart (at the top of this post) for Asthma First Aid. This short video demonstrates how to treat a mild asthma attack. In a more acute attack the process is the same, but it is extended for a longer period. It may be necessary to continue the first aid treatment until the Ambulance arrives.

Asthma Australia have also released a great app to assist with the management and treatment of Asthma. It is free and it is only available on iOS devices so far. Download it here.

The post Updated advice for carers of persons with asthma appeared first on Kids First Aid.

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Knowing what to do in an emergency situation with your child can be reassuring when you know the basics of first aid. So when it comes to the wellbeing and care of our children, learning from a paramedic who does this every day and has a wealth of knowledge can be even more empowering. They have years of experience and secondly, they’re often parents themselves. That’s two powerful reasons why doing first aid training with a paramedic makes a difference.

Most common emergencies

When you’re faced with an emergency situation involving your child, it is very easy to freeze or panic or worry about what to do after calling Triple 0.

Our first aid training course covers the 10 most common emergencies involving children and our paramedics can help you with first aid training that can – and has – saved lives.

All you will need to know

The three-hour course is presented in an engaging and informative manner, making the first aid easy to remember, and it includes covering: CPR, drowning, fractures and bleeding, choking, bites and stings, fits and fevers, burns, meningococcal and poisoning.

Every year, our intensive care paramedics attend critical events. What happens in the first few minutes of an emergency situation can make an enormous difference to the outcome – and the wellbeing of your infant.

With chocking, for example, you will be taught that there are several types of chocking and each has a correct treatment. Steps you need to take to clear the airway and be informed of various dated treatment methods that can actually cause more damage.

Take-home reminder

Our first aid training will ensure that if your child has been underwater and drowning, you’ll know what to do and be prepared. The same goes for the other common emergencies we cover in the course. You will also be given a poster to help remind you of the proper first aid techniques.

Available nationally

We have a team of highly qualified first aid paramedics nationally and we host regular sessions which anyone can book and attend. We also tailor first aid training sessions for corporate businesses and organisations, and we are able to offer the first aid course on site.

Find out more about all our kids first aid courses, you can check here for course dates and venues.

The post Why doing first aid training with a paramedic makes a difference appeared first on Kids First Aid.

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Kids First Aid by Kids First Aid Administrator - 7M ago

Summer is usually the happiest time of year for Australian families. It’s a time when we enjoy extended holidays and sun-soaked Christmas celebrations, long days at the beach and barbecues with friends.

However, sunny days spent outside in the backyard or on the sand can mean injuries are more commonplace.

We’ve had a look at some of the most common injuries parents should be aware of this summer, and offer a few tips on how to treat them:

Drowning:

Gatherings around pools or at the beach are a valued tradition for many Australian families, but with that tradition comes the very real danger of drowning. Parents can reduce risks by always supervising children. When there are several families in one place, ensure you confirm with other parents who’s supervising. At the beach, ensure you always swim between the red and yellow flags. Finally, brushing up on your CPR skills is important for every parent. You can book yourself into a first-aid course covering CPR by clicking here.

Sunburn:

In our harsh Australian climate, sunburn is a very real problem. These days, most parents are very aware of the need to slip slop slap to keep the burns at bay – and prevention is the best cure – but sunburns can and do still happen. A 20 minute cool shower will help reduce symptoms and discomfort. Keep the area moisturized. And ensure you keep your child’s fluids up with water and seek medical help if the burn is bad, if there is extensive blistering, or signs of infection.

Bicycle, scooter and skateboard injuries:

Children should always wear the appropriate clothing for the activity they’re undertaking. A helmet is essential, and knee and wrist pads are also advisable for kids heading out on skateboards. When injuries do occur, act quickly to apply cold compresses to swollen areas. If you think your child has sustained a fracture, seek medical assistance. Click here for more information, too.

Stings and Insect Bites:

When an insect bite strikes, there’s often not much that can be done to treat it. However, applying a cold compress can reduce pain and inflammation. For jellyfish stings, call Triple 0 or seek advice from a lifeguard if there’s one nearby. Apply vinegar liberally to the area, or seawater if there’s no vinegar on hand. Don’t use fresh water to clean the sting.

Snake Bite:

Thankfully this is a less common injury, but it’s most common in the summertime and is an important one to know how to treat. Snakes are active over the warmer months and snake bites can often occur while kids are out exploring, bushwalking or camping.  If your child experiences a snakebite, it’s important to keep them calm and call Triple 0 first. Firmly bandage the affected limb (if that’s where the bite was), starting at the foot or hand and working up towards the body.

Seeing Your Child In An Emergency Can Be Horrifying – Feeling Helpless is Worse

With the help of our training, you’ll sleep easy knowing that you’re prepared for almost every emergency.

  • If your child is burnt or scalded, you’ll be prepared.
  • If your child eats something and starts choking, you’ll be prepared.
  • If your child experiences a sudden seizure, you’ll be prepared.
  • If your child has been underwater and drowning, you’ll be prepared.
  • If your child is suffering from a super-high fever, you’ll be prepared.
  • If your child suffers a severe allergic reaction, you’ll be prepared.
  • If your child swallows poison or a household substance, you’ll be prepared.
  • If your child has an accident and breaks a bone, you’ll be prepared.
For the Price of a Restaurant Dinner, You Can Know PRECISELY How to Deal with Your Child’s Emergency…

Our most popular course is the Kids FIRST Aid — 3 Hour Course

This engaging and practical course covers the 10 most common emergency situations. At the end of 3 hours, you’ll know precisely how to deal with the emergency situation before the paramedics and first responders arrive. You’ll also receive a take home poster to remind you of the correct techniques.

Kids First Aid Workshop Reviews - YouTube

Your entire workshop tuition is just AU$ 85 per person (plus GST). A nominal sum to ensure you’re equipped to respond to a first aid emergency, whenever the need arises.

Unlike many other first aid courses, ALL our workshops are delivered by qualified and experienced paramedics – many of whom are parents themselves.

The post Top 5 Kids Injuries In Summer appeared first on Kids First Aid.

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If you child runs down the road and trips, he or she might get back on their feet and no harm’s been done. As a parent, you will surely breathe a sigh of relief. But, what about if you had to apply first aid to a more serious children’s injury?

Would you know what to do?

Helping your child

Applying first aid to common children’s injuries is all about knowing the basics so that when something happens to your child and it looks potentially serious, you won’t need to freak out and panic. The best thing you can do for your child at such a time is to stay calm.

Good basic knowledge about first aid can really help, though a kids’ first aid course is your step towards peace of mind. With that practical information under your belt, you can rest assured you can help your child in their time of need.

As a parent, you may have already come across a few of these common injuries or you may be in real need of these first aid tips*. At the very least, these will help jog your memory.

Broken bone

If the bone is sticking out or is crooked and your child is in a lot of pain, has fainted, vomited or is light-headed, go to your nearest hospital emergency department.

Nosebleed

When a nosebleed starts, it often looks worse than it is. The first aid key here is to be patient, as it often takes far longer to calm down than you imagine. Set a timer for 15 minutes and have your child tilt their head forward slightly, then pinch their nose tightly just below the nasal bone with a towel or tissues.

Chipped tooth

A chipped tooth with an exposed nerve needs to be seen to straight away; call your dentist immediately and see if they can fit you in, or make other arrangements. Gently rinse a knocked-out permanent tooth and put it back in its socket at once. Ask your child to hold it in place by biting a paper towel or a clean washcloth.

Burns

The skin will either be red and blistered or worse will appear white or black if it is a third-degree burn, which requires immediate medical attention. For a basic burn, hold the area under a cool tap for up to 15 minutes to cool the skin, ease pain, and reduce inflammation. Apply an antibiotic lotion.

Bleeding wound

If the bleeding doesn’t stop after a few minutes of applying pressure, it could be serious. Flush the wound with tap water and soap, gently apply antibiotic ointment, and put on a bandage. If blood then seeps through the bandage, apply direct pressure for 15 minutes and elevate the injured area above the heart to stop the bleeding.

Find out more about all our kids first aid courses here or check out the online course here.

*This is general first aid information. Seek immediate professional help if your child is seriously injured.

The post Applying first aid to common children’s injuries appeared first on Kids First Aid.

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Kids First Aid by Kids First Aid Administrator - 7M ago

Safety challenges

We tend to think of the winter months as a period of hibernation where we prefer to stay indoors. And while that’s true, we still like to be out and about and with that comes a few safety challenges for you and your family, especially your little ones. So it’s wise to stay vigilant. This is why we have prepared your first aid kit list for winter.

What to teach your kids

There are also factors to consider while you and your family cosy up indoors. Teach your children how to stay safe around heat sources. Knowing how to treat burns, scalding and other heat related injuries can not only save a life, but also minimise scarring and shorten the healing process. We teach how to treat burns in our first aid courses here.

Here are a few other scenarios to consider when thinking about your first aid kit list for winter:

Home fires

The statistics show house fires are more prevalent in winter than summer. An insurance company found that when it analysed its home claims from 2011 to 2016 fires across the country spike during winter – increasing by 23 per cent compared to autumn. Common causes include embers escaping from open fire places, and faulty electric blankets and heaters. Its research found people leave electric blankets on overnight and leaving open flames unattended, even for a minute or two. After attending one of our first aid courses, you’ll be able to show your children how to escape a fire by making the easiest exits obvious, and showing them how to avoid smoke inhalation and what to do in case someone does get a burn.

Out in the great outdoors

You may decide to take your family on a skiing holiday or go on a bushwalk. While it is unlikely to occur, would you know what to do if for some reason you and your kids got lost or waylaid in the cold? An extended period outside could result in frostbite or if you were in the water hypothermia. Learning the reasons why it is unwise to rub the frostbitten area and what to do instead, and when to offer warm drinks and dry clothing to hypothermia sufferers is covered in our courses.

Common injuries

Your kids could break their arm, finger or leg, suffer a sprain or strain as it’s easy to slip and fall when it’s cold, wet and slippery out there. Here in this earlier blog we discuss what to do should that happen to your child.

It is always good to have visual reminders around the home also when emergencies happen. So here you will find a free poster which is a potentially lifesaving resource for you and your family – put together by our team of trained paramedics. It’s called Dr ABC and shows you how to first respond should an emergency occur.

Your first aid kit list in winter would be greatly enhanced by doing a kid’s first aid course so that no matter what happens you’ll be prepared.

The post Your First Aid Kit List for Winter appeared first on Kids First Aid.

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Saturday mornings spent on a football field, or after-school gymnastic or swimming lessons are an important rite of passage in most kids’ childhoods – and for good reason.

While we know the health benefits of regular exercise, the ever-present risk of injury can be a dampener for parents. However, there are a few simple things every parent can do to reduce risks – as well as things every parent should know in case injury does strike.

Preventing injury:

Doing what you can to prevent injury on the sporting field involves both a bit of preparation and a bit of vigilance. Here are a few things you can do:

  • Make sure your child is wearing the correct safety gear for the sport they’re playing. Helmets, mouth guards, shin pads, wrist guards and so on all have a role to play, depending on the sport. Your child’s coach should be able to provide a list of the correct equipment.
  • Ensure your child stays hydrated. Kids can become so caught up in the moment they forget to stop and replenish, so encourage them to do so.
  • Know what a concussion looks like. We’ve outlined the symptoms further in this article.
  • Don’t be afraid to speak up if you have concerns over the conditions your child is playing in. If you think it’s too hot for a scheduled game of cricket or too cold for swimming outdoors, then trust your gut.
  • Make sure your child is correctly undertaking any warm-up and cool-down exercises. If none have been set, encourage them to do some gentle running and plenty of stretching before playing sport. Cool-down exercises should involve further stretching.

Be prepared:

You’re making sure your child is prepared, so it pays for you to be as well. Here’s a few steps you can take:

  • Make sure you’re up to date with your first aid training.
  • Keep a first aid kit handy in your car.
  • Keep a phone on you, or close to hand.

Know how to treat common injuries:

Sprains: Sprains are best treated using the RICE approach: rest, ice, compression and elevation.

Cuts: Stop the bleeding by applying direct pressure on the area, gently clean the wound, and wrap in a sterile bandage.

Grazes: Clean the wound with water. Pat the area dry and apply a sterile plaster or dressing.

Bleeding nose: Encourage your child to sit up, leaning slightly forward. Apply an ice pack to the injured area.

Concussion: Some tell-tale signs your child might be concussed are if he or she is complaining of a headache or feeling pressure in the head, has lost consciousness, is behaving confused, seeing stars or has become dizzy.  If you suspect your child may have concussion, seed medical help as soon as possible.

Remember, a few bumps and bruises are part and parcel of playing sports – but with a bit of vigilance, you can ensure your child’s best sporting tales are all ones of glory, not injury.

Seeing Your Child In An Emergency Can Be Horrifying – Feeling Helpless is Worse

With the help of our training, you’ll sleep easy knowing that you’re prepared for almost every emergency.

  • If your child is burnt or scalded, you’ll be prepared.
  • If your child eats something and starts choking, you’ll be prepared.
  • If your child experiences a sudden seizure, you’ll be prepared.
  • If your child has been underwater and drowning, you’ll be prepared.
  • If your child is suffering from a super-high fever, you’ll be prepared.
  • If your child suffers a severe allergic reaction, you’ll be prepared.
  • If your child swallows poison or a household substance, you’ll be prepared.
  • If your child has an accident and breaks a bone, you’ll be prepared.
For the Price of a Restaurant Dinner, You Can Know PRECISELY How to Deal with Your Child’s Emergency…

Our most popular course is the Kids FIRST Aid — 3 Hour Course

This engaging and practical course covers the 10 most common emergency situations. At the end of 3 hours, you’ll know precisely how to deal with the emergency situation before the paramedics and first responders arrive. You’ll also receive a take home poster to remind you of the correct techniques.

Kids First Aid Workshop Reviews - YouTube

Your entire workshop tuition is just AU$ 85 per person (plus GST). A nominal sum to ensure you’re equipped to respond to a first aid emergency, whenever the need arises.

Unlike many other first aid courses, ALL our workshops are delivered by qualified and experienced paramedics – many of whom are parents themselves.

The post How to prevent and treat children’s sports injuries appeared first on Kids First Aid.

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A parent’s love

We are hardwired to protect our young. That goes without saying. However, we often don’t think about what we would do if our little one’s life was on the line. Would you know what to do, depending on the circumstances? It could be hugely beneficial to find out what you can expect to learn in an online first aid course.

What the course offers

Our first aid online course is a 10-module system which helps teach parents with young children how to respond to the most common emergency situations until medical help arrives. It is easy to follow and affordable.

This is what our online course offers:

  • You’ll learn what many parents unknowingly do incorrectly in crisis situations
  • You’ll know exactly what to do in the most common emergencies your child is likely to experience
  • You’ll learn at your own pace and can refresh your knowledge or look up specific information — any time, from anywhere, on any device
  • You’ll get instant access to the course — whenever you need it — so you can learn and review critical skills at the touch of a finger.
Feedback from parents

We have had many parents take our online course and they are always thankful to have gained knowledge they didn’t have before. One couple, for example, noticed their eight-month-old daughter’s face had turned bright red one day and she wasn’t breathing easily. Mum Amelia quickly picked up her daughter and put her on the bed, with her head over the edge. After backslapping her hard a few times, using the safe method she had recently learnt, her daughter threw up what she was choking on. It turned out she had gotten into the baby bag, picked up a seal from a pack of baby food, and put it in her mouth.

Mum knew what to do

Fortunately, Amelia had learned the vital life-saving techniques that her daughter needed in that moment. She was praised for handling the situation exceptionally well, thanks to having done the online first aid training course. Her young daughter was fine as a result.

Common emergencies

The online course will cover all the most common medical emergencies your little one might experience in a mishap such as inability to breath, drowning, poisoning, poisoning, fractures and bleeding, burns, chocking, bites and stings, meningococcal and allergies and anaphylaxis.

Peace of mind

As we’ve mentioned, we are thankful to receive a lot of feedback about our courses over the years, including our online course. Parents tell us that the confidence and peace of mind they gain just from knowing what to do is invaluable. Wouldn’t you like to be able to do that too?

Check out the affordable 10 module online course here.

The post What you can expect to learn in an Online First Aid Course appeared first on Kids First Aid.

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Kids First Aid by Kids First Aid Administrator - 7M ago

Dangerous ground

Australia is a country where everyone loves to be outdoors. But we are also a nation which has some of the most venomous snakes in the world. That’s why it pays to know about snake bite first aid and other nasties when it comes to protecting your children and loved ones from danger.

Deadly snakes

We have at least 10 venomous snakes in this vast land – some of their venom is the most toxic in the world and it is potentially deadly if not treated quickly and appropriately. Some of our most dangerous snakes include: the eastern brown snake; the western brown snake; the mainland tiger snake; the Inland taipan and the king brown snake. They can be found close to urban areas and in the bush.

Bites not uncommon

As we are a much urbanised continent, most of us would not know what to do if confronted with a snake during an outing – though this does not mean it is completely unlikely we will encounter a snake or dangerous animal when out and about. Snake bites and bites from other nasties, such as spiders, do occur.

Plan of action

That is why you need a plan of action against a snake bite and this is where first aid comes in. There are public courses available to teach you what you would need to do to save a life.

Invaluable practical information

Our public courses, available in all states and territories, will teach you invaluable information about what to do if bitten by a snake or other venomous animal. Did you know, for example, that an individual might not experience any symptoms of a snake bite for more than an hour? Or were you aware that it is not recommended that you wash the skin or clothes where a bite may have occurred as leaving it intact can help identify the venom?

What you will learn

The course will help you understand how vital it is to act quickly when a snake bite occurs. If you are able to call triple 0 straight away, you will be shown the following steps to take before medical help arrives. This includes:

  • Lie the person down and ask them to keep still;
  • If the bite is on a limb, apply an elasticised roller bandage (10-15 cm wide) – if available – over the bite site as soon as possible. Use clothing or other material if an elasticised roller bandage is not available;
  • Apply another elasticised roller bandage (10-15 cm wide) just above the fingers or toes and moving upwards on the bitten limb as far as can be reached;
  • Apply the bandage as tightly as possible to the limb;
  • Stay with the person until medical aid arrives.

Make sure you know what to do if an emergency occurs for your child. Find out more about all our kids first aid courses here.

The post Snake bite first aid and other nasties in Australia appeared first on Kids First Aid.

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Kids First Aid by Kids First Aid Administrator - 7M ago

It is always tragic to hear about a baby or child who has died because of a choking accident, but unfortunately they are all too common in Australia.

As a parent, there is something you can do to protect your family against such a terrible event. You can learn about saving your infant should such an incident like choking occur with a baby first aid course.

Injuries are the leading cause of death in Australian children, accounting for nearly half of all deaths. In Australian homes, the most common emergencies for babies and toddlers include:
  • Choking
  • Breathing difficulties, such as asthma and croup
  • Burns and scalds
  • Febrile convulsions
  • Being unconscious or not breathing

The good news is there is something you can do to arm yourself with vital information that could save your baby’s life. Our baby first aid course can mean the difference between life and death. Here is a brief overview:

  • Baby first aid is a specialised course given by trained paramedics which teaches adults or carers what they need to do in an emergency situation where their infant needs care. The baby first aid course covers the most common first aid emergency scenarios.
  • The course offers a wide range of information including helping parents understand the right methods to use in specific incidents.

Would you know, for example, what to do if your baby was in the midst of a febrile convulsion (caused by a spike in body temperature)? One woman who did our baby first aid course later told us that thanks to what she learnt, she recognised the signs and knew what to do and was able to help her child.

  • With choking, for instance, the baby first aid course informs on the different types of choking and the right treatment for each involving clearing the airways. Plus, it also helps dispel myths about old-school style treatments that can cause more harm than good.
  • What if your baby sustains a burn, would you know what to do? Here, we guide you on what steps need to be taken to help your child. How long should you place the burn under cold water? And what should you then use to protect the affected area?

Our baby first aid course gives you the right information so that if you were faced with a situation where your bub is in danger or has been harmed, you can calmly and clearly take the necessary first aid steps to help your child. Knowledge is power.

Find out more about all our kids’ first aid courses here, there are courses in most states.

The post What you need to know about baby first aid appeared first on Kids First Aid.

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