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Katie Jobling Art by Katie Jobling - 9M ago

I love creating little florals because aren’t mini things just the best! Today I am releasing not only these little 5x7” paintings, but also miniature paintings with their own easel.

Most of these little paintings are in oil paint, some are made with high quality acrylic. This size canvas is perfect for me to experiment with colours and placement, and I enjoy it much more than painting medium size. I use a selection of reference images and create my own bouquets using these. That’s why some flowers might make it to more than one painting…greedy flowers!

Firstly I create a base and map where I want the flowers to go. Then I start building up the layers using bold brush strokes and a palette knife. Using a palette knife gives it great texture and oil paint holds the paint really well, which gives a 3d effect.

They make a perfect little gift and add a pop of colour to that desk or shelf. You don’t need a frame because they stand up by themself, with them being painted onto a deep edge frame. This makes them super simple to display and ready to adorn your house or office.

You can view the whole collection of paintings here.

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“The immensity made me realise how tiny we really are in this world. ”

We took a hire car and decided to drive from Geneva, Switzerland to our ski lodge in the French alps. We went from driving main roads in a city, to suddenly being surrounded by trees and mountains in every direction. The trees felt like a protective barrier and made me feel safe and sheltered. They were towering higher than I could have ever imagined and it felt so magical.

For the next week we explored ice glaciers, snow capped mountains and waterfalls. The town we stayed in itself is called Montriond, a ski village which is very popular in the winter. We decided to stay in Summer and I already cannot wait to return.

I wanted to share a few sketchbook pages from my travels. I didn’t get to do as much painting as I’d have liked, as I was too busy exploring and taking it all in. We had a relaxing balcony that looked out onto the town. This became my makeshift studio for a few days. A glass of red wine, painting in my sketchbook on a balcony in the French Alps. (Pinch me!)










These were done with a travel sized Cotman watercolour palette & Moleskine journal. I used a white gel pen to add details.










Items Used Moleskine Pocket Watercolour Notebook (Moleskine Classic) By Moleskine Winsor & Newton Cotman Watercolour Sketch Pocket Box Winsor & Newton

Disclaimer: I earn a small commission if you purchase these products. This money comes from Amazon, and is not added onto the purchase.

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Katie Jobling Art by Katie Jobling - 10M ago

I’ve always enjoyed all sorts of art. But the more paintings I’ve been exposed to, have made me realise I feel much more absorbed by the loose impressionistic style. It has the suggestiveness mixed with the right amount of freedom. Throughout my time as an artist, I’ve found that more creative people have also been drawn to this same style.

Tips to Loosen Artwork
“I feel much more absorbed by the loose impressionistic style”

A lot of people comment on my social media, that they want their artwork to become more loose. There are many ways to achieve this, but firstly we need to start with the way our brain processes images. A tip I used when first starting to create more loose paintings, was to squint heavily at my reference image. I have known artists to remove their glasses, to intentionally blur their reference, whether that’s from life or a photograph. This is just one way to see less realistically.

Another way we can abstractify our reference, is to create studies using colour only. I used this technique earlier this year when I created my abstract pieces. I took reference images that inspired me, and took a few colours from them to create my own original idea.

We could use our brushstrokes, to suggest shapes, rather than an exact representation. I use this technique sometimes when creating petals or leaves in my floral work. Or, if you prefer using a palette knife, this is a great way to create bold marks with restrictions due to the knife shape.

Do you want to loosen your art style? Or do you prefer a more realistic painting? Let me know in the comments!

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