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Test Talks
254: Building A Winning Automation Team with Greg Sypolt

Want to know how to succeed when running automation at scale? In this episode. Greg Sypolt shares his story at USA Today about how he helped change their testing approach from manual to automated testing and grew it from zero to 4000 builds per week. So listen to discover tips on how to put into place a culture that ignites your automation at scale.

About Greg Sypolt

Greg Sypolt is a Director of Quality Engineering at Gannett | USA Today Network. Greg has a blend of a developer, quality, and DevOps mindset allowing him to bridge the gaps between all the team members to achieve the desired outcomes. Greg helps shape the organization approach to testing, tools, processes, continuous integration, and support development teams. He’s an advocate for automating the right things and ensuring that tests are reusable and maintainable.

Quotes & Insights from this Test Talk with Greg Sypolt
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Thanks again for listening to the show. If it has helped you in any way, shape or form, please share it using the social media buttons you see on the page. Additionally, reviews for the podcast on iTunes are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated! They do matter in the rankings of the show and I read each and every one of them.

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Test Talks
253: The Life of a Solo Automation Engineer with Chris Kenst

In this episode discover what it takes to become an automation engineer in a startup with Chris Kenst. Chris also shares tips on how to improve your automation skills leveraging education and conferences. You’ll also discover an awesome resource to make sure you never miss another can’t miss testing event.

About Chris Kenst

Chris Kenst has been improving software quality for nearly 15 years, now serving as an Automation Engineer at BloomNation in Santa Monica, CA. A Board Member for the Non-Profit Association for Software Testing he is working to build better testing education through the AST-BBST classes, webinars and more. An occasional speaker at software conferences and meetups, he writes regularly at Kenst.com and a few other places around the web. Created and maintains an open source list of software testing conferences and workshops from around the world at testingconferences.org.

Quotes & Insights from this Test Talk with Chris Kenst
  • It’s a sort of funny thing. I talk to people and they’re like oh startups don’t hire testers and I’m like I always get hired startups. I’m also usually the sole Tester. So basically what that means is I’m usually recruited by the CTO and the CTO usually comes and they’re like hey we have a testing problem here is what it is. Help us figure it out. So that’s sort of been my mode of operation for a long time.
  • We have a small team. It’s a small engineering team and a small product team and we all sit next to each other. I’m fully embedded in the engineering team. And so part of it is I was like Listen you just feel free to use me as you need to help mitigate problems, put me in the risky areas that kind of thing. And so we do have an overall automation plan. But in terms of what I do day to day, it actually does vary based on like when is our next release, what’s in the release what is my CTO concerned about.
  • You know the funny thing about doing automation is that in order to write the automation you have to understand the features that are out there anyways. And so with that ends up meaning if you end up having to dive deep into a lot of the functionality and features in order to really understand what makes sense automation what doesn’t.
  • I have a big impact when I joined the company and I can speak very well to what I do and the value that I add and the things that I like to see the business do so from once to I get the introduction I’m able to I think proved pretty well that I would be an added value but ultimately for startups they have to get to a point and from what I understand it’s usually when the CTO gets bogged down so much with quality issues or testing that they don’t have enough time to do the things they want to do than they actually actively look for hiring a tester or an automation person.
  • We have some node APIs and some Magento APIs and then we’re using a suite called dredd for basically interpreting our swagger specifications and then auto-generating tests from those.
  • So actionable advice I think it’s gonna be corny but the best actionable advice I can give to someone whether you’re wanting to learn automation or just wanting to get better at something is. I found the best way to make time for that kind of stuff whether or not you have the time after work but if you want to get it done during work I’ve found the best way to do it is literally to schedule the work. It turns out in my experience that my managers and the people around me are really supportive especially as engineers will be able to learn new things. And if you tell someone you want to learn something new as long as you can get over the fear of actually expressing that they’ll generally help you do it and even allow you to do it on work time. Most of the time.
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Test Talks
252: Security Testing in 2019 with SecureGuild

Has the software you’ve tested ever been hacked? How do you know? I just read an article on TechCrunch that hackers went undetected in Citrix internal network for six months! Scary stuff. So in this episode, we’ll take a sneak peek at some of the sessions at SecureGuild an online conference dedicated to security testing taking place May 20-21. Listen up and discover ways to avoid security exploits like the Citrix hack.

About SecureGuild

SecureGuild is An online conference dedicated 100% to security testing taking place May 20-21 2019. 15+ security experts share their biggest actionable testing secrets to help you succeed with your security efforts.

Connect with SecureGuild Rate and Review TestTalks

Thanks again for listening to the show. If it has helped you in any way, shape or form, please share it using the social media buttons you see on the page. Additionally, reviews for the podcast on iTunes are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated! They do matter in the rankings of the show and I read each and every one of them.

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Test Talks
251: People Practices in Digital Transformations with Gurushyam Mony

DevOps and Agility are only successful if your team continues to practice them every day, every hour, every minute. But how do you achieve this type of whole-team approach? In this episode, Gurushyam Mony shares some of his top practices for helping companies with their digital transformations and explains that people are as vital an aspect of this as tools are. So listen up and discover some real-world tips on how to make your people the key to your company’s digital transformation success story.

About Gurushyam Mony

Gurushyam Mony is the Director Of DevOps and Quality Engineering at Markel.

Quotes & Insights from this Test Talk with Gurushyam Mony
  • To me, there are two ways to show the art of the possibility to people who have done certain practice in a certain way. And I believe if the self-realization for people doesn’t kick in no matter how much of effort you put in for marketing and showcasing all these newer practices that can give value it is going to be tough for people within teams to embrace that and start practicing them.
  • I think you have to take two separate approaches to convince people at various different management levels. Making someone’s life more efficient, better elevating their talent elevating how they do things to the next level is always something that would work on your engineering side your bottom up layers of your teams and all that, But from a top-down if you have to convince and get buy-in from the leadership which I would always say should happen either in parallel or should have already happened before you start your bottom-up approach.
  • So the eternal predicament of the triangle of cost, quality, and time. I mean if you have done a large house construction project or any massive undertaking in real life you always get yourself in the conundrum if I want to reduce the cost my quality of what is going to be done on my house is going to be low. Or I can say I want the top materials in my house which are going to increase the cost and increase the time of the project as well. So there are a lot of people who juggle this in an everyday life without even realizing that they do. And it’s a fine balance to reach to not be stuck with only two of them. So typically people would go. Sure we want delivery to happen within six months. So they’ve already put a hard date on time. So then they cannot pick both cost and quality at the same time along with reduced time. One will have to give at the end of the day.
  • Most people who start on the DevOps journey they start to say that let’s invest in tools because the tools are going to help us go faster. So they’ll say we have been doing all of this manual testing, manual build, manual deploy so let’s go ahead and invest some money to procure tools. Now tools also cost money and they cost a lot of maintenance work and efforts and all that. So they end up actually procuring all of those they end up putting all of this in place yet to see that the costs just got bloated up. They got more efficiency they got things automated. However, the costs just went up from what they were doing before. Not because of the people cost but the technology cost.
  • Typically teams should first come to an agreement of what they orchestrated by planned delivery mechanism is and they should lay that out as building blocks and you should focus on all of those boxes in an incremental way rather than going a mile deep on one of the boxes.
  • My one piece of actionable advice is never to stop reflecting back at what you do and improving by way of thinking out of the box because you’re only as good as your last hour.
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Thanks again for listening to the show. If it has helped you in any way, shape or form, please share it using the social media buttons you see on the page. Additionally, reviews for the podcast on iTunes are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated! They do matter in the rankings of the show and I read each and every one of them.

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Test Talks
250: Pushing Security Testing Left, Like a Boss with Tanya Janca

Today we’ll be test talking with security testing expert Tanya Janca about application security and more. Tanya is passionate about application security and evangelizing software security and will share why you should be, too. Listen up to hear how Tanya can make even a topic like security fun.

About Tanya Janca

Tanya Janca is a senior cloud developer advocate for Microsoft, specializing in application security; evangelizing software security and advocating for developers through public speaking, her open source project OWASP DevSlop, and various forms of teaching via workshops, blogs and community events. As an ethical hacker, OWASP Project and Chapter Leader, software developer and professional computer geek of 20+ years, she is a person who is truly fascinated by the ‘science’ of computer science.

Quotes & Insights from this Test Talk with Tanya Janca
  • I feel that security is sort of like taking care of and protecting people. If that makes any sense. And I was really interested in it and I really wanted to do hacking. But one of the first jobs I got in security was actually doing Internet response and just being able to let everyone know everything’s OK. Being able to figure out what happened and then block it from happening again stopping things partway through I just I felt so much pride to me it’s this wonderful impact.
  • For social engineering the main thing is is that you need to create policies and then make sure people actually follow the policies. So for instance, don’t put them in a situation where they’re likely to break the policy. For example, if you have a door where everyone has to badge in it’s common for people to just walk behind someone else. And it’s almost rude if they don’t hold the door. So I’ve worked places where they have this turnstile. So it’s just impossible.
  • Another thing which I think is like the easiest bang for your buck is to do third-party component scanning. So when we write an app like 60 70 80 even 90 percent of it is actually libraries and then those things have vulnerabilities in them.
  • I have this crazy idea that we should put critical types of scans in the CI/CD pipeline that go out to publish but then you can make another like a loop sort of like a circle and you hit every hardcode security check that’s ever happened and then it just goes back to Dev and stops.
  • Security tests have a lot of false positives and they have false negatives. For third party component, they’re pretty good because it’s kind of true or false. For example, you are using JQuery1.1 1.3 or you’re not right. Or there is a CVE a common vulnerability a numerator like a record for a vulnerability that is in that or there isn’t. So those there are few false positives with those, but with static code analysis, it’s insane. It’s like 95 percent false positives. And I know what you’re thinking you’re like That’s awful. Why would anyone use it? Here’s why. If you do a code review of 20,000 lines you have to read 20,000 lines of code. Now if you run a static analysis on it it might say hey I think I found 200 things and then you read those 200 things. It takes a lot less time than reading 20000 things and then you find others only 10 things. Thanks!
  • If you want to learn about penetration testing you. I feel like it would be a good idea to decide if you are more interested in software or if you’re more interested in infrastructure because there’s kind of separate skills that you need for those.
  • For actionable advice, you should read my blog. I’m writing up all of the things that I’ve learned in the past four almost five years of working in security, trying really hard to attract everyone else into security and I am writing how to add security to your pipeline. How to add security to your system development lifecycle. What is a secure coding guideline and like what should be in it and then I’m publishing one really soon as soon as I finish editing it and I feel like I’ve tried to make it really really helpful for beginners and at a level where you can ramp up really quickly.
Connect with Tanya Janca Rate and Review TestTalks

Thanks again for listening to the show. If it has helped you in any way, shape or form, please share it using the social media buttons you see on the page. Additionally, reviews for the podcast on iTunes are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated! They do matter in the rankings of the show and I read each and every one of them.

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Test Talks
249: Next Generation Agile Automation with Guljeet Nagpaul

Two of the hottest new topics in our industry are continuous testing and AI/machine learning. Today we’ll be test talking with Guljeet Nagpaul about next generation Agile automation. We’ll cover codeless test automation, improving Agile quality management and more. Guljeet worked for Mercury as head of their ALM practices back in the day, so he knows his stuff. Discover what has changed since that time, and what you need to know in today’s rapidly changing automation testing landscape.

About Guljeet Nagpaul

Guljeet is an accomplished leader with experience ranging from software engineer to leading platform and market strategy. Guljeet spent 10 years at Mercury where he was North America head for ALM practice. During this time, ALM captured the highest market share and Mercury was acquired by HP. He was a key leader in growing the ALM portfolio with Spydynamics and Shunra acquisitions amongst others.

Guljeet believes accelQ is the biggest breakthrough in Continuous Testing since the introduction of specialist ALM tools by Mercury. Guljeet lead’s the Product Strategy and Marketing. Guljeet holds a Masters in Management of Information Systems from Carnegie Mellon University.

Quotes & Insights from this Test Talk with Guljeet Nagpaul
  • We’ve seen so much innovation in automation in deployment release build, these life cycles to align with the agile or the Continuous Integration or DevOps mode whatever we call it at the end of the day you want faster releases right. But testing has suffered kind of overhead.
  • No matter whether you’re going for commercial tools or you are doing open source you know you’re reinventing the wheel of frameworks and then kind of chasing your automation code and the code maintenance and then API testing unfortunately still remains to be kind of in a completely different work. So you know a lot of these challenges like test design, framework overhead, API testing kind of not being able to embed as part of your end to end flow as well as you know it still remains to be you know very specialized function it needs like really senior development skills to be able to produce a good automation. So our goal was to take a step back and look at all of these challenges. Not just test case automation and silo and have a platform which connects all this. But then at the end of the day also have it connected to your business processes.
  • If you really want to scale up your automation you can’t scale it up unless you have the power and flexibility and that’s what Selenium brought to the table. To give the power back into the tester’s hand. But it obviously comes with a pretty huge overhead of custom frameworks, automation design, chasing that code, maintenance and unless you write a series of perfect world frameworks you know the output of Selenium can drag you down.
  • Interestingly when we talk about Continuous Delivery and Continuous Integration and I know a lot of organizations have a misconception that if they just align their automation suite to a CI tool that’s their job done. They’ve achieved continuous testing. But it’s really a lot more than that.
  • So you can functionally virtualize your application. So that even while it’s under development you can start to write your automation logic, start writing your automation test suites so that you really get ahead of the curve right in terms of bringing that instant automation and not suffer a couple of sprints lag which you usually do.
  • All I would say is — don’t jump into selecting an automation tool or a technology if you’re evaluating newer avenues or whether you may be you know going into automation as a new profession or whether you’re looking to adopt more and more automation for your organization. Look at it from a perspective of which solution brings in the most robustness in automation. Which can give me obviously the speed to align with my continuous delivery and then you know lastly most importantly don’t just look at web automation in a silo. Have a solution, these days the application architecture is complex enough to be selecting a solution which can handle your web to your file interactions, to your APIs, to your database all in a simple flaw without having to hire an army of developers to accomplish that.
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Thanks again for listening to the show. If it has helped you in any way, shape or form, please share it using the social media buttons you see on the page. Additionally, reviews for the podcast on iTunes are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated! They do matter in the rankings of the show and I read each and every one of them.

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Test Talks
248: What is Programming with Edaqa Mortoray

Have you ever wondered what is programming really is, at a deeper level than the obvious answer? That’s what we’ll be test talking about today with Edaqa Mortoray, author of the new book What is programming? A Harmony of People, Code that runs the world, and the Individual behind the Keyboard. If you’ll remember from a previous TestTalks episode, Edaqa is the inventor of the Leaf programming language, so he knows a thing or two about programming. Don’t miss it

About Edaqa Mortoray

Edaqa Mortoray grew up programming. Long before he learned how to code, he was already distilling reality, pulling out meaningful structure. Code came along and gave him a way to express his ideas. And of course, to control computers.

From the beauty of interface design and graphic rendering to the rigid correctness of scientific and financial applications, Edaqa has weaved all sorts of technical wonders. From entertaining video games to sociable communications and practical development products, he’s found a home in many market sectors.

Beyond programming, Edaqa has an unusual palette of abilities. Most relevant is his writing. Perhaps most known for his programming blog, he also writes imaginative fiction and non-fiction alike. He’s the author of “What is Programming?”.

Quotes & Insights from this Test Talk with Edaqa Mortoray
  • This book comes from me doing a lot of interviewing and meeting a lot of new junior programmers. People coming into the industry, people that are uncertain of what it really means to be a developer. I’ve been doing programming for a long time the type of people I work with. We’ve been doing this a long time. We know everything there is to do in the space. But I see a lot of people coming in and they’re uncertain of really what the profession is. People see the code and they think oh it’s all about coding but that’s not really true
  • There’s so much more to programming and even in the coding part is so much more to it. And I really wanted to give this overview. This guide to see everything that’s available to see all the stuff that you could be doing as part of your profession that will make you better at it.
  • One of the things I think a lot of people miss is that programming is a very social activity and the way I’ve been phrasing this late is that if our technology if our computers can actually do everything we want them to do you wouldn’t actually have to talk to people too much because you could just do whatever somebody wanted. But since they never do what we want it’s an endless world of compromise. And this involves talking with people because when you’re programming something it’s really a matter of picking the right features the right way to implement those features. And this involves talking to everybody involved from the original stakeholders from any of the graphic designers even including the testers what they need from it what the users do and how they do it. And I think there’s this misconception that programming is not a social activity but I think it’s one of the primary aspects of programming is actually the social communication to get the right product out.
  • I think one of the biggest goals is basically listening he just have to be willing to listen to other teams and other people on those teams and those other teams have to have that willingness to talk as well. And so I think that’s sort of the biggest skill.
  • In the area of security, you can’t actually determine what the security requirements are on your own because from a programming standpoint there’s no like ideal security you can just keep adding more and more security measures. This is one of the rare cases where you actually need to involve some legal advice and business aspect of the company to come and tell you what we actually need. How much effort do we have to spend on security based on our exposure level now.
  • So my biggest point of advice is just to keep trying new things and don’t get frustrated. Go out and push your limits. Pick up some new technology and try even if you don’t use it. You’ll be amazed at how much you can actually learn from it and apply to what you’re already doing.
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Thanks again for listening to the show. If it has helped you in any way, shape or form, please share it using the social media buttons you see on the page. Additionally, reviews for the podcast on iTunes are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated! They do matter in the rankings of the show and I read each and every one of them.

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Test Talks
247: Discover The Personality of Your Application with Greg Paskal

One of the most common challenges for quality engineers is making the mental shift from merely pursuing pass or fail test results to understanding the characteristics and trends of tests. That’s what we’ll be test talking about today with Greg Paskal. Greg will share how to discover the personality of your application using dashboards created with ELK Stack. Listen up to discover how to create tests that are accurate and actionable.

About Greg Paskal

Greg is currently the Director of Quality Assurance – Automation at Ramsey Solutions, A Dave Ramsey Company. He is also the author of multiple white papers on test automation and testing in general.

Greg recently published his first book, “Test Automation in the Real World”, sharing insights from over 30 years of automated testing development. He has spoken at many conferences including StarEast, StarWest, QAI and QA TrailBlazers.Tutorial.

Quotes & Insights from this Test Talk with Greg Paskal
  • Elastic Stack is a group of opensource tools. And one of them is like a data warehouse type of concept that gathers information that we would inject into it. Then there is an additional tool that allows searching on that I believe the term that the ElasticSearch and then the Kaban toolset which allows the visualization of that these are all bundled together. Some of them are open source; some of them are a bit proprietary to the elastic toolset. But that’s basically what the Elastic Stack is it comes with this bundle of things.
  • It’s an excellent opportunity to get to go to a conference. They come to the automation guild let’s say or are any of the other types of test conferences that are available. You know they get there, and they’re meeting folks, and they’re there maybe attending different sessions and whatever. And then they go back, and it’s as if all that effort and the cost and everything had no impact on them. I think that that hurts us as automation engineers it hurts us as technologists. That we don’t go into a conference with the intent to learn and meet as many folks as we can. And from that you know come away even if it’s one good takeaway or two takeaways that we bring back to the office and apply for our employer.
  • So when you start to look at data over time, you begin to look at past just a test pass or fail. You start to look at one other parameter that’s very helpful which is how long did that test take to run. It’s something we overlook. And yet almost all of our tests produce that sort of data in the reporting. If you can record that one attribute and say hey my login test let’s say it took three seconds to run and you could start to record that information over the next let’s say the next 90 days. And you knew there was going to be some development in your sign on process may be your log in process and you started to notice hey you know 30 days ago we bumped up from three seconds to four seconds and then about another month after that and we’re now taking five seconds to log into our app consistently. That’s something that could creep up over time, and as a tester, you might not even recognize that slight difference of 1 or 2 seconds.
  • So I worked on visualization to identify flaky tests, and it was pretty easy to do. All I did is I log into the data lake every time we began a test set and every time we exited the test set, and I gave it a unique ID and said For every start there should be a finish. And if there’s not, we’re going to call it off like a test. So we have a visualization. Overall the entire automation that shows us that and down to the specific product is pretty cool.
  • The tool I predominantly build everything in is called visual builder and that’s the one I would encourage people if you’re gonna put time into anything that’s the one to look at and try to get turns around because it provides the most flexibility of all the visualization tools within the Kabana tool set from my perspective.
  • I would suggest folks go out to Elastics web site and check out maybe a free demo on the elastic cloud product or consider standing perhaps an instance of this up on a Linux box you have an experiment with it. Be patient and start taking those initial baby steps of how do I get data in there. What data should I get in there and then how do I make something meaningful out of it by creating your first visualization?
Connect with Greg Paskal Rate and Review TestTalks

Thanks again for listening to the show. If it has helped you in any way, shape or form, please share it using the social media buttons you see on the page. Additionally, reviews for the podcast on iTunes are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated! They do matter in the rankings of the show and I read each and every one of them.

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Test Talks
246: Chaos Engineering with Tammy Bütow

Do you want to build more resilient software systems? Do you like to break things on purpose? If so, this episode is for you. We’ll be Test Talking about Chaos Engineering with Tammy Butow, a principal site reliability engineer at Gremlin. Tammy will explain how to test the ways in which your system responds to stress so you can identify and fix failures before they impact your customers—saving you and your company the embarrassment of software downtime, bad publicity and lost revenue. Listen up!

About Tammy Bütow

Tammy Butow is a principal SRE at Gremlin, where she works on chaos engineering—the facilitation of controlled experiments to identify systemic weaknesses. Gremlin helps engineers build resilient systems using their control plane and API. Previously, Tammy led SRE teams at Dropbox responsible for the databases and storage systems used by over 500 million customers and was an IMOC (incident manager on call), where she was responsible for managing and resolving high-severity incidents across the company. She has also worked in infrastructure engineering, security engineering, and product engineering. Tammy is the co-founder of Girl Geek Academy, a global movement to teach one million women technical skills by 2025.

Tammy is an Australian and enjoys riding bikes, skateboarding, snowboarding, and surfing. She also loves mosh pits, crowd surfing, metal, and hardcore punk.

Quotes & Insights from this Test Talk with Tammy Bütow
  • Back in 2010, the Netflix team created something called Chaos Monkey. Chaos Monkey became really popular because it was right when Netflix was moving to the cloud. And they did their massive migration. What they wanted to do is be able to make sure that whenever engineers were building something on the AWS they didn’t just think that all of those machines will be there all the time.
  • It’s really exciting sine Gremlin is the first company to actually build something like that that has a web UI that has an API that allows you to programmatically do all of your Chaos engineering experiments including disaster recovery testing which we call in region fall over in the chaos engineering world.
  • We did actually recently build a new product call Alfi which is application level fault injection. And that’s really a new concept. It’s much more advanced. So usually what people do is they start with infrastructure levels so we collect that Ilfi (infrastructure level fault injection) where you are injecting failure on the actual servers or the containers or network related failure. But there is the idea to have actually injecting failure into your application.
  • The idea here is you can do very precise fault injection so you can actually match against any attribute you’re already using you can really do precise scoping of attacks to things like for example for custom IDs, location, device types after you integrate Alfi into the application. And that means that you can create really small glossed radius chaos engineering experiments.
  • One of the big things that we’ve been focusing on over the last year is really helping people learn about how to get started doing chaos engineering because technically it can be quite complicated and a little bit scary before you start doing. But once you’ve been doing it for a long time you’ll become very good at it and you will no longer be scared to run chaos engineering attacks.
  • This is one of my big cases advice and it is going to sound a little scary but I like to say that it’s important to focus on critical systems not low hanging fruit. And that’s my personal advice and the reason is because if you focus on a critical system you inject failure for a critical system then you’re able to show people why it’s important and you can actually show them the positive impact that you can have because your more likely to be able to identify important things that you need to fix.
Connect with Tammy Bütow Rate and Review TestTalks

Thanks again for listening to the show. If it has helped you in any way, shape or form, please share it using the social media buttons you see on the page. Additionally, reviews for the podcast on iTunes are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated! They do matter in the rankings of the show and I read each and every one of them.

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The post 246: Chaos Engineering with Tammy Bütow appeared first on Test Talks.

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Test Talks
245: Performance Testing in 2019 with PerfGuild

Unfortunately, not many software engineering organizations are familiar with the needs of performance testing or even have the expertise to do so. One major roadblock that prevents teams from successfully executing performance testing is a lack of training. Sometimes, just knowing where to start can be a challenge. One place to start is PerfGuild so in this episode, we’ll be talking all about the online conference dedicated 10% to helping you succeed with performance testing. Listen up.

About PerfGuild

PerfGuild is a World Wide Online Conference Dedicated 100% to Actionable Performance Testing. Our goal is that you’ll pick up a tip, tool, technique or best practices that will accelerate your new or existing performance testing efforts.

Quotes & Insights from this Test Talk with PerfGuild
  • I’m excited to announce that registration for the 2nd annual PerfGuild Conference 2019 April 8-9 is now open!
  • We’re bringing together 15 plus of some of the best experts in the world when it comes to performance testing. During the conference, you’ll learn what works. More importantly, what doesn’t work for some of the top experts I could find to help you create or improve your performance testing efforts.
  • Our 2019 speaker lineup:

IPA (Integrated Performance Assurance) – Leandro Melendez

IOT Performance Testing – Scott Moore

Building Performance Testing Pipelines for CI/CD – Viktoriia Kuznetcova

Machine Learning Application in Performance Analysis – Gopal Brugalette

How to Handle Performance Issues at Scale in the Cloud – Wilson Mar

Chaos Engineering – Ana Medina

Roundtable Ask Us Anything About Performance Testing – Dawn Haynes, Mark Tomlinson, Alex Podelko

Tips and Tricks Using JMeter – Christina Thalayasingam

Absolute Performance – James Pulley

How to shift Left By Shifting Right – Henrik Rexed

SmartBear – Keshav Vasudevan

Performance Testing From User Perspective – Jacek Okrojek

Roundtable Ask Us Anything about Site Reliability Engineering – Paul Bruce, Laura Stone

Making load testing with real browsers a reality – Tim Koopmans

Connect with PerfGuild Rate and Review TestTalks

Thanks again for listening to the show. If it has helped you in any way, shape or form, please share it using the social media buttons you see on the page. Additionally, reviews for the podcast on iTunes are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated! They do matter in the rankings of the show and I read each and every one of them.

Powered By SauceLabs

Test Talks is sponsored by the fantastic folks at Sauce Labs. Try it for free today!

The post 245: Performance Testing in 2019 with PerfGuild appeared first on Test Talks.

Read Full Article

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