Loading...

Follow In your dreams by Jane Teresa Anderson on Feedspot

Continue with Google
Continue with Facebook
or

Valid

How many dream dictionaries have you got on your bookshelf?

It’s so very tempting to look up a dream symbol, or to look up several symbols from the dream you had last night and try to link them together, but how helpful is this approach really?

In this episode we look at why you might want to re-evaluate your collection of dream dictionaries, or, perhaps, toss them altogether.

Can looking up dream themes, rather than symbols be useful? For example, looking up themes of being lost, or being late, rather than symbols like a train station (you’ve lost your way to the station) or a doctor’s surgery (you’re late for an appointment)?

We look at how far an understanding of common dream themes can be helpful, and what you need to be able to do to build on such understanding to arrive at accurate insight into your dream and your life.

Finally, what if you – or the person who is helping you with your dream – gets the interpretation wrong? Is there such a thing as a right or wrong interpretation? By now, you’ll have many questions of your own. Curious? Go ahead, and listen:

Listen

Discover more about our vision: About The Dream Show

You might also enjoy

Ask JT about your dreams

Online learning at your pace

Stay in touch with what’s new

Listen to The Dream Show

The post Episode 218 The Dream Show: Dream dictionary temptations appeared first on In your dreams by Jane Teresa Anderson.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 
In your dreams by Jane Teresa Anderson by Jane Teresa Anderson - 2w ago

“Let’s go back to basics today,” suggested the producer of a television show I’m on from time to time, “and give people some tips about those dreams we all share: teeth falling out, being naked in a public place, falling, being pregnant, being chased.”

I thought I’d follow the same cue for today’s blog. Much as I enjoy getting into the nitty-gritty of more complex dreams in my day-to-day work as a dream analyst and dream therapist, it’s the common dream themes so many of us share that people want to know about when they first become interested in dreams.

In my book, The Dream Handbook, (published by Hachette in Australia and by Little Brown in the UK), I introduce over 40 common dream themes, and give questions and tools you can follow to discover the meaning of your unique variation of the dream and how it relates to your life. I also suggest dream alchemy practices (exercises) you can do for each type of common dream to help you resolve issues and move forward.

Why do we often share the same dream themes as millions of other people, now and throughout time?

Well, because we’re all human we tend to share similar challenging life experiences such as loss, grief, fear, self-doubt, betrayal, and emotional overwhelm, and these grand themes are frequently processed by our dreaming brains and dreaming minds in similar ways. So you and I and a million other people across time might dream about an oncoming tsunami when we are feeling overwhelmed, but the details of our individual dreams will differ. It’s those details, once interpreted, that throw light on the specific meaning of each individual’s dream within the grand theme of the matter.

Here’s a quick take on five common dream themes, followed by a video clip from the television show I mentioned.

Dream of teeth falling out

There are so many variations of ‘teeth falling out’ dreams, but in general people often have these kinds of dreams when they’re worried about communication. Maybe you feel you’ve said too much, and you can’t take those words back (just as you can’t take the teeth back in the dream), or maybe you FEAR saying the wrong thing, worrying that it will come out all wrong (like broken teeth in the dream). Maybe you’re worried about your image, not only how you look but, more importantly, how you come across, and the dream might picture this as you being worried about flashing your smile because you’ll reveal your not-so-solid confidence (like your not-so-solid teeth in the dream).

Dream of being naked in a public place

Again the details of each person’s unique dream points to the correct interpretation, but in general being naked in a dream may reflect your feelings or fears about people seeing the ‘real you’ in waking life: not your body, but your personality, your thoughts, your mind, your agenda. Deprived of hiding behind an image (like the clothes you have chosen), you risk baring your soul, or your true self. If you feel good about your nakedness in the dream, that’s great! Perhaps we should all feel comfortable with being our authentic self. If you don’t feel so good about your nakedness in the dream (the more usual scenario), the other details in your dream will help you to understand why you feel this way, and what you might want to do to change this.

Dream of being chased

If you’re being chased in the dream, presumably you’re running away, trying to escape. What are you running away from in waking life? Is it a fear, a worry, a deadline, something about yourself or your life that you don’t want to face but no matter how much you try to avoid it it’s always just there, on your tail? The other details in your dream can help you to discover what you’re running from, and why you’re not turning around to face it and deal with it. If you have this type of dream, you might like to do this dream alchemy: when you wake up, re-imagine the dream only this time turn around and face what is chasing you, transforming it from something negative or bad into something positive or good. Even imagine yourself hugging that chasing thing. This helps program your unconscious mind to face your concerns and find the positives. It can be very healing too, as that thing that is chasing you represents something in your life or within yourself that really needs your attention and acknowledgement.

Dream of being pregnant

Think symbolically. Often this kind of dream (which can happen for men as well as for women) reflects something you’re creating, gestating, and getting ready to launch into the world – like the pending birth in the dream. What are you thinking about birthing into the world? Your feelings about the dream pregnancy, along with the other details in your unique dream, help you to understand and explore any issues, worries, or limiting beliefs you have around this new step. It can be as simple as a growing desire to be different in the world, to change your attitude or approach to life, something you feel you’re preparing to do, or it can be more obvious, like a book or project or business idea you’re getting ready to launch.

Dream of falling, and why do we wake up before we hit the ground?

We don’t always wake up before we hit the ground, though we usually do. What wakes us up is usually the fear: when you feel fear in a dream, your brain and glands produce fear hormones which enter your bloodstream and produce real physiological fear in your body: racing heartbeat, maybe feeling frozen to the spot, goose bumps across your skin. If you manage to stay asleep and dreaming through the fall, typically you’ll either find you can fly (and miss hitting the ground), or you’ll bounce when you hit the ground and go on to do something else, or you’ll die and then step out of your dead body and continue with the dream as a new self (as if leaving the old self or an old way of being behind). Every falling dream has its own unique meaning depending on the details of the dream, but in general it can be about letting go (what are you clinging onto in life?), or fear of falling behind, or a feeling of not succeeding in your climb to some imagined goal. It can be about letting go of control, but it can also be about feeling unstable in some area of your life, mentally, emotionally, or physically.

Here’s the video clip of me talking about common dreams on one of Australia’s national morning shows, Today Extra:

You might also enjoy

Ask JT about your dreams

Online learning at your pace

Stay in touch with what’s new

Listen to The Dream Show

The post Common dreams appeared first on In your dreams by Jane Teresa Anderson.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

How many possible messages can you spot in a dream, and how do you know which is the right one?

You might wake from a dream and feel that its message was obvious, but is it right? How easy is it to misinterpret a dream, or to settle for the message that jumps out at you instead of delving deeper for one that offers you more appropriate clarity, wisdom, direction, and potential for powerful positive change?

Explore these questions with me, discover what it takes to unearth a dream’s message, and enjoy a side trip into two young children’s dreams, one about a tsunami of rubbish, and one about a scary lion. All designed to bring you closer to understanding your own dreams, naturally, as well as to inspire you and make you smile.

Listen

Discover more about our vision: About The Dream Show

You might also enjoy

Ask JT about your dreams

Online learning at your pace

Stay in touch with what’s new

Listen to The Dream Show

The post Episode 217 The Dream Show: Discovering a dream’s message appeared first on In your dreams by Jane Teresa Anderson.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 
In your dreams by Jane Teresa Anderson by Jane Teresa Anderson - 1M ago

 You dream of a field of lavender in full bloom, swaying in the wind, beautiful yet overwhelmingly same-same, and perhaps a little too heady: what small change would make this dream more comfortable or inspiring?

There are probably myriad possible answers, but let’s take an obvious one. You could add oases of lush roses to the field of lavender, apricot and fig trees for dappled shade and thirst-quenching fruit, perhaps a crystal clear waterfall, a cascading invitation to splash and play and clear your head of an overload of lavender perfume.

Ok, so that wasn’t such a small change, unless you pare it down to ‘introduce variety’.

Take your turn. What small change would you suggest to make this imaginary dream scene more appealing? Or does the field of total lavender feel just right to you?

Without fully interpreting this dream scene, the dreamer might see the connection to a heady (stuffy) overwhelming same-same kind of feeling or situation in her waking life, particularly in the day or two before the dream. She might either be experiencing this same-same directly in her life, or she might relate to a fear of overwhelming same-same that drives her to madly seek a different-different whirlwind lifestyle, a lifestyle that is heady in a giddy kind of way, exhausting and ultimately unsustainable.

There, in a nutshell, is one of many ways to begin a dream interpretation: identifying the connection with waking life. It’s always exciting to make that first step and experience the ‘aha’ goose bumps confirming that you’re onto something, but the real rewards come as you apply the other steps and go deeply into the dream to uncover your mindset and understand why you’re really feeling this way about life and why you respond in the way that you do. This knowledge about your unconscious mind empowers the potential for change.

But let’s go back to that one small change you would make in this dream, or in a dream of your own.

For this to work really well, stay light-hearted. Don’t over-think the change. Stay with the dream scenario and playfully consider changes.

Only after you’ve decided on the change, or changes, translate them into possible actions you can take in the waking life situation you identified from the dream.

In the example I gave, which came down to ‘introduce variety’, how might you introduce variety into that situation that feels so same-same? Notice that my change wasn’t introducing massive variety that overwhelmed the senses, and it didn’t involve moving into a different field, or ripping up the lavender (though these might be changes you choose). It wasn’t about getting as far away from the lavender as possible in a frenzy of fearful escape. It was a subtle change that made a very big difference.

This isn’t dream alchemy, though it may look similar at first glance.

(There are specific guidelines you need to follow to create dream alchemy that leads to effective and meaningful change in waking life.)

Neither is this dream interpretation, apart from that first step in identifying the parallel waking life situation.

And it’s not about discovering a dream’s message. Dreams do not tell us what to do or offer specific guidance, but once we know how to interpret them they give us the insight about ourselves that we need to make our own good decisions.

Today’s exercise is about playfully shifting the dream picture then translating your changes into options.

Some options will be daft, some will be dangerous, some will be unethical, some will be eye-opening, some will be inspiring, some will feel courageous, some will feel just right, and some will awaken you to your brilliant next step, but what all these have in common is nudging you out of a perhaps limited mindset or perspective and preparing you for positive change. That change may be prompted by one of your options, or it may just flow naturally, a result of your shifted vision and the wonderful insights that pop up for us when we play.

You might also enjoy

Ask JT about your dreams

Online learning at your pace

Stay in touch with what’s new

Listen to The Dream Show

The post Dream play appeared first on In your dreams by Jane Teresa Anderson.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Patti from Seattle is my guest for our tenth anniversary show, asking about her dream of parachuting over the oceans to Italy to meet a widowed man who invites her to his bed.

What is the secret of Corsini Island, does Patti have enough battery power to fly home, and will she cover her betrayal by lying to her husband?

In this slightly extended episode, we begin with audio clips sent in by listeners to celebrate ten years of The Dream Show. You’ll hear Cynthia from St Louis, Missouri, USA; Caroline from SW England; Viv from Brisbane, Australia; Marjeta from Slovenia; Barbara from Sydney, Australia; Dana-Sofie from the Czech Republic; Kerry from the Sunshine Coast, Australia; and Domonique from Paris, France.

Huge gratitude to all our listeners over the last ten years, and to those of you who have courageously volunteered to be guests and opened to sharing your dream exploration to help others understand their dreams. Big thanks also to all of you have shared the show with dreamers all around the world.

None of this would have been possible without Michael, my husband, who has engineered the technical side of the recording and production since the very beginning, and – because of this  – probably claims the crown for having listened to the most episodes, in fact, every single episode in minute detail. Big love and deep appreciation to Michael.

And so we continue into the future, creating new episodes every four weeks. (You can learn more about The Dream Show here.)

Now, parachuting to Italy: what’s all that about?

Listen

Discover more about our vision: About The Dream Show

You might also enjoy

Listen to more episodes of The Dream Show

Read Jane Teresa’s In Your Dreams blogs

Read Jane Teresa’s Dream Academy blogs

Subscribe to Dream Sight News

The post Episode 216 The Dream Show: Parachuting to Italy appeared first on In your dreams by Jane Teresa Anderson.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

How much dreaming time do you lose by sleeping six hours instead of eight?

Go on, have a guess, or work it out based on everything you know about sleep and dreaming so far.

Since as long as I can remember, I’ve always needed lots of sleep, and generally fall asleep within minutes of closing my eyes for the night. It’s very rare for me to lay awake at night, and for this, I am deeply grateful. My mother would tell you that as a baby I cried most nights, sleeping very little, and robbing her of good sleep too. In the end she went with the advice of the times and left me alone to cry it out. While I didn’t take that approach with my own babies, and zombied through my fair share of night time soothing and exhausting sleep deprivation, I wonder if Mum’s approach set me up for learning to just get on with it, to fall asleep and stay asleep because no-one was going to come no matter how much I cried. I’m certainly not advocating a return to letting babies cry it out, and thankfully there are many excellent resources and programs available to help new parents today find loving and effective ways of soothing their babies while training them to sleep, but if my ability to sleep so solidly is an outcome I can pin to my early years, I am thankful for that.

How much sleep do you get most nights? Do you get by on six hours a night? Or less?

Did you work out that sleeping six hours instead of eight would mean losing 25% of dreaming time? While that might seem logical, it’s not true.

Given that dreaming is necessary for our physiological, emotional, and mental health, a loss of 25% dreaming time would be bad enough, but in fact you lose far more.

Most – but not all – of our dreams occur during the REM phases of sleep, and the last couple of hours of an eight-hour sleep are very rich in REM, so rich that if you only sleep six hours instead of eight, you lose 60-90% of your dreaming time.

Oh, and by the way, science has shown that eight hours is the natural amount of sleep people need. If you are sleeping less than eight hours, or if your sleep is fitful or broken by nightmares leaving you anxious about getting back to sleep, or if you’re simply awake for long periods or suffering insomnia, you are missing out on more than sleep. You are missing out on nature’s nightly quota of dreaming time, which means you are missing out on the health benefits of dreaming, whether or not you remember your dreams.

Missing out on the health benefits of full dreaming time is one thing, but if you’re getting less than eight hours sleep you’re also missing the opportunity to interpret and work with a full platter of dreams. During one night’s sleep, the dreaming mind and brain will often process the same experience or issue from several different angles, dream after dream, searching for perspective or a solution. In a shorter sleep, you may miss the most significant dreams, the ones that come with early morning light, those that potentially put a night’s worth of puzzling together.

So here’s your sleep-in challenge:

Maybe your life is so packed and busy that you feel stuck with getting by with less than eight hours sleep every night. Or maybe you’re parenting a baby and even a solid five-hour sleep sounds like heaven. Or maybe you’re saddled with insomnia, and getting any sleep over a few hours seems impossible. Or maybe you suffer from nightmare anxiety (which can be overcome by understanding your nightmares and doing dream alchemy exercises).

Or maybe none of these are true, and you know that you can, just for one week, go to bed early enough, or sleep in long enough, to clock up eight hours sleep for seven days in a row.

Or maybe that feels too big, but one night a week sounds doable.

Start where you can. Make yourself a promise.

Then, even if you normally write down your dreams, buy a new notebook or journal with the intention of recording your eight-hour sleep dreams. Or even just recording the last dream of each eight-hour sleep. Maybe decorate the cover with a big number 8. Place it beside your bed each night that you intend to sleep in to reach those eight hours. In the morning write down your dreams, or, if your dreams float away on the morning light, write down any fleeting memories or feelings from the night. You might like to choose a dream from your sleep-in challenge night or week for my Bare Bones treatment, to derive more insight.

If you wake up after your usual six or seven hours, and feel ready to get up, don’t! Close your eyes and drift, or, if your bladder has pressing urgencies, get up, go to the loo, then climb back into bed. Suitably relieved, you are very likely to fall into another round of dreaming. Just close your eyes and surrender to the possibility of drifting into dream.

Take the sleep-in challenge and note the differences: do you feel more refreshed in the mornings? Do you feel calmer, more balanced, and with a greater sense of perspective? Are the dreams you gather from the extra sleep different in context or quality than dreams you have earlier in your sleep? If you know how to work with your dreams, do the insights you reap from your extra hours sleep-in dreams have extra value?

Though you may think that cutting one or two hours from your waking life is a loss, be prepared for a surprise. That extra sleep and dreaming time – well, not really extra sleep, sleep as nature intends it – can add more efficiency and magic to your days. Try it, and see.

You might also enjoy

Read Jane Teresa’s Dream Academy blogs

Read Jane Teresa’s In Your Dreams blogs

Online course: How to interpret your dreams step-by-step

Subscribe to Dream Sight News

The post The sleep-in challenge appeared first on In your dreams by Jane Teresa Anderson.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

As we approach the tenth anniversary of The Dream Show, we look back at how it all began before sweeping into a theme of how past, present, and future intertwine in our dreams and in waking life.

You’ll meet a shaman and a boy-beast from my dreams, and discover how I worked out what they represented and what I could learn from their presence. We’ll explore why we sometimes dream of people and faces we’ve never met, and how to interpret the roles they play in our dreams.

I’ll also tell you the story of two strangers I met some 30 years ago, before I began working with dreams, and the strange and beautiful way in which our short conversation has reverberated throughout my life. It’s all about time. And it’s also about time for you to press the play button and join me, the shaman, and the boy-beast, and discover more insights into how to understand and work with your dreams.

Listen

Discover more about our vision: About The Dream Show

You might also enjoy

Listen to more episodes of The Dream Show

Read Jane Teresa’s In Your Dreams blogs

Read Jane Teresa’s Dream Academy blogs

Subscribe to Dream Sight News

The post Episode 215 The Dream Show: The shaman, the beast, and the nature of time appeared first on In your dreams by Jane Teresa Anderson.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 
In your dreams by Jane Teresa Anderson by Jane Teresa Anderson - 3M ago

“You should do a podcast show about dreams,” said Belinda, a self-confessed geek friend, ten years ago.

I groaned. Podcasting was only vaguely on the periphery of my awareness, and the thought of getting my head around yet another kind of technology for my business felt overwhelming. I was already doing quite advanced html work developing my website – which had originally launched back in 1998 – and was preparing for the inevitability of adding Skype consultations to my repertoire. The ‘blogging’ word was being flung around, and I was successfully dodging that one at the time. I preferred the simplicity of organising my business around phone consultations, writing books, and talking about dreams in the media. All that was to change.

“Podcasting would really suit you because you’re confident on radio,” Belinda added.

I resisted. She persisted.

Then she sent me a list of people offering podcasting platforms, and highlighted one face, James Williams, because she thought his profile read well. I looked and noticed that one of James’ clients was a friend of mine, astrologer Jessica Adams. So I enquired, and, naturally, it all began from there.

My husband, Michael, learned the technical side of podcasting, assisted by James’ expertise, and off we went. The Dream Show was born in May 2009. Now here we are, about to celebrate ten years of podcasting. We’re going to dedicate episode 216, due out on 26 April, to our tenth anniversary.

Little did I know that starting The Dream Show was only the tip of the technology iceberg. By the end of 2009 I began blogging, and in 2017 launched my online learning platform, built by the very same James Williams.

One of the things that we value about The Dream Show is keeping it real and raw. We don’t edit, other than to add some music to the beginning and end. I enjoy knowing nothing about our guests or their dreams until we hit the record button, and then getting to know them and their lives through their dreams. It has been such an honour and a blessing to walk with our guests through their dreams and to share the experience with our listeners. When our guests explain how the dream interpretations relate to their lives, when they share their intimate stories, that’s where the magic happens, for me, for our listeners, and for our guests.

As well as our episodes featuring guests asking about their dreams, we do our ‘talkie’ episodes, where I share information about dreams in, I hope, an entertaining fashion. Our listeners asked for this addition to the format, and we responded.

For our 100thepisode we invited people to send in messages that we read out, or audio clips to include in the show to celebrate.

I’d love to invite your thoughts, messages, and audio clips for us to include in our tenth anniversary episode.

Please leave your comments here, or email me privately. If you’d like to send in an audio clip/mp3 (perhaps saying what you love about the show, or what was most memorable to you), please include your name and which city or country you’re from in the audio.

Thank you. Don’t be shy. Let’s make this a lovely celebration.

I was sorting through my files this week and found this little piece that I wrote as an introduction to one of our newsletters last year, when we were preparing to leave Brisbane for our interstate move to Hobart. It feels like it fits into this blog:

I don’t know whether you have this in your city or country, but in Australia each street has an annual kerbside collection. It’s a week where you put all your oversized garbage and things you’re not allowed to put into regular garbage or recycling out in front of your house for the council to come and collect and dispose of. People put out old furniture, mattresses, defunct electrical and white goods, and various odds and ends. It was our street’s week this week, which was brilliantly timed considering our imminent move. You don’t know how much stuff you’re hanging onto until you move house do you?

As I was writing this newsletter introduction, the council truck picked up our stuff – I have a nice street view from my office – and I felt a lovely lightening as the last pieces were lifted into the truck. The metaphor for dreams is obvious, of course: in dreamwork we discover what we’re hanging onto, what (beliefs and attitudes and so on) we can let go, what can lighten our life and our spirit.

The reality of our kerbside collection system is quite community oriented. We started with a huge pile, including some good usable stuff. People drive by, sort through, and pick out stuff to take home or to recycle in entrepreneurial ways. Everyone gains, and the resultant landfill is reduced. This morning, our last bits and pieces that the council truck picked up amounted to very little.

I’m looking for the analogy to dreams and dream work, and one thing that pops into my head is listening to guests exploring their dreams on The Dream Show. As listeners, we pick over the details of a guest’s dream, what’s ‘let go’ or released, finding treasure and value we can apply in our own lives.

What treasures and value have you found through listening to The Dream Show – or through being a guest on the show?

Do please share for our tenth anniversary. Send me an mp3 or a message. It doesn’t need to be long. A minute or so to share the joy will be perfect.

Thank you.

Meanwhile on television

I was on The House of Wellness last Sunday (Channel 7 national television Australia) talking about dreams. Here’s the clip of the dream segment:

The House of Wellness - Season 3, Episode 3 - YouTube

You might also enjoy

Read Jane Teresa’s Dream Academy blogs

Read Jane Teresa’s In Your Dreams blogs

Online course: How to interpret your dreams step-by-step

Subscribe to Dream Sight News

The post An invitation appeared first on In your dreams by Jane Teresa Anderson.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

We begin around 2,500 years ago, looking at how the Ancient Greeks worked with their dreams to diagnose physical, mental, emotional, and spiritual issues, and to effect cures through processes evocative of our present-day dream therapy and dream alchemy practices.

We then take a side road to explore the symbolism of snakes before drawing up a list of the most important types of dreams to interpret. Since we have up to five dreams a night, those of us who are passionate about using our dreams to gain practical insight into our lives need some guidelines on where to begin. Which dreams should we prioritise?

We look at what it takes to develop a stronger intuition for interpreting dreams, and then end on the promised note: a modern mystery, in the shape of a synchronicity story, one of many I love to share from my magical, but very grounded, life.

Listen

Discover more about our vision: About The Dream Show

You might also enjoy

Listen to more episodes of The Dream Show

Read Jane Teresa’s In Your Dreams blogs

Read Jane Teresa’s Dream Academy blogs

Subscribe to Dream Sight News

The post Episode 214 The Dream Show: Ancient history to modern mystery appeared first on In your dreams by Jane Teresa Anderson.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 
I met two strangers at a party a year or so before I began my work in dreams, almost 30 years ago now. I say strangers, because when I asked around afterwards, nobody else remembered seeing them.

Both men, and both a lot taller than me (I am quite tall), they seemed to act in unison. “We have three questions for you,” one or both of them said.

“Who are you?” they began.

This must be a trick question, I thought, because their intonation didn’t come across as a friendly enquiry about my name. “Well,” I began tentatively, “I’m me.”

They looked quite satisfied with my answer. “What is the time?” came the next question. This one seemed easy. “The time is now,” I replied, getting into the swing of it.

After all these years, I cannot remember the third question, or my answer, but I do remember them saying something about choosing me to bestow their gift, each giving me a hug before promptly leaving the party, as if their mission were done.

I wasn’t drunk or drugged or dreaming. I was totally conscious and aware. But I was slightly spooked. More so when I asked around about who they were, but no-one else seemed to have noticed them. I wondered what gift, if any, they had bestowed, and I still wonder. My life experiences are so extraordinary at times – or my perceptions of them are – that I would be hard pressed to distinguish where or how their intended benevolence may play out.

There are years when I forget about them, and then, at odd moments, like right now when I sat down to write a blog about something else entirely, the memory returns, which is why I find myself sharing this story with you and wondering where it will lead.

Back then, after the party, I didn’t look for signs of the gift. Maybe, I told myself, they were just two men at a party playing a game, or maybe the gift and their ability to bestow it was an illusion they both held dear. Or maybe they were drunk or stoned. Or maybe they, and the gift, were for real. I just let it be. After all, I am me, the time is now, and although there is a third truth that would be nice to recall, I was happy to simply let all that be.

Yet between that time and today my journey into my personal dreams and my professional dream work has transformed everything. I am still me, the time is still now, but the ‘me’ is far more encompassing and the ‘now’ is far richer and deeper. Or is that the other way around? Me, now: same thing.

I sat at my desk today to write a blog about paying attention to the different levels of interpretation and meaning gifted within a single dream. I got as far as the title, Yesterday, today, tomorrow, and that’s where the memory of the party came to mind and different words to those planned appeared on the page.

So let’s see what happens when I return to my intended theme for today’s blog.

For those of you who have studied my work, or done my courses, you’ll know that the entry point for the way I interpret a dream is the understanding that a dream reflects your conscious and unconscious experiences of the day or two before the dream. During dreaming, you are processing those very recent experiences to try to make sense of your world. You’re comparing those experiences of the last one to two days with all your past experiences, sometimes updating your mindset as a result, sometimes consolidating it, always projecting slightly ahead into the future, trying out today’s updated or consolidated mindset on possible future scenarios.

Worried about a job interview you have scheduled for tomorrow? Your dreaming mind will not only process those worries and all your previous similar experiences, feelings, and beliefs, but it will also project ahead and do a test run based on your current mindset.

All your yesterdays, triggered specifically by the last two yesterdays, meet today (while you are dreaming) to try out possible tomorrows.

Of course the dream story might not seem to be about the job interview because it will be richly expressed in the unique symbolic language of your dreaming brain and unconscious mind, but if you are skilled in interpreting your dreams you will be able to pick any limiting beliefs, fears, attitudes, and patterns that may trip you up at that job interview.

It’s easier to get accurate, meaningful insight from a dream if you can identify the experiences in the last two days that triggered all relevant resonating past experiences. We can all remember roughly the essence of the last couple of days, and once you have related your dream to these recent yesterdays, it’s easier to mine the many yesterdays of your past to find the origin of any limiting beliefs, emotions, attitudes, or patterns of behaviour that may be blocking your best future.

Yesterdays are not in the past if they are still influencing the present, and if they are influencing the present, they are influencing the future.

And it’s not only the yesterdays of your conscious memory that influence you today and tomorrow. Far more insidiously, far more powerfully, it’s the yesterdays buried in your unconscious mind that heavily influence your current mindset and the way you respond in the world today.

Your dreams, once interpreted, help you to discover more about the ‘me’ you are, way beyond your daytime conscious understanding, and they help you to discover the enormity of the ‘now’, that timeless place where yesterday, today, and tomorrow co-exist energetically within you while also playing out in your waking life.

When you have the tools to interpret and work with your dreams, and to create and use dream alchemy to reprogram (or heal) aspects of your unconscious mind, you can change the energetic mix of all those yesterdays to create a ‘now’ that is more in alignment with your best intentions.

So, you see, I have still not delivered my original blog idea about paying attention to the different levels of interpretation and meaning gifted within a single dream. I will reserve that for another time. The blog, instead, was high-jacked by the title I chose, or by my unconscious mind, or by the rumblings and resonances of the gift bestowed upon me by those two strangers all those years ago.

You and I might not meet at a party, and might not share a hug, but we can each share with strangers (and with people we already know and love) the gifts bestowed through understanding and working with our dreams.

You might also enjoy

Read Jane Teresa’s Dream Academy blogs

Read Jane Teresa’s In Your Dreams blogs

Online course: How to interpret your dreams step-by-step

Subscribe to Dream Sight News

The post Yesterday, today, tomorrow appeared first on In your dreams by Jane Teresa Anderson.

Read Full Article

Read for later

Articles marked as Favorite are saved for later viewing.
close
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Separate tags by commas
To access this feature, please upgrade your account.
Start your free month
Free Preview