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Viktorija Semjonova, who works under the professional name And Smile Studio, is a London based illustrator and a self-proclaimed huge Kuretake fan. She produces charming and bright portraits and images and was delighted to try out the Kuretake Gansai Tambi Watercolour Starry and Pearl sets we have just started stocking. These iridescent colours have the same creamy texture and opacity as the Kuretake Gansai Tambi Japanese Watercolour standard colours (using these led to Viktorija using gouache more) but produce luxurious shades perfect for adding interesting details or luminous backgrounds. Viktorija’s work with these special watercolours really shows how they can be used to add indulgence and interest to a piece. Trying out Kuretake Gansai Tambi Japanese Watercolour Starry and Pearl sets

by Viktorija Semjonova

One of my favourite watercolour sets, that I own, is a Kuretake set of 36 different colours. I love how opaque these watercolours are. And I love good quality shiny paints! So I was very excited to try the Kuretake Pearl Colours and the Kuretake Starry Colours sets. I decided to paint a couple of girls and mixed the watercolours with gouache paint.

Viktorija Semjonova
http://www.andsmilestudio.com/

These super shiny watercolours can be activated with a wet brush but a trick I have learned is to put a drop or two of water into the paint and let it sit there for a bit.

This means that once the watercolour is activated you can apply it in thick and quite opaque layers. This is how I like my shiny paints to feel — really rich and opaque. And they did feel like this!

Viktorija Semjonova at And Smile Studio showing the Kuretake Gansai Tambi Starry colour set of 6

Here are some girls I painted, some of them have a shiny background and some of them have shiny outfits or small details. The other paints I used in these images were my Holbein gouache on Bockingford hot pressed paper with a round synthetic brush (number 5 if you are curious). [Both Holbein Gouache and Bockingford Hotpressed paper are available from Jackson’s.]

Viktorija Semjonova
http://www.andsmilestudio.com/

All of the colours in Pearl Colours Set were so sweet, they are very soft but still have a bit of colour in them and have a lovely shimmer. They go on to the paper so beautifully and are completely opaque when applied generously. My favourite is the dreamy blue from this set, I painted some patterns over a navy coat. I love how bright and fun they look: it has such a good coverage for a very light paint going over a really deep navy.

Viktorija Semjonova’s illustration of a girl with a scarf using Kuretake Gansai Tambi Japanese Watercolour Pearl set and Kuretake Gansai Tambi Japanese Watercolour Starry set with Holbein Gouache.

The Starry Colours are so beautiful, I love all the golds in this set. The consistency even of the lighter golds and silver is so so so good, the colours are fun too! I think it’s super fun to add some shiny details to some paintings or paint with them on coloured paper. I loved using these shiny numbers to add some pizzaz to mini paintings, they are super fun to use and I’ll be using them a lot more when creating originals or at live events.

Viktorija Semjonova’s illustration of a girl with a scarf catching the light.

Thank you Jackson’s Art Supplies, I loved using them!

To see more of Viktorjia Semjonova’s/ And Smile Studio’s lovely work and read more of her writing you can visit her website or follow her on Facebook, Twitter, Society6, Pinterest and Instagram.

Viktorija Semjonova’s drawing of a girl in a gold dress using Kuretake Gansai Tambi Japanese Watercolour Starry set and Holbein Gouache.

You can find the Kuretake Gansai Tambi Starry Colour set, the Kuretake Gansai Tambi Pearl Colour set and our range of Kuretake Gansai Tambi Japanese Watercolours on our website.

The post And Smile Studio’s Illustrations with Iridescent Kuretake Gansai Tambi appeared first on Jackson's Art Blog.

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How many of you have stepped foot in a life drawing class? Have you ever wondered what it’s like to be a life model? After years of interviewing artists for the Jackson’s Art Blog, I thought it was high time I interview one of London’s best life models. Dominic Blake has posed in most of the UK’s art colleges as well as in many of London’s major art galleries and museums. These include the Royal Academy, The National Gallery, The Courtauld Institute of Arts, The Wallace Collection and the Art Academy. Here’s our interview with Dominic Blake – an insight into life as an artist’s model.

Dominic Blake posing at the National Gallery in 2017 (photo by Karly Allen)

Lisa: How did you first get into life modelling?

Dominic Blake: I was always interested in figurative art. I fell in love with portraiture and sculpture when I was very young. Trips to London’s galleries and museums and my Great Uncle’s work as a portrait painter made a re impression on me.

I later built a career as an Administrator and Press Office Assistant at the V&A, British Museum and Royal Museums Greenwich. These roles placed me in close proximity to some of my favourite works of art, including Rodin’s, Giambologna’s and the Parthenon sculptures.

Although I didn’t have any plans to become a Life Model, I longed to find work that was meaningful. I wanted to find work where I could express myself creatively and also offer inspiration for other people to produce works of art.

About three years ago a friend asked me to pose nude for a painting she hoped to make. I initially rejected the idea, telling her that she was crazy. When I finally decided to work with her my life profoundly changed; I discovered a way of being that possessed great emotional meaning, through which results were tangible and immediate (in the form of drawings, paintings or sculptures).

I learnt quickly that I was quite flexible and could create complex and dynamic gestural poses that were interesting to draw and fun to improvise. And I realised I could sustain them for extended periods of time.

At a point pretty early on in my journey as a Life Model, I realised I loved my work with all my heart. I decided to dedicate my life to it. I now work with almost all art colleges and many galleries, museums and Life Drawing groups in London and beyond.

In the Life Room at The Royal Academy (photo by Mary Ealden)

Lisa: Do you study a lot of paintings to get inspiration for your poses? If so are there any painters out there who are the greatest source of inspiration?

Dominic Blake: My inspiration for poses is filtered through myriad sources including, but not restricted to, painting. I take inspiration from all forms of figurative and abstract art. There’s inspiration to be found in the urban and natural world too: the buildings I walk past on my way to studios, music, literature, the branches in the trees. Pretty much anything can inspire a pose!

If I am booked to undertake classical poses within an atelier, I will usually think about the work of Michelangelo, Da Vinci or of Ancient Greek and Roman sculpture. However, where my poses are influenced by painting it tends to be the colours and geometric forms that excite me. Kandinsky’s work makes me think of complex and dynamic, often strange and beautiful poses that are interesting to draw.

Beyond painting, I am influenced directly by the energy of the studio itself. Studios are charged with an infinitely positive creative energy, limited only by the imaginations of those people who inhabit them.

Finally, I am constantly inspired by some of the other truly incredible Life Models working in London and beyond.

Two minute pose inspired by Kandinsky’s Composition VIII, at Hampstead School of Art 2017 (Photo by Derek Ogbourne)

Lisa: What makes a good pose?

In essence, a good pose is one that is interesting to draw. It needs to make sense within the context of the class, session or artist’s studio you are working within. However, that probably means as many things to as many different people out there drawing from life! So there are certain rules that I think about when creating a pose:

Ideally, a pose will take into consideration negative spaces, light and shade, and twists that accentuate the body’s musculature structure. More often than not artists in classes will be arranged in a either a 180 or 360 degree circle around the life model. So it’s very important to consider how a pose would look in the round, from every viewing position.

I most enjoy improvising short, dynamic gestural poses. Moving organically from one pose to the next, with each pose influencing the one that follows it, and never knowing quite where you will end up can be really exciting.

A room of Dominics!

Lisa: Are you ever surprised by the work that is made in response to your modelling? If so what’s been the biggest surprise?

Dominic: I’m often pleasantly surprised by the work made in response to my modelling. There are as many different approaches to drawing from Life as there people out there! Since no two drawings, paintings or sculptures will ever look the same, I find the way people interpret me endlessly fascinating. Wandering around an art class viewing students’ work is one of the greatest pleasures I know as a Life Model.

Knowing that I am inspiring artists to create works of art is an amazing feeling. I feel that my work is symbiotic in nature; I engage in a creative and collaborative exchange with the artists who draw, sculpt and paint me every day.

Posing in front of Caravaggio’s ‘Salome with the Head of John the Baptist’ at The National Gallery, 2017 (photo by Karly Allen)

Lisa: Where has been the most enjoyable place to pose as a life model?

Dominic: I am fortunate enough to have Life Modelled in some incredible places. I’ve modelled in front of a Caravaggio at The National Gallery as well as next to some of Henry Moore’s sculptures at The Courtauld Institute.

My favourite place to pose, however, will always remain the Life Room at the Royal Academy.

The RA’s historic Life Room dates back over 250 years. Constable, Reynolds, Stubbs and Turner all sat at the benches there. The seats are arranged on three levels in concentric semi-circular arcs, surrounded by original study objects on shelves including busts, statues and even a flayed horse.

The Life Drawing workshops and courses are delivered at the Royal Academy via the Academic Programmes department. I’ve worked within courses focusing on Anatomy, Historical Approaches to Life Drawing and Digital Drawing, among others. Mary Ealden, the RA’s Academic Programmes Manager, curates all the RA’s Life Drawing events. She has an enviable reputation within the London art community for delivering visionary and exciting journeys through drawing.

There is something magical about the RA’s Life Room; every time I work within it I feel that I’m contributing in some small way to the space’s cultural memory and history.

I also love working within the studios at The Art Academy, Hampstead School of Art (HSOA) and Putney School of Art and Design (PSAD). The Art Academy is an inspiring place to Life Model. I have worked there within courses led by artists including Tai Shan Shierenberg, Robin Lee Hall (RP), David Caldwell (RP), Andrew James (RP), Susanne Du Toit and many other artists.

There are countless amazing Life Drawing groups in London; I really enjoy working within figurative artist Dan Whiteson’s epic ‘Freeform Life Drawing’ classes. Also the events staged by Art Macabre, ‘Drawing the Star’, run by Catherine Hall and the Hesketh Hubbard Society at the Mall Galleries’.

At the famous Life Room at The Royal Academy of Arts

Lisa: Why do you think drawing and painting from life models continues to be so important to artists?

Dominic: I can’t think of another subject as endlessly complex, fascinating and interesting to draw than the human form. I think artists will always seek to draw from life in order to hone their observational drawing skills.

Drawing from life is a uniquely human experience. Beyond the form itself, which is of course of central importance, it’s also interesting to appreciate that Life Models are emotional beings. At their best a Life Class can explore the human condition as much as the human form. There is no other more intimate and beautiful artistic context than the Life Class.

‘Caroline Wong’s blind contour drawing of me through which she channeled the energy of Frank Auerbach. This work emerged within a class at The Art Academy in 2018’

Lisa: You must have listened to so many life drawing lessons! What’s the best advice you’ve heard given in an art class?

Dominic: The best advice I have heard in an art class is ‘… Let go of your preconceived notions of what a hand, foot, arm, look like. Draw shape, not subject’. It’s often too easy to draw what we ‘think’ we are looking at, rather than the thing itself. You think you know what a hand looks like. But you don’t really, unless you really, really look!

Seven minute pose at Village Underground, Shoreditch, 2017 within Dan Whiteson’s Freeform Life Drawing session (Photo by Didier Cuzzolin)

Lisa: For anyone considering trying out life modelling, what advice would you give?

Dominic: Life Modelling is the most rewarding career imaginable.. You will work with interesting people and be able to challenge yourself creatively every day. However, I think there are some important points to consider before you start Life Modelling.

You should actively want to learn your craft, which could become a lifelong process. In that way think its really useful to attend a life drawing classes as an artist, to experience things from the other side of the easel. By doing that, you can quickly find out what kinds of poses artists enjoy sketching, and also you might spot ways that you can improve as a model.

Life Modelling is also physically very demanding, so I would also recommend models take up yoga, or learn some good stretching exercises. These are useful before, during and after sessions, to minimise chances of injury.

Finally, don’t give up, and enjoy your journey!

‘One of my favourite interpretations of one of my poses, by figurative artist Dan Whiteson’

Lisa: What plans do you have coming up?

Dominic: I will continue Life Modelling in many of London’s art colleges, galleries and museums throughout the year. Fortunately 2018 has been great so far –  in April I worked in New York, Chicago, Los Angeles and Paris. In June I was really lucky to have the opportunity to work with Maggi Hambling at Morley College.

Dominic Blake by Gina Tawn. Gina is a student of Sam Dalby’s

Lisa: If people want to find out more about your work or how to book you, how should they contact you?

Dominic: If you want to learn more about my work, or contact me, you can check out my website www.dominicblakelifemodel.co.uk and Instagram. These present portfolios of my work to date as a Life and Portrait Model.

You can also find me in the recently published ‘From Life’ book, accompanying the Royal Academy’s exhibition of the same name, as well as in the ‘A Little History of The Royal Academy‘ book.

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At this year’s New English Art Club Annual Exhibition at the Mall Galleries, London, Jackson’s Art Supplies were proud to sponsor a prize. The Jackson’s Art Prize was awarded to the best work in the show by a non- NEAC member. Sharron Astbury-Petit’s ‘Hanabi’ stood out for its gorgeous palette and delicate, understated handling of paint. The composition has a timeless elegance that celebrates the female form. I interviewed Sharron Astbury-Petit to find out more about her artwork.

Hanabi
Sharron Astbury-Petit
Acrylic, graphite & colour pencil on wood panel, 60 x 50 cm

LT: How would you describe your current studio practice?

SA-P: I have always preferred my studio to be close to the heart of my home, a place from where – though apart – I can still feel the pulse of family life going on around me as I work.

It is the still point at the centre of my universe. A cool, calm, space scented by pencil shavings, where I can research, experiment, dream and create.

It is a space I inhabit daily (and where my first cup of tea is often drunk while tinkering), though the length of time I spend there varies greatly, depending on deadlines, mood, the time of year (I work only in natural light) and the stage of my current work.

Sharron Astbury-Petit at the NEAC Annual exhibition 2018 with her prize-winning painting ‘Hanabi’

LT: How did you develop the composition for ‘Hanabi’?

SA-P:I enjoy conveying mood, atmosphere and meaning through colour, background pattern and the pose of my model. I then heighten emotional intensity through cropping decisions which frequently leave my subjects intentionally anonymous.

Hanabi is a comment on female middle age and was inspired by my love of fireworks and the joyful discovery that the evocative translation of this word into Japanese is ‘hanabi’ or fire flower. A word which spoke to me of burning embers glowing in the darkness. Of passion and unquenchable fires. Of the glorious rising of the phoenix. I wanted this painting to glow.

Heloise
Sharron Astbury-Petit acrylic and graphite on poplar panel, 120 x 80 cm, 2004

LT: ‘Hanabi’ was painted using acrylic, graphite and coloured pencil. A really interesting combination of materials – can you describe how you applied them – did you work with all 3 simultaneously or were they applied in layers?

SA-P: Though I occasionally work in various media simultaneously, I prefer to apply them in layers with pauses for thought and evaluation in between. I enjoy experimenting with the layering of different substances and the effects that this can create. It is also very important to me that the grain and texture of the wood panels I paint on play an active role in the finished effect.

Nottingham Lace
Sharron Astbury-Petit
Acrylic and graphite on poplar panel, 97 x 73 cm, 2006

LT: A lot of your work combines pattern with the female form. What impact do you think the presence of repeat patterns have on the emotional content of your work?

SA-P: I feel that the juxtaposition of tight, repetitive detail increases emotional intensity, focus and acts as a counterpoint, emphasising the form and line of the subject.
The background patterns also frequently contain relevant symbolic content.

Tales of Love and Punishment: Remedia Amoris
Sharron Astbury-Petit
Acrylic, graphite, colour pencil and metal leaf on poplar panel, 100 x 100 cm, 2015

LT: Would you describe your work as spiritual? And would you describe the act of painting as being a spiritual act?

SA-P: I am fascinated by the relationship of the mundane with the divine and often explore this through my work. The act of painting in itself can also be very meditational: those glorious times when the creative process takes over from conscious decision making and you lose yourself in your work.

Tales of Love and Punishment: Ars Amatoria
Sharron Astbury-Petit
Acrylic, graphite and colour pencil on poplar panel, 100 x 100 cm, 2014

LT: There is a lot of symbolism in your work. How important is it to you that viewers of your work understand the symbolism present in it?

SA-P: I prefer that viewers should take what they will from my work, and feel that a painting should work on many levels. I do like to understand the symbolism inherent in my subject matter myself though, and research is always an enjoyable part of my creative process. I like to fully comprehend the story I am telling, and explore its’ undercurrents; what lies beneath the surface.

LT: Are the women in your paintings real women, or icons?

SA-P: A lot of my work is concerned with what it is to be a woman, so it’s important to me that my models are real people. My paintings are always based upon women I know well; who I feel in some way exemplify the theme. So I suppose, then, that they are both real and icons!

La Matinale
Sharron Astbury-Petit Acrylic and graphite on poplar panel, 107 x 79, 2005

LT: You spent a long time living in France but have now returned to the UK. How did this move affect your painting and the ideas that concerned you most?

SA-P: When I moved to France, the difference in light and its’ effects on colour intensity made a great impression on me and this was instantly reflected in my work. I also found that my work gradually increased in size and became more bold and experimental. Since my return, I find that I am now honing and embellishing these new skills.

Archer
Sharron Astbury-Petit Acrylic, graphite and colour pencil on poplar panel, 58 x 80 cm, 2009

LT: What artistic plans do you have for the immediate future?

SA-P: Becoming increasingly drawn to explore my reaction to both the Northern urban landscape and to the vast wildness of the nearby moors, I am currently beginning work on a triptych which responds to this.

Hiatus
Sharron Astbury-Petit
Acrylic and graphite on poplar panel, 120 x 75 cm, 2008

LT: Where online or in the flesh can we see more of your work?

SA-P: In addition to the New English Art Club Annual Exhibition 2018 which is now viewable online , I am also currently exhibiting in the Exposition North show in the Crossley Gallery at Dean Clough in Halifax (11 June – 14 July). I also have work selected for the Left Bank Leeds Art Prize Exhibition (18-21 July) at the Left Bank in Leeds. I hope then to have work in the French Salon d’Automne on the Champs Elysées, Paris (25 – 28 October) and in the Time and Place exhibition in the Inspired by…Gallery at The Moors National Park Centre, Danby, North Yorkshire (20 October – 13 November).
My work can also be seen online at:
www.sharronastbury-petit.com
www.facebook.com@sharronastburypetit
www.instagram.com/sharron.astbury.petit
www.leedsfineartists.co.uk
www.artistes-francais.com

Sharron Astbury-Petit at Salon d’Automne in Paris with her painting ‘Reverberation

Header image: ‘La Femme aux Chardons’ by Sharron Astbury-Petit, Acrylic, graphite and colour pencil on poplar panel, 107 x 141 cm, 2010

The post Sharron Astbury-Petit, Interview with the winner of the Jackson’s/NEAC Art Prize appeared first on Jackson's Art Blog.

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You can find all of our recommended art exhibitions in one place. Below is a list of our 7 must-see art shows for the month, along with a navigation that can take you to smaller weekly listings that are worthy of note, this section is updated with new shows every week. If you want to see exhibitions in London or in your area simply go to our Artist Calendar – let us know about an exhibition using the form at the bottom of that page for the chance to be included in one of our Art Exhibitions on Now posts!

7 Unmissable Art Exhibitions on in July

Interesting Exhibitions upcoming in July:
*Exhibitions on in the first week of July

Find out about further art gallery and exhibition listings.

Tell us about an exhibition, art class or opportunity.

7 Unmissable Art Exhibitions on in July This month’s art exhibitions not to miss collection includes several striking group shows and open submission shows that provide you with the possibility to see emerging and dynamic talent as well as two shows focusing on fascinating, historical artists and their lives. 1) Oriel Davies Open 2018: Multiple Artists

J.A. Nicholls, Zeal (detail), 2017, oil and acrylic on canvas

Oriel Davies’ celebrated Open exhibition includes a smorgasborg of established and emerging artists internationally.

The selectors focused on choosing original and engaging work to create this show. Looking through hundreds of entries 26 artists and artist collectives were selected, several of which are from Wales; the combination of these artists work represent the diversity of current practice that ranges from abstract to figurative through to imagined.

There are three awards to be won with the overall winner receiving £1000 and a solo show at Oriel Davies; the student winner receiving £500 (these will both be announced at the opening) and a People’s Choice award of £250 that is awarded at the end of the show after the public have voted.

Selectors include: Sacha Craddock, writer and curator; Jane Simpson, artist and Director Galerie Simpson; Matthew Collings, Artist, Writer, critic and broadcaster; Steffan Jones-Hughes, Director, Oriel Davies and Alex Boyd Jones Curator, Oriel Davies.

Exhibiting artists include: Alice Briggs, Savinder Bual, Nicola Dale, Shona Davies, Katharine Fry, David Garner, Henriette Heimdal, Nicholas Holmes, Bruce Ingram, Cecile Johnson Soliz, Jack Kettlewell, Jon Klein, Dinu Li, Bethan Lloyd Worthington, Gweni Llwyd, Amanda Loomes, Garry Loughlin, Rachel Magdeburg, Myles Mansfield, Myken McDowell, Nicholas McLeod, Dave Monaghan, J.A. Nicholls, Judith Rees, Lizi Sanchez, Louise Short, Nada Velickovic, Alice Walter.

J. A. Nicholls whose work is featured above creates collages in order to make paintings, her rye, surrealist works are to the humour of Eddie Izzard and involve transmuting the world into distinctive ‘felt realities’.

‘Operating as an antithesis to the collage paintings,  Nicholls makes intimate works of figures, mostly on paper. These ‘one-shot’ paintings speak with one voice, not several. Unashamed and undiluted in their fragility, transience and vulnerability. They are rough and careless in coming into being. ‘

Showing at Oriel Davies Gallery, Wales until 5th September 2018.

2) Set 24

This exhibition is a group show by the artists on the Turps Painting Programme, it demonstrates the cultivation of a group of artists who have worked alongside each other in neighbouring spaces, discussed and conversed about each other’s observations, ways of working and ideas. This melting pot has produced an array of discourses that are a full feast and set.

In 2003, the idea to establish a magazine about painting made predominately by painters became concrete during one of Phil King and Marcus Harvey’s many discussions about their own work and other painters that interested them. In 2012 the Turps Studio Programme started, to provide a dynamic structure of mentoring, peer-led learning, talks and visitors within an open studio environment. Set 24 was arranged by two members of the programme Rhiannon Rebecca Salisbury and Patrick H Jones and will be held at The Art Academy. An extra treat about this show is five minutes walk away the Turps Studios are having an open studio day, on the Saturday of the show, where you’ll be able to see where they’re working and the space they exist in.

Exhibiting artists include:
Eleanor Bedlow, Angela Brandys, Lena Brazin, Victoria Cantons, Julie Caves, The Baron Gilvan, Freya Guest, Rebecca Harper, Charles Inge, Patrick H Jones, Craig Lee, Matthew Lippiatt, Scott Miles, Olly Mulvihill, Shona McGovern, Nicholas Peall, Tomás Pizá García, Tom Rapsey, Rhiannon Rebecca Salisbury, Kieron Simms, Jonathan Small, Evan Thomas, Hannah Turner-Duffin, Sonia Wynn

Showing at The Art Academy, London between 18th July and 21st July 2018.

3) Frida Kahlo: Making Her Self Up

Self-portrait on the Border between Mexico and the United States of America, Frida Kahlo, 1932. © Modern Art International Foundation, Courtesy María and Manuel Reyero

The iconicism of Frida Kahlo has only increased in recent years with her receiving more and more critical and popular attention. A subversive and unusual painter Kahlo lived between 1907 and 1954 and incorporated her life events, personal style with her vibrant work so much so that many will be more familiar with her photographs than her actual paintings. This exhibition places Kahlo’s work into context with her domestic objects and specific collections, allowing the visitor to experience a sensation of standing in a physical sketchbook and to understand the aesthetic and philosophical line of thoughts that create each piece.

Many of the objects have not been displayed outside of Mexico before and come from La Casa Azul. ‘The Blue House’ was where Kahlo born, lived and died and was locked up for 50 years following Kahlo’s death at the bequest of her husband ( a muralist himself) Diego Rivera. These treasures that have been unearthed are a precious insight and exciting stimulus as to what inspires creativity and work.

Hilda Trujillo explains:

‘A series of medical corsets, supportive back-braces and a prosthetic leg [complete with leather boot] illuminate the story of her near-fatal bus crash at the age of 18, an event which caused her lasting pain, immobility and left her unable to have children. It was the catalyst for Kahlo’s interest in self-portraiture – she began to paint, while bed-bound, using a mirror inset into her four-poster bed.’

‘What makes this a clever show, as well as a riveting one, is the connections made continuously between her possessions and her paintings. It culminates in a spectacular room full of her dresses, ringed by a gallery of self-portraits and drawings in which she wears the same items, and stares at us with that black-eyed intensity of hers.’
Waldemar Januszczak, The Sunday Times

‘This is the story of human suffering; of a feminist; of a woman who had the insight to redefine her own identity decades before Instagram filters had been invented. ‘
Evening Standard

Showing at the Victoria and Albert Museum, London until 4th November 2018.

4) The London Open 2018

Rachel Ara, This Much I’m Worth (The self-evaluating artwork), 2017, 83 pieces of neon, steel, recycled server room equipment, electronics, computers, IP cameras, programming, 420 cm x 160 cm x 90 cm. Photo Credit: Anise Gallery

The Whitechapel Gallery’s London Open only takes place every 3 years and has had popular and critical acclaim since it was launched in 1932. This year it includes the work of 22 artists and dynamically represents the contemporary, diverse work that voices the experience of what it is like to live in a global city. Set up originally at the East End Academy for ‘all artists living or working east of the famous Aldgate Pump’, it has since expanded the submission radius to all of London so it can invite a wide range of the local thriving artist community to submit. Each show is completely unique and promises variety and rising stars, work includes painting, sculpture, performance and video.

The submission calls for those, over 26, making dynamic work in the Capital to submit and the list of exhibiting alumni prove the selectors’ eye and rebelliousness. Those who have partially launched their career by showing at the Whitechapel Open include Anish Kapoor, Julian Opie, Cornelia Parker, Grayson Perry, Bob & Roberta Smith, Richard Wentworth, Rachel Whiteread and Antony Gormley.

This year selectors include: Emily Butler, Mahera and Mohammad Abu Ghazaleh Curator; Cameron Foote, Assistant Curator, Whitechapel Gallery; Ryan Gander, Artist; Paul Hedge, Hales Gallery; Robert Suss, Collector and Amy Sherlock, Frieze Magazine.

Exhibiting artists include: Larry Achiampong, Rachel Ara, Gabriella Boyd, Hannah Brown, Rachael Champion, Gary Colclough, George Eksts, Ayan Farah, French & Mottershead, Vikesh Govind, Richard Healy, Des Lawrence, Tom Lock, Céline Manz, Uriel Orlow, Rachel Pimm, Renee So, Alexis Teplin, Elisabeth Tomlinson, Jonathan Trayte, Tom Varley and Andrea Luka Zimmerman.

Showing at the Whitechapel Gallery, London until 26th August 2018.

5) RA 250th Summer Exhibition

Shot of Grayson Perry from the video guide to 250th RA Summer Exhibition

The fact that this year’s RA Summer Exhibition in the 250th edition of their show celebrating ‘art made now’ makes it an interesting and monumental moment, however, if you add to that the fact they chose Grayson Perry as the coordinator means this year’s show is truly something special and spectacular.

Grayson Perry and his committee have personally curated a collection of over 1300 artworks, these include a variety of mediums and are made by artists with both renowned, established careers and those who are just starting out and are beginning to be noticed. This year’s RA Summer Exhibition features a large sculpture by Anish Kapoor in the courtyard; gallery spanning works by David Hockney and Joana Vasconcelos. Alongside Royal Academicians including Wolfgang Tillmans, Mike Nelson, Tracey Emin and Rose Wylie, and Honorary Academicians Bruce Nauman and Ed Ruscha, will be shown artists Mona Hatoum and Tal R.

Visiting the exhibit is also a chance to see the RA’s newly expanded cultural campus that features prints on display in The Sackler Wing of Galleries an adeptly named room of humour that shows works by David Shrigley and Martin Parr. This exuberant show is viewable even from the streets with an installation of more than 200 flags created by Royal Academicians.

If you’re still on the fence about whether to go or if you’ve already been Grayson Perry’s video where he shows you around his highlights of this year’s show is extremely informative and interesting. You can see it here.

‘An enthusiastically democratic spectacle that breathes a gust of new life into longstanding tradition.’
Rachel Campbell-Johnston, The Times

Showing at the Royal Academy of Arts, Main Galleries, The Sackler Wing of Galleries and The Ronald and Rita McAulay Gallery London until 19th August 2018.

6) Spike Print Studio Learning Programme End of Year Show

Molly Lemon, Water Landscape IV 2016 Pressure Print on Japanese Rice Paper

Spike Print Studio, is a co-founding, not for profit studio group of Spike Island and is the largest open access print studio in the Southwest. This studio provides a wonderful collaborative environment for artists, the public and their own members to explore work and learn technical skills. Their Learning Programme, of which this is the end of year show for the 1-year portfolio course, is well established with expert tutors and a strong reputation. The creativity, hard work and success of each student is obvious within this group show. The exciting range of processes that artists employ, and that are available at Spike Print Studio, these include screen printing, relief printing, etching, photopolymer, textile screen printing, cyanotype,  paper structures and collagraph. This show also includes the work of their new course Paper Structures and Textile Printmaking which launched in September 2016, for 2017-2018 the course has also been extended to include Contemporary Relief Printing.

A particular highlight of the show is the work of Molly Lemon, an old piece of whom is featured above. She is currently producing a beautiful series of wood engravings and focuses mainly on printmaking, British Wildlife and natural forms in landscapes. Coming from near Dartmoor in Devon, her need to reproduce natural forms is evidently a personal one. Additionally to printmaking, she works into pieces using oil paint, oil pastels and watercolours. She also developed with a bursary from the France Brodeur Young Artist Award a method to pressure print uniquely, a result of which is above. You can see more of her work here.

Showing at Spike Print Studio, Bristol between 22nd July and 26th July 2018.

7) Emil Nolde: Colour is Life

Emil Nolde, Landschaft Nordfriesland 1920, ©Nolde Stiftung Seebüll

This exhibition comprises of 100 paintings, drawings and prints by Emil Nolde one of the greatest and most unique colourists of the twentieth century. Predominantly his work comes across as electrifying and heightened with him as an artist appearing as a restless, raw, problematic genius. His work across rural and urban landscape with distinctive depictions of his North German home’s sprawling skies, windblown landscapes and volatile seas as well as charming, eerie depictions of Berlin’s cafés and cabarets, the bustle and bobbing of Hamburg’s port and a dynamic mix of crowds and places he experienced in 1914.

The show is curated to draw you through his entire career from his early intense paintings of his homeland, to his maturing intense coloured unpainted paintings on to those on pieces of paper during the war, while he was named a degenerate artist and forbidden to work.

The conflict while looking at his work is an interesting experience..

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At this year’s New English Art Club Annual Exhibition at the Mall Galleries, London, Jackson’s Art Supplies were proud to sponsor a prize. The Jackson’s Art Prize was awarded to the best work in the show by a non- NEAC member. Sharron Astbury-Pettit’s ‘Hanabi’ stood out for its gorgeous palette and delicate, understated handling of paint. The composition has a timeless elegance that celebrates the female form. I interviewed Sharron Astbury Pettit to find out more about her artwork.

Hanabi
Sharron Astbury-Pettit
Acrylic, graphite & colour pencil on wood panel, 60 x 50 cm

LT: How would you describe your current studio practice?

SA-P: I have always preferred my studio to be close to the heart of my home, a place from where – though apart – I can still feel the pulse of family life going on around me as I work.

It is the still point at the centre of my universe. A cool, calm, space scented by pencil shavings, where I can research, experiment, dream and create.

It is a space I inhabit daily (and where my first cup of tea is often drunk while tinkering), though the length of time I spend there varies greatly, depending on deadlines, mood, the time of year (I work only in natural light) and the stage of my current work.

Sharron Astbury-Pettit at the NEAC Annual exhibition 2018 with her prize-winning painting ‘Hanabi’

LT: How did you develop the composition for ‘Hanabi’?

SA-P:I enjoy conveying mood, atmosphere and meaning through colour, background pattern and the pose of my model. I then heighten emotional intensity through cropping decisions which frequently leave my subjects intentionally anonymous.

Hanabi is a comment on female middle age and was inspired by my love of fireworks and the joyful discovery that the evocative translation of this word into Japanese is ‘hanabi’ or fire flower. A word which spoke to me of burning embers glowing in the darkness. Of passion and unquenchable fires. Of the glorious rising of the phoenix. I wanted this painting to glow.

Heloise
Sharron Astbury-Pettit acrylic and graphite on poplar panel, 120 x 80 cm, 2004

LT: ‘Hanabi’ was painted using acrylic, graphite and coloured pencil. A really interesting combination of materials – can you describe how you applied them – did you work with all 3 simultaneously or were they applied in layers?

SA-P: Though I occasionally work in various media simultaneously, I prefer to apply them in layers with pauses for thought and evaluation in between. I enjoy experimenting with the layering of different substances and the effects that this can create. It is also very important to me that the grain and texture of the wood panels I paint on play an active role in the finished effect.

Nottingham Lace
Sharron Astbury-Pettit
Acrylic and graphite on poplar panel, 97 x 73 cm, 2006

LT: A lot of your work combines pattern with the female form. What impact do you think the presence of repeat patterns have on the emotional content of your work?

SA-P: I feel that the juxtaposition of tight, repetitive detail increases emotional intensity, focus and acts as a counterpoint, emphasising the form and line of the subject.
The background patterns also frequently contain relevant symbolic content.

Tales of Love and Punishment: Remedia Amoris
Sharron Astbury-Pettit
Acrylic, graphite, colour pencil and metal leaf on poplar panel, 100 x 100 cm, 2015

LT: Would you describe your work as spiritual? And would you describe the act of painting as being a spiritual act?

SA-P: I am fascinated by the relationship of the mundane with the divine and often explore this through my work. The act of painting in itself can also be very meditational: those glorious times when the creative process takes over from conscious decision making and you lose yourself in your work.

Tales of Love and Punishment: Ars Amatoria
Sharron Astbury-Pettit
Acrylic, graphite and colour pencil on poplar panel, 100 x 100 cm, 2014

LT: There is a lot of symbolism in your work. How important is it to you that viewers of your work understand the symbolism present in it?

SA-P: I prefer that viewers should take what they will from my work, and feel that a painting should work on many levels. I do like to understand the symbolism inherent in my subject matter myself though, and research is always an enjoyable part of my creative process. I like to fully comprehend the story I am telling, and explore its’ undercurrents; what lies beneath the surface.

LT: Are the women in your paintings real women, or icons?

SA-P: A lot of my work is concerned with what it is to be a woman, so it’s important to me that my models are real people. My paintings are always based upon women I know well; who I feel in some way exemplify the theme. So I suppose, then, that they are both real and icons!

La Matinale
Sharron Astbury-Pettit Acrylic and graphite on poplar panel, 107 x 79, 2005

LT: You spent a long time living in France but have now returned to the UK. How did this move affect your painting and the ideas that concerned you most?

SA-P: When I moved to France, the difference in light and its’ effects on colour intensity made a great impression on me and this was instantly reflected in my work. I also found that my work gradually increased in size and became more bold and experimental. Since my return, I find that I am now honing and embellishing these new skills.

Archer
Sharron Astbury-Pettit Acrylic, graphite and colour pencil on poplar panel, 58 x 80 cm, 2009

LT: What artistic plans do you have for the immediate future?

SA-P: Becoming increasingly drawn to explore my reaction to both the Northern urban landscape and to the vast wildness of the nearby moors, I am currently beginning work on a triptych which responds to this.

Hiatus
Sharron Astbury-Pettit
Acrylic and graphite on poplar panel, 120 x 75 cm, 2008

LT: Where online or in the flesh can we see more of your work?

SA-P: In addition to the New English Art Club Annual Exhibition 2018 which is now viewable online , I am also currently exhibiting in the Exposition North show in the Crossley Gallery at Dean Clough in Halifax (11 June – 14 July). I also have work selected for the Left Bank Leeds Art Prize Exhibition (18-21 July) at the Left Bank in Leeds. I hope then to have work in the French Salon d’Automne on the Champs Elysées, Paris (25 – 28 October) and in the Time and Place exhibition in the Inspired by…Gallery at The Moors National Park Centre, Danby, North Yorkshire (20 October – 13 November).
My work can also be seen online at:
www.sharronastbury-petit.com
www.facebook.com@sharronastburypetit
www.instagram.com/sharron.astbury.petit
www.leedsfineartists.co.uk
www.artistes-francais.com

Sharron Astbury-Pettit at Salon d’Automne in Paris with her painting ‘Reverberation

Header image: ‘La Femme aux Chardons’ by Sharron Astbury-Pettit, Acrylic, graphite and colour pencil on poplar panel, 107 x 141 cm, 2010

The post Sharron Astbury-Pettit, Interview with the winner of the Jackson’s/NEAC Art Prize appeared first on Jackson's Art Blog.

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Thomas Golunski, an accomplished figurative oil painter and teacher, has tried our Jackson’s Artist Oils for the first time and tells us how they compare to other oil paints and why he likes the big tubes. He has painted a gorgeous portrait using Jackson’s materials: Jackson’s Artist Oils, Jackson’s brushes and a Jackson’s Handmade Linen Panel.

Thomas Golunski is an artist based in the south of England, working in oils and charcoal. His work explores narrative weight and an individual contemplative reflection within figurative painting. Aspiring to control the chaotic, he aims to capture an accurate impression of a precise moment while giving particular focus to the impact that light and shadow have upon his subjects.

Through an urgent and tense recreation of fleeting moments, Golunski seeks to explore the way illumination can be used to aid narrative storytelling and suggest not only the transitory nature of light but also a fleeting moment of atmosphere. Illumination and the impressions that strange, vivid and direct lighting leave feature prominently throughout his work.

Thomas Golunski’s chosen Jackson’s Artist Oil paints

Jackson’s Oil Paint Review

by Thomas Golunski

So arguably the most important aspect of oil painting is the paint. I am a firm believer that you can make wonderful artwork with a very limited set of tools but if you are painting in oil then you’ll definitely need some oil paints!

So as an overview of this review, yes, I think you should buy Jackson’s own brand oil paint regardless of your skill level. I promise I will qualify this statement later but if you want a quick overarching review and prefer to test things yourself, I would highly recommend these paints.

Jackson’s Brushes and Jackson’s Artist oil paint tubes

I recently have started to buy some of Jackson’s own brand materials. Having been a fan of the super fine oil primed linen boards since I started painting in oils, I have recently found that the Jackson’s gesso ground and Thixotropic Alkyd Oil Primer achieve the kind of surface quality I want to work on. In turn this had made me very interested in their paints, as I thought the quality of their product was amazing, while a similar price of other materials I had bought from other brands.

After writing to Jackson’s about how good I thought their products were and asking if I could have some catalogues to give to my students, they were kind enough to send me some paints. I got sent a set of Jackson’s Artist Oil paints to test out.

The paints I chose consisted of:
Titanium White, Genuine Cadmium Yellow, Genuine Cadmium Yellow Deep, Genuine Cadmium Red, Alizarin Crimson, Burnt Sienna, Burnt Umber, Phthalo Turquoise, Prussian Blue and Mars Black.

It’s important to note that I usually prefer a Lemon Yellow, however, for the purpose of this test I wanted to test the quality of their Cadmium Yellow against the quality of their Cadmium Red. It is also important to note that I dislike Ultramarine Blue and haven’t had it in my palette for a few years but instead have replaced it with a Phthalo Turquoise and a Prussian Blue.

I thought that the best way to test the quality of paint would be to dive in at the deep end and complete a painting using only their paints and see how the paint handles in a real world application instead of colour mixing swabs. So with that in mind, here is the example of a painting completed with only Jackson’s Artists’ oil paints.

Thomas Golunski’s portrait painted with Jackson’s Artist Oils

But let’s talk about the paint in more specific detail, now that you’ve seen it in action.
The best aspect of the Jackson’s Artist Oil paints is the quality of the pigment to oil ratio. I found that the paints had very good coverage, much better than similarly priced oil paints from other brands, this also means that the paint goes a very long way. I wanted a real world experience to confirm this theory so I purchased a Jackson’s Artist Oil Paint: Lemon Yellow and a tube of Daler Rowney’s Lemon Yellow Georgian Oil paint (the closest I could find at a similar price).

Now the first thing to notice is the quality, where Georgian oil paint is considered a student quality paint, the Jackson’s Artist Oil paint is Artist level quality and the difference definitely comes across. The Jackson’s paint just performed so much better, a stronger mix that could be used to produce brighter, bolder colours without having to use a huge quantity of paint, especially compared to the Georgian oil paint. The pigment quality in the Georgian Lemon Yellow felt like you had to use a lot of paint for the same result.

The packaging feels like it has been designed with the artist in mind, throughout the whole production process. The paint tubes come in individual cardboard tubes allowing easy studio storage, with a test strip of paint, from the batch that has filled the tube, on top of the box on a black and white background. This means you can very easily see the opacity effects the paint has without having to understand the opacity information that normally ships on the back of paint tubes. Also, the larger 225ml tube and the smaller 75ml tubes have the same screw caps, so they are interchangeable between the two sizes (top tip to any artist: keep any tube caps after you finish a tube of paint you never know when they will come in handy!).

Squeezed out Jackson’s Artist Oil Paint

I also am a huge fan of how all the oil paint colours come in 225ml tubes, due to my practice I generally like to buy bigger tubes of paint, I like to squeeze out a fair amount of paint before starting a painting so I can have control over the handling and mixing of the paint.

I also got two Jackson’s brushes to test out as I hadn’t used Jackson’s brushes before and I also got a super fine oil primed 20cm by 30cm oil board, I normally make my own painting panels to keep the costs down but when I need a painting panel of a specific size and don’t have the time to make my own panel, Jacksons oil primed boards are the only painting panel I will happily paint on.

Jackson’s Handmade Oil Primed Extra Fine Linen Board

Jackson’s Handmade Oil Primed Extra Fine Linen Board

I got a Shiro Hog brush (size 6) and a Red Sable ‘one stroke’ (size 1/4in). I chose these brushes to test as they are staples of my toolkit, but I had never tried Jackson’s own brand before so I definitely wanted to give them a go considering my past experiences with Jackson’s own brand art supplies. They definitely perform fantastically to the point where they are interchangeable in my tool box.

Ultimately my main praise, for the materials I have been fortunate enough to test, is one of incredible value for money, the sheer quality of paint for the price, it is feels like I have hit upon a winner. In between receiving the paints, testing them and writing this review, I have bought a set of 12 large paint tubes as I now use them as my main source of paint. The quality paints at a fraction of the price of some other brands, has allowed me to be more experimental with larger pieces but also being able to load up paint onto brushes on to smaller paintings to get more bold impasto marks. I truly regret not being introduced to them in my earlier days of oil painting as I felt it would have allowed me to start painting with a higher quality of paint and ultimately I think I would have saved money over the past 5 years that I have been buying oil paint.

Thomas Golunski working on a portrait, including palette of Jackson’s Artist Oils.

You can find out more about Thomas Golunski and see more of his accomplished work on his Facebook, Instagram, YouTube, Patreon and Twitter. View our full range of Jackson’s Artist Oils, Jackson’s surfaces and Jackson’s brushes.

The post Thomas Golunski Reviews Jackson’s Artist Oil Paints appeared first on Jackson's Art Blog.

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The opportunity to show in a renowned gallery is every emerging artist’s dream. In June 1983, Angela Flowers’ choice to garner the interest of critics by introducing a two week show, where established artists picked emerging artists to have a solo show for just one day, not only shows a legacy of generosity but a fascinating and unique project that acts as a piece of work with itself. The fact that ‘Artist of the Day’ at Flowers Gallery has now annually been running for 30 years proves the point William Packer wrote in The Times on 1 July 1986 about the show ‘it is not uncommon for galleries to have good ideas; but it is less usual for them to bear repetition.’ From big names to those steeped in obscurity the show is a highlight of the art calendar with the intimacy and special context of the selection coming across every year.

Each solo day must be ready by 10am and be taken down when the gallery closes at 6pm. A mammoth task which every participant has risen too, often choosing unsuitable, large-scale, complex artworks but worthy projects whose process adds to the excitement of discovering new artists and seeing a generation of artists guiding and leading their future colleagues and current heirs.

When:

25 June – 7 July 2018

Where:

Flowers Gallery
21 Cork Street
London W1S 3LZ

About Artist of the Day and Flowers Gallery

“Artist of the Day has given a platform and context to artists, some of whom may not have exhibited much before, accompanied by the support and dedication of their selectors. The relationship between the selector and the artist adds an intimate power to the exhibitions.” – Matthew Flowers

This is the 24th edition a vital West End exhibition programme, where leading contemporary artists have been invited, since 1983, to select an individual artist to show there work for a day. Over the years, 193 artists have been shown by this programme. Due to Flowers Gallery’s Mayfair location, and the programme of events that are taking place each day, this two-week show is a very exciting opportunity and that creates a fast-paced, revolving exhibition, whose new and varied group of artists is then distilled into a forceful and telling project.

It allows one generation of artists to introduce the next, enabling the curative role to be taken away from gallery and into the hands of different important artists. The electric mix that this un-traditional process creates is both distinctly eclectic and often surprising. Additionally, it gives you the incentive to visit the gallery every day for the period and to fully take in the work as it will only be shown in this setting for a singular day; if you don’t go you might miss out on seeing a rising star of the art world and on the opportunity to collect an early piece of theirs. In fact, until recently Flowers Gallery would actually award a prize to the person who was at the gallery for the highest number of days during the show being on.

Selectors have included several large names, distinctive artists and interesting critics in their own right, including Patrick Caulfield, Helen Chadwick, Jake & Dinos Chapman, Tracey Emin, Gilbert & George, Maggi Hambling, Anish Kapoor, Cornelia Parker, Bridget Riley and Gavin Turk. Previous artists who have been exhibited are equally interesting including Juno Calypso (who this year is in fact now a selector), Billy Childish, Adam Dant, Dexter Dalwood, Nicola Hicks and Lynette Yiadom-Boakye.

A catalogue is available at the show which celebrates the incredible history of ‘Artist of the Day’ from its beginnings into the 21st Century, what comes across in this text is not only how it has launched relationships and artists careers but also how Flowers Gallery has encouraged and looked after emerging artists over the years.

Angela Flowers first established a gallery in 1970 in Lise Street in London’s West End followed in the 1980s by the gallery opening in London’s East End (one of the first to set up in this future cultural hub). Flowers East as it became known was first opened in a former laundry come fur storage facility in Hackney. In 1989, Angela’s son Matthew Flowers took over daily operations and later opened a gallery in Los Angeles at Bergamot Station.

Since the turn of the century the Flowers galleries in London have moved so Flowers West is located in Cork Street and Flowers East has moved into a 12,000 ft industrial space in Shoreditch. Similarly, the Los Angeles premises moved to New York’s Madison Avenue and then to West 20th street in Chelsea, between 2003 and 2009. This international and engaged community continues to support all media and a variety of artists at different points in their career.

A Day by Day guide to the 2018 Arist of the Day Show:

*Monday 25th June
*Tuesday 26 June
*Wednesday 27 June
*Thursday 28 June
*Friday 29 June
*Saturday 30 June
*Monday 2 July
*Tuesday 3 July
*Wednesday 4 July
*Thursday 5 July
*Friday 6 July
*Saturday 7 July

Monday 25 June | Simon Popper selected by Rut Blees Luxemburg

Simon Popper selected by Rut Blees Luxemburg. Image credit Uta Kogelsberger

Simon Popper’s work can be broadly understood by its degrees of visual and linguistic separation, that is, through its titles (its naming) and the relations between what the works appear to be, what they are and what they might become. This often rests upon a hinge of wordplay or punning and visual tropes to break down or collapse objects and ideas characterised by a sense of the comedic or the deadpan – but in all seriousness – in a logic of displacement or derangement.

The permeation of a kind of working dyslexia (real and imagined) or visual/linguistic displacement extends to Popper’s methodology in general and to each operation in particular. It’s his way of creating or making things in the world and for the world and his reason for doing it in the first place. This displacement or making other of art, books or just things is as much about the pleasure of creating opportunities as it is about unmaking them, a kind of non-productivity or ‘patience work’ in its ‘purposelessness’ in the folly of its ways. It could be understood as a ‘negative’ making or anti-artisanal production by producing something not just along the lines of value or even the commodity – at least notionally. It’s almost as if the artist was a cottage industry but without the industry, production without product in the simple act of doing.

The work of Simon Popper is an invitation to delinquency, an abandonment of one’s place anchoring a rational centred self into some altogether other self in another place, ordered and classified by systematic play and caprice if only for a moment. The ideal space these works might inhabit would be something like a contemporary ‘room of one’s own’, that now impossibly dissolving bourgeois space, away from the order of things, from the exhaustion of life and from a life surrounded by exhausted objects.

– David Bussel

“I chose Simon Popper, as I am long-time devotee of his work: his witty drawings, joyous sculptures and exuberant paintings, often linked via a humble object such as the earthy and multitudinous mushroom – a recurrent motive – captured in a delicate typology, ongoing and hallucinogenic. His recent book focusses on the potato, another continuously shape-shifting earth-work. A one-day exhibition is an event, that in its temporal compression asks for a shift in the way an artwork is exhibited and transmitted. Will diaphanous elephants dangle from the ceiling? Might incandescent objects move beyond the gallery? And can the making of art continue to be a form of productive subversion?”

– Rut Blees Luxemburg

Tuesday 26 June | Clare Price selected by Hannah Perry

Clare Price selected by Hannah Perry, Image credit Antonio Parente

The ultimate intention for the work is to probe the idea that “Art comes through the body” whilst seeking to maintain a conversation with the history of painting.

The work explores ideas around the voluptuous materiality of paint. In the paintings visceral oil paint is set against more defined lines to create a rupture. Stains and poured goo onto raw canvas refer both to the body and to Abstract Expressionism, Joan Mitchell and Helen Frankenthaler in particular. Geometric shapes interplay with gestural elements creating ambiguous spaces. Stained, spilled vistas are interrupted by shapes drawn from flawed facets of video games and modernist forms in honour of Reinhardt, Palermo and Malevich.

The paintings investigate the sensuousness of making, the palpable “stuff” of paint that freezes the hidden performance, the interaction with the body and materials in the studio, traces and residues of moments are captured like photographic exposures. The edges of the stretcher contain and tether sensations, this containment heightening the forces within; creating deep spaces, harnessing the chaos of the studio to create small universes within the frame. Titles are encrypted autobiographical references that allude to the body, containment and the moments in which the works were made. There is bodily quality to the works they are vulnerable, exposed, rent open after all De Kooning said: “Flesh is the reason Oil paint was invented”.

In recent explorations, I have begun to take photographs of myself situating my body within the practice in relation to the paintings. Through these works I have been playing with my identity or ‘performing the self’, trying to take back power within patriarchal structures by owning it, teasing it; camping it up and at times, using humour as a form of resistance. The photographs are a way of un-containing the sensuality, sexuality and experience of what the paintings hold within them and explore the release of this self from the “bloc of sensation”, as Deleuze would call it, of the painting’s frame. Self-publishing these images via Instagram touches upon ideas of cyber-feminism and of course the female gaze.

An obsession with paint and painting and matter drives the work, dealing with “stuff” that exists in both the stars and the earth and our bodies.

– Clare Price

[1] Research has to go through a body; it has to be lived in some sense—transformed into some sort of lived experience—in order to become whatever we might call art.[1] Mark Leckey interview by Mark Fischer, Kaleidescope Magazine, Kaleidescope-press.com

Clare’s paintings are intimate and bold. Her works to me have a definitive connection to the language of the female body. Not necessarily in it’s pallet or tone, but with the actions and gestures, signalling femininity at its rawest. The expression is both strong and fragile, honest and open.

How can the act of painting be infused with the act of performance is a conversation we have had a lot recently. I like the movement in her work as much as the containment, composure and disposition.

– Hannah Perry

Wednesday 27 June | Miriam Austin selected by Esther Teichmann

Miriam Austin selected by Esther Teichmann, Image credit Antonio Parente

My recent practice explores the relationship between ritual, myth, ecological fragility and embodiment. Drawing on research into feminist fiction, folklore, magical rites and rituals associated with the landscape, this body of work spans sculpture, installation, video and performance. Attempting to address the entanglement of privilege, oppression and representation that accompanies Western interest in “native” or “folk” religions and cultures, the work interrogates the possible links between local mythology, global inequality and ecological disaster.

– Miriam Austin

Thursday 28 June | Michael Ginsborg selected by Keith Milow

Michael Ginsborg selected by Keith Milow

“STREAM” is the title of the group of collages in this one-day exhibition. My work is generated from an ongoing collection of images on paper, some made by me, some found. Some are complete and some are fragments. What unites this disparate, open ended and deliberately un-taxonomic collection, apart from being assembled by me, is the pictorial possibilities that I see both within, and between each item.

I work with a process of extended improvisation. The work is not consciously produced with reference to a motif in the world. When the descriptive element becomes too prevalent I tend to degrade it. The ensuing ambiguities are an inescapable part of my working process.

– Michael Ginsborg

Derek Jarman collected people, it was a great talent, and when I met Derek in 1967 Michael was well established as the friend Derek had met whilst they were both students at Kings. Michael was also a painter and had already developed an enviable skill set which gave his paintings an authority that I was yet to achieve. This sure hand has never been absent from Michael’s work.

As I write, I am looking at an image of a painting called ACCUMULATION, 1976-77, a painting which announces itself immediately in its precision. It is fugal, possibly symphonic in nature, with it’s four sections increasing in volume and complexity. All this happening whilst being exquisitely drawn and painted in the colours of a Russian Constructivist.

In his more recent work, Michael exhibits a wealth of references, some obscure to the viewer, some not. The pleasure is not only in the decoding of these works but in witnessing an artist whose skill with the medium remains undiminished and vigorous.

– Keith Milow

Friday 29 June | Miyako Narita selected by Richard Wilson

Miyako Narita selected by Richard Wilson, Image credit Miyako Narita

I photograph anything that fascinates me in my everyday life normally where it is and how it is. Most of these captured moments are not set up, manipulated or controlled in anyway. Carried with me throughout the day, my camera records moments that I interpret as ‘fragments’ of my daily life. There are no rules in my practice. Photographing starts each morning at home and continues throughout the day wherever I am.

– Miyako Narita

Saturday 30 June | Saron Hughes selected by Charles Avery
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We’ve updated our Competitions Program! Our new program has tailored prizes aimed to give successful applicants the exposure and resources that would be most relevant to them, thereby also creating a like-minded community of entrants that artists can engage and network with. First up in our calendar is the Amateur Artist Prize opening 1st July – read our blog post to make sure you’re ready to enter!

Read more about our new Competitions Program on our website Opportunity Overview:

Do you love using materials and want to start sharing your work with a supportive community? We’d love to see what you’ve been making! Enter your work to the Jackson’s Amateur Artist Prize for the chance to win up to £250 worth of art materials! Whether you’ve just started out, occasionally make things or have been making work for years, we want to showcase your art.

The competition is not open to professional artists or artists who have already won significant prizes and awards for their work – only amateurs. To qualify as an amateur, individuals should not earn more than 50% of their annual income from their artworks. Further, as this is a competition for amateurs, entrants must declare any connection with a commercial art associate or organisation when entering. Although this will not automatically exclude an entrant, Jackson’s will consider any conflict of interest and reserves the right to exclude an entry on that basis. Entrants must be 16 years of age or older.

This opportunity is free to enter and is for 2D Fine Art practices (painting, drawing, printmaking) only.

Prizes

The opportunity is structured to celebrate as many artists as possible, meaning we’ve created as many prizes as we can! During the entry period, a submission a day will be shared on our Facebook page, meaning even if you don’t win we might share your work.

5 Medium-based Prizes: £200 Jackson’s Art Gift Voucher each

Winners chosen by Jackson’s Judging Panel

10 People’s Choice Awards: £50 Jackson’s Art Gift Voucher each

Winners determined by public vote – the 10 artworks with the highest number of votes wins

Key Dates

Entries open: 9am, 1st July 2018

Entries close: 11:59pm, 31st August 2018

Public voting opens: 4th September 2018

Public voting closes: 11:59pm, 23rd September 2018

All winners announced: 24th September 2018

Entry Advice

Photograph your work straight on in a clear, well and naturally lit space. Wait for a nice sunny day and photograph your work in a bright room or outside. Make sure the camera is exactly parallel to your work, there is no glare or shine on the paint and you can’t see your shadow.

Crop the image of your work down to JUST the artwork. This means crop out the mount and frame round your work (unless its intrinsic to the piece e.g. the painting flows onto the frame), the wall/surface your work is displayed on, your sofa etc. The image you submit should be the kind of image you could make a reproduction print from.

Images of artwork must be at least 1000px wide (with a resolution of at least 72px per inch). The maximum jpeg file size is 3MB. Artwork with a copyright stamp or watermark on it will not be accepted.

If your submission does not meet the above standards (e.g. the image is dark or blurry, it is not cropped correctly or the file is too small), it will be disqualified from the competition.

Competition Terms and Conditions

Please click here to read our full terms and conditions before entering.

To enter and read more about our new competitions program, please view our updated website here. 

The post Jackson’s Amateur Artist Prize appeared first on Jackson's Art Blog.

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Glyn Macey can often be found roaming the harbours, moorland and coast of his native West Cornwall, sketchbook in hand recording the details of daily Cornish life and history. Such sketches are used as the basis for his studio paintings. If you can’t get to Cornwall for one of his painting workshops you can learn online from one of the tutorials available on his website.

Watercolours ‘en plein air’ with Winsor & Newton

by Glyn Macey

Painting ‘en plein air’ is always a joyous experience and never more so than when working with the most spontaneous of all mediums, Winsor & Newton watercolour. The unrivalled luminosity and loose speed of a good watercolour seems akin to a magic trick. Just a few deft brushstrokes of water, a touch of added colour and the magic begins to happen. Of course, the British weather doesn’t always play ball, but then, the vagaries of the fast changing climate help to keep things interesting, help to keep us on our toes. And for me, this is key.

Artists of all abilities from all over the UK visit my studio in West Cornwall to take part in workshops. Very often these artists want to loosen up their style and work in a more fluid way. It often turns out that these same artists make their work by copying photographs and therefore paint detailed, representational artworks, a mug of coffee and Radio 4 at hand. To counteract this way of working I take them outdoors, painting by the sea – quickly, fluidly, instinctively. The sun is sometimes hot, the rain comes, the winds blow and the light changes…continually. But far from being an annoyance, these elements add life, action and atmosphere to the paintings. The artists’ development in style is instantaneous and exciting.

Weather on the Way
mixed media painting by Glyn Macey

On a practical note, when working on location with any medium I like to travel light and when using Winsor & Newton watercolour the same ethos applies. I begin by stripping out any unnecessary tools from my bag of tricks. How few brushes can I get away with? How few colours?

Other practical considerations also come into play. For instance, full sheets of watercolour paper can be difficult to deal with when a Sou’westerly is blowing in from the Atlantic. Full sheets would also need an equal-sized board for support and probably an easel that won’t blow over. For these reasons I work on smaller Winsor & Newton pads of heavyweight watercolour paper – the more heavyweight the better to avoid cockling. When working with watercolour my blanket rule is to buy the best that you can afford, which for me means Winsor & Newton Professional watercolour, a couple of good quality sable brushes, usually a 1″ flat and a no. 4 round, together with a pad of heavyweight NOT paper in about A3 size. I chose NOT simply because I love the textured surface. Using a board backed pad means that I can dispense with an easel and a separate board which lightens the load and makes life a whole lot easier when climbing mountains or cliff sides (if that’s your thing)! A water pot is also needed to store water that I collect on location. This found water can be river water, rainwater, a top up from the local pub or shop or seawater. And before anybody raises their hands in mock horror at my mention of seawater, it’s comforting to remember that Turner used seawater in many of his watercolour location studies and they have stood the test of time – well, for over one hundred and seventy years so far…

Heavy Seas
watercolour painting by Glyn Macey

If feasible, I love to use Winsor & Newton watercolours in tubes for the ease of creating rich, deep pools of colour and restrict myself to a limited palette of only four or five colours. A set of Winsor & Newton pan colours will work equally well and a good set will include a carefully chosen range of colours all contained in a durable, small box complete with palette space. These watercolour sets are perfect for travelling, particularly if flying abroad – they’re light, they contain everything you need to capture your chosen scene and they’re not outlawed at the security check-in desks, which can happen with large tubes of paint and mediums (but that’s another story!).

So this summer I challenge you to make the most of creating your artwork outdoors in all of the vagaries of our glorious British weather. Email me an image of your ‘en plein air’ work on glynmacey@googlemail.com for a free critique; I’d love to see your paintings.

You can see what Glyn is up to on social media – Instagram and Facebook.

Cumbria
Watercolour painting by Glyn Macey

Watercolour Painting Supplies at Jackson’s Art

Click on the underlined link to go to the Watercolour Painting Department on the Jackson’s Art Supplies website.

Click on the underlined link to go to the current offers on Winsor & Newton Professional Watercolours on the Jackson’s Art Supplies website.

Click on the underlined link to go to the current offers on Watercolour Brushes on the Jackson’s Art Supplies website.

Postage on orders shipped standard to mainland UK addresses is free for orders of £39.

The post Glyn Macey Paints With Winsor & Newton Watercolours En Plein Air appeared first on Jackson's Art Blog.

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The Fine Art Graduate Show at The Art Academy promises to be an absolute treat. If you’re as excited as we are about its opening on Thursday 5th July 2018, find out from each of the 15 artists about their practice, what they’re focusing on and what they’re working on now. We were delighted to partially sponsor this show and to do mini-interviews with all the artists.

The Art Academy Graduate Show 2018:

The Art Academy Grad Show is a chance to see the culmination of 3 years of total immersion in the making of art. Unusually for art colleges today, The Art Academy gives its students the opportunity to learn all the traditional skills, such as drawing, perspective, composition and also provides an education in contemporary thinking and practice.

The graduating students are a diverse group of all ages with different life experiences including an engineer, a punk rapping queen, a doctor, a filmmaker and a graffiti artist to name a few. Unsurprisingly, the artists use a broad range of media from painting and printing to installation, performance, digital animation and sculpture.

The show will take place in the impressive library rooms and the atmospheric archive spaces of the former Newington Library.

The Private View which will include art world representatives and sponsors is at 6pm – 9pm on Thursday 5th July.

Where:

The Art Academy, Former Newington Library, 155 Walworth Road, London, SE17 1RS.

When:

5th – 8th July 2018, Friday – Sunday 12pm – 5pm.

Private View:

Thursday 5th July 2018 6-9pm.

Exhibiting artists include:

Lisa Keane, Annabel MacIver, Gustavo Fernandes, Scarlett Segal, Bev Sage, Terrence Matthews, David McGrath, Kat Earle, Jackie Smith, Sam King, Ali P Clarke, Manon Aquilina, Sarah Hirigoyen, Shankar Nielsen and David Dafinone, The Shrink.

Lisa Keane

Lisa Keane is a Suffolk and London based painter and installation artist with a background in documentary film-making. She has participated in group shows in London, Suffolk and Goa and had work selected by KPMG for exhibition at their Canada Wharf offices.

Lisa Keene, ‘quick now, here, now’

Tegen: What’s the focus of your practice?

Lisa: My work is about vividness – the brief glimpses we sometimes get that reality is more dynamic and less fixed than our everyday experience suggests.

Tegen: What medium, scale and genre do you work in and why?

Lisa: I work in mixed media creating relatively large-scale installation pieces out of small insignificant ‘stuff’. Installation seems to fit my theme as, for me, moments of vividness are like small epiphanies where I seem to witness matter as it is taking on form – the intermediate state between the abstract and solidity.

Tegen: What are you working on currently and what inspires you most?

Lisa: I am currently working on a piece called ‘HERE’ which is exploring the fluid state between 2D and 3D. I am inspired by the fact that the nature of a vivid experience is not only subjective but is also an objective reality on the quantum level; there is similar dynamism, boundaries are similarly not fixed and the spaces in between are as significant as the solid matter.

View Lisa Keane’s instagram and website.

Annabel MacIver

Annabel MacIver works across media, predominantly sculpture, printmaking and painting. She has participated in group shows around London and the South East, and, most recently, her work was selected for the RA Summer Exhibition and Woolwich Print Fair, 2017.

Annabel MacIver, A memory that never was, begins.,
28x24x16cm,
Porcelain and iron wire

Tegen: What’s the focus of your practice?

Annabel: My interest in the object informs my work: objects hold memories and with these memories, emotions. They can act as portals to different times and places. This fascinates.

Tegen: What medium, scale and genre do you work in and why?

Annabel: I explore meaning through the combined use of different media, bringing them together to create a discussion: with print, painting and 3D forms being my main focus. I continually experiment with the qualities each possess to bear down on the essence of what I want to convey. 3D looks more at the literal, the object; painting, plays with the layers of inference and is a window; and with printmaking I am investigating the transfer and disintegration of memories and emotions. The scale again depends on the aspect, so I am not tied to any scale.

Tegen: What are you working on currently and what inspires you most?

Annabel: I am currently working on Bird.

Bird was found in the depths of an unused fireplace, desiccated and featherless. Bird’s agonising death was evident by its form, inspired poetry, and from this images and forms. I am trying to grasp the emotions attached to Bird and convey these through different media, to ensure that Bird is known and not forgotten. My inspiration lies in the fact that the seemingly ‘insignificant’ object says much more about us and the human condition than we often give it credit, and my motivation comes from uncovering and exploring these hidden worlds.

View Annabel MacIver’s instagram and website.

Gustavo Fernandes

Gustavo Fernandes, Couple, 2018

Monoprint on cotton fabric,
165 x 110cm

Tegen: What’s the focus of your practice?

Gustavo: I have been trying to take figurative subjects to intuitive places of expression, with as much of an intuitive and emotional charge as each specific scene can take. I try often to turn specific banal situations onto more ambiguous, universal and symbolic condition.

Tegen: What medium, scale and genre do you work in and why?

Gustavo: My current practice focuses on painting and printmaking. The scale varies with what each situation asks.

Tegen: What are you working on currently and what inspires you most?

Gustavo: The banal, the corny, the fringed, the scared, and the totally opposite. Its all made of contradictions since the underground is always being marketed by the mainstream. I guess it’s this cycle.

View Gustavo Fernandes’s instagram and website.

Scarlett Segal

Scarlett Segal is a French born abstract and mixed media artist, living and working in London. She is inspired by Modernism and interested in the fusion between art and architecture in urban environments.

Scarlett Segal, Fluidity I,
Acrylic on Canvas,
100×100

Tegen What’s the focus of your practice?

Scarlett: Spatial perception. Space is a fundamental consideration, or in my view the breath of art. It is implied, captured or built. I am particularly fascinated in the interplay between two-dimensional and three-dimensional elements and aim to create depth and movement on a flat plane. To add an extra dimension to the space in which my work sits in, I also translate my paintings into different media, such as sculpture and animation.

Tegen What medium, scale and genre do you work in and why?

Scarlett: My artistic output primarily consists of abstract geometric prints and paintings. It also includes imaginary planar structural compositions. Whilst my work has no narrative, it can be interpreted as an abstract landscape of complex geometry, drawn from multiple perspectives and diagonals that defy gravity and intensify space.

I work in various sizes to remain mindful of the display space, to which I give equal importance. I primarily paint with acrylics, having chosen this exciting medium for its transformative malleability and versatility. It is the best medium for carefully considered compositions with straight edges. Whilst it dictates a fast working pace, it also allows an element of spontaneity in the work. It is easy to change your mind by removing or adding opaque and transparent layers. In a funny way, it still gives you breathing space. The additional benefit is its fast drying time on any surface ranging from canvases, boards, metal and perspex. In my prints, I also like the approach of combining various techniques to get the desired effect. For instance, an etching can be enhanced by a mirror-image collagraph.

But my investigation of spatial perception would not be complete without my three-dimensional works. Hence, I draw with steel rods; I paint on multi layered coloured perspex, playing with reflections and shadows. I also use resin in some structures, with the aim of distorting, morphing, stretching and stressing the forms which I employ.

Tegen What are you working on currently and what inspires you most?

Scarlett: I am currently working on an immersive installation for my degree show. The idea is that the same work will be perceived differently not only because of the medium it is made with but also because of the way it is curated. It is a way of developing my own spatial language. The gallery model is generally to display paintings on a white wall. In this instance, I don’t want this. Instead I am using the positive and negative space as a whole. Where are the paintings ending and where does the wall begin? For me the wall, floor, ceiling are too often the unsung heroes of art display. How can an animation be distorted by inanimate transparent objects and be infused with even more energy, direction and variability. In my practice, I drew on the legacy of works by Cézanne, Lissitsky, Rauschenberg, Stella, Gego and Deconstructivist architects: Gehry and Hadid. I revisit modernist concepts and theories, not to resurrect them, but to incorporate and fit them into my personal view of 21st century modernity.

View Scarlett Segal’s instagram and website.

Bev Sage

Bev is a London-based multi-disciplinary artist who works with print, performance and sound.

Bev Sage, Let there be neon, 2018,
Scrolled mono print, 10mx1m

Tegen: What’s the focus of your practice?

Bev: My work focuses on the archeology of the marks people leave behind on our urban landscapes. In an explosion of raw energy, I splash, splatter, cut, draw, paint and scratch onto printing plates.

Tegen: What medium, scale and genre do you work in and why?

Bev: The moment I walked into the print studio I knew it was home. I love the smell of the inks, the old school processes yet breaking those traditional rules, the physical tactile nature of the medium and the freedom to layer multiple images. I print onto long scrolls of Japanese paper to echoing the memories of a lifetimes visual images. The pieces are large (e.g. 10m by 1m), which gives the viewer an immersive walk-through experience.

Tegen: What are you working on currently and what inspires you most?

Bev: I am currently mono printing on aluminium boxes. I am inspired by places that are falling apart – torn, battered, bruised. For me, marks left behind tell a story; whilst pointing to what is lost, their continued existence feels like a celebration of the human spirit and its drive for survival.

View Bev Sage’s instagram and website.

Terrence Matthews

I am a London-based artist, originally from Humberside, nearing the end of a 3 year Diploma in Fine Art. I work across a broad range of media, including, paint, print, photography, 3-D and diverse found materials.

Terence Matthews,Monolith. 2018.

Acrylic on canvas, 100 x 100 cm

Tegen: What’s the focus of your practice?

Terrence: My practice reflects a broad concern with the environment, including our continued attachment to a carbon-based economy.

Tegen: What medium, scale and genre do you work in and why?

Terrence: My current work is fairly large, drawing on the massive monolithic structures which typify 20th century heavy industry. I tend to use materials which directly allude to this subject matter, including asphalt, cement, rust and metal.

Tegen: What are you working on currently and what inspires you most?

Terrence: My current practice reflects various elements of northern working class culture and their decline during my lifetime. In addition to decaying industrial factory and dockland architecture, I am interested in the traditional seaside resorts which are culturally linked to these industrial areas.

View Terrence Matthews’ instagram and website.

David McGrath

Anunciacio (detail), 2018

Mixed media and acrylic paint,
60cm x 60cm approx.

Tegen: What’s the focus of your practice?

David: Currently, my work focuses on recycling debris, in this case cardboard packaging.

Tegen: What medium, scale and genre do you work in and why?

David: At present no work in this series exceeds more than 100 cm in any dimension, and could be described as 2D/3D. It engages erotic religiosity and the symbology and rituals of the Catholic Church and its prohibitions, usually in a Mediterranean context drawing on my younger days in Spain and elsewhere, and my own Catholic upbringing.

Tegen: What are you working on currently and what inspires you most?

David: My greatest inspirations are the filmmaker Luis Bunuel and the Mallorca-based artist Mati Klarwein during this phase of my artistic development.

View David McGrath’s instagram and website.

Kat Earle

Kat Earle is a London based artist, abstract painter whose main concern is gesture, layer, interaction and space which she depicts on large scale canvases.

Kat Earle, You don’t have to use all the colours…(2018)

Acrylic pigment and mediums on canvas,
100cm x 80cm

Tegen: What’s the focus of your practice?

Kat: My focus is with the gesture and mark, traces and stains. All the time being aware of their art historical origin and meaning, I am concerned with bringing these into the now by juxtaposing these gestures into a contemporary context.

Tegen: What medium, scale and genre do you work in and why?

Kat: I love materials and frequently add to my evergrowing collection of pigments, mediums and assorted drawing media. Alongside these traditional materials I like to mix in household paints, organic matter and fluids, anything that will make a mark and hold a certain characteristic that is integral to the artwork. Currently I am working on oversized canvases. These I stretch and prepare myself using a clear gesso or rabbit skin glue as I want to keep the aesthetic of the raw canvas support. It is during this process that I start a dialogue with the artwork.

I am working on three large canvases for my Fine Art Diploma grad show. The largest of these is 4m x 170cm. Using various domestic tools I am make marks and traces on the canvas, building up layers with thinned pigment in a variety of medium and finishes.

Tegen: What are you working on currently and what inspires you most?

Kat: The source of my inspiration is from the abstract expressionist artists but I find relevance, inspiration and context from the contemporary female abstract painters of today. As a Londoner, I am able to visit exhibitions where I am always enriched and inspired but it is the unintended art of marks and spillages, the unlikely pairing of objects or the striking composition of architecture, the things that catch my eye in the everyday that will inform and start the dialogue with the artwork I make.

View Kat Earle’s instagram and website.

Jackie Smith
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