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What makes Williamsburg Porcelain White special? We decided to look at four of Williamsburg’s Handmade White Oil Paints to explore the differences in working characteristics between them and see why they introduced Safflower Porcelain White to their range.

Contents:

Advantages of Porcelain White Oil Paint
Comparing Four Williamsburg White Oil Paints
Texture and Brush Feel
Temperature
Tinting Strength
Opacity
Drying Time
Why You Might Avoid Zinc White?
View Williamsburg Oil Paint Range

Williamsburg Porcelain White Oil Paint

Advantages of Porcelain White

Williamsburg Porcelain White is based on a new pigment (for Williamsburg), PW 5, it is a complex co-precipitate of barium sulfate and zinc sulfide more commonly known as Lithopone.

First created in the 1870s it was for some time a rival to lead and zinc white oil paints. During this time it captured 60% of the market for white pigments in 1928. By 1945 this demand had decreased to 15% due to the dominance of titanium dioxide (the main pigment included in titanium white). As Zinc White has become less popular due to its brittleness when it is used extensively (you can read more about that later), there is a renewed interest in Porcelain White as they have some similar characteristics. It has also been known historically as Enamel, Orr’s, or Charleston White but the name Porcelain White has been chosen by Williamsburg as the most descriptive.

It is a neutral, very slightly cool, dull white that is semi-opaque and is known to yellow very little if it has a safflower binder. It also has a moderate tinting strength which is useful if you want to use a small amount of colour and desire gentler lightening in mixes.

Williamsburg Safflower Porcelain White test

Willaimsburg Safflower Porcelain White

Pigment: PW5 Complex co-precipitate of barium sulfate and zinc sulfide
Lightfastness: Excellent
Transparency: Semi-Opaque
Pigment size: Very Fine

Comparing Four Williamsburg White Oil Paints

Williamsburg Titanium White test

Williamsburg Titanium White

Titanium White is the most opaque white. It reflects back 97% of the light that falls on it making it far brighter than lead white and also has the highest tinting strength of a white. It has a matt velvety opaque finish that appeals to some artists.

It is desirable for those who want strong highlights but it also requires a large amount of colour to tint it in mixes due to its high tinting strength—some painters find this a frustrating quality.

It holds marks easily from the tube while being easy to move about. This one has a linseed binder so could be quite prone to yellowing. Williamsburg also has a Titanium White with a safflower binder, extending its drying time but providing a less warm, and less likely to yellow, white.

Pigment: PW6 Titanium Dioxide Rutile
Lightfastness: Excellent
Transparency: Opaque
Pigment size: Very Fine

Williamsburg Titanium Zinc White test

Williamsburg Titanium Zinc White

A mix of Titanium and Zinc White. It combines the hiding power of Titanium and the clean tinting properties of Zinc, however, I found when testing it that it seemed surprisingly warm but maybe this is due to the linseed binder (again Williamsburg provide a safflower version). As well as having a cleaner more neutral colour for mixing the other advantage of Titanium-Zinc whites, in general, is the slightly reduced tinting strength which makes it easier to use subtly in mixes, without overpowering them and making them “chalky”. The opacity is still high and its covering power is also high making it a good all-purpose white.

It is creamy and flexible and because Williamsburg, since February 2018 reduced the Zinc percentage to 2% the paint films flexibility is un-compromised.

Pigment: PW6, PW4 Titanium Dioxide Rutile, Zinc Oxidee
Lightfastness: Excellent
Transparency: Opaque
Pigment size: Very Fine

Williamsburg Zinc White test

Williamsburg Zinc White (Discontinued)

Zinc White is cooler, sometimes seen as more neutral than the typical titanium based whites. It has long been used because of its a fairly transparent white making it useful for scrumbling and being used in glazes. It has a low tinting strength meaning its great for clear clean pastel mixing.

The main downfall of Zinc White is it is known to form brittle films when used thickly. This can with time mean cracks will develop on a painting. Flexibility is a quality prized in a white oil paint as in the typical painting 50-90% of the paint on the surface contains white within the mix. This being said, many of the techniques that Zinc White is suited to rely on thin layers of paint that are less likely to crack.

Pigment:PW4 Zinc Oxide
Lightfastness: Excellent
Transparency: Semi-Opaque
Pigment size: Very Fine

Test of four Williamsburg White oil paints. Left to right: Porcelain White, Titanium White, Titanium Zinc White, Zinc White

Texture and Brush Feel

The Porcelain White felt quite stiff when used straight out of the tube, it needed some handling to start moving smoothly and held marks to a reasonable extent. It became quite translucent when mixed with a solvent.

Williamsburg’s Titanium White was much creamier, with that lovely soft butter feel so often talked about, it also had a slight sheen, seeming almost pearly when first squeezed out.

The Titanium Zinc White was softer than the Porcelain but stiffer than the Titanium white.

It had a slight gritty texture which when it was worked with easily broke up. Brush strokes were held a lot more softly as well compared to Titanium White which is strange considering it felt thicker as a paint.

The Zinc White had a very gritty texture when first squeezed out, with what looked like chunks of pigment in it. As soon as I started working with it it felt incredibly smooth and could be handled with ease and subtle movement. The grittiness was harder to break down with the brush than with the Titanium-Zinc White.

White oil paint tests left to right: Porcelain White, Titanium White, Titanium Zinc White, Zinc White

Temperature

This test would’ve been fairer if all the whites had a safflower (or linseed) binder as the temperature of a white oil paint is often changed by the binder used. Those with linseed bonders have a warmer more yellow tint while those using a clear safflower will have a more neutral or cooler white.

The Titanium Zinc White seemed the warmest with a slight yellow tinge, similarly, the Titanium White was quite warm which is what you’d expect. The Zinc White was true to its bright, neutral temperature reputation. And the Porcelain White while fairly neutral in temperature, seemed to me a bit colder and also a touch duller than I expected.

White oil paint testsleft to right: Porcelain White, Titanium White, Titanium Zinc White, Zinc White

Tinting Strength

The tinting strengths of all four whites were quite distinctive. I mixed for each white the same amount of paint with a touch of our Jackson’s Artist Colour Alizarin Crimson. This was in order to show how strong the tinting and hiding strength of the white was.

The Titanium White had by far the strongest tinting strength, followed shortly behind by the Titanium Zinc White and then the Porcelain White. The Zinc White had the lowest tinting strength.

It is easy to see here how Williamsburg Porcelain White and Williamsburg Zinc White share some properties and can be used comparatively: you’d need a similar amount of white to tone mixes meaning Porcelain White would be a good mixing white if you’d rather use a minimal amount of colour to tint mixes.

Opacity

As was entirely predictable, Titanium White was the most opaque followed by Titanium Zinc White which was only slightly less opaque. The Porcelain White was more opaque than its semi-opaque labelling suggested. The Zinc White was semi-opaque.

Drying Time

After three days, none of the whites were dry to the touch, either at a layer depth of one piece of painter’s tape or a layer depth of three pieces of painter’s tape.

After 6 days all the one of painter’s tape layer depth paint swatches were tacky to touch.

We will update the drying times and the yellowing of the swatches as the test progresses.

Why You Might Avoid Zinc White?

Recent tests have conclusively found that Zinc White in oil paint can produce a brittle surface prone to cracking over time. This has been generally known for a while and means it’s recommended that oil painters only use Zinc White on a rigid surface such as a wood or canvas board and not on a flexible surface such as stretched canvas.

Lots of artists have moved away from using Zinc White all together and many ranges have started to remove it from other colours and their range. Many have reduced the amount of it included in oil paints to less than 20% as such a small amount is thought to avoid the undesirable cracking effect.

This has caused a problem for artists looking for a colder white with transparent qualities, Williamsburg Porcelain White could be used as a replacement for artists seeking these working qualities from a paint.

Just Paint has a helpful FAQ all about the use of Zinc White, you can read here.

View Williamsburg Oil Paint Range here. Read our article on Gamblin’s 10 white oil paints and what makes each of them different, here.

The post What Makes a White Different? Spotlight on Williamsburg’s Porcelain White appeared first on Jackson's Art Blog.

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Captured by the visual names given to three of Langridge’s oil paint colours, we set out to discover the texture, consistency and handling of Nickel Azo Red Gold, Quinacridone Magenta and Video Blue, and to explore the palette blends of the three handmade paints. We could never have expected to come across such a vast expanse of colours and hues from just three tubes of paint and from this, it is clear that Langridge know how to combine their knowledge of historical pigments with modern day technology.

Combined tests of Nickel Azo Red Gold, Video Blue and Quinacridone Violet

Overview of Langridge Oil Paint Range:

Langridge Handmade Oil Colour is constructed to excel in saturation of colour and physical handling qualities. Like most professional grade paints, the colours are unadulterated by fillers or modifiers, have maximum pigment loading and each paint has an individual drying time.

Each colour has undergone dedicated analytical testing to ensure its performance and each paint is triple milled in batches of no more than 20 litres to control its quality.

The tubes look clean, minimalist and modern with a wide painted band of colour to make each paint easily identifiable while working.

On each tube, the pigments included, binding oil used, transparency, consistency and drying time is easy to see. This is essential if you’re just starting to use professional oils and want to be made aware of how they behave.

Langridge Oil Paint consistency:

Starting to use the paints, you are immediately met by the attention given to each pigment. The consistency of each colour is defined by the pigment and described on the label using the butter scale. Of the colours tested on this page, the Nickel Azo Red Gold had a lovely smooth buttery feel, the Video Blue was very stiff, leaving distinctive brush marks visible when undiluted, and the Quinacridone Violet was described as having the consistency of soft butter, but felt more like butter that had recently come out of the fridge, needling some handling to loosen.

Texture and Colour Saturation:

There was an expectation that the colours would have a gritty feel, common to some handmade paints, but they’re gorgeously smooth. It was surprising how clean and vivid mixes made with colours such as Nickel Azo Red Gold and Video Blue appeared, considering both are made from a blend of pigments.

The Nickel Azo Red Gold and Quinacridone Violet showed some beautiful undertones and characteristics when used as glazes while Video Blue’s tinting strength was surprisingly strong.

Testing the colours, it seemed almost possible that, with just these three, you could create a whole nuanced painting. Either replicating a classical palette by modifying each carefully or, using them in bolder mixes to create something that looks more contemporary. The colours are fantastically strong and a joy to use.


Langridge Mixing Tests

Langridge Oil Paint—Nickel Azo Red Gold

Pigment Index: PY150, PV19 (Nickel Azo / Quinacridone), Vehicle: Linseed Oil, Consistency: Buttery, Transparent, Drying rate: 3-6 days, Series 4

Earthy red-gold, like the last rays of the desert sun. Very rich in stronger applications, with golden undertones that come through as it is extended.

It is made from Nickel Azo, which produces deep dullish reds to green shade yellows and transparent muted yellows, similar to gamboge, and can be mixed to create botanical yellows, oranges and browns. The addition of PV19 Quinacridone Violet or Rose shifts the colour more towards a warm red but still maintains its ability to create fresh spring greens and rich golden yellows.


Nickel Azo Red Gold tests: opacity, glazes, tinting and drawn out stroke

Almost brown in its mass tone, the range of hues you can draw out of this colour is quite impressive. From a rich orange, burnt deep red to a light muted yellow, it is very versatile. Its transparency lends itself to a variety of lovely glazes when used neat.

Its tinting strength is such that it can be used subtly in mixes or toned down easily. This can be seen in the central test (above) which goes from a pure stroke of Nickel Azo Red Gold to a 1:1 ratio mix, with Titanium White in the middle and a 1:10 ratio to Titanium White at the end.


Langridge Oil Paint—Quinacridone Violet

Pigment: PV42 (Quinacridone), Vehicle: Linseed Oil, Transparent, Consistency: Soft Butter, Drying rate: 2-5 days, Series 6

An elegant modern violet with a deep burgundy mass tone and sweet violet undertones. Creates cool-but-not-cold tints and glazes, in comparison to say, Dioxazine Violet. It doesn’t dominate colours in mixes and is incredibly stable.

Made from PV42 (quinacridone pink), it is quite a dark valued violet, appearing bluer then most magenta coloured quinacridone pinks. As a single pigment colour, it’s great for mixing and produces lovely browns, maroons and brooding reds with warm colours. Combined with dark blues it creates interesting violets and deep atmospheric blues. With greens, you can obtain some delicate greys.


Quinacridone Violet tests: opacity, glazes, tinting and drawn out stroke

It is transparent, again, and able to produce a range of coloured glazes that could be tonally useful. It’s quite high tinting with a shift towards a softer bluish violet when mixed with white. It’s easy with solvent, or a 1:1 ratio to white, to produce a deep, almost fuschia tone.

Finally, it is quite easy to draw out and its slight stiffness meant it dragged nicely.


Langridge Oil Paint—Video Blue

Pigments: PW4, PB15.3, PB28 (Zinc Oxide / Phthalocyanine / Cobalt Teal), Vehicle: Safflower Oil, Semi-Opaque, Consistency: Stiff, Drying rate: 3-6 days, Series 4

Designed as a hot electric blue, built to generate light. This intense warm azure blue is full of depth and space and came from the idea of a computer-generated colour. While a strong colour on its own, it also mixes well to create a range of shades useful in landscape painting.

It is a mid-value warm blue that is semi-opaque and can be used as a base with other blues to create warm azures and aquamarines.

Video Blue is made with Phthalocyanine (PB15:3), a very clean mixing blue with a very strong tinting strength (you can see Video Blue somewhat shares this characteristic on the tinting test below). The colour is lightened somewhat, and the tinting strength reduced, by the addition of zinc oxide (PW4), allowing it a delightful visual impact.

It also contains cobalt teal (PB28) that is a soft blue, verging on green, with a warmth that makes it beautiful for warm skies and oceans, synonymous with Australia. The inclusion of this pigment is what’s responsible for the lovely greener tones in the lighter swatches. For a three pigment colour, it is very versatile for mixing, producing clean, saturated hues.


Video Blue tests: opacity, glazes, tinting and drawn out stroke

The tinting strength is quite strong and interestingly, there’s very little colour change from its mass tone to a glaze, or when mixed with white. Slightly greener undertones do become more obvious and it forms a blue that one associates with the Mediterranean or brochures for hot beach holidays and swimming pools.

Its stiffness means it catches nicely on the paper which means it could be interesting when used for scrumbling.

Mixing Tests


Swatches from mixing Nickel Azo Red Gold with Quinacridone Violet

As both Nickel Azo Red Gold and Quinacridone Violet contain Quinacridone pigments on the red spectrum, they mix easily together. A small addition of Quinacridone Violet to Nickel Azo Red Gold created a richer, redder burnt orange, that is striking but could be toned down to a hyped up terracotta. These reds also easily conjure up Uluru under strong light with harsh shadows, or even the reds of desert cliffs worldwide.

Adding a little of the Nickel Azo Red Gold to the Quinacridone Violet brought out some gorgeous deep magenta pinks and combining both more equally produced strong oxblood reds. Clearly, with the addition of white, you could produce a range of nuanced pinks, violets and light oranges.


Mixing swatches from combining Video Blue and Quinacridone Violet

Modifying Video Blue with small amounts of Quinacridone Violet produces some gorgeous, darker blues, whose semi-opaque nature could be useful. The three blues mixed feel like everyday household colours, with a warmth and a visual familiarity. Using more Quinacridone Violet, with a some Video Blue, produces a dark toned purple, where as a small amount of Video Blue, added to a glaze of Quinacridone Violet, produces a more traditional purple violet. Using even less Video Blue creates a warmer violet that verges on brown.


Swatches from combining Video Blue and Nickel Azo Red Gold (and titanium white)

These swatches demonstrate how both Nickel Azo Red Gold and Video Blue could be appealing to landscape painters, both those working with a traditional or more modern colour palette. The range of mossy greens on the right included more Nickel Azo Red Gold in their mixes. The top green approximates hookers green nicely, the middle glaze is much closer to a green-gold, so many painters find appealing and the green at the bottom, which includes a lot of titanium white, is a nice soft minty green, approaching a swimming-pool turquoise. Adding a small amount of Nickel Azo Red Gold to Video Blue, or mixes of Video Blue and titanium white brings out lovely turquoise undertones and the Cobalt Teal elements of Video Blue.


Swatches from combining all three colours discussed and titanium white

Combing all three colours, also with titanium white for some swatches, shows the range of desaturated, subtle and nuanced colours you can create. There are some appealing warm browns, soft grey options and deep, almost indigo blues. As well as bright high chroma glazes there’s also the more pastel mixes that could be adjusted for softer stone or furnishing colours. Depending on your subject matter, even if you were just to use these three colours and a white, you could create a well-balanced painting with a diverse colour palette, drawn from the warm light, dusty red tones and hyper-real blues of the Australian landscape.

You can view the whole range of Langridge Artist Colours Jackson’s carries here. David Coles, the founder of Langridge Artist Colours, also recently published a book on the history of pigments, you can read our review of it here. You can also find out more about Langridge on their website, here.

The post Three Langridge Handmade Oil Paint Colours: Red Gold, Violet and Video Blue appeared first on Jackson's Art Blog.

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London Fine Art Studios is a Battersea based art school that specialises in teaching the craft of drawing and painting, working always from life and with a focus on the figurative tradition. We spoke with founder and director, Ann Witheridge, about teaching the core principles of proportion, gesture, value and colour and found out more about the upcoming Summer courses, taking place this July.


Sisters
Ann Witheridge
Oil on linen

Clare: Can you give us an overview of your position at London Fine Art Studios and your experience as an artist?

Ann: 
I am the founder and director of London Fine Art Studios; an art school specialising in teaching art in the figurative tradition based on the Old Master techniques. We teach a wide variety of courses from Foundation to Figure, Sculpture and Landscape. I have taught now for twenty years and have always loved painting. I paint with my students and also go on many painting trips around England and abroad, both with friends and fellow artists.


Ann Witheridge and Joni Duarte painting in the studio.

Clare: Where do you think is the best place to start if you are considering studying an art course?

Ann: This really depends on how much time you have. I would start with a foundation class where you can gradually build up your skills. Choose a course with an experienced tutor rather than an experienced artist; many artists are great painters but not necessarily great teachers. Look at the tutor’s work and see if you like their style or subject choice.


Portrait of Nneka
Ann Witheridge
Oil on canvas

Clare: What are the core elements to consider when making a cast drawing?

Ann: Shapes, values (light and dark) and edges (lost and found). We believe that cast drawing is the foundation of painting and drawing. It teaches you all about shapes. Cast drawing is such a fantastic tool as it teaches you to create form and find shapes without the distraction of colour. A cast drawing is also utterly constant; unlike a person, it doesn’t need a break and doesn’t move!


Portrait (2)
Ann Witheridge
Oil on linen

Clare: Which method of painting do you feel makes a more accurate representation of the human figure: working from the life model or working from sketches, photographs and other materials in the studio? Why?

Ann: Working from the life model is a wonderful opportunity. We can be completely energised by working because the model is there for a limited time. I think as an artist you can make many more artistic and atmospheric decisions when working from life, translating the 3D and the living onto a 2D plane. From sketches and photographs, one can learn about design and editing. However, it is important not to copy the sketches and photos but to use them as a stepping-stone to your own work.


Figure
Ann Witheridge
Oil on linen

Clare: Do you feel that practising working from the life model helps artists to create more refined paintings?

Ann: I think the benefits of working from life are more about training one’s eye to see nature with all its details and atmosphere and learning to be selective and therefore able to edit. A more refined painting is a matter of stylistic taste, rather than visual accuracy.


Zelda
Ann Witheridge
Oil on linen

Clare: What is your personal process for painting the figure?

Ann: I like to work from the model in the studio, painting directly onto the canvas. I tone the canvas to a mid-tone and draw my proportions, gesture and shadow shapes before I move onto colour. A painting in one tone, correctly proportioned and with good gesture can be a powerful image; the colour can change the mood and style of the painting, but it does not necessarily improve it. The hardest part of the painting is the proportions and the gesture. Once this is established with the shadow shapes, the colour is all about play and is much more subjective.


Sanguine Sketch
Ann Witheridge
Oil on canvas

Clare: What moment in your general practice has been the most influential to your paintings?

Ann: Spending time on cast drawing and studying art history. Cast drawing gave me the freedom to draw, which you can translate into oil, watercolour, pen & ink and much more. Regarding art history, I love going to museums and looking at paintings; I always go with a subject in mind, such as composition or looking at edges, or seeing how the noses are painted.


Picnic
Ann Witheridge
Oil on linen

Clare: Painting the figure can be very personal – how do you deal with all of your students having different preferences?

Ann: We definitely don’t try to slot all the students into one block. Proportion and gesture are not personal; this is the grammar of the painting. Some students want to work at the gesture and drawing and aren’t interested in the colour; some are all about colour and falsifying the local colour for effect. There has to be a good foundation of drawing and gesture, but then all artists see differently, some might focus on temperature, others on atmosphere and others might want to just focus on a great anatomical drawing. This is one of the many wonderful aspects of teaching: giving the students the fundamental craft so they have the confidence to develop their own style.


Figure
Joni Duarte
Charcoal on paper

Clare: What upcoming courses are you offering?

Ann: We run term-time art courses in all areas of art but also students can choose to do evening, weekend or short courses. Our July course is a fantastic introduction to London Fine Art Studios as students can do 1 to 4 weeks of the July course, which includes the Foundation course, Figure, Portrait and either the Landscape, Sculpture or Etching. The best course to join if you are a beginner is the foundation class. You will learn all about the fundamentals of shape, values, and composition in the relatively calm environment of the studio.

Click here to view London Fine Art Studio Summer Courses

The post The Grammar of Painting: Ann Witheridge of London Fine Art Studios appeared first on Jackson's Art Blog.

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While ready-made stretched canvases are a convenient choice; if you require a particular size or a type of canvas that is not available as a ready-made you may wish to make a custom canvas. Because the bars and canvas are usually more heavyweight, the quality will be better than you can get in most ready-made canvases. Jackson’s offers a reasonably priced bespoke canvas stretching service or you can stretch your own canvas.

The first time you might consider getting or making a custom canvas is when you can’t find the size you want. We stock ready-made canvases in a wide range of sizes in 10cm or 2-inch increments starting at 7x10cm and going up to 120x160cm and 100x180cm. Jackson’s Premium Cotton Canvases also come in special Golden Ratio sizes (*see the note at the end) as well as the standard ratios. But not every size imaginable is available. If you need an unusual proportion (long and narrow for instance), a size between those available, or if you wish a particular canvas material or heavier stretcher bars that are not available in a ready-made, you can order a bespoke canvas made for you. This is done at a fair price by skilled specialists in our Bespoke Canvas Department. But you can save money by stretching your canvas yourself, using the same bars and canvas as they do in our Bespoke Canvas Department. You can get 39 50x60cm standard depth canvases or 6 150x200cm deep profile canvases out of a 210cm wide full 10m roll of canvas, including wrapping the canvas around to the back and trimming off the excess you use to grip and pull. The more you do it, the better and faster you will get. It’s a great way to spend the coldest days of the year too – many artists set aside a few weeks in the depths of winter for preparing surfaces, as you get a little workout and it helps to keep you warm.

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We’ve expanded our range of Jackson’s Professional Oil Paints with three additional colours, a single pigment warm, strong black, a non-toxic replacement for the historical pigment Emerald Green and a lightfast replacement for the renowned traditional Indigo.

Jackson’s Professional Oil Lamp Black mixes on Jackson’s Glass Palette

Emerald Green

Pigments: PG7 PY3 PW6 PW4
A non-toxic replacement for the traditional Emerald Green, an arsenic-based paint, this Emerald Green is made from phthalo green (blue shade), a dull blue-green pigment, Hansa Yellow Light, which is an intense sunny yellow, and contains both a transparent white and an opaque white.

It is a bright, clean green, popular with plein air painters and reminiscent of works by the Impressionists. It can create transparent, natural greens and strong, opaque ones. The white content means it lightens mixes beautifully and with the greater white pigments along with the blue shade of Phthalo Green forms a soft minty shade when put with lots of mixing white. It has an average drying time and is opaque. The Hansa Yellow means it creates gentle turquoises with colder blues, which are appealing and vibrant, opaque greens of different tones when mixed with other yellows.

Mixes left to right, top to bottom: Emerald Green painted out with turps, mixed with titanium white (safflower), mixed with lamp black, mixed with Cadmium Yellow Deep Genuine, mixed with Indigo, mixed with Cadmium Red Genuine, mixed with Cadmium Yellow Genuine, mixed with French Ultramarine, mixed with Lamp Black. The swatches to the left of, and below the mixes are colours I found useful or interesting (sometimes lightened with white or thinned with solvent).

Lamp Black

Lamp Black

Pigment: PBk7
A single pigment colour made from one of the oldest blacks, which has been used since prehistoric times. This carbon-based black has warm almost violet undertones and dries to a very matt finish. It is slow drying, semi-opaque and has a high tinting strength.

It can be used to produce warm greys and can be used to desaturate other colours while subtly warming their temperature, as well as reducing their gloss. Its matt finish can be used to flatten work or create greater depth.

Mixes left to right, top to bottom: Lamp Black painted out with turps, mixed with white, four different ratios of lamp black with zinc white painted out, a 1:1 zinc white to lamp black mix mixed with Cadmium Yellow Deep Genuine, same 1:1 mix mixed with Cadmium Yellow Genuine, 1:1 mixed with Cadmium Red Genuine, 1:1 mixed with Indigo, 1:1 mixed with Manganese Violet, 1:1 mix mixed with Alizarin Crimson. The swatches to the left of, and below the mixes are colours I found useful or interesting (sometimes lightened with white or thinned with solvent).

Indigo

indigo

Pigments: PB15:3 PBk7 PV19
A lightfast replacement for traditional Indigo, made of Quinacridone rose, Lamp Black and Phthalo blue (green shade). The phthalocyanine blue gives it a strong staining deep blue undertone, while the quinacridone rose adds warmth and a dusky element.

It is a deep blue that when used thickly is almost black and can be thinned or mixed to a light blue. Great for adding depth to shadows or using as a basis to produce nuanced sky mixes or duller greens. It is semi-transparent with average drying time.

Mixes left to right, top to bottom: Indigo gradient with turps, mixed with titanium white (safflower), 1:1 Indigo to titanium white mixed with a 1:1 lamp black to zinc white mix, mixed with Cadmium Yellow Deep Genuine, mixed with mixed with French Ultramarine, mixed with Cadmium Red Genuine, mixed with Cadmium Yellow Genuine, 1:1 Indigo to titanium white mix mixed with Manganese Violet, same 1:1 mix mixed with Alizarin Crimson. The swatches to the left of, and below the mixes are colours I found useful or interesting (sometimes lightened with white or thinned with solvent).

Jackson’s Professional Oil Indigo mixes on Jackson’s Glass Palette

Initial Comparison Mixes of Emerald Green, Indigo and Lamp Black

Comparing mixes of each new colour with core primaries

Opacity and tinting strength tests of each new colour using titanium white beginning with 1:1 colour to white.

Read our earlier articles about Jackson’s Professional and Artist Oil Colours

Jackson’s Professional Oil Emerald Green mixes on Jackson’s Glass Palette

Jackson’s Oil Colours on jacksonsart.com

The post Three New Colours in the Jackson’s Professional Oil Range appeared first on Jackson's Art Blog.

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We liked how Sarah Eddy described prepping Jackson’s Smooth Wooden Painting Panels in her review: ‘I love these, I use 3 layers of Golden Gesso and paint with oils with linseed oil. They are wood panels so you can sand them more if you wish but I find the oils grip the wood so much better like they are. I just brush the wood down before the gesso.’ We asked Sarah to explain her process and also awarded her a £25 Jackson’s Gift Voucher for writing the most informative and useful review of the month.

Painting with Oils onto Jackson’s Smooth Wooden Panels

By Cornish artist Sarah Eddy

Jackson’s Smooth Wooden Panel unprimed

The very first thing that drew me to Jackson’s Smooth Wooden Panels, was that they come in a large variety of sizes. Most companies I’d researched online often didn’t offer large panels, or they were very expensive. I wanted to paint larger scale landscapes and so I spent a lot of time and money trying things out. I was using MDF at the time, but it’s incredibly heavy to ship, to frame and can get easily water damaged. I’ve also tried wood panel boards that came ready primed, but found them to be too smooth and I ended up putting a layer of gesso on them anyway.

Jackson’s Smooth Wooden Panel and Golden Gesso

I have been incredibly happy with Jackson’s panels and subsequently, they are currently all I use to paint on. The panels arrive smooth and sanded and ready to prime. I do wipe them down. It’s not recommended to get them wet or wash them, as you could possibly make the wood swell or warp before they’ve been sealed. You only need to check there are no bits that can get trapped in the gesso. The more time you take making sure it’s dry and clean the better the gesso is going to look and therefore the paint you apply.

Jackson’s Smooth Panel with the first layer of Golden Gesso being applied

I use Golden Gesso as the quality is fantastic and I’ve tried quite a few other gessos on the market. I always paint three layers, so the oil paint doesn’t get absorbed into the wood. I sometimes paint a coloured acrylic background again, before I paint with oils on top.

I paint the gesso horizontally and vertically, similar to a canvas. It’s important to remember that when your oils or acrylic is applied, the condition of the gesso will affect the look of the paint, especially if you paint thinly. I paint with a palette knife but I still want the gesso to be applied as best as it can be. I think it makes a big difference. Make sure each layer is completely dry before applying the next one. I always wait a few hours or overnight before I actually use the wooden panel. Some people like to sand between each layer, but with Jackson’s Smooth Panels I don’t think this is necessary when you paint the gesso correctly. Also, I choose not to because I really like the finish I get with good quality gesso. Most importantly, because Jackson’s Wooden Panels are smooth, sanded plywood, they never seem to need a sand if you paint the gesso on nice and evenly.

An oil painting on Jackson’s Smooth Wooden Panel, Looking Back, Port Quin, Cornwall, Ready for exhibition at The Atrium Gallery, Truro, April 2019

About Sarah Eddy

Sarah Eddy painting plein air

Sarah Eddy is a Cornish Artist. Once a founder member and performer with the show ‘Stomp, she’s now back in Cornwall, walking the Cornish coastal path, painting land and seascapes using oils on wood panels.

You can see more of her work and find out about upcoming exhibitions on her website here.

You can view our Jackson’s Smooth Wooden Panels online here and Golden Acrylic Gesso here.

Sarah Eddy, Camalot Hotel

Calling all artists to share their views!

We would like to encourage you to write a review on our website of any products that you have used. Simply navigate to the product you wish to review and click on the ‘Reviews’ button beneath the product image. Be thoughtful and detailed – think about what information will be useful to others.

Each month we will be selecting several well-written examples which will be published on our blog. The writer of the best review will receive a £25 Jackson’s gift voucher plus a photograph of them in their studio (if they wish) and a link to their website will appear alongside their review.

The post Using Jackson’s Smooth Wooden Painting Panels for Oil paintings: Sarah Eddy appeared first on Jackson's Art Blog.

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Adebanji Alade is the Vice President of the Royal Institute of Oil Painters and has sketched and painted for almost all his life. Adebanji is currently working on a project which involves painting 250 small portraits of people. They are of anyone he knows or meets, from willing volunteers and friends to celebrities and iconic people. He is self-sponsoring the project and Winsor & Newton are providing the materials. Adebanji is doing it to improve his portrait painting skills through repeated, daily practice. When the project is complete he will publish a book with all 250 portraits, discussing the processes and what he learnt along the way.

A New Project: Painting 250 Small Portraits By Adebanji Alade

I love drawing people. I sketch people on public transport almost every day – a habit I’ve developed over the past 20 years. What I have noticed is that I am now able to sketch people almost effortlessly because I have done this repeatedly over a long period of time. I recently found out from an artist I admire that this is called ‘Deliberate Practice’. I decided to do a bit more research on this idea I discovered from Bryan Mark Taylor and found out that there’s a whole theory on this.

I noticed that a whole piece has been written about this – it can be a bit of a long read but interesting too. It’s titled ‘The role of Deliberate Practice in the Acquisition of Expert Performance’ by K. Anders Ericsson, Ralf Th. Krampe, and Clemens Tesch-Romer. The main gist is that if you are able to have focused practice that is purposeful, regular and deliberate over a period of time, you will be able to become an expert in any area of such concentration. This whole concept really inspired me because, without knowing this theory existed, I had already seen great results in my sketches of people.

I developed this over a long period by sketching on public transport every day and working en plein air, which I developed by painting 212 small paintings of the City of Bath in 4 months – I called it my Bath Marathon! Through plein air work and sketching people, I can easily say that I have become an expert in these areas with the deliberate practice concept.

Deliberate Portrait Practice #4 – Selfie

But, there is one area of my work I want to gain mastery in – painting portraits. I love painting portraits but I have never really gained the mastery of it. Sometimes it’s on and sometimes it’s off and this has really been quite embarrassing for me. So, once I heard of this theory, I decided to give myself the challenge to paint 250 portraits in 250 days.

Now, that didn’t quite work out last year due to some factors but I am determined to complete them this year. I am already past number 60, so I have got roughly around 190 left! I work on 6 in x 8 in or 8 in x 10 in surfaces. If people are interested in purchasing them I let them go for £375 a piece (unframed). I work mostly in oils and I paint them on a thin gessoed MDF board.

Deliberate Portrait Practice #13 – My Daughter

My goal is just to paint people I know, people I meet, strangers, iconic people, and friends, just anyone. These can be from life or from photographs, it doesn’t really matter – I just want to improve my level of painting portraits to a level of mastery. I believe by constantly painting with a goal not only to get a resemblance but to fashion out a language of my own by experimenting with different techniques and procedures, I will eventually get the full hang of it.

Deliberate Portrait Practice #15 – Arsene Wenger

It’s not been easy. As with any other project, the beginning is always fun and explosive but there comes a time when the wear and tear sets in and the spice dies out. This has happened with this project, life has got in the way, but I have had to revive my goal and purpose again and again!

Deliberate Portrait Practice #30 – Big Issue Seller Charing Cross

I shared my idea with Winsor & Newton who produce most of the oil colours I use and they have been pleased to help with sponsoring the project with a generous supply of oil colours. At the end of this project I plan to produce a book with all the paintings, explaining why I chose the sitters and my experience of painting them and what I have learnt. I called the whole series my Deliberate Portrait Practice. I hope I can make this happen. There is always a price for any worthy endeavour and this is my next challenge.

Deliberate Portrait Practice #49 – Harry Kane

I have always loved a challenge and this one is really daunting! What I have learnt so far when it comes to painting portraits is that the drawing must be spot on. If the drawing is awkward, lacks a bit of accuracy, and misses a major angle or measurement; no matter the amount of fancy painting that comes on top – the portrait will never be a successful one. I have had many wipe-outs and many that have not made the cut – I am going to publish some of the failed attempts in the book too.

Deliberate Portrait Practice #51 – Stranger making up

Below are two portraits – the one that made it (right) and the one that didn’t (left). With this piece, I learnt that speed doesn’t help with portraits. I also learnt that portraits where the person is smiling with teeth showing are better done on a bigger surface than my normal 6 in x 8 in format. I was more careful with the drawing on the second attempt and I used an 8 in x 10 in surface.

Deliberate Portrait Practice #60 – Graham’s Son
[Side By Side Comparison Of Two Portraits]

If you have an idea or something you really want to gain mastery over, try this method of deliberate practice. You might need a mentor or a tutor to guide you along the way, but face your fears and go for it. It might be a long task and you might get a bit discouraged along the way but just don’t give up until you get the results you were looking for at the beginning. I have really seen a great improvement since the start. I even gained the confidence to accept a teaching job at The Art Academy, London – I took their Advanced Expressive Portrait Class for 5 weeks. The students really enjoyed my wealth of knowledge and experience. What they may not know is that it has been thanks to this project. I wonder what I’ll be able to do when I complete this project! Let’s see what the future holds. You can follow this project on my Instagram or Facebook page.

Deliberate Portrait Practice #56, #57 – The Connection

Adebanji Alade’s Winsor & Newton Artist Oil Portrait Palette:

Titanium White, Winsor Lemon, Winsor Yellow, Yellow Ochre Pale, Yellow Ochre, Indian Yellow, Bright Red, Alizarin Crimson, Permanent Rose, Winsor Violet Dioxazine, French Ultramarine, Cobalt Blue, Viridian Green, Raw Umber, Burnt Sienna, Burnt Umber, Ivory Black.

About Adebanji Alade

Adebanji Alade, b.1972, is the Vice President of the Royal Institute of Oil Painters and one of the most exciting artists in Britain today. He has exhibited widely throughout the country and has won numerous awards for his dynamic, mostly urban, paintings that are full of people and life. He currently works full time as a painter from his studio on Lots Road in Chelsea, London.

Whether he works indoors or outdoors, Adebanji strives to bring the life, vitality and movement of ‘the sketch’ into his paintings. He is inspired by the atmosphere, historical importance, mood, and the play of light that a particular place can offer at any point in time. Adebanji frequently presents films and interviews for BBC One’s The One Show and his sketches of commuters on the underground have also been made into the Channel 4 animated short film Two Minutes.

Visit Adebanji’s website to find out more about his work.

The post Adebanji Alade: 250 Portraits In 250 Days appeared first on Jackson's Art Blog.

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Jackson’s Professional Oil Paints are luminous, vibrant, and full of character. Made in the UK by skilled artisans using only the finest grade pigments and the purest refined oils, this range rivals leading oil colour brands but at a fraction of the price. These gorgeous paints are made without extenders, fillers, or drying modifiers. The intense colour saturation and purity of the professional colours is achieved by high pigment loading coupled with our traditional production process. Each pigment is treated individually according to its own properties. Each absorbs a different amount of oil and some pigments like Ultramarine Blue only need gentle milling, whereas coarser earth pigments must undergo a lengthier process on the mill to achieve optimum dispersion of the pigment in the oil.

We occasionally expand the colours in the range when we think a colour would be really useful. We’ve recently added four new colours: three convenience mixes and a single pigment colour that is a particularly good mixer. All four new colours are available in 40ml or 225ml tubes.

(CLICK THE IMAGES TO ZOOM IN)

Brilliant Pink

Pigments: PW4 PW6 PR188 PR209
A mixture of transparent white and opaque white with the orange-red Naphthol Scarlet and the intense, slightly cool, middle red Quinacridone Red. This creates a warm, intense orangey-pink perfect for catching the eye or for bright underpainting. A warm, clean, opaque colour with lots of zing. It has an average drying time and tinting strength and excellent lightfastness. It has a lot of white in it so using a small amount in a mix is useful for lightening and warming the mixture.

The Brilliant Pink will warm up other colours quickly.
The Manganese Violet and Sap Green in differing ratios make some useful dull darks. Some white was added to see the colour better.

Sap Green

Pigments: PG7 PBr7
A mixture of transparent, bright Phthalo Green and natural Iron Oxide. A classic warm, dark, mossy green capable of a wide range of tones, from a yellow green in a thin layer to a rich near-black when applied thickly. It has an average drying time and tinting strength and excellent lightfastness. It is semi-opaque.

Modifying the King’s Blue Deep with a touch of the Brilliant Pink and Sap Green makes some nice warm and cool greys.

King’s Blue Deep

Pigments: PB29 PW6 PW4
A mixture of transparent white and opaque white with Ultramarine Blue. Designed as a deeper replacement for the historic pigment Smalt. It has an average drying time, is opaque and has excellent lightfastness. It has a lot of white in it so using a small amount in a mix is useful for lightening and cooling the mixture. Also a good base to start mixing sky colours. Adding a little Sap Green makes a dull, light blue-green, useful for sea colours. Adding a small amount of the other three new colours easily makes a series of useful warm and cool greys.

A small amount of Manganese Violet in the King’s Blue Deep makes a dark, violet grey that can be lighted with white – useful for shadows or skies.

Beginning to look at some sea and sky colours.

Manganese Violet

Pigments: PV16
A deep, reddish violet with a balanced neutral temperature. It has an average drying time and tinting strength and excellent lightfastness. It is semi-opaque. It is great for shadow mixtures and for darkening colours. Mixed with Alizarin Crimson it creates a rich maroon colour. Mixed with Sap Green it creates a dark blue-grey similar to indigo.

Manganese Violet mixed with warm and cool colours makes a wide variety of darks.

Manganese Violet works beautifully to modify the Sap Green making usefull dull greens and grey greens. A bit of Sap Green in the Manganese Violet makes rich, dark brownish violets.
Brilliant Pink and Manganese Violet mix to a cool magenta.

This columns on the left and right start with Manganese Violet and add more of the mixed colour as it descends. In the centre are 4 variations on the colour you get in the centre of the column, a 50:50 mix. I am highlighting these because the maroon colour on the left and the indigo colour on the right were interesting, useful results.

Manganese Violet mixed in different ratios with four earth colours.

Read our earlier articles about Jackson’s Professional and Artist Oil Colours Jackson’s Oil Colours on jacksonsart.com

Postage on orders shipped standard to mainland UK addresses is free for orders of £39.

The post Four New Colours in the Jackson’s Professional Oil Colour Range appeared first on Jackson's Art Blog.

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Some artists that like painting on canvas do not like the bounce you get with a stretched canvas and find canvas panels the perfect solution. You can attach your favourite primed or un-primed canvas to a wooden panel to paint on a rigid surface that still has the texture of canvas.

There are other reasons you might want to paint on a canvas panel. A thin panel will fit in a pochade box for plein air painting, where a stretched canvas will not. In addition to the bounce during painting, the movement of the canvas can cause problems with the dried paint later. A rigid surface is required for some mediums such as encaustic painting where the flex of a stretched canvas would crack the surface. Also, it is considered more conservationally sound to use a rigid surface for oil painting, to prevent cracking over time, though with large paintings you have to balance the considerations of weight and transportability, so stretched canvas might be a better choice for large paintings.

You can purchase ready made canvas panels but if you make your own you can get exactly the size, depth and canvas you want. It’s a straightforward process to make your own custom canvas panels and you can make a stack in an afternoon.

Making a Canvas Painting Panel Choose a rigid surface

The Jackson’s Smooth Plywood Panels are great if you want an edge of wood around the back side so you can hang the panel on a screw or attached a wire for hanging, it can be a standard depth or a deep-edged panel. You can also use many other rigid surfaces like wood, MDF or gatorboard. For panels that fit into plein air painting pochade box slots you will need a thin, un-cradled panel like MDF or mountboard.

Cut your canvas piece

Making small canvas panels is a great way to use the off cuts of canvas you have after stretching canvas, that are too small to do anything else with. Or you can purchase canvas by the metre. When cutting your piece of canvas be aware that the glue will wet your canvas so it may shrink a few mm as it dries, so cut it a few mm larger than your panel. I trace around the panels (on the wrong side of the canvas if it’s primed) with a pencil and then cut a little outside the line. Because the line of the weave may show, cutting in line with it looks tidy and reduces the distraction of a slightly diagonal grid pattern, so you may want to line your panel up with the weave before you trace around it.

Apply the adhesive

The most commonly used glues are soft acrylic gel or PVA. Brush your chosen adhesive evenly onto your wooden panel. Do not be skimpy as most glues shrink a lot as the water evaporates and you can end up with too thin a layer.

Apply the canvas

I lay the canvas on the table and lower the glued panel down onto it because I can see the edges better to line things up, but you can also lay the canvas on from above. Then smooth it with a brayer/roller or a palette knife and work out all air pockets as you go, paying particular attention to getting the edges pushed down.

Dry it under pressure

Glue needs to be firmly in contact with both side of what it is gluing. If it does not have pressure pushing the canvas against the glue and board, then the glue will shrink away from the fabric, create a dried skin between itself and the board or canvas and you may only have a few spots glued well. (This is true for all PVA type gluing, including when you are gluing a wooden batten to the back of an aluminium panel.)

Lay your board with the canvas side down and place heavy weights on the back so it dries under pressure. You can make a few boards and as each one is finished add it to the stack under the weights. When stacking be sure to line up them up pretty evenly or add a larger board in between, so there is pressure all the way to each corner. Another good way to create pressure is to put a plain board against the front and use four strong clamps all around to press the canvas flat and let it dry for a day. I use clamps if I am doing one or two boards and weights if I am doing more, because I don’t have enough clamps.

Trim the canvas even

When it’s dry put the panel face down and trim the canvas flush with the edge of the board using a utility knife. It is so much easier with a new sharp blade, so be sure to snap off your knife.

Priming

If you have used primed canvas you may not need to do any priming, though some artists always add another layer of primer to any ready-primed canvas to get the surface they prefer. You can choose chalky and absorbent gesso primer which is great for encaustic or non-absorbent for oil paint or many other characteristics. Apply one to three coats of primer, smoothing it as you like with a brush, palette knife or squeegee. With acrylic primer any brushmarks will become less visible as it dries and shrinks.

If you are using a panel with sides and you will be priming the surface you will need to decide if you want to prime the sides white or leave them bare wood. If you wish to leave them bare wood, you may wish to use masking tape to keep the sides clean, as I have done with the green tape shown below.

Treating the sides

If you have left the sides bare wood you can still treat them to keep them from picking up stains and finger prints by either sealing them with a varnish, wood sealer or clear wax.

Read some of our other articles about canvas and panels Canvas at Jackson’s Art
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After seeing a customer review by Margriet Pronk explaining step by step how to start painting with Cobra Oil paints, we knew she’d be a great person to expand her review into a list of tips on how to use watermixable oils. She said that she likes Cobra oil paints ‘because of the beautiful intense colours and the way it paints’ and because ‘after 6 months you can varnish it. I love the matt version, which gives a brilliant effect.’ We also awarded her a £25 Jackson’s Gift Voucher for writing the most informative and useful review of the month.

A Little about Margriet Pronk

Margriet Pronk

Margriet Pronk lives with her husband and two dogs in a small apartment in Castricum in the Netherlands. She paints in her living room. You can see her work on her website here, you can also email her margriet@invenio.nl

She’s been painting since 2016, but before that thought she could not paint or draw. In the past, she was creative by working with programming, websites, stained-glass and bead making.

How Margriet Started Painting with Water-mixable Oils

By Margriet Pronk

Cobra Watermixable Oil Paints

A friend of mine started to give art lessons and I told her: “ Whenever you start teaching, I will be your first student!” So that’s why, when she finally started giving art classes, I went to them! She’s a great art teacher and nowadays she teaches several classes with lots of students. If you are doubting whether to start something, just start! You can always stop!

I tried colour pencils, pastels and then start painting with acrylic because the other students used it. I liked painting but found that every time I tried to blend my paint I got frustrated. I am a slow painter, so acrylic dries too quickly for me! And yes, I have tried slow drying mediums/paint for acrylic, but as I told, I am even to slow for that!

So my friend/teacher advised me to start painting with oil paint. I read about normal oil paint and I was shocked by the idea of using “dangerous” liquids, like turpentine. I just did not want to! I know that there are a lot of liquids that don’t smell, but I was always asking myself if that also meant they would not be dangerous? If yóu prefer to work with normal oil paint and turpentine, be my guest, but I don’t.

So I bought some Cobra Oil paints (it was the brand sold by the local store). There are two kinds of Cobra; “Student” and “Artist”. Because the “Student” was cheaper, I started with that, but when I knew that this was the medium I wanted to work with forever, I bought all the colours of the “Cobra Artist”. Ridiculous of course, but for me it is an addiction, like it for a collector. Every time I found an excuse to buy new colours, however, of course, you can mix most colours with just a few tubes.

I was surprised by how relaxing working with (water mixable) oil paint is, how much less paint you use, how smooth the paint is, how beautiful the colours are, and that the lightfastness is very high. Royal Talens puts a sign on the tubes, which tells how many years they can guarantee each colours lightfastness for. This is very important for when you paint and perhaps sell that painting, as you don’t want the colours to fade away. There are more brands with water mixable oils, but I love Cobra best, because of the points mentioned earlier. I noticed not every brand has a lightfastness guarantee, so pay attention to that when you buy water-mixable oils.

Luna the Beagle Painted using Watermixable Oils

I have enclosed some pictures from when I was painting our beagle, Luna. (BTW: Luna is a famous beagle, she was an actress for a commercial of the KLM and “Sherlock”. Just google these last words on YouTube and you will see her). It is painted on a panel with a measurement of 18 x 24 cm (7 x 9 inch).

The underdrawing and early stages of Margriet’s painting using Cobra oils of the famous beagle Luna

I have transferred the picture on a panel with a projector and an aqua pencil. I still think I that cannot draw. Since I know that even the great Dutch painters, such as Vermeer used camera obscuras, I don’t feel guilty anymore. Why should I spend a lot of time drawing and correcting when I can do it so much easier and quicker? You see that I start with the background first. The background of a painting is what I find the most difficult about painting (which colour? where should the light be? where should the shadows be? etc.) I am still learning about that! Perhaps a nice item for Jackson’s to write about.

First layer blocked in with Cobra thinned down with water.


I then blocked in the first layer with Cobra, thinned with water. It took about a week to dry.

The second layer uses thicker undiluted Cobra paint, following the fat over lean method


Next layer with pure Cobra paint.

The last layer building up details while adding more cobra medium (thinned a little with water) to make the paint fatter.

Last layer (for me) is all about the details, I put a little Cobra medium and thin the medium with water. Every subsequent layer, I use more medium and less water with the paint.

Margriet’s Critiques of Cobra / Her Wishes for it

I would like a medium which is not glossy and shining. Currently, the medium is glossy, so where you use it you get a distinctive shine on the paint. That’s why I can never wait to use the varnish (you have to wait until at least 6 months after you have finished the painting)! Then everything becomes matt (of course if you use a matt varnish) If you see the photo below of the Clown, you can see the difference before and after you’ve used a matt varnish.

I’d also like a varnish that is in a bottle (currently they have only sprays, and these sometimes create drips on my paintings).

Painting of The Clown with Cobra oils before and after applying a matt varnish

You can buy colour charts, however, I made one myself. It was a lot of work, but it helps me when I am in search of a certain colour.

Margriet’s Colourchart

I miss colours that are very common in the world, like Alizarin Crimson, Dioxine Purple, Viridian and I love to look at tutorials on YouTube (thank you for making them), I find these colours that are often used.

You can view all of our Cobra Watermixable Oil Paints and mediums here.

Calling all artists to share their views!

We would like to encourage you to write a review on our website of any products that you have used. Simply navigate to the product you wish to review and click on the ‘Reviews’ button beneath the product image. Be thoughtful and detailed – think about what information will be useful to others.

Each month we will be selecting several well-written examples which will be published on our blog. The writer of the best review will receive a £25 Jackson’s gift voucher plus a photograph of them in their studio (if they wish) and a link to their website will appear alongside their review.

The post How to Start Painting with Cobra Watermixable Oils appeared first on Jackson's Art Blog.

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