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It’s no secret that Italians are proud of their coffee. Dark, and strong, you can’t walk far in any town in the country without finding a place to get a great espresso. A sign of hospitality – especially in the South – when you visit someone, a quick jolt of energy when the morning starts or in a break from work, there’s a whole etiquette to it and you better stick to it if you want to blend in. When in Rome, do as the Romans do – and boy, do they like their espresso. That is why you can’t leave the Eternal City without a good sip of it at least a couple of times. But as with everything else here, there’s always more to the experience than just drinking a good cup of java. That is why we chose a few that will be not only a treat to your taste buds, but also a true taste of Rome.

Books and coffee at Giufà in San Lorenzo

 
The San Lorenzo neighbourhood is the traditional quartiere for college students, since it’s very near to the main buildings of the Sapienza, Rome’s traditional and most well-known university. It follows that one of its best coffee shops here is also a great place to buy books, listen to a conference by an author or just relish a good slice of cake. Giufà is the name of this cosy and charming little bar, where you can also have your aperitivo. Everything is organic and prepared with care for the environment (if you find some carrot cake, grab it fast before someone beats you to it!). From 4pm until well after midnight you can be sure to find people engaged in fascinating conversations or immersed in some beautiful hardcover book.
Giufà can be found at Via degli Aurunci 38.


See how the other half lives at Il Cigno

 
If San Lorenzo is one of Rome’s rambunctious, rebellious parts of the city, the Parioli neighbourhood is its exact opposite. Aristocratic and elegant, you won’t find many tourists wandering around in this area. Which is actually a pity (although the locals surely prefer it that way): Parioli is not only a great example of the Italian brand of Art Nouveau architecture, called here “Liberty”, but also has some hidden jewels, like the quartiere Coppedè. And of course, a more than fair share of great restaurants and bars. One of its most picturesque ones is ll Cigno, “The Swan”. Decorated inside with a bas-relief that depicts the myth of Leda and the swan, and with the constellation of the same name adorning the bar’s floor, it certainly stands out. Il Cigno is a lovely place to get a glimpse of a part of Rome tourists rarely see, and to have some amazing coffee and pastries (cornetti with cherry jam seems to be the most sensible choice).
You’ll find Il Cigno at Viale dei Parioli 16.


Let history fix you a cup of coffee at the Antico Caffè Greco

 
One of Italy’s oldest Caffè, Il Greco has been around for more than 250 years. That in itself is no small feat. But there’s more. This bar has seen the likes of Hans Christian Andersen, Buffalo Bill, Henry James, Orson Welles, James Joyce and Goethe himself stop here for a chat and a drink. If you visit it, you’ll find the traces of all these illustrious guests and many, many more. Smack dab in the city center, it’s just two steps away from Piazza di Spagna. Don’t miss the opportunity to visit this historical spot! You’ll find it at Via dei Condotti 86.


Pick your side in the clash of kings: Tazza d’Oro and Sant’Eustachio

 
While every Roman has her or his own favourite coffee shop, it is almost general knowledge that the title for the best coffee in the city is disputed by two traditional bars in the city centre: Tazza D’Oro and Sant’Eustachio. Just a few minutes of walking from each other, both have fervent supporters, and with good reason. In the end, it all boils down to one thing; your own personal taste. Whichever you pick as the winner, you can be sure that you won’t be disappointed. Tazza d’Oro can be found at Via degli Olmetti 5B, just steps away from the Pantheon; and Sant’Eustachio is located at Piazza Sant’Eustachio 82.
 
As you can see, you won’t have time to miss your local coffee shops, as you’ll have your pick of the litter here. Even having a sip of espresso can be a cultural experience in Rome, and we want to help you plan your trip here to perfection! Get in touch with us and let’s start planning!

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Since people who visit Rome usually keep their visits to the city’s historical centre, they sometimes get the idea that there aren’t many green spaces. Nothing could be further from the truth. Rome boasts the title of being the “greenest” city in Europe, with parks all over. Different in size and style, perhaps the city’s most famous one is Villa Borghese. This particular park was developed around what used to be a residence and garden for the powerful Borghese family. In the early XX century, it was acquired by the State and opened to the general public. With almost 200,000 acres of territory, it’s Rome fourth largest park. But Villa Borghese’s way more than just a lovely green area of the city. It is home to an incredible number of attractions. A stroll down the lanes of this park is definitely worth your while. Here are some of the reasons why.

Museums, museums everywhere

 
One of the most important museums in the city (and the world, actually) is located by one of the Villa’s entrance. The Borghese Gallery is a beautiful building near the northern entrance of the park, not far away from the famous Via Veneto. It is the largest museum based on a single person’s collection, Cardinal Scipione Borghese. Among the numerous works you can find here, there are many of Bernini’s sculptures (“Apollo and Daphne” is a personal favourite), some of Caravaggio’s paintings and a lot of other masterpieces by lesser known artists.
But even if this is the park’s most famous museum, it’s not the only one. You can also find smaller ones, like the Pietro Canonica (a lovely little fortress dedicated to the artist that gives the museum its name); the Carlo Bilotti museum, home to works by De Chirico and others; the National Gallery of Modern and Contemporary Art; and the Etruscan Museum of Villa Giulia, these last two barely outside the Villa.

A great place to enjoy a movie

 
In 2004, the Casa del Cinema (House of Cinema) was created to play movies of general interest. Equipped with many rooms for movies, photo expositions and even a theatre out in the open for the summer months, the Casa is an important cultural centre and a great place to catch a movie while having a bite of mozzarella and enjoying the park’s fresh air.
Villa Borghese also prides itself in being home to the world’s smallest movie theatre, the Cinema dei Piccoli, which plays subtitled children films.

Restaurants galore

 
No place in Italy would be complete without at least a couple of cool eating spots. Near the Villa’s famous water clock (created by a Dominican friar and scientist) there’s the traditional and picturesque Casina dell’Orologio, where you can get your espresso fix before walking on and reaching the Pincio Terrace, one of the best views in all of the city. You can take your selfie there and enjoy the sight of Rome (we recommend getting there by sunset), and then either head to the Casina Valadier for a fancy dinner or, if you’re more in the mood for a sweet treat, walk down a little bit further and have a lovely cup of tea with pastries at Colbert, inside the French Academy. You can also, of course, bring your own food to the villa and have a picnic or DIY aperitivo as well. Nothing like a romantic glass of wine by the Pincio or surrounded by classic statues.

Take a boat ride at the Laghetto

 
Villa Borghese is big enough to hold its very own lake. Well, a small artificial lake, but a beautiful one at that. The Laghetto di Esculapio (“Asclepius’ little lake”) is one of the park’s most charming spots. Near the Villa’s exit to Piazza del Popolo, this area is filled with the shade the trees provide, and it gives you the chance to enjoy a short but romantic boat ride. If that is not your choice, you can always head to the Casina del Lago, a little bar ideal for a cocktail or a cup of tea while the heat dies down.
  

As you can now probably see, you can spend more than one day in this park and there would still be things to do and places to visit. We hope you can allot some time in your schedule to visit Villa Borghese and appreciate its beauty personally. If you’re already thinking about it, contact us! We can help you plan the best trip to Rome ever!

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Legend has it that the famed Greek physician Hippocrates discovered that when one of his patients suffered from a lack of appetite, a few sips of a bitter concoction made with wine and herbs would open even the most closed stomachs. While this fact would make the ancient medic one of history’s oldest mixologists, it also provides the first evidence of what would later become a beloved Italian tradition, the aperitivo. From the Latin aperitivus, “to open”, it describes succinctly a fantastic idea put into practice by Italians everywhere when the sun sets: to have a drink while you nibble on something (or gorge on a buffet, depending on your choice of place) and start your engines for dinner a little bit later.
There seems to be a consensus that this tradition begins at its earnest in Turin, around the last quarter of the XIX century. It was there that the vermouth was born, becoming so popular that it became the Court’s official aperitivo. The custom spread and of course, it also reached Rome. Nowadays, you have plenty of places to choose from when you come here, and different styles of aperitivo to enjoy. Here’s just a few you might like, especially in these warmer summer months.

Keep it local at the Oasi della Birra

 
We haven’t been coy about our love of Testaccio. Definitely one of the best places to eat or drink in the whole city, it also sports quite a few great spots for an aperitivo. The Oasi della Birra is one of them. A fantastic wine and beer shop, it also provides you with the chance to cool off after a long walk under the Roman sun with a great buffet filled with different cold cuts, veggie dishes and more. The list of beers is almost overwhelming, but the staff is extremely helpful. The best part of the Oasi is that you’ll feel like a local watching people pass by the square in front of the shop while you sip on a tasty rosso and wonder how you can export the aperitivo to your home town.
You can find the Oasi della Birra at Piazza Testaccio 38/41.

Take a trip to the 60’s at the Gatsby Cafè

 
The Esquilino neighborhood is home to some of Rome’s most beautiful churches, arguably its most colorful market and a few curious spots (like the mysterious Magic Door). Needless to say, more than worth your curiosity and interest. But should you be in need of further encouragement, we can give you another reason: the Gatsby Cafè. Decorated in true 60’s fashion, you’ll be expecting some star from Italy’s golden age of film to walk through its doors and drink a Negroni at the bar. Here the aperitivo is classic in its quantity but innovative in its content, and usually varies. Expect to be surprised with some twist on some old recipe or an unusual but effective combination of flavors. You’ll find the same fun eclecticism on the cocktail list. Put on your flat cap and head out there!
The Gatsby Cafè is found at Piazza Vittorio Emanuele II, 106.

Find a hidden jewel of the Trastevere at Alembic Ak Bar

 
No one will argue that the Trastevere is among the most popular rioni to enjoy a night out. And while its most bustling area is found around the ancient basilica of Santa Maria in Trastevere, we invite you to head in the opposite direction towards the Piazza in Piscinula and enjoy an artistic aperitivo at the Alembic # Ak Bar. Host to artistic events of different sorts, every time you go there, there’ll be something new to see. It has a very unique vintage atmosphere and a great barman that will prepare that spritz you’ll be longing to drink once you sit on a dreamy lounge chair.
Alembic # Ak Bar can be found at Piazza in Piscinula 51, in the Trastevere neighborhood.

 
The Roman summer is truly hot, but in the best of ways. It’s an amazing time to travel to our city and enjoy all it has to offer. Don’t wait any longer and start planning your trip! Get in touch with us and let us help plan the experience of a lifetime.

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One of the first things that usually strike people as odd when they arrive in Rome is the number of churches they find in the city, especially in the most visited areas. There is, of course, a logical explanation for this. Rome, having been for more than two thousand years the “headquarters” for the Catholic Church, has seen the growth and prosperity of the church throughout history and the temples it has are here as a sign of this. Do not mistake them for abandoned buildings or museums, though. Most of the churches in Rome continue to be active and, besides the visits from the millions of tourists that come here every year, are also active centres for worship, formation and welfare service.
That being said, it is also true that many of them are truly precious, whether for their historical importance, the artistic works of art they house or the building in themselves that make them masterpieces on their own right. This, of course, is no secret, but the huge number of temples makes it impossible to visit them all. That is why we wanted to suggest a couple of them you really shouldn’t miss while you’re here. We’ll skip the more classic and well known, like Saint Peter or the Pantheon, and instead propose some rather unknown but very interesting ones.

Find layer upon layer of Rome in San Clemente

 
Not far away from the Colosseum or Saint John’s Basilica lies San Clemente, “Saint Clement”. This gorgeous basilica is especially interesting, however, not because of the current building, but of what lies underneath. In the lower levels you will find the remains of the medieval basilica, and going even deeper underground the ruins of a Roman house and a Mithraeum, a small ancient temple dedicated to the god Mithras, whose cult was pretty much in fashion during the time of Emperor Hadrian. The whole exhibition is very well curated, definitely worth a visit (and also a refreshing change of temperature in the scorching heat of the summer). You’ll find it at Via Labicana 93.


Geek out at Saint’Ivo alla Sapienza

 
Francesco Borromini is, to this day, one of the persons who has left his very visible mark in Rome. Among his works, one of the most interesting is the small (by Roman standards) chapel for what once was the main building for the Sapienza University and now is home to the State’s Archive. Since it was to become the church for that university’s students, Borromini made of that building a symbol of humanity’s search for wisdom (Sapienza means “wisdom” in Italian). From the foundations to the cross on the top of Saint Ivo, the place is packed with symbols and images related to this pursuit. The gorgeous courtyard where the church is located isolates it from the noisy streets of the city centre, so it can also be an oasis of stillness in the middle of Rome. You’ll find it at Corso del Rinascimento 40, between the Pantheon and Piazza Navona.


Be dazzled by mosaics at Santa Prassede

 
Just a few steps away from Santa Maria la Maggiore lies Santa Prassede, one of Rome’s many minor Basilicas. It’s one of those places you’ll risk passing by without noticing it. But once you enter, it’s a different story. While there are other churches in Rome that have kept at least a little of byzantine art, Santa Prassede has probably the lion’s share of it. Both the apse and a small chapel remain as a glorious example of medieval art. Santa Prassede also claims to have a relic from Jesus himself: namely, part of the pillar where he was whipped by the soldiers during his Passion (the Franciscans in Jerusalem’s Holy Sepulchre Basilica claim to have it as well, but that’s another story for another day). The Basilica is also home to a huge reliquary holding the remains of hundreds of Roman martyrs, which makes it an interesting stop if you’re a pilgrim or interested in the early days of Christianism in the city. You’ll find all this at Via di Santa Prassede.


Adjust your sundial at Santa Maria degli Angeli e dei Martiri

 
What do you do when you have the ruins of ancient baths lying around? Well, Pope Pius IV charged Michelangelo with the task of using them as base to build a Basilica. The famed artist laid down the main design to which other artists would add their own contributions later on. Located at the Piazza della Repubblica, this basilica was for a while the main church for the Kingdom of Italy. All this, and the church’s undisputable beauty makes for a sight to see. But Santa Maria is also the home to the city’s meridian. Pope Clement XI had it built there to check the accuracy of the then new Gregorian Calendar, and also as a way to predict Easter and boast a bigger and better meridian than the one there was in Bologna. Picture a huge sundial decorated with the signs of the zodiac and you’ll get an estimate image of this quirky creation. The Basilica holds contemporary art exhibitions from time to time, so ask if there’s any presentation when you go visit it!



 

This small showing of Rome’s almost thousand churches is another great example of how the city’s attractions are almost limitless. It also reminds us that, while Rome is always amazing, it’s better to know with someone who knows how to move around town. Let us help you plan your trip and guide you through the Eternal City. Contact us! We can’t wait to show you Rome.

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Summer is already here and the Roman sun is beating hard on your head while you’re strolling through the streets. While it’s true that it’s easier to get cold water in one of the hundreds of water fountains in the city, it’s also perfectly understandable that one may one want to get something more fun in the drinks department. Never fear: Rome is packed with plenty of places to get a great cocktail. We’ve chosen a few that will be perfect for a pause after a day of walking and shopping, or an after-hours drink. And for those who favour beer, we’re adding an extra option so they won’t feel left out.

Get in touch with your inner hipster at ‘Na Cosetta
The Pigneto neighbourhood can be considered Rome’s hipster area (if you’ve been to New York, think of a more roughed up Williamsburg). Packed with street art, posters inviting to the latest underground concerts and people from all over, it has a unique flavour among Rome’s many colourful boroughs. While it’s not in the usual itinerary one might make, it’s worth it to take a cab and find your way to ‘Na Cosetta. This little vintage bistrot opened its door a couple of years ago and has already made a name for itself by combining good food, great drinks and live shows. You can find more information on their website or keep up with their daily events on their Facebook Page.

Fancy it up at the Dorsia
If you head up to the elegant quartiere Salario, you’ll find the Dorsia cocktail bar and restaurant. It’s certainly unique, with a retro-futurist design that gives it a steampunk novel feel. But while the beauty and originality of the place makes already for quite an experience, its cocktail list is the true hook to make you want coming back again and again. Whether you’re craving for a classic Negroni; a new take on a classic drink or some cocktail you’ve never heard of before, you can be sure that you won’t be disappointed. And if you don’t believe us, check out their Instagram account: it’s the stuff of dreams. Dorsia is located at Via Messina 42.

Do as the Romans do at the APT Bar
Monti, the rione (Latin for “region”) between Santa Maria la Maggiore and the Colosseum, is one of the most popular meeting places for the locals. Just a few steps away from its lovely piazzetta (little square), you’ll find the APT Bar. The owners describe it as a place to feel at home (APT is short for “apartment” here), and you’ll truly feel like that. Don’t hesitate to stop here for a sip of something that will make your stay in Rome even sweeter. You’ll find APT Bar at Via Clementina 9.

Go underground at the Barber Shop

There’s a growing number of speakeasies in Rome, some already world famous like the Jerry Thomas bar. But our favourite is definitely the Barber Shop. Located near the Manzoni metro station and behind the doors of a classy barber shop, you’ll go down the stairs to find yourself in a cozy bar, with cool jazz and swing music in the background, an extremely welcoming staff and a great drink list. As with all speakeasies, you’ll have to get yourself carded to get in. Look for more information on their Facebook page.

Bonus round: get your beer fix at Bir & Fud

The Trastevere doesn’t need publicity, as it’s already probably one of Rome’s most visited spots. But if you are still in need for encouragement, and you like beer, then you have to know of the best beer bars in Rome is there. Bir & Fud has a great selection of local and foreign beers, a cool atmosphere and plenty of food choices to go with your fancy IPA or your classic Lager. It’s just behind Piazza Trilussa, at Via Benedetta 23.

Don’t doubt it: Rome in the summer is an amazing place for a holiday. Want to have an amazing experience here? Contact us and let us make you fall in love with one the most beautiful cities in the world!

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Rome is not only a fantastic city for art, food and entertainment: it’s also a place of pilgrimage for many who come here to visit the tombs of the Saints Peter and Paul and of many Christian martyrs and saints. Furthermore, it’s home to the Pope, bishop of Rome, who resides in the City State of the Vatican. Many, both Catholic and not, ask how and when it is possible to see the Pope while they visit Rome. It may surprise you, but it’s actually easier than it might seem!

When?
The Pope has two weekly appointments where he speaks in public: the general audiences he holds every Wednesday morning and the Angelus prayer (or the Regina Coeli during Easter time) on Sundays.
General Audiences are held at Saint Peter’s square, except when it’s very cold or raining – in those cases they move it to the Paul VI Audience Hall, just besides the colonnata by the Holy Office Door. Every Wednesday those who would participate in it gather early in the morning and listen a Scriptural text which is translated in several languages, after which the Pope makes a brief reflection or catechesis, which is also then summarized and translated for everyone to understand. Afterwards, the Pope greets the different groups that are taking part in the audience and blesses everyone before returning to his other appointments for the day.

How I can assist?
Anybody can go to the audiences, but if you want to get a seating, you’ll need a ticket. The best way to get them is via the Prefecture of the Papal Household, the office in charge of all the celebrations the Pope presides in the Vatican. You can find all the pertaining information on how to reserve tickets on its website, here. An important tip (you’ll thank us for this!): bear in mind that it’s a whole morning you’ll be spending outdoors and rather static, with no roof over your head. Therefore, don’t forget to bring warm clothes in the winter or water, hats, and an umbrella during the warmer months. Get as early as you can to the square (even as much as two or three hours in advance), as the place gets packed really fast.

The Pope guides the Angelus prayer (an ancient devotion to the Virgin Mary) from the balcony of the Apostolic Palace just besides Saint Peter’s Square. No need for tickets here (no seats either). It’s a short prayer and a short meditation on that Sunday’s mass readings followed by some brief greetings. Even though the Pope is far from the square, huge jumbo screens allow to see and hear him with no problems from the square. It’s only a few minutes long. Once again, it is recommended to arrive a little bit early (about an hour or slightly less than that).

There are other celebrations the Pope presides over, whether at Saint Peter’s or in other places in the city. It’s wise to check the schedule for these events on the Vatican website, and you can usually reserve tickets via the Prefecture. Remember that these tickets are always free, so if anybody tries to sell you some… they are trying to scam you!

As you can see, it’s not that difficult to see the Pope, but it takes a little planning, as with every trip that you want to fully enjoy. Let us help you find the best tours, tailored to your needs and expectation. Don’t hesitate to contact us!

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Few things are more exciting than taking a cruise: living in the open sea, enjoying the comfort and entertainment… and specially the possibility of getting to know different travel destinations. How to make the most of your time on land? That’s where we come in. Let us help you have the best day in Italy.

Share the experiences
Want to include your new cruise buddies in the trip? Even better! Our shared tours give you the chance to make the excursion together, and save up some money in the process. It’s a win-win! You can also participate in other shared tours that somebody might be organizing. You can learn more about our Shared Tour option by reading our FAQ.

None of the fuss, all of the fun!
We pick you up, we plan the itinerary and we take you where you want to go. When you’re on a cruise you don’t have to worry about anything; we want you to feel the same way when you’re discovering Italy with us.

Zero time wasted
If there’s one thing that you don’t want to lose (besides your passport) when you’re traveling, it’s your time. With us, you can be sure that not a moment will be wasted and you’ll have time to relish the experience and take advantage of every minute.

Italy’s greatest hits
Italy is a true cornucopia of art, culture, natural beauty and delicious food… and our tours take you to some of the best places in all of the country! Whether it’s the charming and bustling Naples; the magnificent Eternal City of Rome; the elegance and sophistication of Pisa and Florence or the picturesque sights in Taormina and Mount Etna, you can be sure you’ll get a true feel of our unsurpassable and lovely Italy.

Now that you know, don’t hesitate to contact us. We want to help put that extra value in your already wonderful cruise experience. Italy and its infinite beauty awaits. What are you waiting for?

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When you’re visiting the city with most monuments by square feet in the world, it’s easy to go looking for the “greatest hits”: The Colosseum, Saint Peter’s Basilica, the beloved Trevi Fountain and many more. While this is more than understandable, it’s also true that a big part of Rome’s charm comes from its streets. Whether you want to get lost in the cobblestone vicoli that fill the Historic Centre, or venture outside the Aurelian Walls to see some of the other quaint boroughs of the city, you can be sure that you’ll find many unforgettable spots that you will treasure as your very own. By all means, wander away and get lost in the city: you’re bound to found many gorgeous locations. But let us suggest a couple of classic Roman Streets you won’t want to miss out on.

Via Margutta
Parallel to the very chic Via del Babuino, which starts as you leave Piazza di Spagna, you take a small turn to the right and you find Via Margutta. Home to many antiquaries and art galleries, you can also find some cool eating spots like the pop-art decorated Trattoria Margutta or the vegetarian restaurant Il Margutta. This charming Roman via was home, among others, to the famous film director Federico Fellini and his wife, Giuletta Massina. Via Margutta can be an excellent place to have your picture taken with your significant other, or just by yourself. The hidden jewel of this street? Il marmoraro, one of Rome’s cutest shops, where you can get your very own artisanal marble plaque with your name, your favourite phrase or a typical Roman one.



Via Giulia
Back in the XVI century, Pope Julius II (the same one who commissioned the Sistine Chapel and ordered Saint Peter’s Basilica complete rebuilding) wanted to take Rome to new heights of splendour, and asked the famous architect Bramante to develop this street that would be part of the city’s renewed beauty. Centuries later, Via Giulia has been through some change, but remains one of the city’s most charming streets. Being rather long, it’s ideal for a stroll during the afternoon hours. You can visit Borromini’s tomb at San Giovanni dei Fiorentini, or, if you feel courageous, visit the ossuary chapel at Santa Maria dell’Orazione e della Morte, Rome’s creepiest church. The Galleria Spada, home to Borromini’s famouse perspective gallery is also located there. Or just find a cute coffee shop and enjoy watching people pass by. Whatever your choice, Via Viulia is certainly worth a walk.


Via dei Coronari
Head north from Piazza Navona, and turning to your left almost as soon as you leave the square, you’ll find Via dei Coronari. Named after the rosary crown sellers who used to work there centuries ago, it was also home to many courtesans back in the day. Nowadays the place is packed with posh clothing shops, antiquaries and cool places to have a bite or sip some proper espresso. Do take your time to snap some pictures at Piazza San Simeone, or, for a one-two punch of flavour and photos, get some of Rome’s best gelato at the Gelateria del Teatro and then take a selfie with your free hand while savouring your ice cream at the steps besides it. You’ll thank us for it.



Via Bernardo Celentano, “Little London”
A city as ancient and rich with art, architecture and history as Rome is bound to have more than one quirky or peculiar spot (places like the Coppedè neighbourhood or the Secret of Rome at the Aventino hill come to mind), and its streets are filled with them. In some cases, the street itself is the thing to watch. Not far from Piazza del Popolo and near Rome’s Auditorium, a little bit of Notting Hill seems to have been uprooted from British soil and planted in a small street called Via Bernardo Celentano. No cars can enter the street and everything is kept spick and span. It all makes for an almost surreal experience, as you’ll feel you’ve left Rome for a few moments. It is a little bit off the usual beaten path, but for those eager for a hidden jewel in Rome’s treasure cove, it’s a great find.



This is just a small taste of all that you can find walking down the streets of Rome, whether you’re looking for someplace in particular or just wandering around to be surprised by the city’s majesty. We want to help you make your trip here unforgettable. Don’t hesitate to contact us!

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The Eternal city may not strike at first as the most family-friendly destination for a holiday. But as with any family vacation, it only takes a little bit of imagination and some planning to create the perfect travel experience in Rome! Book things in advance, find accommodations near the Centro Storico (the main tourist area in Rome) and you’ll be set for an amazing trip. But what to do with your family while you’re here? Here are some ideas to get you excited about your visit to our beautiful city.

1. Get your dose of fresh air in our Villas
Rome is filled with beautiful parks (we usually call them Villas here), where you can either just relax under the shadow of a tree, have a picnic or enjoy a lovely stroll while looking at the art that is present also in these greener parts of the city. Bikes and Segways are usually available there to rent and have a family ride. From the majestic sights at Villa Borghese’s Pincio to the more rustic feel of Villa Ada or the mixture of lights and fresh shade at Villa Doria Pamphilj, you have plenty of places to pick to rest from your walks or get your fill of nature and quiet in the middle of the city noise.

2. The biggest and most entertaining classroom ever
Rome was called “an outdoors museum” by Alberto Sordi, a famous Italian actor. Wherever you go, art and history surround you. You’d be hard pressed to find a better and cooler learning experience. There are many ways to find tours that will suit your family’s needs, and the possibilities are almost endless when it comes to Rome, from getting to know how the gladiators prepared for battle to learning about artists, emperors, Popes and heroes that walked and lived where you’ll be. We can help you plan your trip so that you and your family won’t have to worry about anything but the beauty around you.

3. When in Rome, eat like the Romans do
No visit to Italy is complete without getting a true taste of its cuisine. And there’s probably no place in the world with more family-friendly (and delicious food) than this one. The tasting part is probably the most interesting one for many, but you can also learn how Italian food is made or even learn to do it yourself! It all makes for a fun, inspiring and unforgettable time while you’re staying here in Rome. Few things are more memorable than learning something together as a family.

We want to help you plan your trip to Rome so you can enjoy it to the fullest. Whether it’s art, history, food or just plain good fun, we’ve got a tour that can cater to you and your family needs. Contact us!

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We want to offer you as many possibilities as there are when it comes to planning your cruise and its excursions. That’s why we came up with our Sharing Tours: it’s a fantastic way to enjoy a lovely short trip, share it with others and save money in the process! What’s not to like?

How does it work?

If you’re the group creator, you simply book the trip, letting us know how many people will participate in your Sharing Tour. If you’re concerned about your responsibility regarding the financial part, don’t worry ever for a second: every one of the participants is responsible for their payment. You simply pay directly to the driver at the end of the day. No hassle whatsoever and all the benefits that come from a group tour.

Just think about it: you’ll get a chance to see some of the most beautiful and unforgettable sights in Italy with family and friends (and maybe you’ll make some new ones in the process!) and it’s also financially convenient. Talk about getting more bang for your buck!

We know you may still have some questions. Please visit our FAQ page regarding the Sharing Tours to find out more, or get in touch with us.

We are ready to help you with any inquiry or concern you might have regarding our Sharing Trips.

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