Loading...

Follow International Animal Rescue | Saving animals from .. on Feedspot

Continue with Google
Continue with Facebook
or

Valid
International Animal Rescue has praised action taken by the Indonesian government to protect a deep peatland forest in West Kalimantan (Indonesian Borneo.) The Sungai Putri Forest in Ketapang Regency is home to one of the world’s largest remaining populations of critically endangered orangutans but the habitat is under threat in spite of changes in the law designed to protect it.In 2008 Indonesian company PT Mohairson Pawan Khatulistiwa (MPK) was granted a logging licence for the land and work began in 2013. However, following raging fires in 2015 which destroyed 2.6 million hectares of forest and shrouded Indonesia in a suffocating haze, President Joko Widodo changed the law and introduced regulations to prevent the burning of peatland. Companies including PT Mohairson could no longer cut down intact forest for industrial use. MPK was ordered to cease all operations and fill in the canal which had been created to drain the peat swamp forest. In spite of the change in the law, some work continued. When this was drawn to his attention by the BBC earlier this year, the Director General of Environmental Damage Control at the Environment Ministry, Mr MR Karliansyah, said: “If this is correct, this is a clear violation and we will investigate. The forest is virgin forest that should be saved. If they haven’t started logging and the forest is still intact and under law it’s now protected, it must be conserved, it cannot be touched.”Between 800 and 1,000 critically endangered orangutans live in Sungai Putri forest, according to a 2017 survey conducted by the state Natural Resources Conservation Centre (BKSDA) in partnership with international environmental groups. That makes it the largest orangutan population living outside a protected area in Indonesia, according to the report. [[{"fid":"15464","view_mode":"large","fields":{"format":"large","alignment":"left","field_caption[und][0][value]":""},"type":"media","field_deltas":{"1":{"format":"large","alignment":"left","field_caption[und][0][value]":""}},"link_text":null,"attributes":{"height":320,"width":480,"style":"float: right; width: 480px; height: 320px;","class":"media-element file-large media-wysiwyg-align-left","data-delta":"1"}}]]In 2017 our teams rescued male orangutan Zola (pictured) from a pineapple plantation adjacent to Sungai Putri Forest. The adult male weighing about 60 kg was captured by IAR’s team after damaging hundreds of the villagers’ pineapple plants. The pineapple orchard was adjacent to an area of land being cleared by PT MPK. The orangutan had apparently been driven out of his habitat by the land clearing activities and entered the pineapple plantation in search of food. He was subsequently released with two other rescued orangutans into Gunung Palung National Park.We applaud the crackdown by the Indonesian authorities on illegal logging in Sungai Putri. Alan Knight OBE, IAR Chief Executive, said: “We’ve learnt today that on 1 July the quick response and special crime units of the police and officials from the Ministry of Environment and Forestry raided a company in Ketapang Regency suspected of illegal logging from Sungai Putri Forest. “We applaud the strong stance being taken by the authorities on this important issue. In particular we commend the Director General of Law Enforcement for Environment and Forestry, Rasio Ridho Sani who stated that “unlawful environmental activity, including illegal logging, is an extraordinary crime which must be dealt with firmly, not only because it harms the state but also because it destroys the ecosystem and threatens the livelihood of local people.”[[{"fid":"15465","view_mode":"large","fields":{"format":"large","alignment":"right","field_caption[und][0][value]":""},"type":"media","field_deltas":{"2":{"format":"large","alignment":"right","field_caption[und][0][value]":""}},"link_text":null,"attributes":{"height":253,"width":480,"style":"float: left; width: 480px; height: 253px;","class":"media-element file-large media-wysiwyg-align-right","data-delta":"2"}}]]On 4 July in Pontianak Subhan, Head of the Law Enforcement Unit for Environment and Forestry in Kalimantan said: "We will continue the investigation in order to reveal the identity of the other perpetrators and process the case to be put on trial. This effort is a concrete step by the Directorate General to save orangutan habitat in the area of Gunung Palung-Sungai Putri."Knight concluded: “The Ministry of Environment and Forestry has made a clear commitment to crack down hard on illegal logging and punish the perpetrators. “If Sungai Putri Forest were to be destroyed, we would lose one of the most important orangutan populations we have left. We are indebted to the Environment Ministry for its ongoing efforts to end illegal logging operations in the area and preserve this precious habitat for the sake of both people and wildlife.”
Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 
Karmele Llano Sanchez, Programme Director of IAR Indonesia, has won an award for excellence which was presented to her on 26 June in Bogor, West Java.The GFAS (Global Federation of Animal Sanctuaries) Carole Noon Award for Sanctuary Excellence is given annually to an individual who embodies and puts into practice the GFAS philosophy of vision, dedication, and excellence in animal care at sanctuaries. It memorialises Carole Noon, founder of Save the Chimps in Fort Pierce, Florida, the world’s largest chimpanzee sanctuary.This year marks the 10th year of the award presentation and GFAS has selected two co-winners: Karmele is one recipient and Patti Ragan from the Center for Great Apes is the other. In presenting the award, GFAS provides a donation to the awardee’s organisation in addition to an award plaque.The award was handed over to Karmele in person in Bogor. She commented: This award is dedicated to the whole team of IAR in Indonesia, a very dedicated team that has made it possible for us to be honoured in this way. It’s only thanks to this team that IAR has achieved this international recognition.”Jackie Bennett, Programme Director of GFAS in Africa and Asia, said: “Having known Karmele for several years and seen first-hand her incredible work and dedication, I cannot think of a more worthy recipient! Alan Knight, our Chief Executive, added: “It is no surprise to any of us that Karmele is being honoured with this award.Under her leadership, IAR’s team in Indonesia maintains the highest standards of dedication, professionalism and animal care.“We’re proud and delighted that she is sharing the award with someone as well respected as Patti Regan. Both recipients are in our opinion highly deserving of the honour being bestowed upon them.”[[{"fid":"15459","view_mode":"large","fields":{"format":"large","alignment":"right","field_caption[und][0][value]":""},"type":"media","field_deltas":{"1":{"format":"large","alignment":"right","field_caption[und][0][value]":""}},"link_text":null,"attributes":{"height":480,"width":320,"class":"media-element file-large media-wysiwyg-align-right","data-delta":"1"}}]]
Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 
We are set to benefit from a prestigious art exhibition being held in London for two weeks from 28 June.The ‘Endangered’ exhibition features a series of 15 powerful artworks by artist Dan Pearce highlighting precious wildlife species on the brink of extinction. Twenty per cent of the purchase price for each piece is being donated towards our life-saving work. For his latest exhibition, contemporary mixed media artist Pearce has set aside his iconic portraits to create a new wildlife series focusing on the beauty of animals whose existence is being challenged by mankind. Four of the pieces feature the closest relatives of humankind – majestic Apes – a decision which Dan hopes will alert people to how rapidly they are heading towards extinction. Both the Sumatran and Bornean orangutans feature in the series, with both now listed as ‘Critically Endangered’ as a result of hunting, killing and destruction of the rainforest to make way for palm oil plantations and other large-scale agriculture.[[{"fid":"15452","view_mode":"large","fields":{"format":"large","alignment":"right","field_caption[und][0][value]":""},"type":"media","field_deltas":{"1":{"format":"large","alignment":"right","field_caption[und][0][value]":""}},"link_text":null,"attributes":{"height":360,"width":480,"style":"width: 480px; height: 360px; float: right;","class":"media-element file-large media-wysiwyg-align-right","data-delta":"1"}}]]Our team in West Borneo is dedicated to the rescue, rehabilitation and reintroduction of orangutans into safe areas of forest and works with government bodies and local communities to protect precious orangutan habitat.The collection also features African Lions, Grevy’s Zebra, the Snow Leopard, Siberian Tiger, Asian Elephant, Giant Panda and ‘Sudan,’ the last of the Northern White Rhinos. Each of the originals will be sold for £1995.Dan’s iconic style using spray paint, aluminium and resin is evident in the series, staying true to his love of colour and mixed media. However, he has introduced the use of shattered glass and glass shards into the artwork to send out a strong message to echo the fragile future of these incredible animals.
Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 
Like many of the howler monkeys at our sanctuary, Daniela had become a victim of an uninsulated power cable after mistaking it for a tree branch.Witnesses told the Refuge For Wildlife rescue team that she had been thrown to the ground by a violent bolt of electricity and knocked unconscious. She is very lucky not to have been killed!Miraculously, after being taken to our sanctuary and examined by our on-site veterinarian, we could not find any visible injuries. No cuts, broken bones or burns.We tested her blood with a specialist blood machine and found nothing to be concerned about. She was a little dehydrated, so we put her on a drip and some anti-inflammatory pain medication to help deal with any discomfort.We observed Daniela for several weeks. She showed no further symptoms from the electrocution or fall to the ground, so we felt that the time was now right to return her to her rightful home in the beautiful Costa Rican rainforest.The release happened a couple of days ago in a heavily forested area next to a river. She will now be able to live the rest of her days in peace, away from humans and dangerous, uninsulated power cables.Thank you to everyone that has supported our howler monkey project so far! YOU are the reason why this is possible. Watch the release below: 
Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 
As part of our Great Bear Rescue campaign in Armenia, we recently freed five more bears from their miserable lives behind bars. The animals were part of a private zoo collection discovered during a raid on the home of a retired army General in Echmiadzin.The first phase of the rescue operation, which saw the removal of a tiger and two bears from their cages, was streamed live on our Facebook page, generating comments of support and thanks from people around the world.Even at first sight it was clear that the animals were in very poor condition, extremely underweight and with sparse, matted coats. Closer inspection under anaesthetic revealed that one bear in particular, at first thought to be a young cub because of its size, was in fact an adult whose growth had been stunted by years of malnourishment and neglect.[[{"fid":"15381","view_mode":"large","fields":{"format":"large","alignment":"right","field_caption[und][0][value]":""},"type":"media","field_deltas":{"1":{"format":"large","alignment":"right","field_caption[und][0][value]":""}},"link_text":null,"attributes":{"height":270,"width":480,"style":"width: 480px; height: 270px; float: right;border:none","class":"media-element file-large media-wysiwyg-align-right","data-delta":"1"}}]]The bears are now all safely in our care and being kept in quarantine while they are tested for contagious diseases. Their ailments are being treated and the bears are receiving a healthy diet and food supplements to build up their strength. The rescued tiger is under the expert care of the staff at Yerevan zoo.Alan Knight OBE, IAR CEO, said: “These poor animals led miserable lives behind bars purely for the idle entertainment of their captor and his friends. Thankfully now the tables have been turned and he is behind bars while the animals have been liberated! It will take considerable time for them to recover from the mistreatment and neglect they have endured - and we can’t tell at this stage whether they have suffered lasting physical or mental damage. With the help of FPWC, our partners on the ground in Armenia, we will do all we can to restore them to health and give them the chance to enjoy the lives they deserve, with the freedom to express natural behaviour and live as nature intended.”  
Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 
International Animal Rescue | Saving ani.. by Nicola@internationalanimalrescue.or.. - 1M ago
Budi is a very different orangutan to the one that arrived at our centre several years ago. He has grown up so fast and nowadays spends all of his time learning the skills he’ll need in the wild along with his friends in forest school.Budi loves to climb and forage for natural foods, in fact when the vets conduct their routine check-ups they often find him up the tallest tree! [[{"fid":"15351","view_mode":"large","fields":{"format":"large","alignment":"right","field_caption[und][0][value]":""},"type":"media","field_deltas":{"1":{"format":"large","alignment":"right","field_caption[und][0][value]":""}},"link_text":null,"attributes":{"height":480,"width":320,"style":"width: 320px; height: 480px; float: left;","class":"media-element file-large media-wysiwyg-align-right","data-delta":"1"}}]] Budi has started to show us that he’s well on his way to becoming an independent orangutan, however he still has a long way to go and a lot more things left to learn.In the wild, Budi would stay with his mother for up to seven years, learning all the skills necessary to live a life in the forest. We can’t ever replace his mother, but we will do our best to ensure he is given the best chance.   Watch the video below of Budi hanging out in the trees in forest school, showing his impressive climbing skills!     
Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 
At the end of May our team in Ketapang, West Borneo released three slow lorises in Gunung Tarak, a protected forest about five hours’ drive from our rehabilitation centre. They are called Lawu, Tara, and Tasya.Lawu is a sub-adult male slow loris rescued on 13 April 2017. He was from Temajuk in the north west of Borneo and sadly all his canine teeth had been clipped off. Our medical team performed dental surgery on his broken teeth which was very successful. Now Lawu is able to eat well and has reached his ideal weight.Tari is an adult female loris from Pontianak. She was bought from a trader and kept as a pet for a week before she was rescued and admitted to our centre on 18 June 2016. When Tari arrived she had a severe infection in the remnants of her clipped teeth and gums. She was also suffering from malnutrition and hair loss. Tari had to undergo three dental surgeries to repair the damage to her mouth. After the final surgery, she displayed good natural, wild behaviour and was identified as a suitable candidate for release.Tasya is also an adult female loris from Pontianak. She was still a baby when she was rescued on 9 July 2015. Even at her young age, Tasya had had her teeth clipped and had to undergo two sessions of dental surgery to repair the damage she had suffered.[[{"fid":"15256","view_mode":"large","fields":{"format":"large","alignment":"","field_caption[und][0][value]":""},"type":"media","field_deltas":{"1":{"format":"large","alignment":"","field_caption[und][0][value]":""}},"link_text":null,"attributes":{"height":320,"width":480,"style":"font-size: 13.008px; float: right; width: 350px; height: 233px;","class":"media-element file-large","data-delta":"1"}}]]The three slow lorises were released into the habituation enclosure inside Gunung Tarak on 20 May and will be kept under observation for a month by our loris monitoring team before they are given complete freedom of the forest.Alan Knight OBE, IAR’s Chief Executive, said: “We’re thrilled to see these three lorises returning to their rightful home in the rainforest. Our team in Ketapang has done a fantastic job of treating their wounds and caring for them.  The rehabilitation of these extraordinary primates is often lengthy and complex but absolutely worth it in order to conserve as many of these endangered primates as we possibly can.”[[{"fid":"15271","view_mode":"large","fields":{"format":"large","alignment":"","field_caption[und][0][value]":""},"type":"media","field_deltas":{"3":{"format":"large","alignment":"","field_caption[und][0][value]":""}},"link_text":null,"attributes":{"height":320,"width":480,"style":"font-size: 13.008px; float: right; height: 200px; width: 300px;","class":"media-element file-large","data-delta":"3"}}]][[{"fid":"15261","view_mode":"large","fields":{"format":"large","alignment":"","field_caption[und][0][value]":""},"type":"media","field_deltas":{"2":{"format":"large","alignment":"","field_caption[und][0][value]":""}},"link_text":null,"attributes":{"height":320,"width":480,"style":"font-size: 13.008px; float: left; width: 300px; height: 200px;","class":"media-element file-large","data-delta":"2"}}]]  
Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 
We have applauded the Quick Reaction Forest Police Unit (SPORC) in West Borneo for arresting two poachers trading in pangolin scales (Manis javanica) The pair, initials PD, 25 years old and JN, 27 years old, caught red-handed in Nanga Pinoh, Melawi district, West Borneo on 22 May 2018. The successful undercover operation resulted in the confiscation of 9.45 kilograms of pangolin scales. Both men were apprehended in a local restaurant in Nanga Pinoh while they were waiting for their buyer to arrive. SPORC had received information about the time and place of the deal from a member of the local community. The person suspected of being the buyer, initials BD, is still on the run and SPORC believe that BD is part of a pangolin trading syndicate in West Borneo which is targeting international markets in Asia such as Vietnam and China.[[{"fid":"15171","view_mode":"large","fields":{"format":"large","alignment":"left","field_caption[und][0][value]":""},"type":"media","field_deltas":{"1":{"format":"large","alignment":"left","field_caption[und][0][value]":""}},"link_text":null,"attributes":{"height":320,"width":480,"style":"width: 480px; height: 320px; float: right;","class":"media-element file-large media-wysiwyg-align-left","data-delta":"1"}}]]According to Section Head of Law Enforcement Department Region III West Kalimantan David Muhammad, the two poachers confessed to obtaining the pangolin scales by hunting in the forest near their village in Seruyan Hulu, Central Borneo. They admitted that for the past three years they had been hunting pangolins in the forest at night. They would ride motorbikes and use hunting dogs to track them down and catch them.PD and JN captured and killed the pangolins for both meat and scales. They kept the meat for their own consumption and the scales were for trading. They were intending to sell the scales for IDR 3,2 million (USD $228, £171) per kilogram.Based on the evidence, both men were detained in Prison House Class 2A in Pontianak, West Borneo for hunting, keeping, exploiting and trading in pangolins. They had both violated Section 5 of the 1990 Law on Conservation of Natural Resources and Ecosystems. Article 21 Paragraph (2) letter D. Article 40 paragraph (2) states that hunting, keeping, exploiting and trading pangolins carries a sentence of five years in prison and IDR 100 million maximum fine (USD 7147).[[{"fid":"15176","view_mode":"large","fields":{"format":"large","alignment":"left","field_caption[und][0][value]":""},"type":"media","field_deltas":{"2":{"format":"large","alignment":"left","field_caption[und][0][value]":""}},"link_text":null,"attributes":{"height":320,"width":480,"style":"width: 480px; height: 320px; float: right;","class":"media-element file-large media-wysiwyg-align-left","data-delta":"2"}}]]Based on undercover police investigations in the field, it is believed that the poaching was part of a crime syndicate which stretched from sub-district hunters to district and regional dealers, all the way to international dealers who export the animal products to Asian countries such as Vietnam and China.David Muhammad, Section Head of Law Enforcement Department Region III West Kalimantan, said: “We will [investigate] deep into this crime web to search for other trading networks. They are collecting about 8-9 kilograms of scales per week and dozens of kilograms every month to supply a district dealer.”[[{"fid":"15181","view_mode":"large","fields":{"format":"large","alignment":"left","field_caption[und][0][value]":""},"type":"media","field_deltas":{"3":{"format":"large","alignment":"left","field_caption[und][0][value]":""}},"link_text":null,"attributes":{"height":320,"width":480,"style":"width: 430px; height: 287px; float: left;","class":"media-element file-large media-wysiwyg-align-left","data-delta":"3"}}]]Karmele Llano Sanchez, our Programme Director in Indonesia, said: “We applaud the police on the arrest of these two individuals. The illegal trade in pangolins is both extremely cruel and responsible for decimating numbers in the wild. The illegal wildlife trade is pushing entire species to the brink of extinction.The trade is motivated by the greed of people who seek to keep, eat and exploit wild animals and their products. We simply can’t allow this to happen. It’s up to all of us to stop the trade in wildlife before we erase all these beautiful animals from the face of the earth. Moreover, this trade is not only putting animals at risk, it also presents a threat to human health, with many zoonotic diseases originating from habits related to wildlife consumption and trade.”Adam Miller, Executive Director, Planet Indonesia-USA, said: “The sheer size and volume of the pangolin trade is nothing but a global tragedy. Organised crime groups adapt quickly to exploit shortcomings in law enforcement agencies and capitalise on government corruption. Pangolins represent yet another species pushed to the edge of extinction as a result of the human thirst for wildlife products. It will take a global effort of stakeholders from local communities to top-level government agencies to save this amazing species from extinction.”  PHOTO CREDIT - SPORC: The Quick Reaction Forest Police Unit (SPORC) Brigade Bekantan of the Law Enforcement Department of the Ministry of Environment and Forestry Region III West Kalimantan (Gakkum KLHK).
Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 
For the first time in Armenia, two rescued bears have been released back into the forests where they belong. The two young Syrian brown bears – female Bambak and brother Zangak - were orphaned last year when their mother was shot by a hunter. They were taken into the care of a wildlife rescue centre run by IAR and local group FPWC (Foundation for the Preservation of Wildlife.)For the past year the bears have been kept in seclusion with very little human contact, enabling them to grow up in a semi-wild state and develop all the natural behaviours they need to survive in the wild.With winter at an end and a plentiful supply of food available for the bears in the forest, plans were put in place to release the pair. A special GPS collar was made in the UK and fitted around Bambak’s neck so that the bears’ movements can be tracked during their first months of freedom. After six months the collar will unlock and fall off.In preparation for their release, both bears were given a final thorough medical check-up and pronounced fit and healthy by the veterinary team. One by one they were sedated, settled into two large transport crates and lifted onto a large truck for the journey up into the mountains.[[{"fid":"15036","view_mode":"large","fields":{"format":"large","alignment":"","field_caption[und][0][value]":""},"type":"media","field_deltas":{"1":{"format":"large","alignment":"","field_caption[und][0][value]":""}},"link_text":null,"attributes":{"height":320,"width":480,"style":"font-size: 13.008px; float: right; width: 480px; height: 320px;border:none","class":"media-element file-large","data-delta":"1"}}]]Said Alan Knight, IAR chief executive: “Our convoy of vehicles climbed higher and higher up into the hills and then finally reached a lush water meadow covered in buttercups. To left and right were lakes full of fish and frogs and ahead was dense forest. I can’t think of a better or more beautiful place for the bears to enjoy their first taste of freedom.“After a very sad start in life, Bambak and Zangak have been given a second chance to live as nature intended. Thanks to the radio collar, we can keep track of their whereabouts and check that they are safe and well.”When the two crates were opened, both bears sprang out into the meadow, standing on their hindlegs and surveying their new surroundings almost in disbelief.[[{"fid":"15046","view_mode":"large","fields":{"format":"large","alignment":"left","field_caption[und][0][value]":""},"type":"media","field_deltas":{"2":{"format":"large","alignment":"left","field_caption[und][0][value]":""}},"link_text":null,"attributes":{"height":320,"width":480,"style":"float: left; border: none; width: 480px; height: 320px;border:none","class":"media-element file-large media-wysiwyg-align-left","data-delta":"2"}}]]“We were all close to tears at the sight of those two beautiful bears sniffing the mountain air and savouring their new-found freedom,” Knight observed. “It was a proud moment to see Bambak and Zangak back in the wild and know that it was all thanks to the efforts of International Animal Rescue, FPWC and everyone who supports us and makes our work possible.“It was a very moving moment,” added Ruben Khachatryan, Founder and CEO of FPWC. “During the months since we rescued them we have watched those two tiny cubs grow into handsome young bears.  Their release is the culmination of months of treatment and care by our team to restore them to health and prepare them for their return to freedom. Now the day has finally arrived and we are like proud parents waving our children off into the big wide world!”Since releasing the bears, our team have been able to locate them via the radio collar and confirmed that they have moved deeper into the vast forest which it is hoped will be their home for many years to come.
Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 
A rescued bear in Armenia that spent years behind bars on the bank of a river, has given birth to two healthy cubs in the rescue centre where she is undergoing rehabilitation.Brown bears Dasha and mate Misha were kept in a cramped cage half-submerged in water by a riverside restaurant in Hrazdan Gorge in Yerevan. The bears were used as a tourist attraction and spent their days pacing to and fro in boredom and frustration or climbing up the bars of the cage in a desperate attempt to escape from their iron prison.[[{"fid":"15011","view_mode":"large","fields":{"format":"large","alignment":"right","field_caption[und][0][value]":""},"type":"media","field_deltas":{"1":{"format":"large","alignment":"right","field_caption[und][0][value]":""}},"link_text":null,"attributes":{"height":320,"width":480,"style":"float: right; width: 480px; height: 320px;border:none","class":"media-element file-large media-wysiwyg-align-right","data-delta":"1"}}]]Then, after more than ten years in captivity, last November the two bears’ misery came to an end. We joined forces with Armenian group FPWC (Foundation for the Preservation of Wildlife) to mount a rescue mission and cut Dasha and Misha free. The operation was carried out with the support of the Armenian government and the emergency rescue services who cut through the iron bars with an angle grinder.The two bears were taken to our wildlife rescue centre high in the mountains outside Yerevan. Here they were put in quarantine and given a series of health checks. They were also put on a nutritious diet and vitamin supplements to improve their condition after being fed for years on leftovers from the restaurant and scraps thrown to them by passers-by.[[{"fid":"15016","view_mode":"large","fields":{"format":"large","alignment":"left","field_caption[und][0][value]":""},"type":"media","field_deltas":{"2":{"format":"large","alignment":"left","field_caption[und][0][value]":""}},"link_text":null,"attributes":{"height":320,"width":480,"style":"float: left;border:none","class":"media-element file-large media-wysiwyg-align-left","data-delta":"2"}}]]Now, seven months later, Dasha is proud mother to two beautiful cubs. She has been moved into a separate enclosure where she has the peace and quiet to care for her new arrivals and is already proving to be a natural mother.Alan Knight, our CEO, said: “The vets have confirmed that both mother and babies are fit and healthy, in spite of the stress Dasha must have suffered when she was rescued and the long dark years she spent in captivity.“I’m delighted that her cubs have been born into such a new, natural environment, rather than starting life behind bars. These two cubs will have everything they need to grow healthy and strong and we hope one day all three will have the chance to return to the wild where they belong.“Dasha and Misha were the first bears to be rescued after we launched our Great Bear Rescue campaign which aims to rescue up to 80 caged bears in Armenia. The birth of these cubs is such fitting testimony to the success of the project which is ending the misery of bears all across Armenia and giving them the lives and the freedom they deserve.”
Read Full Article

Read for later

Articles marked as Favorite are saved for later viewing.
close
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Separate tags by commas
To access this feature, please upgrade your account.
Start your free month
Free Preview