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IEAA is now taking expressions of interest for the role of Pathways Network Convener.

The Convener's role is to help shape the direction of the Pathways Network and play a key role in the development of IEAA's professional development program, including annual forums and workshops/sessions at the Australian International Education Conference (AIEC). The Convener also encourages information sharing and networking among the Network members.

Network leadership positions are a great way to give back to the sector and enhance your own leadership skills.​

This position is for the term ending October 2020. To submit your interest, send a bio and short statement (max 200 words) to Emily O'Callaghan by COB Thursday 25 July. The successful candidate will be announced at the IEAA Pathways Network Forum on Friday 26 July 2019.

Submit your expression of interest.

Special thanks to Ruby Biscuit

IEAA would like to take this opportunity to thank outgoing network convener, Ruby Biscuit, who has stepped down from the position.

In her short time in the role, Ruby undertook a number of initiatives for the group and we thank her for her time, knowledge and contribution.

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From 1 September 2019, the Department of Home Affairs intends to include onshore refusals in the Evidence Level (EL) reports of education providers.


To date, only offshore refusals are used to calculate ELs.
 
This change is one of the recommendations from the appraisal of the Simplified Student Visa Framework (SSVF) conducted in 2018:

  • Recommendation 2(a)
    That the Department, in consultation with the Education Visa Consultative Committee (EVCC), include onshore refusals in the risk rating methodology to encourage education providers to focus on the recruitment of genuine students onshore.

For the September update, a provider’s EL will be determined by using data in the current model (i.e. offshore only) for the first six months (July to December 2018), then for the second six months (January to June 2019) using data for the new model, which will include onshore decisions, including refusals.
 
For the March 2020 update, onshore and offshore data will be used for all 12 months.
 
The Department of Home Affairs will advise as soon as education providers are able to access their new reports. The methodology used to calculate country EL will not change.
 
A fact sheet from Home Affairs with more information will be available shortly.

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Know someone who's made an impact in international education? Been involved in a ground-breaking or innovative project? Now's the time to get your nominations in for the IEAA Excellence Awards 2019.

IEAA's Excellence Awards recognise the outstanding contributions by individuals and teams to international education in Australia. They also provide a benchmark of excellence and best practice for the entire sector.

Award categories include:

  • Distinguished Contribution
  • Excellence in Leadership
  • Best Practice
  • Innovation
  • Professional Commentary
  • Outstanding Postgraduate Thesis.

IEAA Excellence Awards 2018: Meet the winners - YouTube

Need a little inspiration? Meet the winners from last year's awards.


Nominations are open to all, but must be submitted by an IEAA member. Get your nominations in by Sunday 7 July 2019. Winners will be announced at the Australian International Education Conference (AIEC) in October.

Get your nomination started.

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IEAA has launched a new initiative to showcase the benefits of international students to employers and the broader Australian community.
 


International students account for around 1 in 50 people in Australia and they have a tremendous impact on the communities in which they live, study and work. They also make an enormous contribution to Australia’s social, cultural and economic prosperity.

IEAA is therefore pleased to launch a new project that celebrates international students in Australia and highlights their importance to employers and the wider Australian community.

“This project builds on earlier research commissioned by IEAA which concluded that while the sector itself understands the benefits of international education, we need to move beyond preaching to the converted,” said Phil Honeywood, IEAA CEO.

Bijay Sapkota, President of the Council of International Students Australia (CISA), noted that “the benefits of tourism as a sector is well understood by the general population. Unfortunately, we can’t always say the same about international education. There is a general lack of awareness among the community and negative media commentary is a regular occurrence. We need to counter that and share the positive impact that international students have on Australia.”

Through targeted engagement with industry and local community organisations, the project aims to:

  • Increase awareness and understanding of the social, cultural and economic benefits of international education
  • Encourage better engagement between industry, international education sector stakeholders and the wider community.
  • Provide a central resource for the international education sector to use when communicating the benefits of the sector.

Funded by a Department of Education and Training Enabling Growth and Innovation (EGI) grant, the website includes whitepapers, videos, infographs and insight articles that highlight the project’s key messages. IEAA is also running a targeted LinkedIn campaign over the next five weeks aimed at employers and the general community.

Share and share alike

We encourage you to share the site and its resources via your social media channels. Be sure to use the #broadenourhorizons hashtag.

Show your organisation’s support

Do you believe that international students broaden Australia’s horizons? We encourage organisations to submit their logo to be featured on the website's supporter's page.

www.broadenourhorizons.com.au

Media contact

Phil Honeywood
0409 964 363

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Two of Australia’s peak international education bodies have slammed the ABC’s latest Four Corners program, saying it flies in the face of the ABC’s charter to provide balanced coverage and fails to highlight the positive impact of international students to Australia’s social, cultural and economic prosperity.


“Each time the Four Corners producers focus on Australia’s international education sector they seem intent on finding as many negative angles as possible. Any media outlet can string together a group of disaffected academics, students and even education agents. The fact that the program’s producers and reporters continually choose to ignore the incredibly positive outcomes that Australia is achieving with our 450,000 overseas students is cause for real concern,” said the CEO of the International Education Association of Australia (IEAA), Phil Honeywood.

“The English language academic entry requirements were the focus of a particular attack from Four Corners on this occasion. However, no mention was made that only 18 months ago Australia significantly toughened up its English language entry standards. This included direct entry pathway agreements which are now subject to stricter controls by the national regulator. These regulations are now regarded as some of the most stringent in the world,” said CEO of English Australia, Brett Blacker.

“Quite apart from stricter macro regulatory settings, most education providers have proactively raised their own English entry requirements. Many have initiated programs, from informal social events to formal support to provide concurrent language proficiency with the main course of study,” argued Mr Blacker.

Rather than our education system’s quality declining because of international students, Australia has continued to improve, comparative to our main study destination competitors, in international ranking systems.

“Rather than our education system’s quality declining because of international students, Australia has continued to improve, comparative to our main study destination competitors, in international ranking systems. Whether it be the percentage of our universities in the top 500, increasingly high rates of student satisfaction or course completion rates, both our domestic and international students have benefited from these system wide improvements,” Mr Honeywood maintained.

“On every occasion that Four Corners launches another attack on our sector – which now employs more than 240,000 people and brings in $34.9 billion per annum in export earnings for the benefit of all Australians – they restrict any positive commentary to just one spokesperson. With this latest program, the Chair of Universities Australia, Professor Margaret Gardner, provided an extensive interview which the producers chose to make significant and detrimental cuts to in the editing room. Given that no reporter from the program has ever bothered to reach out for any background information or balanced commentary from our two representative national associations, we can only wonder about the motivations behind this ongoing negative campaign,” concluded Mr Honeywood and Mr Blacker.

On a related note, IEAA launches today a new project showcasing the benefits of international education to the broader Australia community. For more information, visit www.broadenourhorizons.com.au

Media contact

Phil Honeywood: 0409 964 363
Brett Blacker 0470 406 595

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Are you looking for better data on market size and key trends in pathways? If your institution is interested in contributing to a potential research project that aims to generate more reliable and transparent pathways data, keep reading below.

At several of our networking events in 2018, IEAA Pathways Network members expressed a need for clear Pathway-specific data they could trust; data that can be used internally and externally for sector-specific reporting and stakeholder influence. Members felt that better access to more transparent data would help to demonstrate the Australian pathway sector’s student volume and revenue contributions to the broader Australian sector and partner universities.

In early 2019, the IEAA Pathways Network began a discussion with Phillip Allen from UTS:INSEARCH who has a particular passion for this work and has begun exploring how this research might be conducted. The IEAA Pathways Network team supports the idea of developing Phillip Allen’s initial exploration into an independent, de-identified research project.

The project would aim to address four key sector challenges:

  1. Aggregate data available on pathways is both insufficiently granular and potentially inaccurate, leading to a number of challenges, including inefficiencies for institutions in managing strategy and performance and inaccurate understanding of the number of international students. 

  2. Higher education enrolment and intake data may have double counting, exaggerating growth rates and potentially resulting in universities missing the emerging trends.

  3. There are, due to a lack of collective data sources, few standardised reporting metrics among universities and insufficient collective understanding of the pathways market.

  4. There is insufficient profile and recognition for the pathways sector as a contributor to the Australian economy and to the higher education sector.

In discussions with both Phillip Allen and the IEAA Research team, we believe that if there is sufficient interest from the Pathways sector we could undertake a collective research project. Engaging in a jointly-funded, independent study (with support from IEAA), would provide an opportunity for collaboration and effective joint action that addresses the above issues.

To progress this idea to the next stage, we are looking to ascertain interest from pathway providers in jointly contributing to the project.

Project outcomes

The outcomes of the overall project would be to:

  • Identify likely inaccuracies and insufficiency of the existing data on pathways and higher education

  • Provide a view of actual trends if these inaccuracies were corrected

  • Share these findings in a public-facing report to capture both the study findings and the importance of the pathways sector for the wider economy and higher education sector.

For participating institutions who contribute financially, the institution specific outcomes would be potentially:

  • Analysis of institution specific market share for key products and markets

  • Report or presentation about the results, potentially how country of origin and other demographic characteristics have changed for pathway students.

How can your institution participate?

To progress this idea to the next stage, we are looking to ascertain interest from pathway providers in jointly contributing to the project.

Based on some initial exploratory quotes, we estimate that the cost per provider could be between $7,500–$10,000 if we get 10 interested parties. Of course, if we could secure a higher volume of interested parties and/or secure a more inexpensive quote this cost would come down.

As this piece of work could reframe significant assumptions about international education volumes, this report could draw significant public visibility to the Pathways sector and its contribution to the sector, as well as result in more reliable and transparent national data for all.

We would like to know if your centre is prepared to commit to an expression of interest in participating in this project. This EOI would require no formal commitment at this stage, but would enable us to take the project to the next stage of sourcing vendor quotes and securing further external funding commitments.


It would be appreciated if you could let us know your centre’s interest (including min/max financial investment) by Friday 10 May. Please email your responses to Emily O’Callaghan, IEAA General Manager via the link below:

Submit an expression of interest.

Ruby Biscuit,
Convener, IEAA Pathways Network

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The call for papers to present at IEAA's upcoming Transnational Education, Teaching and Learning and Learning Abroad events is now open!

Presenting a session is a great way to share your insights and enhance your profile across the sector. If you have any ideas and insights to share on any of the themes below, we encourage you to submit a proposal.

Transnational Education (1-2 August, Melbourne)

Suggested topics include:

  • Updates and case studies on emerging markets
    (e.g. Nepal, Sri Lanka, Myanmar, Africa)

  • Impact of major geopolitical events on TNE
    (e.g. Brexit, US-China relations)

  • Microcredentials, online and blended learning in TNE

  • Student service delivery in TNE

  • TNE marketing and recruitment and more.

    Submissions close Sunday 28 April 2019.

Teaching and Learning (9 August, Melbourne)

Suggested topics include:

  • Teaching approaches for interactive, on-site, immersive-experiential learning in cross-cultural settings

  • New technologies and curricula re-shaping the way we teach

  • Inclusive, team-based and self-determining programs of learning

  • Creative, critical and policy-focused learning program

  • Pedagogies for multi-lingual situations.

    Submissions close Tuesday 30 April 2019.

Learning Abroad (15-16 August, Sydney)

Suggested topics include:

  • Building best practice and process improvement

  • Collaborating with academic staff and curriculum mapping

  • Targets, data collection and analysis

  • Effectively engaging stakeholders.

    Submissions close Sunday 5 May 2019.

Successful submissions will be eligible for a reduced speaker rate to attend the event. Flights and accommodation not included.

Get your submission started for Transnational Education

Get your submission started for Teaching and Learning

Get your submission started for Learning Abroad

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What impact does learning abroad have on career outcomes? Does it vary depending on program duration and type? And how do these impacts compare to students who haven’t participated in learning abroad?

In line with the current focus on graduate employability, this study will examine the career outcomes of learning abroad. Australian universities are now invited to participate in this leading study via direct communication with their alumni networks.

Research questions
  1. What is the perceived impact of learning abroad on skill development, job attainment and career prospects of participants?
  2. Do perceived impacts vary depending on program duration and program type?
  3. Compared to a group of graduates who didn’t participate in learning abroad, can differences be identified in terms of job attainment and career prospects?
Why this study is critical right now?

With a possible change of government, policies for federal grant funding for learning abroad are being examined. Evidence to advocate for continued funding is thin and we currently have very little outcomes data to support short-term learning abroad or international internships. Your participation in this study will contribute towards national advocacy around learning abroad policy and funding, as well as support state-based and institutional efforts.

Target participants

Graduates of an Australian universities who participated in learning abroad programs.

Invitation to participate

Australian universities are invited to participate in the project by contacting alumni through direct communication and alumni networks.

Find out more about participating in the research.

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Reducing time lags, enhancing accessibility and improved student outcomes data are among the key findings of IEAA’s recently released report on ‘International Education Data Gaps’.


IEAA undertook a comprehensive analysis of existing international education data, as well as identifying any data gaps or areas for improvement. The consultation process engaged almost 200 stakeholders between October 2017 and April 2018.

This included an online survey, as well as face-to-face focus groups where providers shared their experiences with using existing data sets, discussed opportunities for improvement and identified critical data gaps.

The report makes the following three recommendations to government:

  • Recommendation 1: Improve awareness and accessibility of data
  • Recommendation 2: Expand data sets where critical gaps or insufficiencies exist
  • Recommendation 3: Increase support for interpretation of existing data

From a provider perspective, improvements in these areas will have significant impact on policy, evaluation and quality assurance.

Click below to download the full report and read about key actions to date.

Download the full report.

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AIEC is calling for proposals to be submitted for the 33rd Australian International Education Conference to be held in Perth, Australia, on 15–18 October 2019.

If you have a unique idea for a presentation, panel, café or lightning session and want to be part of the conversation at this year’s conference, make sure you submit a proposal to present at AIEC 2019.

Call for proposals ends 1 March 2019. Submission guidelines, review and selection criteria and other important information can be found via the link below.

We look forward to receiving your proposals.

Find out more and submit your proposal.

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