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Ideabook.com by Chuck Green - 2d ago

I originally pointed you to Arthur Mount’s illustrations back in 2006 when his work was primarily vector illustration. In refreshing the links I find that, in addition to his signature line drawings, he continues to explore other areas.

What caught my eye, in particular, was his series of portraits of Major League Baseball players, including the one of Khris Davis of the Oakland A’s above. The image is a simple GIF animation of three separate illustrations. I don’t recall having see this exact effect before but it does command your attention.

Portraits…

Instructive…

Architectural…

Spot illustrations…

Arthur Mount on Instagram…

And his Twitter feed…

Image: Copyright Arthur Mount 2018, www.arthurmount.com

Posted in MAY 2019 / Chuck Green is the principal of Logic Arts, a design and marketing firm, a contributor to numerous magazines and websites, and the author of books published by Random House, Peachpit Press, and Rockport Publishers. Contact.

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I love type and these are some of my favorite typography-related resources for graphic designers, marketers, and other creatives.

Check back occasionally, the list is always being added to and updated. And when you have some time, try clicking through link-by-link—there are some real treasures here—some that might not jump out at you at first blush—people, products, tools, organizations, and so on, that will help you dig deeper into an area of interest. In addition to Typography, there are six other lists: Illustration, Marketing/PR, Photography, Print Design, Reference, and Web Design.

Most of the links are resources I use personally and/or discuss in posts here on ideabook.com (no one pays for links except for the obvious ads). Want to suggest a relevant link or a change? Use “Thoughts?” at the bottom of the page. If you find the list useful, I hope you’ll point others to it.

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The illustration shows a screen capture of the animated homepage of Mark van Bronkhorst’s TypoBrand website.

Enjoy!

The post Chuck Green’s curated list of Typography resources appeared first on Ideabook.com.

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In 2008, I pointed you to the website of publisher Scott & Nix, Inc. and their pick of “100 Typographic Books”.

Charles Nix, who curated the list, described it like this: “One hundred books about typography might seem like a lot, but actually, it just scratches the surface. Consider this a start. Below are a selection of the typographic books on our shelves…”

Sadly, the list is gone. Scott & Nix is still alive and kicking but Charles Nix, when he moved on to become the Type Director at Monotype, shared the list on the website of the Type Directors Club but, alas, that too is gone to the great internet archive in the sky (and the Internet Archive).

After sharing a few emails with Mr. Nix, he has graciously allowed me to reprise the list. All 100 books are listed with the addition of three sub-category designations Charles invented narrow the offerings for those who don’t aspire to hunt them all down: [must see], [should see], and [see also] (you’ll find them at the end of the titles they apply to). My contribution has been to add some further details about the books and links to resources related to them.

It makes for a very long list, but it’s all text so it isn’t taxing on your device or difficult to navigate. But then I’m a linear kind of guy.

Enjoy!

Illustration: A specimen sheet of typefaces and languages, by William Caslon I, letter founder; dated 1734.

About Charles Nix

Charles Nix is a typographer, educator, and designer—a type director for Monotype and chairman emeritus of the board of the Type Directors Club, an educator at Parsons School of Design in New York, and formally co-owner of Scott & Nix, highly respected small publisher.

More…

From Monotype: Charles Nix loves you. When he’s not with you, his heart aches—and so, he makes typefaces…

Charles Nix typeface designs…

Twitter feed…

Instagram feed…

Listed alphabetically by title.

20th Century Type Designers

by Sebastian Carter

1995, W. W. Norton & Company, 192 pages

From the publisher: “This new edition of the text first published in 1987 includes an examination of the latest technological developments in the design and composition of type, and introduces the work of some of the more recent designers to have made their mark this century.

Although the skeleton shapes of the letters of our alphabet hardly change, many skilled type designers have devoted much time, sometimes their whole lives, to drawing different versions of the outlines. This book serves as an introduction to the concept of typefaces and to some of the personalities who have created them—oudy, Rogers, Koch, Gill, Morison, Van Krimpen, Trump, Tschichold, Frutiger, and Zapf—and places them in the context of the enormous changes that have occurred the 20th century in the methods of creating and setting type.”

Sebastian Carter’s Rampant Lions Press…

From Amazon…

Will Carter typeface designs (father of the author)…

The ABC’s of Triangle, Square, Circle: The Bauhaus and Design Theory

by Ellen Lupton

2000, Princeton Architectural Press, 64 pages

From the publisher: “The Bauhaus, the legendary school in Dessau, Germany, transformed architecture and design around the world. This book broke new ground when first published in 1991 by introducing psychoanalysis, geometry, early childhood education, and popular culture into the standard political history of the Bauhaus. The ABC’s of Triangle, Square, Circle also introduced two young designers, Ellen Lupton and J. Abbott Miller, whose multidisciplinary approach changed the field of design writing and research.”

From Amazon…

ABC of Lettering and Printing Typefaces: A Complete Guide to the Letters and Typefaces Used for Typesetting and Printing [see also]

by Erik Lindgren

1982, Crown Publishing, 348 pages

From Amazon…

American Wood Type, 1828–1900 [see also]

by Rob Roy Kelly

2016, Liber Apertus Press, 352 pages

From the publisher: “The first and most authoritative history of wood type in the United States is now reissued in paperback. This book tells the complete story of wood type, beginning with the history of wood as a printing material, the development of decorated letters and large letters, and the invention of machinery for mass-producing wood letters. The 19th-century heyday of wood type is explored in great detail, including all aspects of design, manufacture, and marketing, and the evolution of styles. Many related trades interacted with wood type production; the book examines the influence of lithography, letterpress, metal-plate and wood engraving, sign painting and calligraphy, poster printing, and type-founding.

Long out of print, the book is still regarded by scholars and designers as an invaluable resource for a rich legacy of typographic art. More than 600 specimens of wood type are classified and annotated, as are more than 100 specimens of complete fonts. This reissue includes a new foreword by David Shields, Design Curator of the Rob Roy Kelly Wood Type Collection at the University of Texas at Austin, discussing the renewed interest in the subject since the mid-1990s as well as ongoing research into the history of wood type.”

Rob Roy Kelly Bio…

On Facebook: Rob Roy Kelly American Wood Type Collection…

From Amazon…

Anatomy of a Typeface

by Alexander S. Lawson

2010, David R Godine, reprint edition, 432 pages

From the publisher: “To the layman, all printing types look the same. But for typographers, graphic artists and others of that lunatic fringe who believe that the letters we look at daily (and take entirely for granted) are of profound importance, the question of how letters are formed, what shape they assume, and how they have evolved remains one of passionate and continuing concern.

Lawson explores the vast territory of types, their development and uses, their antecedents and offspring, with precision, insight, and clarity. Written for the layman but containing exhaustive research, drawings and synopses of typefaces, this book is an essential addition to the library of anyone s typographic library. It is, as Lawson states, not written for the printer convinced that there are already too many typefaces, but rather for that curious part of the population that believes the opposite; that the subtleties of refinement as applies to roman and cursive letters have yet to be fully investigated and that the production of the perfect typeface remains a goal to be as much desired by present as by future type designers. Anyone aspiring to typographic wisdom should own and treasure this classic.”

Alexander S. Lawson Bio…

From Amazon…

An Approach to Type

by John R. Biggstype direct

1952, Pellegrini & Cudahy, 152 pages

From the publisher: “A type specimen book that also introduces the reader to the study of type. With sections on size, legibility, classification, rules, and paper.”

From Amazon…

An Essay on Typography [should see]

by Eric Gill

2015, David R Godine, reprint edition, 138 pages

From the publisher: “Born in 1882, Gill was an artist, letter carver, gadfly, polemicist, and social reformer. In 1925, he had started drawing alphabets and printing books, and in 1931, this plainspoken little book was a fustian and forceful argument for common sense in design, composed for anyone remotely interested in the subtle and evolving challenge of the typographic arts. Set rag right, with tight word spacing, it is a model of composition. The text, like most of Gill’s, is exasperating, exorbitant, and exciting. But Gill was, above all, a craftsman, whose work always reflected his philosophy and whose hand always followed his moral convictions.”

Eric Gill profile…

From Amazon…

Eric Gill typeface designs…

Arabic Typography

by Huda Smitshuijzen Abifares

2000, Saqi Books, 242 pages

From the publisher: “In the twenty-first century, the widespread integration of computer technologies has brought text-based information into many facets of everyday life. This has caused an ever-growing interest in typography across many fields of visual communication, where text and letterform play a central role in disseminating social trends and reflecting the spirit of the times.

Arabic Typography takes the reader through a comprehensive study of Arabic letterforms, starting with a concise historical overview of their development and styles, and proceeding to the latest design and technological advances. It attempts to establish the foundations for Arabic type-design by drawing lessons from past practices and aesthetic conventions, in order to retain the enduring traits that are of relevance for improvement and innovation in future type-design creations.

Going beyond the historical facts to discuss current design issues pertaining to the creation and production of letterforms, it presents Arabic typographic design as an essential communication tool that should marry functionality and legibility to aesthetic delight.

This book will serve as a valuable reference on Arabic typography, and as an educational guide for design students, professionals and anyone who uses Arabic type and enjoys the visual appearance of this language and its letterforms.”

From the author: Arabic Typography and the Shaping of a Modern Design Culture…

From Amazon…

The Art of Graphic Design [see also]

by Bradbury Thompson

2018, Yale University Press, 248 pages (first printing 1988)

From the publisher: “Bradbury Thompson (1911–1995) remains one of the most admired and influential graphic designers of the twentieth century, having trained a generation of design students while on the faculty of the Yale School of Art for more than thirty years. The art director of Mademoiselle and design director of Art News and Art News Annual in the decades after World War II, Thompson was also a distinguished designer of limited-edition books, postage stamps, rationalized alphabets, corporate identification programs, trademarks, and sacred works (most notably the Washburn College Bible). Thompson also designed more than sixty issues of Westvaco Inspirations, a magazine that was published by the Westvaco Corporation and distributed to thousands of printers, designers, and teachers to show the range and versatility of printing papers. Thompson was especially revered for his ability to adapt classic typography for the modern world.”

Bradbury Thompson Bio…

From Wikipedia: Bradbury Thompson…

From Amazon…

Art of the Printed Book, 1455–1955

by Joseph Blumenthal

1979, David R Godine Publishing, 92 pages

From the interior cover flap (front): “Masterpieces of Typography Through Five Centuries from the Collections of the Pierpont Morgan Library, New York. This handsome, fully illustrated, meticulously produced volume fills a long-standing gap in the history of books concerned with distinguished typography and bookmaking. Neither a print manual nor a technical treatise, it was written by an accomplished designer and printer and presents concisely and consecutively, the history and romance of the greatly printed books. It includes descriptions of the lives of the great printers Gutenberg, de Tournes, Baskerville, Aldus, etc., and presents the historical backgrounds under which their noble folios were made. Lehman and amateurs of the book will read it with pleasure; professionals involved in bookmaking, including designers, printers, publishers, librarians, and booksellers, will find it a useful and authoritative addition to the literature.

Art of the Printed Book was written by Joseph Blumenthal, a practitioner whose Spiral Press set a long acknowledged standard in the small company of fine printers in the United States and Europe. It is, in one sense, a personal selection, dependent on Mr. Blumenthal‘s exacting aesthetic standards and, and another, testament to the discrimination and collections of that preeminent repository of typography, the Morgan Library. The 112 books selected and reproduced, from the Gutenberg Bible to the twentieth-century words of Rogers, Gill, Updike, Meynell, and Mardersteig, are among the finest copies known and, as would be expected from the Morgan library and Mr. Blumenthal, no effort has been spared in the production, design, or illustration of this impressive volume. It presents the book as an object to beauty and printers as men of sensitivity, taste, and training. This book belongs on the shelf at every library and bibliophile; it further belongs in the home of all persons interested in the slow and subtle development of the book, art’s most conservative craft and history is most reliable repository.”

From Wikipedia: Joseph Blumenthal…

From Amazon…

Joseph Blumenthal typeface designs…

The Art of Typography, An Introduction to Typo-icon-ography

by Martin Solomon

1986, Watson-Guptill, 240 pages

From the publisher: “Explores the aesthetics of effective typographic design—line, mass, texture, planes, and tonal value—and includes a comparative chart of more than two hundred typefaces.”

Martin Solomon obituary…

From Amazon…

Asymmetric Typography [must see]

by Jan Tschichold

1967, Reinhold Publishing Corporation, 94 pages

From the publisher: “A landmark book in typographic design in which Tschichold advanced his ideas on asymmetric typography. He later recognized that there were two approaches to design problems and asymmetric was not necessarily the best.”

From Wikipedia: Jan Tschichold…

From Amazon…

Jan Tschichold typeface designs…

Better Type

by Betty Binns

1989, Watson-Guptill

From the publisher: “To achieve excellence in typography, designers must be able to perceive subtle differences in the relationships between faces, letters, & spaces. This book trains designers to make these fine discriminations, with the aim of specifying text type that is readable, beautiful & expressive. The author clearly demonstrates how such factors as the design of the typeface, line spacing, work spacing, & letter spacing affect type color. Using the same piece of text set in different faces or with slight variations in spacing, she demonstrates how designers can determine when there is too much space or too little & how they affect legibility & readability.”

From Amazon…

Book Typography: A Designer’s Manual

by Michael and Susan Wightman Mitchell

2005, Libanus Press, 448 pages

From the publisher: “Books depend on good design to communicate. This practical guide to typography explains the principles of good design, why they exist and when and how to put them into practice.”

From Amazon…

Champ Rose, Wherein May Be Discovered the Roman Letters That Were Made by Geoffroy Tory and Printed by Him at Paris in His Book Called “Champ Fleury”

by Bruce Rogers

1933, Peter Pauper Press

Bruce Rogers: Perfectionism at Work by Stephanie Levasseur…

From Wikipedia: Geoffroy Tory…

Champ Fleury…

From Amazon…

Bruce Rogers typeface designs…

Counterpunch

by Fred Smeijers

Hyphen Press, 200 pages

From the publisher: “Western typography is still dominated by letterforms designed in the first hundred years of printing. What were the processes that lie behind these forms? This book provides a close-up view of the work of the sixteenth-century French and Flemish punchcutters. On the basis both of his own experience in making type and a hard look at the surviving evidence, Fred Smeijers blows away the antiquarian dust that now covers the topic. As an introduction to this discussion, he outlines fundamental issues in letter and type design. The last chapters consider punchcutting in the light of current technical and social developments.

Counterpunch shows that the old processes echo on, giving lessons for contemporary practice. The book will appeal to anyone curious about type and what can be done with letters.”

From Amazon…

Design of Books

by Adrian Wilson

1993, Chronicle Books, 159 pages

From the publisher: “In 1967, award-winning designer Adrian Wilson wrote a seminal work on book design. It was published to enthusiastic critical acclaim, The Design of Books has since become the classic on the subject. This is a newly re-issued volume in 1993 and contains 250 outstanding design samples, many by leading international designers, accompanied by Adrian Wilson’s insightful and inspirational text. A monumental achievement, The Design of Books is a work of art in itself and an essential addition to every designer’s library. This book is considered a classic on the subject of the craft of bookmaking. A practical and effective compendium of information and inspiration for the book designer, this seminal work provides professionals and students of the book in typographic design with numerous design approaches and the information necessary to prepare layouts and carry a book through the production process.

Illustrated with 250 superb design samples, many from the masterpieces of leading book designers, the book presents the principles and methods essential to planning and executing the design of a wide variety of publications, including limited editions, manuals, encyclopedias, trade, and reference books. Wilson’s thorough text discusses in detail every aspect of book composition—from the manuscript, layout, typography, and paper to jacket in paperback covers, binding, and printing process. This book was out of print since 1998, but the 1999 edition of The Design of Books includes a forward by Sumner Stone, which brings this classic work into the computer age. The author’s spirited approach to subject can be seen in his directive to the reader in the introduction: The criterion is imaginative appropriateness—that sense of delightful surprise which draws a reader to a book and sends him out of the store or library with it under his arm, which gives the book club or mail order subscriber a glow of delight and an irresistible desire to read.”

Adrian Wilson, Printing and Book Designing, An interview with Ruth Teiser, Oral History 1966…

Adrian Wilson obituary…

From Amazon…

Design Writing Research [see also]

by Ellen Lupton

1999, Phaidon Press, 211 pages

From the publisher: “This critical study of graphic design and typography is a source for anyone interested in the art and history of books, letterforms, symbols, advertising, and theories of visual and verbal communication. A section on theory considers the centrality of the written and printed word to post-structuralism and deconstruction. A wide range of design practices are discussed, from the history of punctuation and the origins of international pictograms to the structure of modern typography. A section on media looks at the role of design in mass communications with essays on stock photography, visual journalism, illustration, advertising and vernacular design cultures. The book closes with history, a section organised as a time line spanning 200 years of design in America. These historical case studies show how the modern profession of graphic design emerged in response to cultural, political and economic developments in the US.”

AIGA: Ellen Lupton Biography…

The author’s website…

From Amazon…

Designing Books

by Jost Hochuli, Robin Kinross

1997, Hyphen Press, 168 pages

From the publisher: “This book has three parts. In the first two, basic principles in the theory and practice of book design are discussed. The third part then shows how the ideas of the first and second parts have been applied in particular examples. ‘Book design as a school of thought’ was originally delivered (in German) as a lecture and published as a pamphlet, in 1991. This is its first publication in English. ‘Designing books’ was published as a separate booklet by Agfa (Wilmington, Mass.) in 1989, in German. Translation into several other languages followed, including an English edition (1990): all long out of print. The version published here has been revised and considerably augmented with new illustrations. The third part, ‘Books designed by Jost Hochuli’, is completely new. Here Robin Kinross comments on 27 of Hochuli’s works. Both authors are internationally known, Kinross more as critic and historian, Hochuli above all as a practitioner. In this book they offer a serious introduction to book design, free of ideological dogma. Short and concise, it contains a rich, painstakingly selected fund of illustrations.”

Jost Hochuli Bio…

From Wikipedia: Robin Kinross…

From Amazon…

Designing with Type: The Essential Guide to Typography [must see]

by James Craig, William Bevington, Irene Korol Scala

2006, Watson-Guptill, 176 pages

From the publisher: “The classic Designing with Type has been completely..

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In 2008, I pointed you to the website of publisher Scott & Nix, Inc. and their pick of “100 Typographic Books”.

Charles Nix, who curated the list, described it like this: “One hundred books about typography might seem like a lot, but actually, it just scratches the surface. Consider this a start. Below are a selection of the typographic books on our shelves…”

Sadly, the list is gone. Scott & Nix is still alive and kicking but Charles Nix, when he moved on to become the Type Director at Monotype, shared the list on the website of the Type Directors Club but, alas, that too is gone to the great internet archive in the sky.

After sharing a few emails with Mr. Nix, he has graciously allowed me to reprise the list. All 100 books are listed plus three sub-categories Charles invented in the interim to narrow the offerings for those who don’t aspire to hunt them all down: [must see], [should see], and [see also] (you’ll find them at the end of the titles they apply to). My contribution is to added some further details about the books and links to resources related to them.

Going forward, I hope you’ll share suggestions of other type-related books you think are of a similar caliber. If you’d like to contribute, simply add your recommendation in the comments section a the bottom of the article and I’ll add those that seem to gain a consensus.

Enjoy!

About Charles Nix

Charles Nix is a typographer, educator, and designer—a type director for Monotype and chairman emeritus of the board of the Type Directors Club, an educator at Parsons School of Design in New York, and formally co-owner of Scott & Nix, highly respected small publisher.

More…

From Monotype: Charles Nix loves you. When he’s not with you, his heart aches—and so, he makes typefaces…

Charles Nix typeface designs…

Twitter feed…

Instagram feed…

Alphabetical by title.

20th Century Type Designers

by Sebastian Carter

1995, W. W. Norton & Company, 192 pages

From the publisher: “This new edition of the text first published in 1987 includes an examination of the latest technological developments in the design and composition of type, and introduces the work of some of the more recent designers to have made their mark this century.

Although the skeleton shapes of the letters of our alphabet hardly change, many skilled type designers have devoted much time, sometimes their whole lives, to drawing different versions of the outlines. This book serves as an introduction to the concept of typefaces and to some of the personalities who have created them—oudy, Rogers, Koch, Gill, Morison, Van Krimpen, Trump, Tschichold, Frutiger, and Zapf—and places them in the context of the enormous changes that have occurred the 20th century in the methods of creating and setting type.”

Sebastian Carter’s Rampant Lions Press…

From Amazon…

Will Carter typeface designs (father of the author)…

The ABC’s of Triangle, Square, Circle: The Bauhaus and Design Theory

by Ellen Lupton

2000, Princeton Architectural Press, 64 pages

From the publisher: “The Bauhaus, the legendary school in Dessau, Germany, transformed architecture and design around the world. This book broke new ground when first published in 1991 by introducing psychoanalysis, geometry, early childhood education, and popular culture into the standard political history of the Bauhaus. The ABC’s of Triangle, Square, Circle also introduced two young designers, Ellen Lupton and J. Abbott Miller, whose multidisciplinary approach changed the field of design writing and research.”

From Amazon…

ABC of Lettering and Printing Typefaces: A Complete Guide to the Letters and Typefaces Used for Typesetting and Printing [see also]

by Erik Lindgren

1982, Crown Publishing, 348 pages

From Amazon…

American Wood Type, 1828–1900 [see also]

by Rob Roy Kelly

2016, Liber Apertus Press, 352 pages

From the publisher: “The first and most authoritative history of wood type in the United States is now reissued in paperback. This book tells the complete story of wood type, beginning with the history of wood as a printing material, the development of decorated letters and large letters, and the invention of machinery for mass-producing wood letters. The 19th-century heyday of wood type is explored in great detail, including all aspects of design, manufacture, and marketing, and the evolution of styles. Many related trades interacted with wood type production; the book examines the influence of lithography, letterpress, metal-plate and wood engraving, sign painting and calligraphy, poster printing, and type-founding.

Long out of print, the book is still regarded by scholars and designers as an invaluable resource for a rich legacy of typographic art. More than 600 specimens of wood type are classified and annotated, as are more than 100 specimens of complete fonts. This reissue includes a new foreword by David Shields, Design Curator of the Rob Roy Kelly Wood Type Collection at the University of Texas at Austin, discussing the renewed interest in the subject since the mid-1990s as well as ongoing research into the history of wood type.”

Rob Roy Kelly Bio…

On Facebook: Rob Roy Kelly American Wood Type Collection…

From Amazon…

Anatomy of a Typeface

by Alexander S. Lawson

2010, David R Godine, reprint edition, 432 pages

From the publisher: “To the layman, all printing types look the same. But for typographers, graphic artists and others of that lunatic fringe who believe that the letters we look at daily (and take entirely for granted) are of profound importance, the question of how letters are formed, what shape they assume, and how they have evolved remains one of passionate and continuing concern.

Lawson explores the vast territory of types, their development and uses, their antecedents and offspring, with precision, insight, and clarity. Written for the layman but containing exhaustive research, drawings and synopses of typefaces, this book is an essential addition to the library of anyone s typographic library. It is, as Lawson states, not written for the printer convinced that there are already too many typefaces, but rather for that curious part of the population that believes the opposite; that the subtleties of refinement as applies to roman and cursive letters have yet to be fully investigated and that the production of the perfect typeface remains a goal to be as much desired by present as by future type designers. Anyone aspiring to typographic wisdom should own and treasure this classic.”

Alexander S. Lawson Bio…

From Amazon…

An Approach to Type

by John R. Biggstype direct

1952, Pellegrini & Cudahy, 152 pages

From the publisher: “A type specimen book that also introduces the reader to the study of type. With sections on size, legibility, classification, rules, and paper.”

From Amazon…

An Essay on Typography [should see]

by Eric Gill

2015, David R Godine, reprint edition, 138 pages

From the publisher: “Born in 1882, Gill was an artist, letter carver, gadfly, polemicist, and social reformer. In 1925, he had started drawing alphabets and printing books, and in 1931, this plainspoken little book was a fustian and forceful argument for common sense in design, composed for anyone remotely interested in the subtle and evolving challenge of the typographic arts. Set rag right, with tight word spacing, it is a model of composition. The text, like most of Gill’s, is exasperating, exorbitant, and exciting. But Gill was, above all, a craftsman, whose work always reflected his philosophy and whose hand always followed his moral convictions.”

Eric Gill profile…

From Amazon…

Eric Gill typeface designs…

Arabic Typography

by Huda Smitshuijzen Abifares

2000, Saqi Books, 242 pages

From the publisher: “In the twenty-first century, the widespread integration of computer technologies has brought text-based information into many facets of everyday life. This has caused an ever-growing interest in typography across many fields of visual communication, where text and letterform play a central role in disseminating social trends and reflecting the spirit of the times.

Arabic Typography takes the reader through a comprehensive study of Arabic letterforms, starting with a concise historical overview of their development and styles, and proceeding to the latest design and technological advances. It attempts to establish the foundations for Arabic type-design by drawing lessons from past practices and aesthetic conventions, in order to retain the enduring traits that are of relevance for improvement and innovation in future type-design creations.

Going beyond the historical facts to discuss current design issues pertaining to the creation and production of letterforms, it presents Arabic typographic design as an essential communication tool that should marry functionality and legibility to aesthetic delight.

This book will serve as a valuable reference on Arabic typography, and as an educational guide for design students, professionals and anyone who uses Arabic type and enjoys the visual appearance of this language and its letterforms.”

From the author: Arabic Typography and the Shaping of a Modern Design Culture…

From Amazon…

The Art of Graphic Design [see also]

by Bradbury Thompson

2018, Yale University Press, 248 pages (first printing 1988)

From the publisher: “Bradbury Thompson (1911–1995) remains one of the most admired and influential graphic designers of the twentieth century, having trained a generation of design students while on the faculty of the Yale School of Art for more than thirty years. The art director of Mademoiselle and design director of Art News and Art News Annual in the decades after World War II, Thompson was also a distinguished designer of limited-edition books, postage stamps, rationalized alphabets, corporate identification programs, trademarks, and sacred works (most notably the Washburn College Bible). Thompson also designed more than sixty issues of Westvaco Inspirations, a magazine that was published by the Westvaco Corporation and distributed to thousands of printers, designers, and teachers to show the range and versatility of printing papers. Thompson was especially revered for his ability to adapt classic typography for the modern world.”

Bradbury Thompson Bio…

From Wikipedia: Bradbury Thompson…

From Amazon…

Art of the Printed Book, 1455–1955

by Joseph Blumenthal

1979, David R Godine Publishing, 92 pages

From the interior cover flap (front): “Masterpieces of Typography Through Five Centuries from the Collections of the Pierpont Morgan Library, New York. This handsome, fully illustrated, meticulously produced volume fills a long-standing gap in the history of books concerned with distinguished typography and bookmaking. Neither a print manual nor a technical treatise, it was written by an accomplished designer and printer and presents concisely and consecutively, the history and romance of the greatly printed books. It includes descriptions of the lives of the great printers Gutenberg, de Tournes, Baskerville, Aldus, etc., and presents the historical backgrounds under which their noble folios were made. Lehman and amateurs of the book will read it with pleasure; professionals involved in bookmaking, including designers, printers, publishers, librarians, and booksellers, will find it a useful and authoritative addition to the literature.

Art of the Printed Book was written by Joseph Blumenthal, a practitioner whose Spiral Press set a long acknowledged standard in the small company of fine printers in the United States and Europe. It is, in one sense, a personal selection, dependent on Mr. Blumenthal‘s exacting aesthetic standards and, and another, testament to the discrimination and collections of that preeminent repository of typography, the Morgan Library. The 112 books selected and reproduced, from the Gutenberg Bible to the twentieth-century words of Rogers, Gill, Updike, Meynell, and Mardersteig, are among the finest copies known and, as would be expected from the Morgan library and Mr. Blumenthal, no effort has been spared in the production, design, or illustration of this impressive volume. It presents the book as an object to beauty and printers as men of sensitivity, taste, and training. This book belongs on the shelf at every library and bibliophile; it further belongs in the home of all persons interested in the slow and subtle development of the book, art’s most conservative craft and history is most reliable repository.”

From Wikipedia: Joseph Blumenthal…

From Amazon…

Joseph Blumenthal typeface designs…

The Art of Typography, An Introduction to Typo-icon-ography

by Martin Solomon

1986, Watson-Guptill, 240 pages

From the publisher: “Explores the aesthetics of effective typographic design—line, mass, texture, planes, and tonal value—and includes a comparative chart of more than two hundred typefaces.”

Martin Solomon obituary…

From Amazon…

Asymmetric Typography [must see]

by Jan Tschichold

1967, Reinhold Publishing Corporation, 94 pages

From the publisher: “A landmark book in typographic design in which Tschichold advanced his ideas on asymmetric typography. He later recognized that there were two approaches to design problems and asymmetric was not necessarily the best.”

From Wikipedia: Jan Tschichold…

From Amazon…

Jan Tschichold typeface designs…

Better Type

by Betty Binns

1989, Watson-Guptill

From the publisher: “To achieve excellence in typography, designers must be able to perceive subtle differences in the relationships between faces, letters, & spaces. This book trains designers to make these fine discriminations, with the aim of specifying text type that is readable, beautiful & expressive. The author clearly demonstrates how such factors as the design of the typeface, line spacing, work spacing, & letter spacing affect type color. Using the same piece of text set in different faces or with slight variations in spacing, she demonstrates how designers can determine when there is too much space or too little & how they affect legibility & readability.”

From Amazon…

Book Typography: A Designer’s Manual

by Michael and Susan Wightman Mitchell

2005, Libanus Press, 448 pages

From the publisher: “Books depend on good design to communicate. This practical guide to typography explains the principles of good design, why they exist and when and how to put them into practice.”

From Amazon…

Champ Rose, Wherein May Be Discovered the Roman Letters That Were Made by Geoffroy Tory and Printed by Him at Paris in His Book Called “Champ Fleury”

by Bruce Rogers

1933, Peter Pauper Press

Bruce Rogers: Perfectionism at Work by Stephanie Levasseur…

From Wikipedia: Geoffroy Tory…

Champ Fleury…

From Amazon…

Bruce Rogers typeface designs…

Counterpunch

by Fred Smeijers

Hyphen Press, 200 pages

From the publisher: “Western typography is still dominated by letterforms designed in the first hundred years of printing. What were the processes that lie behind these forms? This book provides a close-up view of the work of the sixteenth-century French and Flemish punchcutters. On the basis both of his own experience in making type and a hard look at the surviving evidence, Fred Smeijers blows away the antiquarian dust that now covers the topic. As an introduction to this discussion, he outlines fundamental issues in letter and type design. The last chapters consider punchcutting in the light of current technical and social developments.

Counterpunch shows that the old processes echo on, giving lessons for contemporary practice. The book will appeal to anyone curious about type and what can be done with letters.”

From Amazon…

Design of Books

by Adrian Wilson

1993, Chronicle Books, 159 pages

From the publisher: “In 1967, award-winning designer Adrian Wilson wrote a seminal work on book design. It was published to enthusiastic critical acclaim, The Design of Books has since become the classic on the subject. This is a newly re-issued volume in 1993 and contains 250 outstanding design samples, many by leading international designers, accompanied by Adrian Wilson’s insightful and inspirational text. A monumental achievement, The Design of Books is a work of art in itself and an essential addition to every designer’s library. This book is considered a classic on the subject of the craft of bookmaking. A practical and effective compendium of information and inspiration for the book designer, this seminal work provides professionals and students of the book in typographic design with numerous design approaches and the information necessary to prepare layouts and carry a book through the production process.

Illustrated with 250 superb design samples, many from the masterpieces of leading book designers, the book presents the principles and methods essential to planning and executing the design of a wide variety of publications, including limited editions, manuals, encyclopedias, trade, and reference books. Wilson’s thorough text discusses in detail every aspect of book composition—from the manuscript, layout, typography, and paper to jacket in paperback covers, binding, and printing process. This book was out of print since 1998, but the 1999 edition of The Design of Books includes a forward by Sumner Stone, which brings this classic work into the computer age. The author’s spirited approach to subject can be seen in his directive to the reader in the introduction: The criterion is imaginative appropriateness—that sense of delightful surprise which draws a reader to a book and sends him out of the store or library with it under his arm, which gives the book club or mail order subscriber a glow of delight and an irresistible desire to read.”

Adrian Wilson, Printing and Book Designing, An interview with Ruth Teiser, Oral History 1966…

Adrian Wilson obituary…

From Amazon…

Design Writing Research [see also]

by Ellen Lupton

1999, Phaidon Press, 211 pages

From the publisher: “This critical study of graphic design and typography is a source for anyone interested in the art and history of books, letterforms, symbols, advertising, and theories of visual and verbal communication. A section on theory considers the centrality of the written and printed word to post-structuralism and deconstruction. A wide range of design practices are discussed, from the history of punctuation and the origins of international pictograms to the structure of modern typography. A section on media looks at the role of design in mass communications with essays on stock photography, visual journalism, illustration, advertising and vernacular design cultures. The book closes with history, a section organised as a time line spanning 200 years of design in America. These historical case studies show how the modern profession of graphic design emerged in response to cultural, political and economic developments in the US.”

AIGA: Ellen Lupton Biography…

The author’s website…

From Amazon…

Designing Books

by Jost Hochuli, Robin Kinross

1997, Hyphen Press, 168 pages

From the publisher: “This book has three parts. In the first two, basic principles in the theory and practice of book design are discussed. The third part then shows how the ideas of the first and second parts have been applied in particular examples. ‘Book design as a school of thought’ was originally delivered (in German) as a lecture and published as a pamphlet, in 1991. This is its first publication in English. ‘Designing books’ was published as a separate booklet by Agfa (Wilmington, Mass.) in 1989, in German. Translation into several other languages followed, including an English edition (1990): all long out of print. The version published here has been revised and considerably augmented with new illustrations. The third part, ‘Books designed by Jost Hochuli’, is completely new. Here Robin Kinross comments on 27 of Hochuli’s works. Both authors are internationally known, Kinross more as critic and historian, Hochuli above all as a practitioner. In this book they offer a serious introduction to book design, free of ideological dogma. Short and concise, it contains a rich, painstakingly selected fund of illustrations.”

Jost Hochuli Bio…

From Wikipedia: Robin Kinross…

From Amazon…

Designing with Type: The Essential Guide to Typography [must see]

by James Craig, William Bevington, Irene Korol Scala

2006, Watson-Guptill, 176 pages

From the publisher: “The classic Designing with Type has been completely redesigned, with an..

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“If you’re over 60 you can’t know anything about computers, social networking, app development, and such.” In 1990 there might have been some truth to that claim, today it’s a fiction. Age is no longer a measure of technological savvy.

To the contrary, many folks in their 60s, 70s, and above are the people who invented this stuff—who built the communities of users, who developed the hardware, who invented the platforms and coded the software—in reality, without those people, we’d be storing files in metal cabinets, going to the library to look at the encyclopedia, and talking on a phone that’s plugged into the wall.

Take, for example, Fred Showker (his post is what got me thinking on this). He retired in 2017 from his post as the editor and publisher of the “User Group News Network” (UGNN) and offered a summary of some of his history with the computer world.

Fred’s post…

Fred is just one of tens of thousands of professionals who, in the last thirty-plus years, have devoted much of their lives and resources to the world of personal computers—the hardware, the software, and the logistics of making it happen for you and me.

They used C++ so you could use Swift. They developed hypertext so you could achieve responsive. They built the 24lb Osborne 1 (the first “portable” computer) so you could wear one 10,000 times more powerful on your wrist.

Don’t get me wrong, I don’t claim one generation is better than the next. I’m simply pointing out that the idea that people of a certain age know less about computing is a tired, outdated concept. The reality is, that 70-something that you’re passing in hall every day may have had a hand in inventing the very things you deem most cutting edge. And that grandmother playing with the child across the way may spend this afternoon adding a social media plug-in to the back end of her client’s website.

The illustration is an amalgam of windows and mac operating systems.

The post “If you’re over 60 you can’t know anything about computers, social networking, app development, and such…” appeared first on Ideabook.com.

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The relationship between entertainment and advertising is long standing. But beginning in the 1950s, as described in an introduction to The Wonderful World Of Industrial Musicals, “Business and Broadway had a baby”.

“This mutant offspring, glimpsed only at conventions and sales meetings, was the industrial musical. Think Broadway show, except the audience is managers and salesmen, and the songs are about how great it is to be working at the company.”

It may sound horrific, but some consider the writing and music quite good—it is by any measure entertaining.

The album cover above (courtesy of American Standard and Bathtubs Over Broadway) is one such work…

Listen here to American-Standard’s The Bathrooms Are Coming! (WFMU)…

Another example of the genre is the Chevrolet Sales Convention Musical…

Purely by happenstance, in May of 2019, NETFLIX began streaming Bathtubs Over Broadway…

BATHTUBS OVER BROADWAY - Official Trailer [HD] - Now Streaming on Netflix - YouTube

The Bathtubs Over Broadway website…

A more formal definition of Industrial musicals Wikipedia)…

A sampling of industrial musicals and corporate recordings (Discogs.com)…

Recruit, Train and Motivate: The History of the Industrial Musical (Jonathan Ward)…

Coke’s Industrial Musicals: Bottling Goes Broadway (Coca-Cola)…

Thanks to Jim Green for pointing us to it.

Posted in MAY 2019 / Chuck Green is the principal of Logic Arts, a design and marketing firm, a contributor to numerous magazines and websites, and the author of books published by Random House, Peachpit Press, and Rockport Publishers. Contact.

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The design planets are aligning.

I originally posted here about Spoonflower, a platform that allows you to create fabric from your graphic design, when it first surfaced in 2008. Haha… It was so new, one of the links lead to the page where you could, “Sign up to be invited to test the process…”

My friend Lee Garvey reintroduced me to it recently and I want to give you an update: It’s come a long, long way.

These days you can design and print fabrics, wallpaper, gift wrap, and to specific items such as pillows, bedding, tablecloths, curtains, and blankets.

I don’t recall how many examples of Spoonflower design were on Flickr at the time but as of April of 2019 there are upwards of 40,000.

For a good overview, here’s the latest issue of Spoonflower Magazine…

Details about doing it yourself…

Need instructions? Here’s the Spoonflower YouTube Channel…

40,000-plus examples of what other designers are doing from the Spoonflower Fabric Designs Group on Flickr…

The Spoonflower Blog…

The Spoonflower Twitter feed…

In addition to the obvious, imagine the applications for creating one-of-a-kind promotional items, imagery for presentations, products, and so on. Design Pool, on the other hand, has made a business of designing products for clients and licensing its considerable collection through producers such as Spoonflower…

Design Pool…

Curious about the technology? Me too. Since the early days, it appears they have graduated to using a Kornit Allegro roll to roll printer. As I understand it, the NeoPigment Inks that it uses allow for a wider color gamut than conventional CMYK printing.

Spoonflower talks about the Kornit Allegro - YouTube

And according to this release, they are currently testing a new piece of equipment…

The image courtesy of Spoonflower. Custom printed by Spoonflower, starting at $5 – featured fabric designs.

The original version of this post appeared in September of 2008.

Posted in MAY 2019 / Chuck Green is the principal of Logic Arts, a design and marketing firm, a contributor to numerous magazines and websites, and the author of books published by Random House, Peachpit Press, and Rockport Publishers. Contact.

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The post How to print your graphic designs to fabric—and more… appeared first on Ideabook.com.

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If you love witnessing the creative process, don’t miss this classic post about Saul Bass’ design of the poster for Stanley Kubrick’s “The Shining”. A letter from Bass to Kubrick, in part, reads:

Dear Stanley: Here are the five designs which surfaced out of the work done since I returned. I am excited about all of them, and I could give you many reasons why I think they would be strong and effective identifiers for the film. But the one I think is strongest is No. 1. It’s provocative, scary and emotional. It has size, and promises a picture I haven’t seen before.SAUL BASS

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Here is a grid of random snippets I pulled from illustrations by John S. Dykes. Dykes is a well known illustrator whose work you are as likely to see on pages of The Wall Street Journal as you are to see on the wall over the coffee machine at a Sheetz convenience store.

What do you see?

I see an illustrator who clearly isn’t satisfied with applying the same solution to every problem—a way of working we should all aspire to.

Watch for how diverse these various examples are—different styles, line treatments, color palettes, proportions, and so on. Don’t you love it?

Example 1…

Example 2…

Example 3…

Example 4…

Here’s a piece from a campaign he illustrated for the aforementioned Sheetz.

"Coffee Trek" - :30s - YouTube

Example 5…

Example 6…

Example 7…

John Dykes’ website…

His Twitter feed…

On Illoz.com…

Image: The illustration of Bezos, Zuckerberg, and Cook was created for Kiplinger’s Personal Finance magazine. Copyright John S. Dykes 2019, ww.jsdykes.com

Posted in APRIL 2019 / Chuck Green is the principal of Logic Arts, a design and marketing firm, a contributor to numerous magazines and websites, and the author of books published by Random House, Peachpit Press, and Rockport Publishers. Contact.

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The post Meet illustrator John S. Dykes appeared first on Ideabook.com.

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I’m reprising this post about a Print Magazine article from a few years back featuring the work of Shiva Nallaperumal (with some updates).

It include a typeface under development at the time, working title of “Labyrinth”, that ended up as “Calcula”.

As Nallaperumal described it at the time, “The typeface is pseudo artificially intelligent and the design process was equal parts design and programming. For the project I collaborated with and was guided by Tal [Leming], who created the advance opentype features while I designed the system of glyphs. We have been working on it for almost two years now, and [it] will soon be published commercially.”

I point you to it because Nallaperumal has followed up with other faces and other particularly interesting design insight. Have a look…

This was the original prototype…

The original Print Magazine story…

And this is how it ended up—from typotheque.com, a PDF type specimen book (453KB PDF)…

You can play around with it here…

Another Nallaperumal creation: Faction…

His Instagram feed…

His Twitter feed…

And a way out of date website (but with lots of interesting work)…

Finally, from December 2018, a presentation at CreativeMornings…

Shiva Nallaperumal - YouTube

The original version of this post appeared in March of 2015.

Posted in MARCH 2019 / Chuck Green is the principal of Logic Arts, a design and marketing firm, a contributor to numerous magazines and websites, and the author of books published by Random House, Peachpit Press, and Rockport Publishers. Contact.

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The post An unusual typeface design: Equal parts design and programming… appeared first on Ideabook.com.

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