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The King’s Indian Defense is a popular opening choice at all levels and is the choice of players looking to win as Black against 1.d4.

The reason for this is that many positions in the King’s Indian Defense promise Black more active play than in most other openings. Black is able to avoid early simplifications and can enter unbalanced positions, which allows him to play for more than equality.

From club players to Super-GMs like Hikaru Nakamura, Teimour Radjabov or Garry Kasparov, you regularly see this opening arising on the chessboard.

In this exclusive iChess Club video, however, King’s Indian Defense expert GM Damian Lemos takes a close look at how White should play against this opening. As someone who has relied upon the King’s Indian Defense throughout his chess career, he certainly knows the toughest challenges it can come under.

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In this series, IM Ris focusses on the Open Catalan.

The Open Catalan begins with the moves 1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 e6 3.Nf3 d5 4.g3 dxc4 5.Bg2. (See the diagram)

The Catalan was used extensively by Vladimir Kramnik during his World Chess Championship matches.

In this exclusive iChess Club video, IM Ris takes a look at how play continues when White plays 7.Ne5, or the currently trendy move of 7.Na3.

Watch the Full Video with iChess.club

Want to watch the full video? Check out the iChess Club, a premium membership for our top fans and customers that gives you tons of exclusive benefits such as:

  • 2-3 exclusive new premium videos a week by the world’s top Grandmasters and chess educators (such as this one!)
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  • Sale extender allowing you to get an item at the sale price up to 30 days after a sale has ended!
  • An additional $19.97 in store credit each month you renew!
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All this for only $19.97 a month! Click here to sign up for the iChess Club and get your first month for only $9.97.

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Essential Chess Endgames with IM Anna Rudolf - YouTube

Most club players hate endgames. With a clenched fist in the air, they’ll wail and shout that it’s much more fun to just line up their pieces, sac one of them, and deliver a brutal checkmate as a roaring crowd cheer them on…

…better than grinding out a tiring 60 move endgame win.

But what if this dream checkmate doesn’t happen and their opponent manages to wriggle out of trouble? The pain of a feeble, unskilled handling of the resulting endgame, a win turned into a draw, or a draw turned into a loss… will be AGONIZING.

But not for you. IM Anna Rudolf’s new course makes things simple for you! Anna sheds light on the endgames every serious chess player absolutely must know.

…and in mastering these techniques, you’ll soon be converting fundamental endgames with a well-practised mastery.

This video is an exclusive free preview of Anna’s Essential Endgames. Anna gives an overview of what she covers in the full course, and then goes into how to checkmate with 2 bishops.

Checkmate with 2 Bishops

Let’s work from the position to the left. At the moment, White’s bishops are rather passive. The first thing you need to do when you enter an endgame like this is to get your pieces working together in harmony.

1.Bg3 activates the first bishop, and takes control of the h2-b8 diagonal. 1…Kd4 2. Bf3. This is the pattern you need to learn – see how the 2 bishops cut off Black’s king and create a fence around it?

Black plays 2…Kc4. How can you make the cage smaller for Black’s king and push it towards the side of the board?

3.Bf2 Kb4 4.Be2 – following the same pattern, using the two bishops to control both the light and dark squares around the Black king, which is running out of space. 4…Kb3.

STOP! Think for a moment. So far, we’ve been very efficient with our bishops, but now we can’t really play Be1 because our king is in the way. It’s now time to activate the king itself. Remember, in almost every endgame, you’ll need your king to assist your other pieces.

5.Kd3, in opposition to the Black king. Yes, the king has moved in front of the bishop, but it controls key squares.

5…Kb4 6.Kc2 takes away the b3 and c3 squares from the Black king, and allows the bishops to remain active. All the pieces are coordinating well.

Now, the Black king can only move to the a-file, 6…Ka6 (diagram, right).

What is White’s best move?

Don’t play 7.Kb3! That would be a stalemate, throwing away the win. Make sure the opponent’s king has a square to move to while you’re still chasing it down. The right move is 7.Kc3. Why? It takes away the b4 square from Black’s king. The cage gets even smaller. 7…Ka4 is the only move.

In order to checkmate the king, we’re going to need to push it into one of the corners of the board. We play 8.Bb6, taking away the a5 square.

8…Ka3 9.Bb5 taking away another square. 9…Ka2.

Don’t let the king slip away now. Playing 10.Bc5 would allow the king to escape to b1. It’s still winning for White, but why give yourself all that work to do?

Try to play accurately. 10.Kc2 Ka3 – Black wants to escape via the b4 square. How do we prevent it? 11.Bc5+ 12.Ka2 and we’re almost there…

It’s mate in 2. Can you find the solution?

Essential Endgames with IM Anna Rudolf

Join IM Anna and you’ll quickly be saving the toughest Rook Endings, winning the most drawish Opposite Color bishop endings, blocking dangerous passed pawns, and much more…

Whether you love or hate endgames, serious chess players need this endgame knowledge in order to improve… and Anna’s Essential Endgames Course is the simplest way to cram the ideas into your brain and begin using them immediately.

This is the strong endgame foundation you need and will support you for the rest of your chess playing life. Your path to endgame mastery has begun…

Click here to get your copy with 50% off!

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The Nimzo Indian Defense is a chess opening for Black against 1.d4 and occurs after the moves 1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 e6 3.Nc3 Bb4 (see the diagram on the right).

It was developed by the famous chess master Aaron Nimzowitsch and is a popular opening choice at all levels,  a choice of players looking to win with Black against 1.d4.

It has been a reliable setup for Black for many years, and still remains one of the most trusted options against White’s first move 1.d2-d4. The Nimzo-Indian Defense not only gives a decent game for Black but also offers high chances for double-edged positions with rich resources for fighting for a victory.

The Nimzo-Indian Defense has been included in the Black repertoires of the greatest chess players ever, such as Capablanca, Botvinnik, Smyslov, Petrosian, Spassky, Karpov, Kasparov, Anand, Kramnik, Carlsen and many others.

In this exclusive iChess Club video, GM Eugene Perelshteyn continues his exploration of this opening, this time focussing on the Rubinstein Variation with 4.e3.

Watch the Full Video with iChess.club

Want to watch the full video? Check out the iChess Club, a premium membership for our top fans and customers that gives you tons of exclusive benefits such as:

  • 2-3 exclusive new premium videos a week by the world’s top Grandmasters and chess educators (such as this one!)
  • 40% off all items in our shop, anytime
  • 5% additional discount for products already on sale
  • Sale extender allowing you to get an item at the sale price up to 30 days after a sale has ended!
  • An additional $19.97 in store credit each month you renew!
  • A 30+ minute preview of almost every product in our shop

All this for only $19.97 a month! Click here to sign up for the iChess Club and get your first month for only $9.97.

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The English Opening is a chess opening for White and occurs after the move 1.c4 (see the diagram on the right).

Many great players including Bobby Fischer, Anatoly Karpov, Garry Kasparov, Vladimir Kramnik, Levon Aronian, and Magnus Carlsen have played this opening with great success. What’s more, the opening has seen steady growth in popularity in recent years.

Club players who study the English Opening tend to be quite successful with it as most other non-professional players are not well prepared for it and only have a vague idea of how to counter it. The opening can easily cause some headaches for an unprepared Black player, especially if White is booked up with the latest theory.

GM Mihail Marin, a renowned expert on the English Opening, and author of three highly-regarded repertoire books on the opening, has produced a series of videos explaining the ideas behind the opening.

In this iChess Club exclusive video, GM Mihail Marin takes a look at the Symmetrical Variation when Black fianchettos early and plays 5…d6. For example, 1.c4 c5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Nc3 g6 4.g3 Bg7 5.Bg2 d6.

Watch the Full Video with iChess.club

Want to watch the full video? Check out the iChess Club, a premium membership for our top fans and customers that gives you tons of exclusive benefits such as:

  • 2-3 exclusive new premium videos a week by the world’s top Grandmasters and chess educators (such as this one!)
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  • Sale extender allowing you to get an item at the sale price up to 30 days after a sale has ended!
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All this for only $19.97 a month! Click here to sign up for the iChess Club and get your first month for only $9.97.

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The Stonewall Dutch (see the diagram on the left) can be reached through a number of move orders, but a common way is 1.d4 f5 2.g3 Nf6 3.Bg2 e6 4.c4 d5 5.Nf3 c6 6.0-0 Bd6.

By playing 1…f5, Black is making an effort to claim the e4 square right away. At the same time, this move weakens Black’s kingside. It’s an aggressive and unbalanced effort from Black, and as such this opening often ends up with decisive results – it has a low percentage of draws.

The Dutch Defense isn’t often seen at the highest level, but a number of top players have used it in their careers, including Alexander Alekhine, Bent Larsen, Paul Morphy, Miguel Najdorf, Mikhail Botvinnik and David Bronstein.

In this exclusive iChess Club video, Grandmaster Damian Lemos explores this attacking opening and provides a system that White can play against it.

Watch the Full Video with iChess.club

Want to watch the full video? Check out the iChess Club, a premium membership for our top fans and customers that gives you tons of exclusive benefits such as:

  • 2-3 exclusive new premium videos a week by the world’s top Grandmasters and chess educators (such as this one!)
  • 40% off all items in our shop, anytime
  • 5% additional discount for products already on sale
  • Sale extender allowing you to get an item at the sale price up to 30 days after a sale has ended!
  • An additional $19.97 in store credit each month you renew!
  • A 30+ minute preview of almost every product in our shop

All this for only $19.97 a month! Click here to sign up for the iChess Club and get your first month for only $9.97.

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In this series, IM Ris focusses on the Open Catalan. This is the second video on the Catalan. If you haven’t seen it yet, you can catch Part 1 here.

The Open Catalan begins with the moves 1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 e6 3.Nf3 d5 4.g3 dxc4 5.Bg2. (See the diagram)

The Catalan was used extensively by Vladimir Kramnik during his World Chess Championship matches.

In this exclusive iChess Club video, IM Ris takes a look at how play continues when Black plays 5…Bd7. With this move, Black is trying to ease the pressure along the long diagonal by playing …Bc6 soon.

Watch the Full Video with iChess.club

Want to watch the full video? Check out the iChess Club, a premium membership for our top fans and customers that gives you tons of exclusive benefits such as:

  • 2-3 exclusive new premium videos a week by the world’s top Grandmasters and chess educators (such as this one!)
  • 40% off all items in our shop, anytime
  • 5% additional discount for products already on sale
  • Sale extender allowing you to get an item at the sale price up to 30 days after a sale has ended!
  • An additional $19.97 in store credit each month you renew!
  • A 30+ minute preview of almost every product in our shop

All this for only $19.97 a month! Click here to sign up for the iChess Club and get your first month for only $9.97.

Other interesting iChess.club articles for you:

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The Nimzo Indian Defense is a chess opening for Black against 1.d4 and occurs after the moves 1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 e6 3.Nc3 Bb4 (see the diagram on the right).

It was developed by the famous chess master Aaron Nimzowitsch and is a popular opening choice at all levels,  a choice of players looking to win with Black against 1.d4.

It has been a reliable setup for Black for many years, and still remains one of the most trusted options against White’s first move 1.d2-d4. The Nimzo-Indian Defense not only gives a decent game for Black but also offers high chances for double-edged positions with rich resources for fighting for a victory.

The Nimzo-Indian Defense has been included in the Black repertoires of the greatest chess players ever, such as Capablanca, Botvinnik, Smyslov, Petrosian, Spassky, Karpov, Kasparov, Anand, Kramnik, Carlsen and many others.

In this exclusive iChess Club videos, GM Eugene Perelshteyn continues his exploration of this opening, this time focussing on the Rubinstein Variation (4.e3), and how Black can proceed against either 5.Nf3 or 5.Bd3, the main lines.

Watch the Full Video with iChess.club

Want to watch the full video? Check out the iChess Club, a premium membership for our top fans and customers that gives you tons of exclusive benefits such as:

  • 2-3 exclusive new premium videos a week by the world’s top Grandmasters and chess educators (such as this one!)
  • 40% off all items in our shop, anytime
  • 5% additional discount for products already on sale
  • Sale extender allowing you to get an item at the sale price up to 30 days after a sale has ended!
  • An additional $19.97 in store credit each month you renew!
  • A 30+ minute preview of almost every product in our shop

All this for only $19.97 a month! Click here to sign up for the iChess Club and get your first month for only $9.97.

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Live Stream: Chess Traps After 1.e4 e5 - IM Valeri Lilov - YouTube

1.e4 e5 is one of the most common openings in all of chess, with both sides immediately battling for the center of the board.

At club level, anything could happen next! You often have to face weird openings you don’t often see at higher levels such as the Danish Gambit or the King’s Gambit, and sometimes you’ll have to deal with a cheeky White player trying to set a trap!

It’s quite embarrassing to lose a game in only a few moves, and sometimes it’s not easy to figure out how to respond over-the-board when White sets a trap.

But never fear, IM Valeri Lilov is here! In this live stream, Valeri will explore some of the traps you can expect to see sometimes after 1.e4 e5 so that you can avoid falling for them, and in some cases punish White for trying dubious cheap tricks!

On the flip side, you might also enjoy using some of these traps yourself when you’re playing quick Blitz games.

Tune in on Saturday 22nd June at 1pm EST (6PM UK).

1.e4 e5 Beating Sidelines & Gambits with Black

At club level, you can’t expect to face mainlines most of the time. You’ll always have to play against not-so-common openings such as the Vienna Gambit, King’s Gambit, Danish Gambit, and other old school gambits and attacks that could get you in trouble if you’re not prepared.

GM Damian Lemos is here to arm you to the teeth so that you can be ready to demolish any sideline or gambits that White players could use against you after 1.e4 e5.

It’s time to take the bull by the horns and bravely play 1…e5. Because, as of today, there is nothing to fear!

Click here to get your copy with 50% off during this live stream!

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Beating Sidelines & Gambits with Black after 1.e4 e5 - GM Damian Lemos (Lemos Deep Dive) - YouTube

Capablanca, Karpov and even the champion himself, Magnus Carlsen — all of them have relied upon 1…e5 as a key weapon to completely neutralize the aggressive intentions of 1.e4 players.

Even blood-thirsty attackers like Kasparov and Tal have been abruptly stopped in their tracks by a skilfully played 1…e5 defense.

But things are slightly different at the club level, right?

At club level you’ll need to face openings like the King’s Gambit, Vienna, Danish Gambit and other bone-chilling attacks and gambits…and against a strong tactical player, this could end in disaster.

But, not for you.

GM Damian Lemos’ new course is dedicated to crushing these openings. Damian calmly dismantles each of them and shows you exactly how to do the same in your games.

No need to fear the King’s Gambit. Nor the Danish. None of these 19th-century fossil openings.

GM Lemos has a complete blueprint for beating them and proves it via instructive sample games, cutting-edge theory, sophisticated middlegame plans and much more in 6 and a half hours of professional lessons.

This video is a free preview of the course ‘1.e4 e5 Beating Sidelines & Gambits with Black”. Damian introduces you to some of the lines he covers in the course and then dives into his recommendations against the Center Gambit.

The Center Game

The Center Game starts with 1.e4 e5 2.d4. White aims for occupation of the center. GM Lemos recommends taking the d-pawn, and after 2…exd4 3.Qxd4 we reach the position to the left. Here, Black can continue with 3…Nc6 gaining a tempo on the queen.

White can also opt to play 3.Nf3 first and after 3…Nc6, this can transpose into a variation of the Scotch game.

After 1.e4 e5 2.d4 exd4 3.Qxd4 Nc6 White must be careful where he retreats the queen as there are a few squares that could be dangerous. 4.Qd2 blocks in White’s dark-squared bishop, for example, which is good for Black.

If White retreats with Qd1, Black can easily equalize by playing 4…Nf6 5.Bc5 0-0 6. Re8 d5.

A dangerous option that should be avoided by Black would be if White goes for c3 which is a real gambit as he doesn’t aim to regain the pawn. Black should be wary of allowing White to develop if he goes for the pawn with 3…dxc3 4.Bc4 cxb2 5.Bxb2, where White is way ahead in development at the cost of two pawns See the diagram on the right.

White has a couple of other options open to him, so be sure to watch the video for GM Damian Lemos’ recommendations.

1.e4 e5 Beating Sidelines & Gambits with Black

At club level, you can’t expect to face mainlines most of the time. You’ll always have to play against not-so-common openings such as the Vienna Gambit, King’s Gambit, Danish Gambit, and other old school gambits and attacks that could get you in trouble if you’re not prepared.

GM Damian Lemos is here to arm you to the teeth so that you can be ready to demolish any sideline or gambits that White players could use against you after 1.e4 e5.

It’s time to take the bull by the horns and bravely play 1…e5. Because, as of today, there is nothing to fear!

Click here to get your copy with 50% off!

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