Loading...

Follow ICCS Krav Maga on Feedspot

Continue with Google
Continue with Facebook
or

Valid
There are so many "self defense" systems and techniques. So many masters. So many people claiming to have all the answers to all the violent problems. So how can you know what really works, and what is nonsense? In ICCS we have a solution. We call it the "bull shit meter". Basically, every time we see a new technique, we test its principle under pressure. I say principle, because the exact technique hardly ever works in a fight. However, the idea behind it should make sense. How dose the "bull shit" meter test work? simple, we test the technique under pressure. Pressure training must have to elements to it; you must be physically exhausted, and your training partner must resist you 100%. He must try to kick your ass, not make you look good and come out a winner. Anything short of that is nothing but acting. Train smart, Stay Safe, Sharir R, ICCS head Instructor.
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 
People ask me what are my thoughts regarding training with real knives. In one word; fake. Sure, to an untrained eye, it may look cool. However, if people do train with real knives I can assure you, that no matter what they say or do, it's not real training. Real training must have two elements; it has to be done when your tired to simulate pressure, and your training partner needs to resist you, or in other words try to really make you fail. If your not training like that, you might be moving fast and making noises, but bottom line, it's not really realistic training. Imagine you train the way I described with real knives, there would be no students left after one class. All would be dead, or in the hospital. Nobody is good enough to train with real knives and not get stabbed, I guarantee you that. Instead of playing with real knives, your better off training real but with fake knives. Train smart, stay safe, Sharir R, ICCS Head instructor.
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 
Everyone likes to win. It's natural. But in order to win in the real fights, you must lose a lot in practice. The more the better. I see too many students partnering up with people they know and feel comfortable they can beat. The truth is, you don't learn much when you win someone in practice. It's a good ego boost, but that's pretty much it. It's far more fruitful for you if you invest in failure. Look for the biggest,toughest, and most experienced people in the class and partner with them. You'll learn and improve your fighting skills a lot more by losing to them, than by beating on the new guy. Train Smart, Stay Safe, Sharir R, ICCS Head Instructor.
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 
A good friend and fellow instructor sent me a video today showing two people explaining how punching people in the face for a street fight is bad, and should be done only in the ring. Moreover, they say that punching people in the face is considered 'sports fighting' and in the 'real' fight you should only punch the body. The main reason they claim punching is bad is because your going to hurt your hand if you do. Newsflash; we all know that. Yes, we know that if we punch someone really hard in the face we might end up breaking a bone or two in our hand. I actually broke a bone in my hand 2 weeks ago, And what? At least I 'm still here to talk about it. Point is, a real fight is all about minimizing damage. Your going to get hurt anyway. If all that happened to you after a life threatening fight is that you hurt your finger busting your opponent’s face up, then you did great. Also, personally I hate when 'reality' instructors call sport fighting, not real. I come from both world's and teach both athletes as well as people who only need to know how to survive in the street. Maybe there are rules and even a referee to protect you from dying, but make no mistake; MMA, Thai boxing, boxing; those are real fights. When the person across the cage or ring wants to take your head off, what would you call it if not real. And those 'sport fighters' are way tougher than most 'reality' fighters out there. Believe me. Yes, your gonna hurt your hand if you punch someone, but stop thinking like a nerd. Your going to get hurt anyway, it's a fight. Now make the most of it. It's dangerous to tell people “here is how you don't get hurt” it leads to false confidence, and bad things. Your going to get hurt, but move forward, hurt him more. Be more effective than your enemy. Win the fight no matter what. Train smart, Stay safe, Sharir R, ICCS Head Instructor
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 
Training under fatigue doesn't necessarily mean your training under anything resembling a real fight. True, part of reality training should be practicing when your exhausted, however if all your doing is training when your tired, then your just training when your tired, nothing more. Likewise, many people think training under pressure mean practicing really fast. If all you doing is going over agreed moments quickly, then it's no different then salsa. Nothing wrong with dancing, however it has nothing to do with fighting. Training for a real fight must have two components to make it resemble anything remotely close to a real fight; 1- Yes, you must be tired. The feeling of fatigue is similar to the pressure you might be feeling in a real fight, and it's great to get used to that feeling. It's not just about being in shape, it's about getting used to feeling like crap and keep moving forward. 2- The most important part, and sadly what too many martial artists seem to miss is that your training partner must resist anything your doing with 100%. He must try, as best he could to make you fail and kick your ass. Just like a real fight. Train smart, stay safe, Sharir R, ICCS Head instructor
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 
Of course, in a street fight you want to stay standing. But to stay on your feet, you need to have knowledge of grappling. How else are you planning to keep the fight standing? First act of war is collecting intelligence, knowing your enemie's strong and weak points, so you can best make a plan to beat him. If the first time in your life you will be taken down is in a street fight, your in a problem. There are some positions on the ground where aggression alone is not enough. without technique you'll be just looking like a caged baboon. implement ground fighting in your training, so you could stay up, or get up in reality. Train Smart, Stay Safe, Sharir R, ICCS Head instructor
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 
There is no escaping a choke once its applied and tight. If escaping a choke was possible, we wouldn't have so many world class grapplers and top athletes tapping out or passing out. No, there's no escaping a choke. You can only escape a choke attempt, when your opponent is trying to choke you, but still fighting for it. Sadly most reality based system teach only how to "escape" chokes, and very basic ones at that. There's so many choke options out there. Study and learn how to choke first. The more you understand it, the bigger chance you'l actually be able to stop it from happening to you. Train smart, Stay Safe. ICCS- World Leader For Reality Training
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 
Too many people use the fact that they train "reality based" fighting as an excuse why they don't grapple, don't wrestle, and even don't spar. Yes, in a "street fight" I want to keep the fight standing, but so you don't fall you need to know what wrestlers and grapples can do and how they think. Yes, in a "real fight" I don't exchange punches like in sparring,I finish the fight as fast as possible. However can you think of a better way to get used to getting hit? or thinking under pressure ? And finally, coming from both worlds, I can say this; an MMA fight, or any other full contact fight, even though there is rules, make no mistake, it's a real fight. Someone wants to take your head off, and is standing in front of you. You want to prepare for a real fight? add full contact to your training, and the more the better. ICCS is on a mission to bring the good name back into Krav Maga. Yes, we are a "street fighting" system, however we also spar, wrestle, and grapple. And on a high level. We can fight real anywhere, with no excuse. Train smart, stay safe, Sharir R, ICCS Head instructor.
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 
It's all about mind set. To win a fight you must first see yourself winning, and for that you must be willing to be aggressive. It doesn't matter how much techniques you think you know, if your not ready to be aggressive, do what it takes, and win the fight no matter what, your nothing but a paper tiger. Too many systems are popping up all over the place, with so called secret techniques, claiming they teach how to win fights. I even saw a video the other day of people doing CrossFit, and applying it to a fight. I mean come on! seriously? most of these systems lack the only ingredient that matters, the most crucial part to win a fight. Aggression. Train Smart, Stay safe, Sharir R, ICCS Head instructor
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 
Reality training is not about practicing endless scenarios or wearing tactical clothes. On the contrary, when training too many scenarios, you're taking a big chance of falling into the land of fairytales and never never land, rather than actually doing something realistic. Reality training is about training hard (even if its not as fun as playing soldiers), keeping the principles simple and being a genius with the basics. Train Smart, Stay safe, Sharir R, ICCS Head instructor

Read for later

Articles marked as Favorite are saved for later viewing.
close
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Separate tags by commas
To access this feature, please upgrade your account.
Start your free month
Free Preview