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Natwest employee's vegan outburst has potential business cost

High street bank Natwest has found itself at the centre of a media storm after a staff member went on an anti-vegan rant to a customer.

The case, which involved a vegan loan applicant being told by a Natwest staff member that “all vegans should be punched in the face”, raises questions about the impact employees, and HR, can have on their firm’s brand.

Tofu love?

The debacle made headlines this week after a Bristol-based Natwest customer phoned up for a loan with the bank.

Although she did not meet requirements for the bank to lend her money, a recording of the call revealed that she was not spoken to in a manner which would not suggest great customer service.

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After learning that the customer was vegan, the staff member was recorded saying that “all vegans should be punched in the face”.

He also told her that he felt vegans were forcing their beliefs on him. The customer added that she felt his tone was “really unpleasant” and didn’t feel she should be punished for her lifestyle choices by a “big organisation.”

Natwest has since released a statement that the way in which the woman was spoken to was “wholly inappropriate”.

After listening to the recording, the bank decided to accept her loan request – for £400 – and pay out just under £200 in compensation.

Soy, what next?

In the age of transparency, incidents like this matter.

Last year, Starbucks had to deal with, amongst other incidents, public fallout after an employee mocked a customer with a disability.

The customer had a lisp and the employee wrote his name on the cup as “SSSAM” – mimicking his voice.

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Like the Natwest story, both of these incidents have an impact on the firm’s employer branding.

Poor practice, especially within visible, customer-facing roles – or roles susceptible to media coverages – raises questions about how engaged with their job or how aligned with the firm’s corporate ethos these employees truly felt.

The impact for brands is huge if staff are not upholding the tone or image that is expected of the firm. A 2013 study found that customers rank employee actions and words much higher than a company’s PR department, CEO, or Founder.

Writing in Forbes, William Arruda, a branding expert, re-emphasised that it is a firm’s staff, and their actions, which really embody what a firm stands for – more than any PR.

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“When a customer interacts with one of your frontline employees, or with the work produced by your behind-the-scenes employees, everything your PR and marketing departments have done will be put to the test.”

To build a strong brand, he advised that employees need to be ambassadors, adding the best “employees who are thoroughly engaged, connected and committed.”

HR needs to get on the pulse

Often, improving employee engagement is incumbent on HR. They are looked to improve how employees feel about the firm and how they engage with their work.

One way that this can be reached, and one that is increasingly popular with larger firms, is allowing employees to bring their “authentic selves” to work rather than a workplace persona they feel the company wants.

Research shows this improves turnover rates, gets employees performing tasks more effectively and boosts overall engagement and performance.

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However, in the Natwest case, this would raise questions about voicing opinions that are against the brand ethos or against – such as voicing anti-vegan opinions.

Yet, this could be because simply put, employees don’t really know what their company stands for.

A recent survey found that only just over four in 10 of employees knew what their firm stands for.

It is up to HR, alongside senior leadership, to connect the corporate and the personal. Arruda adds: “The most successful companies help employees understand their personal brands, capitalizing on the integration of these individual traits with the broader corporate objectives.”

This involves good communication, learning and development, as well as adequate re-education or discipline, if necessary, if things go awry.

What would you do in this situation? Tell us in the comments….

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UK organisations suffering from 'non-starter syndrome'

When starting a new job, new recruits are often excited to embark on a shining career with their fresh employer. This new starter enthusiasm and eagerness often sticks for a little while after their initial induction until the employee has properly found their feet within their new role.

However, recent research by Cezanne HR has revealed that two thirds (63%) of HR professionals have had new recruits quit before they have even resumed their job.

The survey – which was conducted last month and polled 250 senior HR practitioners across the UK – found that many employers are falling vulnerable to ‘non-starter syndrome’. This is when new starters merely don’t show up for work on their first day.

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Furthermore, the research found that just one in five employees stay in a job for less than a year, which highlights the severe struggles that HR departments now face when it comes to recruiting and retaining talent.

Previous Cezanne HR research found that 31% of non-starters cited poor communication and a lack of verbal follow-ups by the organisation as partially responsible for the new starters no-show.

Subsequently, this led to 24% saying that they would have appreciated more communication before starting the job, while 51% admitted to quitting their jobs within the first six months because their new role didn’t meet pre-meditated expectations.

And the study’s findings closely aligned with separate research from Fosway Group, indicating a desperate need to augment onboarding, with 48% of organisations looking to spend more on their onboarding process.

75% cited using emails, phones (66%) and posting (25%) to communicate when onboarding, while a staggering 87% of respondents admitted a severe lack of digitised tools or web-based portals to enhance their onboarding processes.

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Sue Lingard, Director at Cezanne HR, said that the focus has fallen on improving candidate experience using digital recruitment methods, though she has cited online recruitment as important “in the race to acquire talent”.

She explained: “Many companies have not, until recently, lent the same attention to onboarding processes.

“With a new generation entering the workplace and a fast-growing gig economy, the need to optimise onboarding is now a point of competitive difference.

"Organisations that don’t deliver a consumer-like digital experience for their new staff will struggle to keep up in the war for talent.”

So, how can HR keep new recruits enthusiastic and deter non-starter syndrome? Employmenthero.com share these five tips:

  • Communication is key – Make sure that new recruits receive clear communication from the time that they are offered the job to the second that they set foot in the office on the first day. Not only will this create a working rapport earlier on, new recruits are likely to feel welcomed into their new working environment.

  • Get the paperwork done and dusted early – The sooner new recruits fill out the appropriate paperwork, the better. Tackling this online is a far easier and quicker way to process the paperwork before the employee starts.

  • Make everyone aware of the new starter – HR should be communicating with other departments so that team members can prepare some welcoming words for their introduction.

  • Ensure that their workspace is ready – Check with the new starters line manager that everything is in place for their arrival. Otherwise, new recruits may feel disheartened that the office isn’t prepared for them.

  • Prepare an induction checklist – Make sure new starters have a checklist that outlines all of the important information that they need to know and the people that they will need to acquaint themselves with.

What are your tips for welcoming new starters? Let us know in the comments below…

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Suicidal employee sent 'appalling' legal threat in unfair dismissal case

A man working for the NHS was dismissed after disclosing that he was experiencing suicidal thoughts in a case described as “appalling” by a judge.

HSJ reports that the judgment, delivered at Norwich Employment Tribunal in January, ruled Gordon Flemming’s claim that he was unfairly dismissed was “well-founded”.

Flemming had contacted the then human resources director Ruth McAll’s assistant, and Paul Henry, assistant director of operations support. He accused the trust of corporate bullying and said he had considered suicide.

“I am suffering from a severe and crippling mental illness,” he wrote.

“Are you really interested in what has happened to me Mr Henry, corporate bullying on such a scale that I have contemplated ending it all, does nobody care about that?”

However, McAll responded with a callous letter telling him not to discuss his complaints in future. “I appreciate you may have mental health problems, but this letter is not acceptable,” she wrote. “In future do not write to anyone else in the trust except me. If you continue to write such letters we will refer them to our solicitors.”

Then, following an altercation with his line manager, Flemming began to experience chest pains – later diagnosed as a heart attack. He was signed off work on health grounds, but his efforts to return to work were delayed by further rows with his line manager, as well as physical health relapses and the deepening mental health problems involving anxiety and depression.

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During a disciplinary meeting that followed, Flemming left his phone on the table during a break to secretly record the conversation being had about him. Robert Ashford, then Deputy Director for Operations, was caught saying: “I mean getting up and pummelling it into him [Flemming] with my fists is probably not appropriate in terms of policy, is it?”

“It seems to us beyond belief that someone conducting a disciplinary hearing would have felt it appropriate to use the language that he did,” the judgement stated. “The tribunal comment that in our combined 60 years’ judicial experience we have not before seen such an appalling response [to someone disclosing mental health issues].

“We use the word ‘appalling’ advisedly.”

HSJ asked the trust for comment. It said in a statement: “The trust has noted the tribunal’s judgment and is giving it close consideration. We are unable to comment further as the matter is not yet concluded.”

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Recent research from recruitment experts Robert Walters has found that over three quarters (76%) of professionals believe employees at their place of work would be uncomfortable discussing mental health challenges – largely due to fear of being stigmatised and singled out.

Chris Hickey, UK CEO of Robert Walters, said that just six per cent of hiring managers specifically recruit staff with expertise in mental health, and of these less than 10% feel that their skills are being used as effectively as possible.

“In addition to reviewing the recruitment process in order to seek professionals with specific skills and experience of dealing with mental health barriers in the workplace, employers should review their current workforce to identify staff who already possess expertise in the field and help to train them up,” he said.

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Outrage at HSBC as women offered vacuum cleaners in staff deal

HSBC has come under fire from employees in London and Hong Kong after staff were sent emails with controversially sexist deals.

Reuters reports that Hong Kong staff were presented with deals offering laptop computers, GoPro cameras and wireless headphones ‘for him’ – while the ‘for her’ alternative offered five different vacuum cleaners and kitchen appliances.

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This implies that men are more likely to enjoy technology and fun toys for their hobbies – while women are expected to be the ones carrying out household chores.

Recipients shared screenshots of the email in an internal chatroom, sparking outrage from global members of HSBC’s workforce.

“The offer is from a third-party source that manages its own marketing materials,” a Spokeswoman for the bank told Reuters. “HSBC is committed to gender diversity in the workplace.”

Sarah Kaiser, Employee Experience, Diversity and Inclusion Lead for Fujitsu EMEIA, previously told HR Grapevine that more needs to be done to ensure that gender equality becomes a workplace norm. She said:

“Whilst great strides have been made, there’s still an ocean of gender inequality left for us to conquer. 

“Women need to be properly retained and included with an organisation, and the introduction of women’s networks, for instance, can be vital in ensuring women receive the proper support and advice they need.”

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Reuters adds that HSBC reported in December that its gender pay gap, which measures the difference between the average hourly salary of men and women, grew to 61% in the year to April 2018 – from 59% a year earlier. The bank - which employs more than 40,000 people in Britain - had the widest gender pay gap of any large British company in 2017.

Research from the Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC) has found a large pay gap may influence where women want to work – with 61% of women reporting it as a consideration when job hunting.

Speaking at Acas’ Future of Work Conference, EHRC’s Chair David Isaac CBE said that, “the message to all employers from your existing and prospective female staff is very clear from the results.

"They want action and if they don’t see a change, there is a very real risk that they won’t join you or, most importantly, stay with you. It will also affect their commitment to you.”

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Pay reaches seven-year high as employers struggle with skills shortages

Emerging skills shortages in the UK jobs market are starting to drive up wages, according to research compiled by the Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development (CIPD).

The Guardian reports that, after a “lost decade” of lethargic growth since the financial crisis back in 2008, privately-owned businesses have anticipated an increase in annual pay by 2.5% on average in 2019 – which is up from two per cent at the end of 2018.

Furthermore, the research found that nearly three quarters of the 1,254 employers surveyed were finding it increasingly tough to fill vacancies within the first quarter of 2019. The manufacturing industry was dubbed as the sector harbouring the greatest difficulties when recruiting.

Jon Boys, Labour Market Economist at the CIPD said that the employment market has showed signs that it is ‘surprisingly robust’. He added:

“There are skills shortages and companies are struggling to get the talent they need – that’s what’s driving this increase in pay growth we’re seeing.”

Minus growing concerns about the future stability of the British economy following an anticipated ‘no-deal’ Brexit, it seems that unemployment has hit its lowest rate since the mid-1970s.

Last month, the BBC reported that 32.54million Brits are now in work, with the number of job vacancies rising by 10,000 to a record high of 853,000.

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David Freeman, ONS Head of Labour Market told the publication: "The number of people working grew again, with the share of the population in work now the highest on record.

And, figures from the Office for National Statistics have revealed that nation-wide pay growth has peaked to the highest level in a decade as companies propose higher pay to attract new recruits.

Statistics have outlined that the number of unemployed individuals per job vacancy has dropped to 1.6 – down from 5.8 in 2011.

Last year, The Independent reported that several UK firms are finding it complex to recruit the staff that they need after slumping net migration from the EU.

Previous research from the CIPD revealed that 40% of employers had more problems filling vacancies than they did last year, particularly after record numbers of people fleeing the UK – ONS data revealed.

And it seems that skills shortages have worsened in numerous sectors which traditionally rely on an influx of non-UK labour. The CIPD cite these sectors as IT, transport and construction.

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Are Millennials the most challenging generation to work with?

Millennials - or those born between 1980 and 1999 - are often blamed in the media for disrupting societal norms.

Recent headlines have accused this generation of ‘killing’ everything from golf to paper napkins, and their trend towards having less (or even no) children is greatly worrying economists.

However, research from Robert Walters may have found one thing that Millennials are creating more of - intergenerational conflict in the workplace.

The researchers dubbed the age group the most ‘impatient generation’ in the workplace, with over 90% wanting ‘rapid career progression.’

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Almost 70% of employers believe that this level of ambition and desire is the leading cause of conflict between generations – with a third of Generation X (born 1960 -1979) (34%) and a quarter of Baby Boomers (born 1940 -1959) (24%) and Millennials (24%) agreeing with this.

Millennials widely perceive technology to be the root cause of workplace conflicts. A third (34%) reported that older workers not understanding new technology was the chief cause of these conflicts, followed by younger workers becoming frustrated at using outdated technology (33%) whilst at work.

However, employers and employees from Generation X and Baby Boomers believe that Millennials are far more pampered than was ever the norm in the workplace – with their demands for time and a tailored approach way out of line with general expectations.

“According to our survey almost 60% of workers have experienced intergenerational conflict in the workplace,” said Chris Hickey, UK CEO at Robert Walters.

“As Millennials make up a growing part of the workforce, finding a way for members of different generations to work together effectively is an increasingly high priority.

“Making sure that managers understand what motivates workers from different generations, how they like to communicate, and identifying common sources of conflict is essential to creating a strong team of varied generations and diversity of opinions.”

The researchers suggested that Millennials expect several perks from their employer – including a good salary, options for progression, transparency, and the ability to feel fulfilment through work.

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During the recession, many Millennials struggled to find jobs that met their expectations. Three in ten (31%) reported that they had taken work in a sector that they did not wish to work in as a last resort. Now, as the economic outlook improves, many are ready to change jobs to find a new role that better suits their ambitions.

“Employers looking to retain Millennial employees should consider giving them the option to move around the business to find a position that better suits their desired career path, particularly given that 70% of Millennials consider job rotation within the business one of the most important aspects of their job,” advised Hickey.

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Why should HR care about D&I?

Belief in the importance of Diversity and Inclusion (D&I) has soared over the past few years, as businesses begin to recognise the benefits that harbouring a culturally diverse workforce can have.

This is why the implementation and execution of D&I strategies in the workplace — and the continuous promotion of such HR initiatives — is important for HR professionals to consider. Not only will prioritising D&I avoid discriminative workplace labels, it will also increase a businesses exposure to legal compliance.

HR Consultant and Author of Inclusion: Diversity, the New Workplace, and The Will to Change, Jennifer Brown, told Forbes that D&I are closely related, but defined differently.

She said: “Diversity is the who and the what: who’s sitting around that table, who's being recruited, who's being promoted, who we’re tracking from the traditional characteristics and identities of gender and ethnicity, and sexual orientation and disability—inherent diversity characteristics that we're born with.”

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However, Brown explains that inclusion in the workplace concerns how the individuals feel and how recruiters accept the diversity of prospective employees within the hiring process. She continued: “If you are a great leader for inclusion, you have figured out how to embrace and galvanise diversity of voices and identities.”

ACAS reports that the benefits of promoting workforce equality and diversity externally offers “a better chance that the best candidate from the widest possible pool of applicants is selected for the job.” There are internal business benefits too; not only will a diverse and inclusive workplace improve employee satisfaction and encourage more positive workplace atmospheres, but it will also enhance the financial integrity of businesses, creating more room for further development. These benefits also extend to business performance.

Katherine Early commented on a study by McKinley & Co in an article for The Telegraph: “Businesses with a healthy balance of men and women are 15% more likely to outperform their competitors, while those with employees from a good mix of ethnic backgrounds are 35% more likely.” So, there are a lot of factors to convince HR that D&I is critical for business.

Nevertheless, it’s one thing to be aware of D&I — the importance it plays for a business and the benefits available to be reaped — but it’s another thing to actually implement programmes and develop initiatives on a global scale. One firm actively prioritising D&I is the telecommunications company, Vodafone.

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Sharon Doherty, Global Organisation & People Development Director at Vodafone, told HR Grapevine about the initiatives that they have woven through Vodafone’s working culture — after quickly realising the benefits that a diverse and inclusive workforce can have on company.

In 2017 Vodafone created a programme called ReConnect, with the aim being to reintroduce unemployed women who have potentially left work for several years, most possibly to raise a family, and who would like to return to work on a full-time or flexible basis. They have a target of 1,000 recruits within three years.

This is something that Vodafone have started to focus on with a view to level the gender playing field for women in leadership. She explained: “Since 2010, we published an ambition to move 20% to 30% of women in leadership roles by 2020. As a tech company to now have 45% of our board female, 28% of our ExCo will be female from April 2019, (and 21% BAME), 31% female in our 6,000 management roles have been important achievements — numbers matter in business.”

One of the key successes of Vodafone’s initiatives is stemmed from the ability to empathise with a range of prospective candidates and eventual employees: “To hit the numbers, we have had a tight grip on the hiring, retention and turnover processes.

Introducing hiring rituals such as all ExCo must personally interview at least one woman for their roles, language de-biasing tools in job adverts, publicly showing we are an LGBT+ friendly employer for graduates and introducing our ground-breaking maternity policy in 2015 have all played a key role.” So, recruitment strategies can be easily managed and better advertised, to be more diverse and inclusive of all candidates.

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The importance of the D&I agenda continues inside a business’s company culture too. An environment where all can belong seems to be something that Vodafone advocates proudly, through their continual development of D&I initiatives and programmes.

This shows that it works for them as a business and their evolution as a company has grown to an envious level. Doherty concludes: “Of course the real magic is creating a culture that prospers with a more diverse and inclusive workplace. Successive CEOs have given a clear tone from the top that diversity and inclusion is who we are as a company. We then light fires and make real action happen.”

So, the key takeaway for HR is to implement programmes and initiatives — firstly into recruitment processes, to actively attract the very best talent, fairly and diversely. Following this, it’s important that the D&I of a company’s culture is promoted and celebrated to retain staff, make them feel included and create a business model that enables customer satisfaction as the end goal.

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Everything You Need To Know About eLearning in 2019

eLearning has been around for a while in some guise or another, however, perhaps not as a credible alternative to live programmes.

Early eLearning solutions simply didn’t meet the ‘real’ needs of the organisation or the learner, so whilst some organisations have dipped their toes in the water, many have had limited success. Until now. Times are changing quickly, and today’s technological landscape has created a massive opportunity for eLearning to grow at an exponential rate, and make a real difference to the way that people learn in organisations.

As a result, we have been on a quest to bring an innovative solution to the marketplace that can meet the needs of the FUTURE organisation. Crucially, we knew that if we were going to introduce a technological solution to the market, it had to ‘pack a punch’ and in many ways be able to outperform our ‘live’ programmes, as well as continue to deliver the behaviour change that has underpinned the commercial success typically achieved by our clients.

So, in 2018, Notion launched STAR® Manager, the latest advancement in behavioural change, which is a 100% virtual, fully blended, management development programme that helps managers transform their leadership style in a way that increases performance, productivity and engagement.

STAR® Manager leverages the very best of eLearning and live learning. Learners can access the programme at anytime, from anywhere, using any device and still take advantage of the knowledge and experience of expert coaches throughout the programme. What’s more, it’s cost effective and fully scalable which gives organisations the opportunity to truly impact the prevailing management culture.

What we discovered on our own journey, however, is that our clients needed more support and guidance about how to introduce eLearning into their organisations in an effective way: how to ready their organisations for change, how to get the technology right, how to ensure that the eLearning itself was useful and impactful, how to engage people in something different, and ultimately how to integrate eLearning into their organisations in a way that works.

Over the past couple of years, we have had to ask the hard questions that had to be answered if we were really serious about making eLearning work. In doing so we have generated many new insights that we hope will prove useful in guiding others through their own learning journey, and in some way, contribute to the overall quality and effectiveness of eLearning in organisations as a whole.

In our latest white paper ‘How to Make eLearning Work’, We’re pleased to share with you some of the insights we’ve gathered over the last two years and hope that we might help some organisations to do just that.

Part 1 looks at the rise of eLearning in the workplace and the limitations organisations need to overcome. Part 2 explores the conditions that need to exist for eLearning to work well. In Part 3, we ask the big questions and give guidance about how to implement eLearning strategies as well as offering a ‘blueprint tool’ that can be used to help design effective eLearning policies. Part 4 explores some future considerations for learning in an online world, and, finally, in Part 5, we reflect upon how important it is for organisations to re-evaluate their learning and development strategies in order to remain relevant and competitive in the new world.

Whether you're already advanced down the path of integrating eLearning into your L&D mix or just beginning to consider the way forward and want to learn how to harness the benefits of eLearning, Notion can share with you how to make eLearning work in your organisation in a way that suits your specific circumstances and needs.

Simply download our latest white paper How to Make eLearning Work, or call us for a free consultation on +44 (0)1926 889 885.

Click here to download the whitepaper

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Occupational rehabilitation services: who, what, when, why & how to use

By Colin Hawes, Head of Group Income Protection Claims and Medical Underwriting at Generali Employee Benefits UK

Insurers, health professionals, employers and the government all seem united – to varying degrees – in one goal: prevention, wherever possible, is better than cure. Against this backdrop, there’s a big and ever-growing role for the expertise of occupational rehabilitation professionals in the workplace.

But when is it appropriate to call on such expertise? How do you access it if you don’t have the dedicated expertise in-house? And who’s best placed to help – Occupational Health (OH) or Vocational Rehabilitation (VR)? Plus, where does Occupational Therapy (OT) fit into the mix? In this article, we aim to clear up the confusion.

The Health Secretary Matt Hancock recently laid down a challenge to employers to help improve the health of their staff and the nation. During a keynote speech in London, where he announced that a greater proportion of annual NHS spend would go towards preventing illness and disease, he added that employers need to play a bigger role.

Who’s involved?

Group Income Protection (GIP) providers ensure back to work support to employers and employees, wherever possible. Currently, over a third of all GIP claimants are helped back to work after a period of sick leave: often before the claim even becomes payable.

To identify who would benefit, providers and intermediaries work closely with HR and the employer’s in-house or outsourced occupational rehabilitation practitioners (whether OH or OT), where relevant, to carefully select those employees on long term sick leave – either before or after a claim has kicked in – who would benefit from rehabilitation support.

By ‘carefully select’, we mean where the medical evidence supports the likelihood of a successful return to work.

What is Occupational Health?

OH services are there to support people in the workplace, to help to ensure that workplaces are safe and healthy and to address health problems when they arise. OH and occupational medicine are concerned with the interaction of health and work, recognising that work can affect health and vice versa.

Many large organisations have their own OH service, or buy in services from specialist providers. Smaller organisations are more likely to seek advice or buy in OH services on an ad hoc basis.

Where in-house, OH practitioners typically get involved in absence management, early interventions and proactive work with employers and employees.

Governed by the Society of Occupational Medicine, OH professionals are either OH Physicians (a doctor who has undertaken advanced training in work and health) or an OH Nurse Adviser (postgraduate level).

What is Occupational Therapy?

Occupational Therapists are dual trained, working in both physical and mental health. There tends to be a misconception that Occupational Therapists are primarily NHS hospital based, focused solely on getting patients back to their homes following illness or an operation.

Their remit is indeed the restoration of function, but this may be achieved in any and all environments, enabling the individual to do the things they need to do: this includes supporting people back to work, where appropriate.

What is Vocational Rehabilitation?

It’s probably safe to say that the VR profession is relatively new in comparison to OH and OT. Many GIP insurers now either directly employ such professionals full time or on a contract basis to provide support to clients, perhaps where such employers do not have OH or OT support or particularly in instances where alternate employment options for an individual represent the most appropriate course of action.

VR professionals may also be used by insurers to also work alongside an employer’s occupational rehabilitation practitioners in situations where: such professionals are only used by the employer on an ad hoc basis; where their expertise is not called upon from day one of absence; or perhaps where the employee concerned is based in a remote branch.

Where an employer has the requisite OH or OT support, the insurer will of course liaise with such individuals directly and may not involve VR professionals at all.

Are Occupational Rehabilitation services regulated?

There is no regulatory body in the UK as yet, but there is in Australia and the US. Deborah Edwards, Chair of the Vocational Rehabilitation Association (VRA), comments: “It’s safe to say we’re a little bit behind in the UK.

"This is largely because vocational rehabilitation is something that only started to grow in the UK in the 1990s, but it’s now strong. We’re now working towards having an accreditation in place for case management to ensure quality standards of practice across all providers of case management and vocational rehabilitation.”

The VRA is a charity-based professional association, which has close affiliations with the Society of Occupational Medicine, Case Management Society UK and the British Association of Brain Injury Case Managers. All seek to support the professional development of case managers and vocational rehabilitation practitioners.

It’s worth also noting that The British Society of Rehabilitation Medicine (BSRM), a body traditionally only representing doctors who practise in rehabilitation medicine, confirmed that it is now accepting senior allied health professionals endorsed by existing members.

Getting the right people for the job

Clearly, one size doesn’t fit all. Health & Case Management Limited (HCML), a specialist provider in the rehabilitation and case management arena, prefers to label the service they offer as oppose to the professional providing it: the latter tailored to need and often with experience and qualifications that don’t fit neatly with the traditional descriptors of OH professionals.

Pete Clark, Director of New Business, Corporate & Psychological Services at HCML, comments: “Employer feedback is that external professionals across some health disciplines can be risk averse and have a tendency to just report back what the employee is saying rather than doing their own clinical assessment. They can also be reluctant to comment on capability, the Equality Act and issues of engagement.

“That’s why I designed the service that we deliver at HCML. We provide an occupational rehabilitation service. We use OT’s because of their core problem solving skills and broad clinical knowledge. The approach we take focuses on the rehabilitation needs of the individual but also the needs of the business.

“What’s really important to us and our customers is that every report we deliver has an agreed action plan, with most of the responsibility falling on the individual to mitigate their situation but that also includes the key things the employer needs to do to support a return to work.”

Generali UK partners with HCML, along with a whole host of wellbeing, early intervention and rehabilitation specialists, as part of its Wellbeing Investment Matching and Added value support services initiatives.

Find out more about Generali

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Come and see Crown @ The Security and Policing Event 2019

The UK’s leading provider of duty management systems to policing in the UK is taking part in a leading expo led by the Home Office.

The Security and Policing Event takes place at the Farnborough International Exhibition and Conference Centre, Hampshire, 5-7 March.

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Crown Workforce Management will be exhibiting within the ‘Marketplace’ arena on stand A10.

Said David Hughes, Head of Marketing for Crown Workforce Management: “Although we already provide our duty rostering, time and attendance, and business analytics software to more than 40 per cent of police forces in the UK, the nature of this event means that it will attract representatives of similar organisations for which we would be able to make a very natural transition to meet their requirements.

“The Security and Policing Event is an important date on the calendar and provides real value and insights into the sector. It also gives us an opportunity to meet with existing customers and keep our finger on the pulse of the issues that the police, prison and security services are currently managing which allows us to develop our products accordingly for this particular sector.”

To keep up-to-date with forthcoming seminars and workshops from Crown Workforce Management, click here to find out more or click the button below.

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