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Would the Heat draft another power rotation player?

The Miami Herald’s Barry Jackson reported that the Miami Heat brought in former Gonzaga forward Brandon Clarke in for a workout at American Airlines Arena on Monday.

NEW: A fresh 6-pack of Heat nuggets, including the player in mix for No. 13 who was summoned team headquarters Monday, plus more draft chatter, other things: https://t.co/hEw8ygQ8mw

— Barry Jackson (@flasportsbuzz) June 3, 2019

Jackson said that Clarke is “one of about 10 players in the mix” for the Heat’s 13th overall pick in this month’s NBA Draft. For what it’s worth, Jackson said last week that Miami would prefer to draft a wing player in the draft, but would take a big if that’s who is the best available option.

Now, Clarke will probably be drafted somewhere around the Heat’s No. 13. ESPN’s Jonathan Givony currently has Clarke being drafted 14th overall to the Boston Celtics. The Ringer’s mock draft has him hearing his name called with the 11th pick.

Clarke is known for his defensive wit and skill, and that may be what has drawn Miami’s interest. According to The Ringer’s profile of him, he “plays his ass off. Makes the extra effort, attacks the offensive boards, dives for loose balls and hustles back in transition.” Looking at other players Miami has worked out, I’ve noted that Pat Riley may look to draft the next Udonis Haslem for his team. The longtime Heat power forward and all-time team leader in rebounds is contemplating retirement. Clarke could become that player for the next iteration of the Heat, provided he develops a 3-point shot.

Brandon Clarke: 2019 NCAA tournament highlights - YouTube

But after drafting Bam Adebayo in 2017, should the Heat draft another big — especially in the new NBA? As I’ve mentioned before, the Heat’s apparent willingness to draft a power forward signals that Miami may look to trade James Johnson, who still has two years left on his deal. Could Riley possibly look to overhaul his perimeter player rotation via trades, and have young players like Adebayo, Derrick Jones Jr. and Clarke supporting that infusion of talent?

The NBA Draft day of June 20 is fast approaching.

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A new report says that the Heat will be active participants in trade discussions this year.

In the last three seasons, the Miami Heat have missed the playoffs twice. The one year Miami made the postseason, in 2018, the Philadelphia 76ers dispatched the Heat in five games.

It should come as no surprise that Pat Riley isn’t satisfied with those results. And according to a new Barry Jackson article in the Miami Herald, Riley will be active this summer in pursuing potential trades. Jackson said that an NBA official who has had conversations with Heat executives said that “everything is on the table.” No player is untouchable.

NEW: Some feedback from NBA people who have spoken to the Heat's front office this offseason, with regard to what Miami is trying to achieve this summer: https://t.co/yMwnI3nCfm

— Barry Jackson (@flasportsbuzz) May 29, 2019

This report comes on the heels of ESPN’s Zach Lowe saying on his podcast that he expects Miami to be “incredibly aggressive” in trade talks a couple weeks ago.

Would Miami be willing to include Bam Adebayo or Justise Winslow in a trade to get a quality player? Reports have already mentioned Riley’s interest in Mike Conley. It’s also worth noting that the Heat traded away their unprotected 2021 first-round pick in the 2015 Goran Dragic deal — one that currently belongs to the Los Angeles Clippers. Is Riley trying to do everything in his power to keep that 2021 pick from being a top-five selection?

For my part, I hope Riley exercises caution in trades. As I’ve stated before, how good would Miami be if the Heat pulled off the trade for Jimmy Butler last October and gave up Adebayo and Josh Richardson for the 6-foot-8 former Marquette standout?

Now, Butler is far better than anyone currently wearing a Miami uniform. But he’s a couple notches below Kawhi Leonard and Giannis Antetokounmpo, who were just battling in the Eastern Conference Finals. And without solid role players like Adebayo and Richardson around Butler, Miami would probably be no better than a middling playoff team in the East.

The Heat need a collection of young players to attract stars, not to simply trade them away.

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Miami has scheduled private workouts with PJ Washington and Tyler Herro.

The 2019 NBA Finals are about to start. But for Miami Heat executives, now is the time to look at potential candidates for the 13th overall pick. And some candidates are emerging.

Looks like Pat Riley, Erik Spoelstra and Adam Simon have a front row seat for this. https://t.co/yEjqSirsun

— Anthony Chiang (@Anthony_Chiang) May 29, 2019

That’s Heat President Pat Riley, coach Erik Spoelstra and assistant general manager Adam Simon looking at Kevin Porter Jr., the 6-foot-6 swingman who may fall to the Heat due to a two-week suspension while in college.

And moreover, the Miami Herald’s Barry Jackson reported that the Heat have scheduled a private workout with 6-foot-8 Kentucky forward PJ Washington. And the team also plans to bring in Kentucky guard Tyler Herro for a workout, he said.

NEW: A fresh 6-pack of Heat nuggets, including more draft visits schedule; plus Heat updates concerning Nassir Little, Romeo Langford, Dewan Hernandez, more: https://t.co/H2cNoXh6R0

— Barry Jackson (@flasportsbuzz) May 28, 2019

The Ringer projects Washington to hear his name called for the 22nd pick and compares him to Taj Gibson and Jerami Grant. Drafting him may also signal that the Heat don’t view James Johnson — who still has two years left on his contract — as a long-term Heat player. The Ringer projects Tyler Herro to go 24th and highlights his shooting in comparing him to Devin Booker.

Now, Booker was selected 13th in the 2015 NBA Draft — just after Miami picked Justise Winslow at 10. Is Miami looking for a scorer, now knowing that Winslow and Josh Richardson can’t carry the load? (A 37-year-old Dwyane Wade was the closer too often for this rebuilding team.)

Barry Jackson also reported that Simon and Heat general manager Andy Elisburg saw UNC swingman Nassir Little in a Las Vegas workout on Monday and that Little “remains in play” for the Heat’s first-round pick. Little and Porter Jr. would be my top picks for Miami’s selection. Both have the potential to become solid 3-and-D guys to complement Winslow, Josh Richardson and Bam Adebayo.

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The Heat’s offense needs a fresh look this coming campaign, and Richardson may be a key ingredient.

The Miami Heat imploded at the end of last season, so a better approach than simply trying harder is needed to get back onto the winning track.

Josh Richardson shows a promising trend over his four seasons in Miami that may be exploited: improving number of assists per 100 possessions:

  • 2015 – 3.4 ast vs 1.6 tov = 2.1 ast/tov
  • 2016 – 4.4 ast vs 2.0 tov = 2.2 ast/tov
  • 2017 – 4.3 ast vs 2.6 tov = 1.7 ast/tov
  • 2018 – 5.7 ast vs 2.2 tov = 2.6 ast/tov

Last season Richardson displayed such an improved court awareness that he ranked sixth in ast/tov ratio among qualifying rivals (min 40 games, 24 min, 20% usage), and beating out Eric Bledsoe, Damian Lillard, Russell Westbrook, Kemba Walker, Ben Simmons in that one statistic.

PLAYER – AST/TOV

  1. Mike Conley – 3.45
  2. Chris Paul – 3.11
  3. Jimmy Butler – 2.77
  4. Kyrie Irving – 2.70
  5. Derrick Rose – 2.68
  6. Josh Richardson – 2.64

Experience has given Richardson the ability to better read defenses and beat double-teams to find an open teammate for a basket.

After all, Richardson doesn’t get an assist unless his receiver scores.

GOOD FINISHERS OF ASSISTS

Which receivers fared best well last season on the Heat?

Surprisingly Dion Waiters was the team’s premier spot-up shooter with an EFG% of 64.5%, which was good for sixth place in the NBA among 112 qualifying participants (greater than 150 FGA).

As a note, a catch-and-shoot man shoots right away, while a spot-up guy may pump-fake or make a dribble first, but remains in the same spot.

Another twist to the puzzle comes from the fact that Derrick Jones Jr. was the top pick-and-roll man in the NBA with 10 or more FGA at the rim with a 14 of 18 (78%) conversion rate.

Jones Jr. has great hands and timing, plus the elite speed to arrive at the rim before help defenders get there.

Richardson delivering the basketball to Waiters or Jones Jr. in a timely manner could be something he would excel at.

Regarding his attempt at isolation scoring last season, Richardson trailed far behind Kelly Olynyk (95% percentile) and Goran Dragic (92% percentile), who were in the top 10% of NBA iso men.

TEAMWORK ESSENTIAL FOR HEAT’S SUCCESS

Richardson thrives best in a team environment where he and his teammates work together in a coordinated fashion, rather than being the focus of attention, i.e. leading man.

Richardson at 26 years old this upcoming season, plus Winslow at 23, Jones Jr. and Bam Adebayo at 22, even Waiters at 27, are young enough to implement a pass and shoot game that catches defenses leaving a man open for an efficient look.

Richardson’s growth in spotting open men, not necessarily dribbling the ball up the court, has quietly improved with experience and will only get better as he reaches the prime of his playing days.

The point man may initiate an action, but Richardson has a knack for becoming the middlemen who sets up the eventual scorer.

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As the NBA lottery date approaches the Heat might have their own twist to talent evaluation.

In 2014 the Miami Heat fell to the former San Antonio Spurs duo of Kawhi Leonard and Danny Green, who this time with the Toronto Raptors, sank the Milwaukee Bucks,

What’s unusual fact about the two is how low of a draft pick they were out of college.

Matter-of-fact Leonard was the highest draft pick on the court for the Raptors in the game clincher.

Raptors players by draft status

How does a team with only one player under the 24th draft pick defeat the Orlando Magic, Philadelphia 76ers, and Bucks to reach the NBA Finals?

Answer could be the top NBA Lottery picks are too talented for their own good.

Let me explain by quoting what Raptors coach Nick Nurse said about the Raptors’ approach to winning the game.

”Our communication, scheme, switching, blitzing, our rotations, contesting shots, all those things have been growing here since the start of the playoffs,” Raptors coach Nick Nurse said. “The other thing is there are some moments, like stretches -- we call them consecutive stops -- and there are some stretches where it’s darned hard to complete a pass against us. That wears into a team after a while when you’re up into them and you’re denying, and everybody is just that connected and playing that hard.”

The first word he used was communication, that is, having the mental skills at the next level trumps the physical traits (both are necessary though) at the professional level.

Number one picks like Andrew Wiggins have all the physical tools in world, but if they can’t communicate effectively on a NBA level they’ll go no further than their physical talents will ever take them.

Looking at how tall Raptors’ players are questions the concept of positionless basketball promoted by the Boston Celtics.

Raptors rotation by minutes played and height in the last game.

With Lowry and VanVleet playing the 2nd and 4th most minutes, height and speed alone didn’t hold the Bucks to 102, 99, 94 points in the last three games.

Enough about the Raptors. What does their success have to do with the Miami Heat?

First, the back end of the draft holds value as scouts over weigh the importance of physical attributes among the lottery choices.

Second, some (not all) top draft picks may believe their physical gifts suffice to get by in the NBA, so they never reach the NBA Finals on their own.

Third, being able to finish at the rim against high school and college amateurs in highlight fashion takes a back seat to communication skills and teamwork at championship levels.

Fourth, even though intangibles count a lot, at least one transcendental NBA player is needed on a team to reach the top tier.

The Miami Heat had planned for one or more of the players among Goran Dragic, Hassan Whiteside, Dion Waiters, Josh Richardson, Justise Winslow to reach first team All-NBA status, but that hasn’t happened as of today.

Perhaps Bam Adebayo could make the quantum leap to leader of the pack soon.

As for the June 20 NBA draft, finding a star NBA professional among the talented amateur hopefuls means going beyond video clips of teenagers to select a man who understands basketball at the world-class level.

Pat Riley could have some surprises in store in June and July, because the rise of the Raptors and Bucks emphasize the NBA has many elite athletes, but the playoffs separate the men from the boys.

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Last season’s lottery disappointment means forming a coherent team structure this summer.

When the Miami Heat had LeBron James, Dwyane Wade and Chris Bosh, the supporting cast rightfully took a backseat to the “Big 3.”

Now what’s left after their departure is collection of odds and ends whose only common characteristic is the Heat name on the front of the team’s jerseys.

In the weeks leading up to the draft and free agency the front office’s audit of last season’s inventory will try to turn a ship wandering aimlessly at sea into a Miami cigarette boat.

MIAMI VICE Boat Tribute : Wellcraft Scarab 38KV - YouTube

While the Miami Vice tv show glamorized fast boats and cars, the Heat team on the Vice basketball court failed to live up to show’s non-stop action.

The concept of multiple ball handlers sounds good in theory, but in real life sows chaos on the court where strong leadership is needed to pull a team together.

The upcoming draft grabs the headline, but behind the scenes a 4-step game plan might be in the works to give the team a coherent structure off and on the court.

  1. Identify players who are willing to embrace winning as the main thing.
  2. Get or develop an undisputed alpha who won’t tolerate anything less than the best.
  3. Ace the draft with a player who can thrive and blossom in Heat Culture.
  4. Get the best undrafted players for two-way deals in an organized fashion.

The last point is often overlooked, but after the draft process is over all the NBA teams will be on the phone to sign the best remaining players for Summer League and possible two-way contracts.

Towards that end among the three players (Brandon Clarke, Tyler Herro, Matt Mooney) reportedly working out for Miami, the last one seems like a candidate for development.

Mooney looks like Shane Battier, and fits a team-first style of play.

Matt Mooney: 2019 NCAA tournament highlights - YouTube

Someone said this about him among an extensive list of comments in a thread:

“Athleticism and size for his primary position which is currently not PG. Mooney is small and not very quick or explosive. Techs help defense really covered for Mooney if he was ever beat off the bounce, so its hard to full evaluate whether he’d be a liability against a court full of elite athletes. He’d be a 6’3 wing 3 and D prospect. Although he is long -which obviously compensates to some degree- he is competing against the “mold” of super athletic 6’5+ guys with the same or greater wingspan.”

“As I said I think that he has enough athleticism, rare mental talent to be a great defender with the potential to become an elite pro shooter with NBA IQ. But Mooneys profile is not one that normally gets you drafted. I think he is a very unique player and that may scare off some GM’s, looking to trim down the list of targets.”

Mooney’s garnered several awards in his lone season at Texas Tech.

  • Big 12 All-Defense team
  • Big 12 steal percentage leader, 3.5
  • NCAA Defensive win shares, 4th place (3.1, tied with Matisse Thybulle)
  • NCAA All-Tournement

He gained notoriety under the pressure of the national spotlight on the NCAA stage.

“The Red Raider guard turned heads in the Final Four when he lit up Michigan State for 22 points on 50% shooting. This was the game that he believed got him to this opportunity. “Even though I had a solid regular season at Tech, I probably wouldn’t be here if it wasn’t for that performance in the Final Four,” Mooney stated.”

His off-court choices display his maturity and high character.

“Mooney recently signed with Octagon Sports Agency, which also represents NBA players such as Giannis Antetokounmpo, Steph Curry, and Trae Young.”

“Currently, Matt, along with a group of fellow draft hopefuls, is being trained by NBA trainer, Phil Beckner in Phoenix, Arizona. Beckner is best known to be Portland Trailblazer’s all-star guard Damian Lillard’s, main trainer. Mooney and the others have multiple workouts a day and learn firsthand what it takes from a training standpoint to make it to the league.”

Damian Lillard Working on The Shot with Trainer Phil Beckner - YouTube

Selecting the same shooting coach as Dame shows Mooney won’t settle fot the easy road to success [bold emphasis mine].

“Over the years, Beckner prodded Lillard’s perfectionist tendencies by demanding what the two call “high-quality makes.” If Lillard’s shot hit the rim before going in or if his body mechanics were off, the shots wouldn’t count. During an average day early in his pro career, Lillard would sink 700 or more “high-quality” makes during twice-daily sessions.”

Lillard has worked with Beckner for a decade, and he hired the former Boise State associate head coach last summer as his full-time adviser. Beckner tracks all of Lillard’s three-point attempts during the season, grading each on a numbered scale based on factors such as degree of difficulty, mechanics and the time/score situation.”

Lillard’s “logo-shots” came from a commitment to a well-defined purpose.

“In fact, Lillard’s shot was the culmination of 12 months of intense and purposeful work with Phil Beckner, his longtime player development trainer, and Ben Kenyon, the Blazers’ sports performance coach. The three men decided at the beginning of last summer that extending Lillard’s range was their offseason priority. The goals were simple: to give Lillard a weapon that could stretch opposing defenses past the breaking point, and to prepare Lillard’s mind, body and shooting stroke for a moment just like the closing seconds of Game 5.”

“Those situations are handled way before the time comes,” Lillard said. “In the summer, when you truly prepare yourself with training and conditioning. When you cheat yourself, you fail in those moments and crash. When you really put the time in, it always comes to light.”

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Josh Richardson and Bam Adebayo garnered votes for their efforts on the defensive side of the floor.

Though the Miami Heat didn’t have any players on the first or second 2018-19 NBA All-Defensive team, Josh Richardson and Bam Adebayo received 3 votes and 1 vote respectively from the 100 media members who cast their ballots for the league’s top-ten defenders.

The ten players who made either All-Defensive team were

Notably of the ten players above only Holiday was on a non-playoff team, so winning helps players get recognition.

Strangely James Harden received 4 votes for his efforts on defense, while Jimmy Butler got only 9 votes and Chris Paul 7 votes.

Among guards Richardson’s 3 votes bested Ben Simmons’ and Donovan Mitchell’s 2, even though Richardson often assumed a forward’s responsibility.

Nice to see Adebayo get a nod for his contributions, and hopefully many more to come.

For the NBA press release click here.

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Thomas falsely claimed Erik Spoelstra was a rookie coach when James first joined the Miami Heat.

Appearing on the Fox Sports program First Things First, Isiah Thomas said that the NBA has “failed” LeBron James because he never played for an established coach. He even falsely claimed that Erik Spoelstra was a rookie coach when James signed with the Miami Heat in 2010. In fact, Spoelstra’s first year as a head coach was the 2008-09 season.

"This is where the NBA and our league has truly failed LeBron James: every place he's gone, they've always given him either a first year coach or someone they were experimenting with. LeBron James has never had the benefit of Hall of Fame coaches." — @IsiahThomas pic.twitter.com/nhR1mHPpoe

— First Things First (@FTFonFS1) May 20, 2019

The notion that James always played for a rookie coach or someone the franchise was “experimenting with” is just flat wrong. Then in his mid-60s, Pat Riley named Spoelstra as his hand-picked successor. Here’s part of what he said in Spoelstra’s April 2008 introductory press conference:

I believe Erik Spoelstra is one of the most talented young coaches to come around in a long time. This game is now about younger coaches who are technologically skilled, innovative and bring fresh new ideas. That’s what we feel we are getting with Erik Spoelstra. He’s a man that was born to coach.”

Does that sound like someone Riley is just “experimenting with?” When he was named as head coach of the Heat, Spoelstra had just completed his 13th season on the Miami staff. In no way does that situation resemble the Cleveland Cavaliers hiring David Blatt in June 2014, just weeks before James signed with the Cavaliers.

Riley said that he was never interested in coming back to coach (as he did in 2005, replacing Stan Van Gundy), and that he told James as much. In the midst of a March 2011 five-game losing streak, Riley responded to rumors of Spoelstra’s firing — “Write it off. Write it off. It’s the media being neurotic.”

Now, I have criticized Spoelstra’s decision-making in several recaps on this Web site. I’ve talked about how he’s a better defensive coach than offensive one. But every single NBA coach has made mistakes.

Gregg Popovich invited James to take jump shots in Game 7 of the 2013 NBA Finals — in one case, he even took a dribble before making a wide-open corner 3 — and James made five 3s in a 95-88 game. Doc Rivers had a good year coaching the Los Angeles Clippers, but has made questionable moves. Even Brad Stevens, who quickly earned a reputation as one of the league’s best coaches, failed to manage personalities on the Boston Celtics this year.

So could Miami have done better than two championships in four years than Spoelstra did? My bet is no. Spoelstra missed opportunities to counter Rick Carlisle’s moves in the 2011 NBA Finals — including insisting on starting Mike Bibby over Mario Chalmers and playing an injured Mike Miller over James Jones — but Miami lost that series because LeBron James didn’t play well. Chris Bosh averaged more points per game than James in that Finals. James couldn’t even post up J.J. Barea.

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The Heat assistant coach will rejoin his alma mater as head coach of the Michigan Wolverines basketball team.

Juwan Howard is a Michigan legend. One of they key members of the famed “Fab Five”, Howard electrified audiences alongside Jalen Rose, Chris Webber, Jimmy King, and Ray Jackson as a student. Now he’ll be rejoining his Alma Mater, but this time as head coach as reported by Miami Heat Beat. He’ll replace John Beilein who left the Wolverines last week to join the Cavaliers.

It’s no secret that Howard was ready for head coaching role, he’d interviewed for a few vacant NBA head coaching positions in recent years. Howard has been a beloved assistant coach by Heat players, and by all indications a key contributor in Miami’s player development. His absence will be felt immediately. Rumours say Udonis Haslem could be considered as a replacement, but it’s too early to tell.

Hopefully Juwan is able to bring some of the Heat Culture to the Michigan locker room.

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The Heat met with some players who are projected to go later in the first round.

The Miami Heat met with some prospects at the NBA Draft Combine last week. And some of them — like Tennessee forward Grant Williams and Purdue point guard Carsen Edwards — are projected to go after the Heat’s 13th pick in the draft.

Five players confirmed meetings with the Heat last week: Carsen Edwards, Grant Williams, Bruno Fernando, Naz Reid and Ignas Brazdeikis. Some scouting reports on that group: https://t.co/OlCNIPKlIk pic.twitter.com/5dW3ded5IF

— David Wilson (@DBWilson2) May 20, 2019

Does that mean the Heat are thinking of trading their pick and moving downward in the draft? First, let’s start with a couple players Miami met with.

The Ringer projects the 6-foot-8 Grant Williams to be drafted with the 17th overall pick, labeling him as a “high-IQ defender,” an “instinctual rebounder who boxes out” and someone who will “take a charge or dive for a loose ball.” Pat Riley may hope he can emerge as the prototypical glue guy for a championship team and provide the toughness that Udonis Haslem brought for so many years — but with a 3-point shot.

Grant Williams: 2019 March Madness highlights - YouTube

The Ringer projects Carsen Edwards going 27th. (Of note, the Brooklyn Nets have both the 17 and 27th overall picks — could the Heat trade the 13th pick for the 17th and 27th ones?) He is barely 6 feet tall, something that could make him a liability on defense. In an ideal world, he would become an instant offense guard off the bench with his shooting ability.

Highlights: Carsen Edwards Declares for 2019 NBA Draft | Purdue | B1G Basketball - YouTube

But in a not-ideal world? The Ringer actually compares Edwards to Shabazz Napier, whom Miami traded up in the 2014 NBA Draft to get. But Napier disappointed in his rookie season with the Heat, and Miami traded him after just one year.

Are Heat executives dissatisfied with the players in their range? Of course, Miami could simply be doing their due diligence, meeting with various players to see how players’ stock will rise and fall until draft night. The Heat don’t have a second-round pick in this June’s draft; Riley may want to see if he can trade into the second round for a player he likes. He did that for Mario Chalmers in 2008.

We never know who pans out in the NBA Draft — at least after the first few picks. Draymond Green was taken with the 35th pick in the 2012 NBA Draft. The Heat had the 27th pick that year, coming off an NBA championship. Miami even brought in Green for a workout.

(Side note: Imagine if Riley had kept Patrick Beverley, whom he traded for during the 2011 NBA Draft, and drafted Green in 2012. Would LeBron James still be a member of the Heat?)

Pascal Siakam was the 27th pick in the 2016 NBA Draft, when Miami didn’t even have a first-round pick. So if the Heat want to trade down? Fine by me. I just hope the players the Heat get pan out.

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