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Rift Valley fever is a viral disease endemic to Africa that is found on animals and spread via biting mosquitoes. The threat of Rift Valley fever is on the rise and has recently been added to the World Health Organisation priority list. Health control measures alone could be ineffective in the long term fight against the deadly infection, a new study in the journal PNAS reports. During this innovative study researchers from a consortium including the University of Surrey, University of Cambridge and the International Livestock Research Institute investigated the impact of environmental factors on Rift Valley fever. Unlike previous

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Scientists have made a major discovery about how cells repair broken strands of DNA that could have huge implications for the treatment of cancer. Their study, published in Nature, uncovered a brand new protein complex in cells that shields broken DNA ends and controls the way in which it is repaired. The new complex pushes cancer cells to use a particular type of DNA repair system that is vulnerable to targeting by exciting new drugs called PARP inhibitors or platinum-based chemotherapies. The landmark study was a result of collaboration between the University of Toronto, The Institute of Cancer Research, London,

The post DNA discovery could help target cancer cells appeared first on The Hippocratic Post.

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Nicotine exposure during pregnancy, whether from smoking cigarettes, or nicotine patches and e-cigarettes, increases risk of sudden infant death syndrome – sometimes known as “cot death” – according to new research published in The Journal of Physiology. Sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) is the sudden and unexpected death of an infant under 12 months of age that occurs typically while sleeping. Failure of autoresuscitation, the ability to recover normal heart rate and breathing following gasping caused by lack of oxygen in the brain, has been recorded in human SIDS cases. Smoking increases risk for SIDS. Over the last decade, use

The post Nicotine in pregnancy increases risk of cot death appeared first on The Hippocratic Post.

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An allergy antibody known as Immunoglobulin E, or IgE, may protect the skin against cancer, according to new study led by scientists at Imperial College, London. IgE is a component of the immune system that triggers allergic reactions. The research highlights previously unknown skin defences – and could open avenues for developing new skin cancer treatments. The early-stage study, published in the journal Nature Immunology, may also provide clues into why allergies are on the rise. Estimates suggest 44 per cent of Britons now suffer from at least one allergy – but the reasons behind the increase are unknown. The

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Everyone has suffered from that incredibly itchy bite that keeps you awake at night. Although some people seem far more susceptible to being bitten and suffer spectacular reactions; it is a fact of summer that we will all get nibbled by something and it won’t be pleasant! This guide gives you a general overview as to what might have got you and suggestions as to the best way to treat the bites and stings to make them more bearable and less of an ordeal. First point – no matter how tempting it is, please don’t scratch the bite. Once the skin

The post Dealing with bites and stings appeared first on The Hippocratic Post.

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‘IVF: 6 Million Babies Later’ is a major, new exhibition at London’s Science Museum exploring the remarkable story of the invention of in-vitro fertilization, (IVF), in the United Kingdom and the first “test-tube” baby, Louise Brown, born 40 years ago, on 25 July 1978. Since Louise’s ‘miraculous’ birth, more than eight million children have been born by IVF and related treatments thanks to the perseverance of the early pioneers and the latest research in reproductive science today. On display will be one of the old ‘Oldham Notebooks’ that record the scientific data collected by Purdy and Edwards between 1969 and 1978, as

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Giving blood saves lives.

The post You’re somebody’s type appeared first on The Hippocratic Post.

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What is pneumonia? Pneumonia is an infection of the lungs that can be caused by a variety of different pathogens, including viruses, bacteria, fungi, and mycobacteria.  

The post What is pneumonia? appeared first on The Hippocratic Post.

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High intensity exercise could be beneficial to heart health in teenagers, according to new research published in Experimental Physiology. Teenage years are an important stage of life, with research suggesting it is a time during which heart diseases start to develop. These findings indicate that teenagers who participate in high intensity exercise have lower blood pressure. This may lead to a lower risk of developing heart disease later in life, but this requires confirmation with further research. This study, conducted by researchers at the Children’s Health & Exercise Research Centre, University of Exeter, recruited healthy teenage males (12-15 years old),

The post Heart health in teens linked to high intensity exercise appeared first on The Hippocratic Post.

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With summer in full swing, many of us will slap on some sunscreen to protect our skin from harmful UV rays. But what about the areas which are commonly missed? And does it matter if you don’t get to the back of your ears? Here are some tops from Dr Anjali Mahto, consultant dermatologist and spokesperson of the British Skin Foundation. Eyelids: The sun’s rays can damage the eyes and surrounding skin over time. The skin of the upper and lower eyelids is thin and fragile, requiring protection. Eyelid cancers account for about 5-10% of all skin cancers and occur

The post Sunscreen: the spots you miss appeared first on The Hippocratic Post.

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