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You will want to relax at the pool, but instead, you will be packing/unpacking boxes and moving heavy items. Here are some quick tips for coping during a hot summer moving day.

Moving in the Summer Heat
  • Be sure to check the weather forecast about a week prior to moving day, and double check each day so you won’t be surprised by extreme heat. If you are moving long distance, check the forecast for your destination as well. If you know what to expect, you will be better prepared. Keep bottled water and sports drinks on hand, and consider keeping the electricity on so you have the refrigerator and freezer. You can stock them with cold treats such as popsicles. If the refrigerator is being moved, then invest in ice and a cooler.
  • On moving day, ensure that everyone, including the moving crew, remains hydrated. Your relocation will go more smoothly without anyone experiencing symptoms of heat exhaustion and dehydration. These can include fatigue, headaches, and dizziness. If anyone complains of any of these symptoms, have than rest, drink fluids, and cool down.
  • If you air condition is still on, plan on taking advantage of it in efficient ways. You can move furniture and boxes to a main location, such as a room at the front of the house. Then you can close off the rest of the house to keep in the cooler temperatures. In addition, you can shut off vents around the house except for one or two rooms. Anyone feeling a little overheated can retreat to one of those rooms to cool down.
  • Load and unload the truck in early morning and late evening when the temps are cooler. Seek out opportunities to shade the path from the truck to the house, and wear a brimmed hat. Always remember the sunscreen to avoid the pain of sunburn.
  • Prep you car or truck by double checking the coolant and oil. In addition, check the tires for appropriate pressure to avoid drag that can cause the engine to overheat or result in a flat tire.
  • If you moved and unloaded a truck in extreme heat, your family will be hot, sweaty, and perhaps a little grumpy towards the end. Have everyone clean up and head out for dinner in an air conditioned restaurant. Delivered pizza is fun, but the cooler environment of a diner will be appreciated.

With some advanced planning and knowledge, you can make your hot weather move run smoothly. Hot weather can be dangerous, so plan to keep hydrated and let yourself cool down.

The post How to Cope with Hot Weather During a Summer Move appeared first on Global Van Lines.

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If you are moving abroad, shipping items first will make your relocation much smoother than you can envision. So, it is crucial to ask yourself, “What items should I ship ahead to my new home?” After you answer this important question, you will be one step closer to a happy new life in a new country.

Your Car

When you relocate to a new country, you will definitely experience life changing occurrences. So, in order to less the shock when surrounded by a different, albeit exciting, culture, it would be comforting to have some familiar items with you. Having your personal car there when you arrive is a great feeling. And, this may be an excellent choice for you, but keep a few things in mind. Some cars may not be suited for your new country. Various countries will have different requirements and roadways, so double check first if your car is appropriate for the new country.

Irreplaceable Furniture

In most instances, people who relocate abroad will sell their furniture and purchase new furniture when they arrive in their new home. Yet, some pieces of furniture are special and cannot be replaced. You may wish to consider shipping these in advance. Prior to choosing a company to ship your precious personal belongings, research the business carefully. You want to be assured that your valuable items are in excellent hands. Having them in your new home will make you feel comfortable in a brand new environment.

Clothing

If you are like many people, you most likely have quite a bit of clothing to move from one home to another. Your wardrobe is certainly something that can be shipped ahead. When you fly, you will have a limit to the luggage you can check without additional fees. Be certain to have clothing to wear when you arrive in your new home by shipping it with a qualified moving company. Ask about conditions if they company uses ships and shipping containers. The ocean air can be very damp, and you want to avoid mold and mildew growing on your clothing.

Moving internationally can be a challenge. If you prepare appropriately, everything should go smoothly. Sending over items such as your car, furniture, and clothing will help with feeling comfortable in your newly adopted culture. Your essentials and necessities will be waiting there for you. An international relocation is an exciting experience, Make the most of that experience by planning ahead and letting your Global Van Lines Moving Concierge assist. This is our gift to you – no cost and no obligation. Simply enter starting destination zip code to start the easy process.

The post What to Ship Ahead in an International Move appeared first on Global Van Lines.

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Not securing the drums and doing other required prep can result in expensive repairs. We recommend that you hire a professional, but if you still choose a DIY move, here are some tips for moving a washer and dryer:

Disconnect the Unit
  • It is crucial that you shut off all supply to your washer and dryer units prior to moving them. This means the gas supply valve behind a gas dryer and the breakers to any electric washer or dryer. Again, we highly recommend a professional, since a mistake in shutting off the gas can result in a hazardous gas leak.
  • Next, shut off and disconnect the water supplies prior to moving the units. Also, remove the drain hose from its stand pipe. You will find these directly behind the washer and dryer units.
  • As you move the dryer away from the wall, watch the tension of the hidden vent, gas and electrical supply lines. Depending on your type of appliance, these may have a flexible or solid vent pipe, which will be secured by clamps or screws. Carefully loosen any permanent fasteners.
Clean & Air Dry
  • You won’t want to move a dirty appliance, so give both the washer and dryer a thorough cleaning prior to wrapping them in protective padding for the move. Wipe off the outer housing with a damp cloth and mild soap to remove any lint, dust, or other residue.
  • Prevent the growth of any mold by thoroughly allowing your washer to dry out. Leave the door open a minimum of 24 hours after you disconnect the water supply. This will help ensure the washer is free from moisture during relocation.
Secure the Drum
  • Many washers and dryers have moving bolts or pins that will secure the drum during relocation. If you no longer have the original kit that came with the appliance, check with a professional service technician for help or advice on the best way to secure the drum of your particular model.
Important Advice When DIY Moving Your Washer and Dryer

Appliances need special care as your prepare for your relocation. Many units have gas supplies or high-voltage connections that require the help of a professional appliance technician. If you hire a mover, double check their policies about moving them. They may not always assist with disconnect, service, or reinstall.

Some movers will ask you to authorize them to pre-arrange for appliance servicing for a move. This service should be provided through a vetted, third-party service and added to the Bill of Lading as an extra cost.

Many movers will not do – and should not do – the following:

  • Disconnect appliances or reconnect them in the new residence.
  • Disconnect utilities.
  • Remove or install window air conditioners or television and radio antennas.
  • Repair appliances.
  • Perform plumbing, wiring, carpentry, or electrical services.

Check with your Global Van Lines Moving Concierge about moving your washer and dryer. The cost for third-party servicing may be far more cost effective than a DIY move that leaves your appliances in disrepair or damaged.

The post Moving Your Washer and Dryer appeared first on Global Van Lines.

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  • Use dishpacks to prepare your dishes, stemware, and glassware for moving. A dishpack, which is a box specifically made for packing dishware, is much hardier than they standard box, and you should use one for fragile items such as collectibles and dishes.
  • Stack and wrap plates in bundles of 2 to 4, and bowls in bundles of 2 to 3. However, fragile china should be wrapped individually prior to bundling.
  • Wrap mugs and glasses separately and individually.
  • Wrap a wineglass stem with separate paper, then wrap the entire glass in packing paper.
  • For items with lids, such as teapots, wrap the item first, then wrap the lid and the item as a bundle.
  • Line a dishpack with plenty of crumpled paper. Begin with the heaviest items at the bottom. Bundles of bowls and plates can be on their side to make space. Layers may be protected with additional cardboard or cellpacks.
A Dish Pack Box Helps to Ensure a Secure Transport
  • When you pack for a long-distance relocation, a dishpack is a worthy investment. This sturdy box has double wall, corrugated construction to protect glassware, china, crystal, and other fragile items during a move.
  • Wrap items of glassware, crystal, and china separately in clean wrapping paper – not newsprint. Begin at the corner, wrap diagonally, and continue to tuck in the overlapping paper as you wrap. You can use newsprint on the outside as extra protection, and use a generous amount of padding for all fragile items.
China and Glassware
  • Your larger china plates and platters should form the lowest layer of the box.
  • Use plenty of packing material as a bottom layer. You should wrap each fragile item separately, then wrap again as a bundle of 2 to 3. Use a double layer of newsprint on the outside to finish.
  • Carefully surround every bundle with additional packing material and fill in any open space. Leave two to three inches at the top for more packing material for additional protection. You can use cardboard dividers for extra sturdiness between layers.
  • Smaller plates, bowls, and saucers should be the next layer.
Bowls and Odd Shaped Dishware
  • Depending on their size, you can use these either as a bottom or a top layer. Wrap them as you do flat plates. Shallow bowls can form the edges of the carton, although deeper bowls should be nested together with packing material between them.
  • Lids for sugar bowls and teapots should be wrapped separately, then turned upside down on top of their mate. Wrap both together and follow with extra layers of newsprint. Even if you use a dishpack or mini-cells for fragile china, wrap tea and coffee cups separately and protect the handles with extra packing material. Pack cups upside down.
  • If you use regular boxes, wrap each item with extra paper. You will need more boxes and space, although you can save money by not purchasing dishpacks.

Your dedicated Moving Concierge can offer you even more tips on how to pack your fragile items. Global Van Lines is the only company to offer this service free of charge. Give us a call today!

The post How to Pack Dishes, Stemware, and Glassware appeared first on Global Van Lines.

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Moving involves so many issues and laborious tasks. You need to strategize and cover unexpected expenses. You spend considerable time organizing a smooth, easy relocation to your new home hoping your nerves and finances survive the process.

Tips for Cutting Down Moving Expenses

Moving your home and life can come at a substantial price – both emotionally and financially. And while you can enjoy the excitement of a new home and neighborhood, you can address the financial impact by following some proving ways to cut moving costs and keep your budget in line throughout the relocation process. Researching rates and services, planning ahead when possible, and rethinking the most appropriate and efficient moving options available to you will help you with a successful relocation plan and cut those expenses.

Hiring a Low Cost Moving Company

Carefully research all the relevant information to find a moving company that fits your budget. Submit a request for a moving quote, and you will receive calls from several movers to offer their services. This is where taking a little extra time pays off. Make sure you select a legitimate company that will provide the best conditions for your specific circumstances. You need high quality services at a sensible price.

  • Get on-site binding written estimates from at least 2 to 3 reputable moving companies and carefully compare the estimates. Ensure that all the details are clearly stated with specifics, all your needs are met, and that you fully understand and agree with the fine print.
  • Ask about extra services and their costs. Read the fine print carefully and pay close attention to the type of liability protection offered, the storage and transportation options, and any third party or subcontractors involved in the move. Some companies have minimum charges, while others may charge for travel time or overtime on certain days.
  • Negotiate for lower costs when possible. Ask for any discounts, ongoing daily specials, coupons or vouchers – anything that can lower the final moving cost. You can negotiate the amount of the requested deposit and ensure that it is refundable if you need to cancel the move or reschedule the date. Just as important, make sure the deposit is refundable if the mover doesn’t perform its duties under the contract. Many moving companies will try to beat or match a competitor’s offer, so let them know if you received a better estimate.
  • Research online reviews and ask for references from friends and family. This is a good way to check how satisfied former customers were or learn of any disputes or claims that arose.
  • Avoid moving scams by verifying the company’s insurance and USDOT number. If the offer seems too good to be true, or if the company accepts only cash, be careful and always double check their credentials.
  • Schedule your move during off peak seasons when possible (autumn and winter), and try to book early. This gives you better opportunities to negotiate lower prices and avoid unpleasant surprises by being properly prepared. You should also set your moving budget early in the process and include items such as the moving company’s rates, additional insurance, extra fees, vehicle shipping, moving your pets, road tolls, fuel, parking fees, hotels and meals along the way if your are driving, airline tickets if you are flying, rents, deposits, supplies, and more.

For even more information about planning a move that keeps costs in control, let us help you free of charge! Your Global Van Lines Moving Concierge offers you access to information and a vast network of vetted professionals at no cost to you. There’s no obligation. Contact us today to get started!

The post Cutting Moving Expenses appeared first on Global Van Lines.

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With our decades of experience, we have collected tips you may never have thought of, and we want to help you in any way we can. So this blog post is about moving tips that may sound crazy, but are tried and true. They will save you time, effort, and money. So, here are several crazy moving tips to get you started.

Don’t Pay for Packing Supplies

If you are paying for a full service move, this won’t apply to you. However, if you are paying for mover to only load, transport, and unload your already packed household items, or if this is a DIY move, then know that you have options for free packing supplies. You only need ingenuity, planning, and a little extra time.

Packing supplies can be a significant expense, especially if you have a large household. A purchase of boxes, bubble wrap, and packing paper can reach into the hundreds of dollars. Yes, you can have them for free.

You can find cardboard boxes from friends, family, neighbors, and co-workers. Also, check Nextdoor.com or your local social media sites. People will frequently offer free moving boxes if you simply pick them up. This is where planning in advance will help. You may need to check the social media sites for several months to collect as many as you need. Even so, if you can find enough for half of your goods, you have saved some real dollars.

You can also check local retailers and ask them for boxes. Grocery stores frequently see this as goodwill with the neighbors who shop with them.

Or, you can use what you have as “boxes.” Backpacks, suitcases, travel bags, tote bags, briefcases, garbage bags, hampers, baskets, plastic bins, and dresser drawers are all suitable for moving some of your items, particularly soft, non-breakable items. In addition, sheets, blankets, bath towels, and some clothing can be used to wrap items rather than packing paper. Newsprint will also work, but be careful about items that may be permanently damaged by news ink.

Remember Those Russian Stacking Dolls?

You can learn a lot about packing from those cute Russian nesting dolls. Or, have you ever been amazed at how Ikea can pack an entire bed set into a portable box? Retailers have made packing a science in recent years.

This may sound like a crazy tip, but maximizing your packing space is crucial to keeping expenses down. Nesting dolls and other similar toys decrease in size so they fit into one another. This is the precise method you should use to pack your household goods. If there is empty air in a wicker basket, fill that basket up. You will save on space and money. You will pack faster and have more room in the moving van.

Global Van Lines Moving Concierge

Would you like more crazy, yet fully effective, moving tips? Simply contact your dedicated Global Van Lines Moving Concierge for a wealth of free advice designed to help you move with ease.

The post Crazy Moving Tips You Never Thought Of appeared first on Global Van Lines.

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You know that knowledge is power, especially for consumers. Signing a moving contract takes a little advanced knowledge about the various moving industry definitions that show up frequently in moving documents. Here is our last installment of our four part series on moving industry terminology definitions:

  • Full service mover. This is the professional to hire when you want each detail of a relocation handled by a moving company, from packing your household goods to preparing fragile, odd-sized, or expensive items for transport. Full service movers can also unpack and set up your personal belongings, dispose of packing materials, and re-assemble furniture.
  • Released value replacement versus full value replacement. You will need to choose between two types of protection from your moving company. The released value replacement is typically lower than full value, frequently just $0.60 per pound of damaged goods. For instance, if a 50 pound item were damaged, the moving company would pay you $30 for replacement or repair. If you choose full value replacement, the company will provide full repair or replacement value for items listed as above $100 per pound.
  • Gross weight. This industry term is the total weight of the moving truck loaded with your household items. This is an important number. The total weight of your goods is typically the determining factor for the calculated cost of the move.
  • Inventory sheets. You will receive inventory sheets on the day of the move. The moving company will list each item for transport. Most professional movers will also tag items as they are packed and loaded, and then record the tag number next to the corresponding item on the inventory sheet. You can use this information to ensure that everything that was picked up got delivered to the proper destination. If you have high value items, you can request that these be listed on a separate inventory list. This is helpful if you need to enter a claim for damage to a high value item.
  • Line haul charges. These are the charges based upon the distance of the transport and how much the gross weight is.
  • SIT, or storage-in-transit. If your household goods need to be stored prior to final delivery into your new home, you can arrange for SIT, but it will cost you extra. Even so, this may be a handy option if there is a gap between when you must move out of your old home and can move into your new home.
  • Valuation. This is an important word to know. Valuation is the cap on what the move may be responsible for if goods are lost or damaged in transit. It is the declared value of your total household goods, and the mover will not be liable for an amount over the valuation.
  • Weight ticket. Once the moving truck is loaded with your goods, it will be weighed on certified scales. You will receive a scale ticket that indicates the total weight of the van before and after it was loaded to determine the weight of your items.

Knowing ahead of time what the moving industry lingo means will help ensure that your move is the smoothest possible. For even more information, contact your Global Van Lines Moving Concierge for free assistance with your relocation.

The post Additional Moving Industry Definitions appeared first on Global Van Lines.

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This is part 3 in our series about understanding moving contracts and the terminology that is specific to the moving industry.

We continue with definitions here:
  • Bill of lading. The Bill of Lading is your receipt that shows the moving company is now in possession of your household goods. It will also contain the contract and define how and where the moving company will transport your items. You need to read this very carefully prior to signing. Ensure that each item is correct, and don’t lose this document! Keep it in a safe place until your relocation is fully completed and you have inspected all your goods.
  • 
Carrier’s liability. This will state the carrier’s liability in relation to the type of coverage you selected. It will also be the determining clause on how you will be reimbursed for household items that are lost, damaged, or destroyed.
  • Claims. Unfortunately, sometimes things do happen and items get damaged. You will need to file a claim with the company. However, you should understand the claims process prior to filing. You want to be appropriately compensated for the damages. You may have set time to file a claim, and if you miss the deadline, which is typically set by the mover, you may no longer have a right to claim damages.
  • 
Consignor/Consignee. It sounds so legal, but keep this in mind. The consignor signs the documents that allow the mover to take possession of the items for transport. The consignee is the person who signs the receipt for the items at their final destination. Some moving companies want the consignor and consignee to be the same person, but you may be able to make other arrangements if necessary.
  • Door-to-door service versus door-to-port service. Most residential moves are door-to-door relocations, which simply means your household items are removed from one home and delivered into the new home. Door-to-port services are typically used for overseas relocations, where your household goods are moved from your home and delivered to a local port near you new location. You may have additional charges for transporting your goods from the port to your new home.
  • Estimates. You can get one of two types of estimates: binding and non-binding. A binding estimates means that you will not be charged above the original estimate as long as the weights were accurately projected. A non-binding estimate is a close and reasonable approximation of the final cost, which includes extra charges. A mover cannot charge you more than 110 percent of the non-binding estimate.

We have one last installment to our four part series on moving industry lingo and contracts. In the meantime, contact your dedicated Global Van Lines Moving Concierge for more assistance free of charge to you.

The post More Moving Terminology Definitions appeared first on Global Van Lines.

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For instance, if any household goods are damaged in transit, your contract may provide for less reimbursement than you want. You might also miss the opportunity to properly inform the moving company about high value or items that need special handling.

We have compiled a list of common terminology that is frequently found in moving contracts. This list will be published over the next three postings, so be sure to check back or subscribe. You can also contact your dedicated Global Van Lines Moving Concierge for personal assistance that is free of charge to you.

  • 110 percent rule. This rule was established by the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration in 2003. This regulation ensures that movers may only charge you 110 percent of the non-binding estimate once your personal, household items are delivered. This means that your final expense should be no more than 110 percent of the non-binding estimate. The exception is if your household goods exceeded the stated amount on the estimate.
  • Assessing costs. These can be additional expenses that may be calculated into the estimate for moving. Some common assessing costs are advanced charges, additional charges, line haul charges, and replacement coverage.
  • Additional charges. You may see these referred to as accessorial charges, which are additional charges that apply to services other than loading, transporting, and unloading your household goods. These can include extra services such as preparing large items such as big screen TVs or pianos for shipping and delivery to locations with inadequate roads for large vehicle access.
  • Advanced charges. You may encounter advanced charges when a third-party company must take some action to give movers access to goods in your home. This can be something such as disconnecting a gas line. The moving company may pay the third party on your behalf, and the cost transferred to your final bill.
  • Agents. You may encounter several agents throughout your relocation process. Agents are representatives of other organizations or companies who assist you or the moving company. You might work with booking agents to schedule your relocation, or you may work with agents who represent local moving companies that complete services on behalf of larger movers. Destination agents, or origin agents, provide assistance with preparing for your move, such as answering questions or packing cartons.

Part three of our four part series will continue with moving industry terminology. If you have any questions in the meantime, we make it easy for you to get the answers. Contact your personal Global Van Lines Moving Concierge for complimentary help that comes with no obligations to you.

The post More on Moving Contracts and What to Know appeared first on Global Van Lines.

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Knowing what the terminology means and understanding the documents is crucial to a smooth and successful move. We have put together this four part series to help you be prepared to deal well with moving contracts.

Key Elements of a Moving Contract: The Mover Estimate

When the professional movers arrive to assess your household possessions to move, you will receive a copy of the moving estimate. This important document will give you an outline of the estimate. It will state whether it is binding or non-binding, and how the final estimate was calculated. This is a great time to ask questions, especially if you have special items that will require different handling.

Order for Service

After the initial estimate, and after you have agreed to the estimate, you will receive an order for service. This is the contract between the moving company and you. The order of service should include every detail such as date of pick up, estimated amount, estimated date of delivery, terms of the contract, and insurance coverage. Other terms may be the type of truck to be used, the cancellation policy, and household goods the mover will not handle. Check for any listing of additional fees that may apply to your specific move.

The order for service is also the agreement that the mover may move your personal items. Read this document carefully. If you have questions or disagree with any notation, speak to the manager in charge immediately. This is the time to negotiate and ensure you get the service you want.

Specific Moving Contract Terminology

Once you have the moving contract in front of you, how do you understand all the lingo that is specific to the moving industry? Contracts are beneficial to both parties, and when both sides understand what the contract spells out, a successful move is much more assured.

Many people have difficulty with the terminology of the contract, which contains common moving terms. Your professional moving company looks at contracts every day, but you may have no understanding of the difference between full-value and released-value replacement or the varying categories of moving estimates.

In our next post on moving contracts, we will delve into defining specific terms used frequently in moving contracts. In the meantime, if you have any questions, simply contact your personal Global Van Lines Moving Concierge, who is available to assist you free of charge.

The post Things to Know About a Moving Contract appeared first on Global Van Lines.

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