Loading...

Follow Global Partnership for Education on Feedspot

Continue with Google
Continue with Facebook
or

Valid
Country: 
Check to make this blog as featured: 
Featured
Mailchimp Status: 
Sent
Caption text: 
Ethiopia’s joint sector review meeting gathered some 70 participants to share experiences and lessons to inform future planning.
Photo credit: 
GPE/Kelley Lynch
Blog Year: 
2019
Add section: 
Body: 

Ethiopia’s joint sector review (JSR) meeting gathered some 70 participants including the country’s minister of Education, Dr. Tilaye Gete, along with state ministers, ambassadors, development agencies, civil society organizations and members of the local education group, to review and assess the status of the education sector.  

The meeting focused on two key elements - reflecting on the challenges and progress achieved to date as outlined in the mid-term review of the current education plan (Education Sector Development Program V), as well as reviewing the draft Education and Training Roadmap 2030. The Education Roadmap 2030 is currently being developed and proposes a series of reforms to transform the country’s education system.

Since Ethiopia hadn’t conducted a JSR since 2016, this meeting was an opportunity for all stakeholders to engage in an open dialogue and share experiences and lessons to inform future planning. The meeting’s focus was reinforced during the opening remarks by Dr. Sai Väyrynen, Co-chair of Ethiopia’s Education Technical Working Group (ETWG), which brings partners together around sector priorities.

Animation: 
Fade
Image Type:: 
Centered - Medium (860px max)
Image: 
Caption text: 
Dr. Sai Väyrynen, Co-chair of Ethiopia’s Education Technical Working Group (ETWG), during her opening remarks.
Photo credit: 
GPE/Kelley Lynch
Animation: 
Fade
Body: 

“Education institutions aren’t learning organizations, and they should be. Learning doesn’t only refer to students, but also to staff – the teachers, researchers, administrators, lecturers, professors and coordinators. If organizations don’t learn, changes are unlikely to happen. Today we are here to learn and critically think about the past and the future. Understanding the past is much easier than imagining the future.”

Animation: 
Fade
Body: 

The minister of Education then welcomed participants and reviewed the main achievements and challenges outlined in the Education Roadmap 2030 including:

  • Increasing the number of primary schools from over 12,000 in 2001/2 to 38,000 in 2017/18.
  • Increasing the net enrollment rate for primary education from 54% in 2002/03 to over 94% in 2014/15.
  • Increasing the gender parity index from 0.7 in 1999/2000 to 0.93 in 2014/15.
  • Developing a national early childhood care and education (ECCE) policy framework and launching ECCE teacher education programs.
  • Increasing the number of secondary schools from 278 to 3500 in the past 20 years.

Despite these great achievements, several challenges were also highlighted including: high dropout rates, low graduation rates, low participation of disadvantaged groups (including children with disabilities) in primary education, poor learning outcomes, as well as the absence of a standardized national curriculum. Among the recommendations to address these challenges were improving teachers’ quality, ensuring free and compulsory primary education, and creating a safe environment for children in school.

Animation: 
Fade
Image Type:: 
Centered - Medium (860px max)
Image: 
Caption text: 
Ethiopia's country’s minister of Education, Dr. Tilaye Gete, addresses JSR participants.
Photo credit: 
GPE/Kelley Lynch
Animation: 
Fade
subscribe: 
Subscribe to our blog alerts
Animation: 
Fade
Body: 
A fruitful dialogue between partners

JSR participants were divided into groups to share their thoughts on the strategy and brainstorm on how the government of Ethiopia can further improve collaboration with development partners in order to achieve better results in education.

Participants were deeply engaged in dialogue and provided several insights and recommendations including:

  • The Education Roadmap 2030 is highly ambitious and outlines numerous priorities; prioritizing certain interventions could make the strategy more focused and achievable.
  • It would be useful to further clarify on how past achievements and challenges have informed proposed decisions and reforms.
  • CSOs should be more actively engaged to better support the Education Roadmap 2030 going forward.
More children in school, but need for expanded access in ECCE and secondary schools

The mid-term review analyzed the progress made during the first three years of the education sector development program V implementation. It offered an opportunity to identify key achievements and challenges preventing progress in quality, access, equity, and efficiency, as well as present recommendations to overcome these barriers. 

The mid-term review was based on extensive quantitative and qualitative research using EMIS data, implementation reports for GEQIP I and II[1], annual and biannual official reports, findings from focus groups, as well as reports of education development partners to name a few.

Mr. Elias Wakjira, Director of the Planning and Resource Mobilization Directorate, Ethiopia’s ministry of Education, presented the mid-term review report. The highlighted key achievements included:

  • 15 million new students in primary education, signaling the commitment of the government to expand education opportunities.
  • The dropout rates for grades 1-8 decreased to less than 10% in three years.
  • Access to secondary education showed significant improvement, increasing from 25% to 47.5% between 2014 and 2017.

Regarding the challenges that remain to be addressed in the near future, several were mentioned including that progress in ECCE lags behind other sectors. There is also a need to continue constructing additional secondary schools to meet the rising demand and addressing the needs of internally displaced students, refugees and homeless children.

Several recommendations were discussed, such as launching awareness programs to reach parents and the community on the importance of ECCE; improving education in emergencies support; and building new secondary schools throughout the country.

The feedback collected from stakeholders during the meeting will be used to inform the preparation of the next education plan and the annual work plan. It will also be used to review current education strategies and policies to achieve better results. Additionally, a report with the main findings and recommendations will be written following the JSR meeting.

Participants share their thoughts on the JSR

Several participants expressed how JSRs are an important forum to improve dialogue between partners and the government, as well as to review progress and plan for the future:
 

Animation: 
Fade
Slideshow token:: 
{GPE-SLIDESHOW-28778-DISPLAY}
Slideshow type:: 
Centered – Large (1170px)
Animation: 
Fade
Body: 
GPE’s support to Ethiopia

GPE grants to Ethiopia totaling US$368 million have supported education reforms to improve the quality of teaching and learning in approximately 40,000 schools. GPE funding contributes to the General Education Quality Improvement Program (GEQIP), a pooled fund established in 2008 supported by GPE along with IDA, DFID, Finland, Italy, Norway, UNICEF and USAID to focus on better alignment with the country’s education priorities.

Animation: 
Fade
Link: 
The General Education Quality Improvement Program (GEQIP), is a pooled fund supported by GPE along with IDA, DFID, Finland, Italy, Norway, UNICEF and USAID. GEQIP aims to improve the quality of education in all schools in Ethiopia.
Animation: 
Fade
Blog type:: 
Standard
Story blog main image opacity: 
50%
Featured blog check: 
Check this to make this content featured
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 
Author: 
Check to make this blog as featured: 
Featured
Mailchimp Status: 
Old Content
Caption text: 
University of Ghana students listen to their political science professor, Dr. Evans Aggrey-Darkoh in Accra, Ghana.
Photo credit: 
Dominic Chavez/World Bank
Blog Year: 
2019
Add section: 
Body: 

This post is the seventh in a blog series published in 2019 in the context of a collaboration between the Association for the Development of Education in Africa (ADEA) and the Global Partnership for Education (GPE)

Today, it is becoming increasingly important for developing economies to adapt to the rapidly changing skills landscape. To become more competitive and follow the fast pace of technological innovation globally, developing economies need to re-skill their workforce with the skills for the jobs of the future.

Nevertheless, is this optimistic account of a future of high-skilled work for all justified? Where does Africa’s developing economies fit into this trajectory?

Animation: 
Fade
subscribe: 
Subscribe to our blog alerts
Animation: 
Fade
Body: 
African digitally-driven economies

Modern economies are transforming from agricultural and industrial economies to information and knowledge-based economies. Such rapid transformation has had significant impact on social, economic, political and cultural development across the world.

For such development and growth, information and communication technology (ICT) is seen as both a driver and an enabler towards establishing and developing the various sectors that contribute to stronger, more developed and richer societies. Africa is on a journey of transformation towards information and knowledge societies.

Animation: 
Fade
Body: 

The use of ICT systems will revolutionize the growth and management of the under-developed agricultural sector across Africa and make it an attractive career option for young people.

Animation: 
Fade
Body: 

Challenges of ICT in Africa often relate to a lack of human and financial resources, which translate into inadequate and insufficient skills supply and skills gaps as well as inadequate infrastructure and communication platforms. To close this digital divide with the developed world, Africa must lower the cost of capital, provide reliable energy resources and raise the pace of digitization and the provision of high-speed internet.

The future of jobs in Africa

Africa must match today's skills to tomorrow's jobs. With more than 60% of its population under the age of 25, sub-Saharan Africa is the world’s youngest region. By 2030, the continent’s working-age population is set to increase by two-thirds, from 370 million adults in 2010 to over 600 million in 2030.

At current rates, 15 to 20 million increasingly well-educated young people are expected to join the continent’s workforce every year until 2030. This poses a challenge to governments and businesses: how can they make the most of the talent of this up-and-coming generation as well as those under-educated and under-skilled youth who outnumber those with post-secondary education?

Within the – still small – pool of tertiary-educated Africans exists a wide range of specializations: 16% of this group have studied engineering, manufacturing and construction; 11% ICT and 11% natural sciences, mathematics and statistics.

Fast-growing professions on the continent include food technologists, 3D designers and data collection and analysis workers, as well as people working in healthcare and education. The digital media-enabled creative and cultural industries offer huge opportunities for employment. Strong demand for STEM and ICT skills already exists across a wide range of sectors.

The future of skills in Africa

In unpacking the different skills needs across types of tasks, core skills that need to be developed include:

  • job-neutral digital skills
  • job-specific digital skills
  • job-neutral soft skills such as communication, management, analytical and critical thinking and creativity.

Ancillary skills that can support the digital economy include physical skills that require dexterity and socio-emotional and interpersonal skills for low-skilled service and sales occupations.

The digital economy core skills nexus
Animation: 
Fade
Image Type:: 
Centered - Medium (860px max)
Image: 
Caption text: 
Source: https://pathwayscommission.bsg.ox.ac.uk/sites/default/files/2019-01/Skills-needs-paper.pdf pg 21
Animation: 
Fade
Body: 

The 2016 World Economic Forum Report finds that the percentage of jobs requiring cognitive abilities as a core skill is expected to rise to 15%, from a current level of 11%. Similarly, there are going to be changes in skills requirement within a job. For instance, among all the jobs requiring cognitive abilities as part of their core skill sets, 52% of the jobs do not have such requirements now and are expected to have increasing demand of cognitive abilities by 2020. As per the report, cognitive abilities, system skills (i.e. evaluation and analysis of systems) and complex problem-solving skills are expected to be the top three skills demanded in the future.

Clearly, education and training systems, at all levels, must play central roles in providing the new skills required to drive the development of African knowledge economies. 

Animation: 
Fade
Body: 

Urgent curricula design and developments are required to reflect current employer-led consensus that a strong emphasis must be placed on creativity, teamwork, employability, self-employment, and lifelong learning.

Animation: 
Fade
Body: 

National technical and vocational education and training (TVET) systems require comprehensive reforms and increased funding to allow for curriculum reforms, tutor trainings and a wide range of digital equipment.

Some African governments are already focusing on TVET and technical and vocational skills development (TVSD) reforms as the key route to youth employment, and have earmarked additional funding for the sector. Increasingly, young people are looking to TVET/TVSD to get the technical skills and entrepreneurial know-how they need to launch start-ups.      

The key role of the Global e-Schools & Communities Initiative

The Global e-Schools & Communities Initiative (GeSCI) is an international non-profit, non-governmental organization, headquartered in Nairobi, Kenya, that works with developing country governments and state agencies to integrate ICT in education, science, technology and innovation systems through professional, institutional and technical capacity building.

In addition, GeSCI has adopted the approach of integrating 21st century skills at school, vocational and tertiary levels and has sought to improve the capacities of youth and children to engage in the digital economy.

In the last few years, GESCI has pioneered a new model for digitally driven skills and entrepreneurship for youth, which can be scaled across Africa. The original focus of using “living lab” to empower youth in the digital creative media is now being developed with partners as an accredited, internationally recognized certificate in animation and visual effects for disadvantaged youth in refugee camps and host communities.

The model is a 9 to 12-month digital training hub that provides a mix of expert tuition and skills development to industry standards in three areas: animation, digital games and apps, and music design and production.

Using industry mentors and support, a cohort of up to 40 young entrepreneurs collaborate, leading to the formation of start-ups. The model allows one to develop blueprints and models for scaling and applications in other ICT-based skills environments. Incorporation of the living lab methodology and outcomes from policy fora are used to refine the model.

GESCI has also developed an e-readiness system assessment tool for the education sector that helps countries to assess their enabling environment, their approaches to school management of ICT integration, teacher development, integration of ICT in the curriculum, community outreach and the necessary levels of ICT infrastructure and equipment for successful integration. Additionally, we have developed a tool that allows government to estimate various scenarios of the likely purchase and roll-out costs of ICT integration in education depending on the type of equipment and infrastructure proposed.

Finally, as an international non-governmental organization (INGO), GESCI’s approach, in developing and trialing new whole school digitally - driven models for teaching and learning as well as new digital skills for employment programs, is to provide Governments with realistic, scalable and sustainable models for reforms of education and training systems.

Animation: 
Fade
Blog type:: 
Standard
Story blog main image opacity: 
50%
Featured blog check: 
Check this to make this content featured
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 
Check to make this blog as featured: 
Featured
Donor countries: 
Mailchimp Status: 
Old Content
Caption text: 
Alice Albright during G7 Ministerial Forums.
Photo credit: 
Sinead Andersen
Blog Year: 
2019
Add section: 
Body: 

The last two weeks in Paris can only be described a momentous one in the fight to secure Education for All. Alice Albright, CEO of the Global Partnership for Education, addressed key G7 forums and underscored the urgent role of education in realizing an equal, peaceful, stable and prosperous future for all.

Animation: 
Fade
Body: 

"Though complex to achieve, it is as simple as this: our future will stand or fall on the quality of our education systems today and their ability to fulfil the potential of every individual”, Alice said. “Whether meeting the Civil Society 7 or G7 Development Ministers, my message is the same: we need more teachers of every gender at every level. We need to focus on learning not only schooling and that girls can only access and continue an education if they are safe – whether from conflict, sexual violence, childhood marriage or harmful traditional practices.”

Animation: 
Fade
Body: 

At the meeting with G7 development ministers on July 4 – chaired by the French Minister of Foreign Affairs, Alice addressed the group in her capacity as member of the G7 Gender Equality Advisory Council.  In the presence of Ministers from Niger, Mali, Mauritania, Chad, Burkina Faso, the G5 Sahel Alliance and international organizations including UN agencies and the World Bank, she emphasized that persistent gender inequality is a root cause of fragility and cycles of poverty, girls disproportionately affected because of sexual and gender-based violence, and harmful traditional practices such as child marriage.

Whether in Mali or Burkina Faso, Niger or Yemen, insecurity affects many parts of the Sahel region. We see schools closed, teachers absent and students’ learning on standby. Yet the painful irony is that education is never more necessary than during times of crisis. Investments in education can also reduce the chances of conflict in the future.

Animation: 
Fade
subscribe: 
Subscribe to our blog alerts
Animation: 
Fade
Body: 
Meeting with G7 development and education ministers

The following day saw a unique opportunity for the global education agenda, with Alice addressing the G7 Joint Development and Education Ministerial. She called on the group to urgently address the learning crisis in the Sahel, cautioning against ad hoc interventions and championing the importance of leadership at country level to build strong gender-responsive education systems. 

The ministers of education from Sahel countries and Senegal joined the discussions, and each gave stark accounts of the challenges in providing quality education, especially to girls. They shared common challenges such as not having an effective teacher work-force, persistent insecurity, high rates of early forced marriage and pregnancy as well as other harmful traditional practices.

The ministers highlighted the especially difficult circumstances for girls living in rural areas without sanitation and hygiene facilities in school to meet their basic needs. GPE works with all of these countries to address the issues by building stronger education systems that pay special attention to the needs of girls. 

Animation: 
Fade
Animation: 
Fade
Background Color: 
 
Font color: 
 
Description: 
<p><a href="https://www.globalpartnership.org/news-and-media/news/statement-alice-albright-welcoming-g7-ministers-commitment-support-childrens-education-worlds-poorest-countries">Statement by Alice Albright welcoming G7 ministers’ commitment to support children’s education in the world’s poorest countries</a>
Body: 
Innovating for women and girls

Later the same day, UNESCO and the French Government co-hosted the ‘Innovating for Women and Girls: Empowerment Through Education’ Summit - uniting leaders from across all sectors in their support for greater ambition and delivery around the global education goal (SDG 4).

Following Alice’s interventions on how education can help to tackle gender stereotypes, President Macron and Malala Yusufzai both took the stage to champion the ultimate power of education for achieving global transformation. 

President Macron spoke of Frances’ support for the Global Partnership for Education and received raucous support from the audience when he said “what we owe to ourselves, what we owe to our youth and to our children, is that all the children of the world, girls and boys, are educated. And if there are obstacles on the way to school, we must bring them down. If we are told that it is the lack of transport, we must create it. If we are told that it is insecurity, we must fight against it. If we are told that it is the lack of means, we must bring it. If we are told that it is the lack of trained teachers, we must provide them”.

Not just a talking shop

This G7 ministerial week was a pivotal moment in building commitment from donor and developing country governments alike to achieve SDG 4 by 2030. So, what were some of the key announcements?

  • Adoption of France’s Gender at the Centre Initiative, developed by GPE and UNGEI, will be financially supported by Canada, European Union, France, Germany, and the United Kingdom to support sustainable development through education plans that respond to gender needs and dynamics.
  • A ministerial joint communique outlining further support to education, particularly for girls and for the furthest behind, including commitment to concrete steps to make this a reality.
  • The French government will launch a women’s entrepreneurship fund with the African Development Bank at the G7 leaders’ summit next month.
  • Creation of a special fund of 120 million euros housed to improve the status and rights of women around the world, especially in the field of education.
  • A direct call from President Macron for the G7 to double the funds for education in the Sahel, particularly for young girls.
  • The first ever joint G7/G5 Sahel communique which promoted the vital importance of a human capital-based approach and education as a cornerstone within this.
Adding a gender lens to the G7

Our sojourn in Paris ended with a meeting of the G7 Gender Equality Advisory Council, a group of amazing feminists who have been tasked by President Macron to ensure all G7 negotiations have a gender lens. The Council is now putting the final touches to a report they will release along with a call to action to all countries to enact and implement progressive legislative frameworks that advance gender equality. There is more to come on this in the coming weeks – hopefully to be announced at the G7 Leaders’ Summit to be held in Biarritz in August.

What is clear from our meetings in Paris over the past two weeks is that no country in the world is immune from gender inequality and its impact is global. The quest to achieve a gender equal world is one that must unite us all. 

The power of education is transformative, we must do more to ensure girls and boys in all countries of the world can be inspired and equipped to build a better future by having access to quality education.

Animation: 
Fade
Blog type:: 
Standard
Story blog main image opacity: 
50%
Featured blog check: 
Check this to make this content featured
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 
Country: 
Check to make this blog as featured: 
Featured
Mailchimp Status: 
Ready to Go
Caption text: 
Sakinatu, Nafisa and Morinatu are three students at the Lycée Nelson Mandela, an all-female high school in Burkina Faso’s capital Ouagadougou.
Photo credit: 
GPE/Roland Zanre
Blog Year: 
2019
Add section: 
Body: 

Sakinatu, Nafisa and Morinatu are three students at the Lycée Nelson Mandela, an all-female high school in Burkina Faso’s capital Ouagadougou. These bright young women have probably seen more hardship in their short lives than most of us can imagine. They come from poor families who can barely afford to send them to school — a daily journey which is long and unsafe. They have also seen how poverty has driven some of their former classmates to early marriage and even prostitution.

These three girls are not alone. Every single day, all over the world, girls face physical, psychological and sexual violence and harassment on their way to school – and, too often, in school – by men, peers and even teachers. While girls are disproportionally affected, boys also experience sexual violence, corporal punishment in the classroom, and bullying and harassment by fellow students.

And thousands of children are left traumatized when their schools are attacked by militant groups. Between 2013 and 2017, more than 12,000 students and teachers were harmed in more than 12,700 attacks on education in more than 70 countries.

Each case represents a shocking failure of basic morality, when innocent people are targeted by parties to conflict.

It is a sad truth that schools are not the safe space they should be and that we all want them to be.

Children themselves are sounding the alarm. In a recent UNICEF poll of young people, which received more than 1 million responses from over 160 countries, two out of three respondents said they had felt afraid of violence in and around their school.

This is unacceptable.

Animation: 
Fade
subscribe: 
Subscribe to our blog alerts
Animation: 
Fade
Body: 
Ending violence improves learning — and strengthens economies

UNICEF and the Global Partnership for Education, the organizations we represent, are working tirelessly to improve the quality of education for all children and ensure they can learn in safety and without violence. We know that safe and equitable education, particularly for girls, is instrumental in reducing poverty, inequality and violence against children.

For example, if all girls received a quality education, child marriage would virtually be eradicated, and lifetime earnings for women could increase by US$15 to US$30 billion globally.

On the other hand, we know that violence hampers learning, undermines educational investments, and is detrimental to children and adults alike.

Animation: 
Fade
Body: 
#SafeToLearn

This week marks an important moment to shine a spotlight on this critical issue.

The high-level political forum on sustainable development taking place at the United Nations in New York brings together ministers and political leaders from around the world to review progress against the Sustainable Development Goals. This includes Goal 4 on inclusive and equitable quality education, and Goal 16, which captures the world’s commitment to end abuse, exploitation, trafficking and all forms of violence against and torture of children.

As we already know from the just published UNESCO report Meeting Our Commitments, the world is off-track in achieving the global education goal. At our current pace, one in six children will still be excluded from education in 2030.

From health to protection, to gender and economic growth, education is at the core of all 17 SDGs. Failing to achieve the education goal will hamper our ability to achieve all of them.

We must take urgent action — now. We’re calling for all governments to listen to what young people are telling us, and address the scourge of violence in schools.

On July 15, at the high-level political forum, we will join governments and global organizations to pledge our support to #SafeToLearn — a five-year initiative dedicated to ending violence in schools by 2024. This campaign is inspired by the UNICEF global poll, and the #ENDviolence Youth Manifesto prepared by 100 young people from around the world in South Africa last December.

Animation: 
Fade
Body: 

#SafeToLearn calls on governments, civil society organizations, communities, teachers and children themselves to generate commitments and create action. All to help to make schools safer – for all children.

Animation: 
Fade
Body: 

A five-point Call to Action has been developed, setting out what needs to happen to end violence in schools. It recognizes that we need to work across many sectors, including health and justice, and with all levels of the wider school community.

Countries around the world are formally endorsing it.

We’ll be there to express our organizations’ commitments and to call on governments and communities around the world to support #SafeToLearn and ensure that children’s schooling is safe and free from violence.

Because children need to know that schools are sanctuaries of hope and opportunity, where children are #SafetoLearn, advance and thrive.

Let’s give them that opportunity.

Animation: 
Fade
Blog type:: 
Standard
Story blog main image opacity: 
50%
Featured blog check: 
Check this to make this content featured
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 
Country: 
Check to make this blog as featured: 
Featured
Mailchimp Status: 
Ready to Go
Caption text: 
Habtam Asfaw walks to the Meskerem School in the region of Bahar Dar, Ethiopia, where she attends grade 6.
Photo credit: 
GPE/Kelley Lynch
Blog Year: 
2019
Add section: 
Body: 

Every day, Habtam Asfaw walks to the Meskerem School in Bahar Dar, Ethiopia, where she attends grade 6. It wouldn’t be a long walk, if she didn’t have to deal with boys and men harassing and frightening her along the busy road. Every single day, all over the world, girls like Habtam face physical, psychological, and sexual harassment and violence on their way to and from school and while in school.

Since Habtam attended a life skills training at school, she has more confidence and feels better prepared to respond to harassment. The monthly training offers a space where girls can share their experiences and fears with female teachers who advise them on issues like menstruation, family planning, gender-based violence and conflict resolution.

Animation: 
Fade
subscribe: 
Subscribe to our blog alerts
Animation: 
Fade
Body: 

To support girls’ attendance, the Meskerem School has also built a menstrual hygiene facility where girls can take a break, rest, and change their clothes if necessary. This ensures that girls can manage their periods in a safe, hygienic and comfortable way and reduces menstruation-related absenteeism among girls.

Animation: 
Fade
Body: 

UNICEF estimates that 1 in 10 school-age African girls do not attend school during menstruation

Animation: 
Fade
Body: 

Supported by GPE and other education partners, Ethiopian schools receive grants to improve their schools, focusing on what’s most needed. This often includes interventions to support girls’ education such as life skills training, refurbishing classrooms, and building separate toilets for boys and girls.

In just four years between 2013/14 and 2017/18, the completion rate of girls in grade 8 increased from 47% to 56%, and the repetition for girls in grades 1-8 decreased from 8% to 5%. More schools in Ethiopia are becoming girl-friendly and for girls like Habtam, a safe school environment is key to continuing and completing her education.

Animation: 
Fade
Blog type:: 
Standard
Story blog main image opacity: 
50%
Featured blog check: 
Check this to make this content featured
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 
Check to make this blog as featured: 
Featured
Mailchimp Status: 
Ready to Go
Caption text: 
Student in class. Couronne Nord 1 Primary School, Niamey, Niger.
Photo credit: 
GPE/Kelley Lynch
Blog Year: 
2019
… and without rapid change, sub-Saharan Africa will fall further behind
Add section: 
Body: 

We are one-third of the way towards the 2030 deadline for the achievement of the Agenda for Sustainable Development, which includes Sustainable Development Goal 4 (SDG 4): a quality education for all. But the world is severely behind on its commitments, and rapidly running out of time. As political leaders meet at this week’s High-level Political Forum (HLPF), the official mechanism to review progress towards the 2030 Agenda, the first-ever projections on the prospects for achieving SDG 4 show that the world is woefully off track. 

This year, the generation of students that is due to finish secondary education by 2030 should be going to school for the first time. But according to the projections, published by the UNESCO Institute for Statistics (UIS) and the Global Education Monitoring Report, one in six children aged 6-17 will still be excluded from education in 2030, and only six in 10 young people will complete secondary education. In other words, without action that propels us far beyond business as usual, we simply will not make it.

Animation: 
Fade
subscribe: 
Subscribe to our blog alerts
Animation: 
Fade
Body: 
Challenges for sub-Saharan Africa

The global picture is worrying enough. But one region faces even greater challenges to its achievement of SDG 4: sub-Saharan Africa. Across the data, we see a region that is being outpaced by progress elsewhere and falling further and further behind.

By 2030, the region will still be far from the goal of universal and primary education in 2030. According to the new projections for low-income countries, all but a handful of which are in sub-Saharan Africa, 19% of children, 31% of adolescents and 51% of youth will still be out of school in 2030.   

Currently, in low-income countries just 68% complete primary and 19% upper secondary education. By 2030, just eight in 10 will be completing primary school (a target that should have been achieved in 2015) and just one in four will be completing secondary school (the 2030 target).

The situation is extreme for countries in sub-Saharan Africa, where the school-age population is growing faster than elsewhere in the world. Data show that the region’s share of the world’s out-of-school children of primary school age grew from 41% in 2000 to 54% in 2017.

The challenges for the region go beyond access to schooling, to the quality of the education on offer. There are concerns that this quality is in decline in some part of the region. Data from the Analysis Program of CONFEMEN Education Systems (PASEC) show that only 42% of grade 6 students in the assessed Francophone African countries achieve minimum proficiency. On current trends, that proportion could drop by nearly one-third by 2030.

Animation: 
Fade
Image Type:: 
Centered - Medium (860px max)
Image: 
Caption text: 
Percentage of students who reach minimum proficiency level in reading, current level and projections to reach 2030 by scenarios<br > Blue line: Needed - Yellow line: Best - Red line: Average <br > Analysis program of CONFEMEN education systems (PASEC)
Animation: 
Fade
Body: 

Such concerns are heightened by a fall in the proportion of trained teachers in sub-Saharan Africa since 2000, mostly because schools are hiring contract teachers – often unqualified – to respond to the growing demand for education. Only 64% of primary and 50% of secondary school teachers in the region have the minimum required training.

Animation: 
Fade
Image Type:: 
Centered - Medium (860px max)
Image: 
Caption text: 
Percentage of trained teachers by region, 2000–2017
Animation: 
Fade
Body: 
Lack of aid, lack of progress
Animation: 
Fade
Image Type:: 
Centered - Medium (860px max)
Image: 
Animation: 
Fade
Body: 

One major factor in the lack of progress being made in sub-Saharan Africa and in other regions is that aid to education has stalled. Most notably, progress on the out-of-school rate in low-income countries came to a complete stop when the rate reached 20% -- coinciding with a sudden halt in the growth of aid to education after the global financial crisis.

The GEM Report has estimated that the annual funding gap is at least US$39 billion per year in low- and lower-middle-income countries. To close that gap, aid to education needs to increase six-fold from its 2010 levels. Yet aid to education, which had more than doubled in the 2000s, has remained stagnant since 2010. The share of education in total official development assistance, excluding debt relief, has dropped from 10% in 2010 to 7% in 2017 – a clear signal that education has moved down the list of priorities for donors.

Animation: 
Fade
Body: 

In FY 18, the Global Partnership for Education had close to US$1.2 billion in active grants (82% of all active grants) in 26 sub-Saharan African partner countries, in particular to support the most marginalized children who don’t go to school.

Animation: 
Fade
Body: 
The clock is ticking: time to commit

If we do not reach SDG 4, we will not reach any of the other global goals of the 2030 Agenda. The new projections raise the grim prospect of failing an entire generation, even though such a failure is entirely preventable. The world can easily afford the relatively small investment in education that is needed to reach the feasible goal: a quality education for all.  We have one message for the political leaders meeting this week at the HLPF: business as usual for education has to end. It is time for them to #Commit2Education.

Animation: 
Fade
Blog type:: 
Standard
Story blog main image opacity: 
50%
Featured blog check: 
Check this to make this content featured
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 
Check to make this blog as featured: 
Featured
Mailchimp Status: 
Ready to Go
Caption text: 
A teacher in class with her students. Mauritania.
Photo credit: 
GPE/Kelley Lynch
Blog Year: 
2019
Add section: 
Body: 

Significant progress is needed to improve education quality in developing countries. The UNESCO Institute for Statistics estimates that 617 million children worldwide are not achieving minimum proficiency levels in reading and mathematics; nearly all of these children are in low-income countries.

At the current pace of change, we will not achieve Sustainable Development Goal 4—ensure inclusive and equitable quality education and promote lifelong learning opportunities for all—by 2030, leaving many children behind. The status quo will mean a ‘100-year gap’ for poor children to catch up with the educational levels of today’s wealthy children. If we are serious about SDG 4 and accelerating the pace of change, we must find new ways of overcoming the learning crisis.

Animation: 
Fade
subscribe: 
Subscribe to our blog alerts
Animation: 
Fade
Body: 
5 critical issues to improve education outcomes

Five issues hamper the pace of improved education outcomes across the globe:

1. Limited knowledge about what works

Global evidence points to the characteristics of well-functioning education systems. Yet, a recent review of the impact of education interventions on learning and school participation in low- and middle-income countries noted that there is little available evidence about what does or does not make interventions work, or about the costs of implementing them.

Further, as recently observed, when relevant evidence is available, dissemination is often weak, especially among key education stakeholders in developing countries. To improve policy and practice and close the educational gap between rich and poor children, we need a much better approach to collect and disseminate dependable evidence about effective education interventions.

2. The challenges of scaling educational innovations

Expanding the use of innovations that demonstrate impact as pilots is crucial to accelerating positive change. Yet scaling is challenging in terms of funding and timing, and despite the proliferation of education innovations, there is limited evidence about how to scale initiatives that improve learning outcomes.

In recent years, projects such as Journeys to Scale and Millions Learning have generated important insights into successful scaling practice. Yet more knowledge and experience are required to understand why, for instance, the Cambodian attempt to scale early childhood development centers and preschools had varied and limited impact on child development, whereas the approach of getting textbooks to schools in Burundi proved successful, as noted in the World Development Report 2018.

3. The need for nationally relevant responses

Effective education systems are those that work with and best respond to national political, economic and cultural dynamics. Yet while it is universally acknowledged that context matters, contextualization remains challenging in developing countries because most systems refinements and innovations are sourced, designed and supported internationally, far removed  from national realities.

For instance, while the learning crisis may be greatest across countries in sub-Saharan Africa, because these countries represent extremely heterogeneous contexts, attempts to accelerate change can only be successful if they are designed with specific country dynamics in mind, and include capacity development to adapt existing solutions.

4. The limited use of evidence in policy and planning

The quality of education will not improve without the effective implementation of robust policies. While there is increasing demand for the use of evidence in policy dialogue and planning in many developing countries, governments often have limited access to relevant evidence, and also face capacity constraints to use available evidence to shape policies and practices.

To accelerate the pace of improving education quality we must ensure, first, that governments have access to evidence-based research and, second, that they have the capacity to uptake evidence and innovations in their education sector.

5. Limited investments in knowledge sharing

The above issues are further intensified by very low investments in knowledge sharing that can help scale effective innovations, coordinate efforts across borders, and empower local education systems. Currently, only 3% of official development assistance in education is allocated to the production of global public goods, whereas this figure is 21% in the health sector.

If we are to close the 100-year gap, we need increased investments in global public goods to facilitate knowledge sharing across borders and disseminate effective practices adapted for national or local contexts.

Animation: 
Fade
Body: 
GPE’s Knowledge and Innovation Exchange

The GPE Knowledge and Innovation Exchange (KIX) is a joint endeavor between GPE and IDRC that aims to respond to these challenges and strengthen education systems in 68 partner countries. GPE brings its network of committed partners and experience of supporting improved sector planning, implementation and system strengthening; IDRC brings a wealth of experience in supporting and disseminating research and innovation to build healthier, equitable and more prosperous societies in the developing world.

Implemented by IDRC and with a budget of close to US$63 million over five years, KIX will find, fund and help scale proven responses to key educational challenges identified by partner countries, and ensure these solutions feed into national education sector policy and planning processes.

Animation: 
Fade
Body: 

KIX will be shaped by demand from national governments and driven by what countries consider to be their principal policy challenges.

Animation: 
Fade
Body: 

KIX will also fund new research to fill gaps in evidence and knowledge, generate innovative solutions to issues identified by partner countries, and strengthen the capacity of governments to innovate, generate and use evidence and data. In doing so, KIX will expand the ‘learning ecosystem’ of Southern-based organizations to learn, innovate, build and use evidence, in turn deepening our collective understanding of successfully scaling innovations to make education systems more effective.

KIX will rely on four regional hubs where partners will come together to share information, innovation and relevant practices, and will provide grants at the global and regional levels to invest in knowledge generation and innovation, and to scale proven approaches.

KIX will focus initially on six themes proposed by developing country governments and partner organizations as priority areas. And as a first step to identifying evidence and knowledge gaps, in consultation with international and developing country experts, discussion papers have been developed by thematic specialists: Luis Crouch on data systems, Kate Anderson on learning assessment systems, Kwame Akyeampong on teaching and learning, Elaine Unterhalter on gender equality, Pauline Rose on equity and inclusion, and Francis Aboud and Kerrie Proulx on early childhood care and education.

Animation: 
Fade
Body: 
KIX is up and running

KIX is scheduled to roll out over the coming months. First steps include establishing the regional hubs and launching the call for KIX Global Grants.

Earlier this month, we launched a call for expressions of interest for organizations interested to apply as learning partners for the regional hubs. These partners will facilitate the learning and peer exchange among GPE partner countries.

And next week, we will launch the first call for KIX global grants to develop knowledge and evidence for the adoption, adaptation and scaling of promising innovations in partner countries. The global grants will fund projects in support of adopting, adapting, and scaling promising innovations in GPE countries across the six thematic areas (the KIX discussion papers will be released alongside the call for global grants). We anticipate these grants will improve our understanding of how to scale innovative, cost-effective and sustainable education responses within GPE partner countries.

Additional elements will be implemented over the next year including the KIX digital platform, contracting a research partner to accompany all KIX grants, and launching KIX regional grants in all four regions. Updates will be available through the GPE KIX webpage and mailing list.

We are tremendously excited about this joint endeavor and look forward to working with partner countries and organizations around the world to accelerate the pace of change and improve education quality for the most disadvantaged children now and into the future.

Animation: 
Fade
Blog type:: 
Standard
Story blog main image opacity: 
50%
Featured blog check: 
Check this to make this content featured
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 
Country: 
Check to make this blog as featured: 
Featured
Mailchimp Status: 
Ready to Go
Photo credit: 
Fadi Arouri
Blog Year: 
2019
Add section: 
Body: 

By the end of 2018, over 70 million individuals were forcibly displaced worldwide as a direct result of persecution, conflict, violence, as well as human rights violations. This represents an increase of 2.3 million from the previous year. The world counts over 25 million refugees, 41 million internally displaced people, and 3.5 million asylum-seekers.

As of 2018, conflict has become a negative characteristic of the contemporary Middle East, forcing millions of individuals and families to flee their homes. Of the 70 million displaced people worldwide, close to 40% originate from the Arab region, mainly Syria and Palestine. 

Education: a fundamental human right to ensure in times of emergencies
Animation: 
Fade
Image Type:: 
Centered - Medium (860px max)
Image: 
Photo credit: 
Fadi Arouri
Animation: 
Fade
Body: 

The right to education is one of the fundamental rights guaranteed through numerous international conventions and agreements, such as, but not limited to, the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights, the Convention on the Rights of the Child, the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women

Under the Global Campaign for Education's Global Action Week overarching theme: "Making the right to an inclusive, equitable, quality, free public education a reality", the Arab Campaign for Education for All (ACEA) member organizations coordinated events in more than 10 countries around the Arab Region.

In addition, recognizing the importance of ensuring education in emergencies, ACEA trained its members in Jordan, Lebanon, Palestine and Iraq using conflict-sensitive education as a life-saving response and the INEE (Inter-Agency Network for Education in Emergencies) standards. ACEA members are now familiar with INEE standards' key elements and how to apply them. It is both necessary and important to understand the interaction between conflict and each INEE Minimum Standards domain, especially education policy and its interaction with coalitions' work.

In Yemen, progress through community mobilization but dire needs remain

In Yemen, effective coordination and collaboration efforts between the UN Office, the Ministry of Education, the Ministry of Higher Education, and the Yemeni Coalition for Education for All (YCEA) has led to the provision and access to schools and universities for refugees.  Building on these achievements, the Yemeni coalition expanded the scope of its activities in order to involve all concerned people through a huge community mobilization that included parents, teacher unions, civil organizations, political parties, the Ministry of Education, international organizations, and media.

While significant steps have been taken by education stakeholders in the region, many problems still ensue. For example, in Yemen 97% of refugees are from Somalia and other surrounding African countries and there are more than 4 million displaced people in Yemen striving to access their right to education. Education is a critical tool to rebuilding society as a whole and refugees worldwide look forward to returning back to a normal life. 

The Yemeni Coalition for Education for All (YCEA) has secured protection of the education process through agreements with the political parties and confronting factions in Yemen since after the war started in March 2014 until now. Furthermore, a strong position paper addressing the education crisis in Yemen was  published by YCEA, ACEA, and GCE under the title “Education Needs Immediate and Collaborative Support to Prevent One Whole Generation Missing Out on Education”.

Animation: 
Fade
subscribe: 
Subscribe to our blog alerts
Animation: 
Fade
Body: 
Government must invest in education during and after emergencies

Key learning elements are clear for ACEA members working in education in emergencies. The most important issue in emergencies is access to quality education. In addition, citizenship education, human rights values, life skills and self-assertion are very important to the children living in emergency settings. Basic, primary education and literacy are essential for children. Finally, no discrimination based on religion, sex, race or disability should be ensured in free, compulsory primary education.

We know that the greatest challenge in asylum and emergency situations is how to maintain mandatory and free education despite lack of financial and human resources. Therefore, special national policies should be adopted to deal with education under emergencies such as: 

  • allocation of fixed budgets for education in emergency; 
  • development and design of educational programs that respond to education under emergencies; 
  • taking into consideration the psychological and social counselling needs; 
  • a focus on human rights and citizenship values; 
  • development of a special curriculum, unbiased and focused on basic skills and knowledge; 
  • a focus on the use of technology and mobile applications (see the successful experience in Afghanistan);
  •  and hiring of qualified staff who are flexible and experienced.

Given these circumstances, the key policy challenge is to ensure that refugees and displaced people have acquired the skills needed to escape the cycle of poverty. We have to put education under the lens of conflict-sensitive education to identify new situations in current education systems. 

We call on governments to invest in education systems to be more responsive to conflict and emergencies so that they maximize human resources, equip people with updated skills, protect children in emergencies and preserve their right to education; and to be more flexible so they guarantee social cohesion, inclusion, and wellbeing for all.

For more information, please contact:

  • Refat Sabbah, General Secretary, Arab Campaign for Education for All- ACEA
  • Fotouh Younes, Advocacy Coordinator, Arab Campaign for Education for All- ACEA
Animation: 
Fade
Blog type:: 
Standard
Story blog main image opacity: 
50%
Featured blog check: 
Check this to make this content featured
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 
Author: 
Check to make this blog as featured: 
Featured
Mailchimp Status: 
Ready to Go
Caption text: 
The Sô-Ava primary school is on the Sô river. It benefited from a new building financed through the GPE grant. Benin.
Photo credit: 
GPE/Chantal Rigaud
Blog Year: 
2019
Add section: 
Body: 

This blog is a collective call to action issued by the 38 organizations listed at the bottom of the page.

Back in February, the UNESCO Institute for Statistics (UIS) and its partners sent out an urgent call to make the case for education data. Now we have an opportunity to make that case – loudly and clearly – directly to policy-makers.

Hundreds of international, regional and national policymakers will be in New York from 9 to 18 July to discuss global progress in education during the UN High-Level Political Forum on Sustainable Development (HLPF). It’s an opportunity we cannot afford to miss. That’s why we are issuing a collective call for greater funding for data on Sustainable Development Goal 4 (SDG 4): a quality, inclusive education for all. Our message is clear: we need more and better data not only to monitor progress towards that goal but also to achieve it.

Data for action and results

It is true that significant strides have been made since 2000, with more children in school than ever before and a narrowing of the gender gap in primary education in particular. But many challenges persist, with 262 million children and adolescents – one in every five – out of school. That figure rises to a shocking one in three children excluded from education in the world’s poorest countries.

Then there are the challenges related to learning and education quality. An estimated 617 million children and adolescents worldwide are not reaching minimum proficiency levels in reading and mathematics. While one-third of them are out of school, two-thirds are sitting in the world’s classrooms, waiting for an education that delivers. Such alarming statistics demonstrate that data can serve as a wake-up call for action.

Animation: 
Fade
subscribe: 
Subscribe to our blog alerts
Animation: 
Fade
Body: 
The urgent need to support countries

Policymakers need more precise and timely data to know which children, youth and adults are making progress and which are not, and why. Yet today, education planners in many countries are working in the dark, without the data they need to target policies and resources. Many national statistical offices still struggle to report data on the basics – from the numbers of girls who never set foot in a classroom to the number of schools with clean drinking water.   

Animation: 
Fade
Image Type:: 
Centered - Medium (860px max)
Image: 
Animation: 
Fade
Body: 

To track progress towards SDG 4, policymakers also need a broader span of education data, from expenditure on education to teacher training. They need data on new and more complex indicators, particularly those related to learning, skills and equity. This means looking beyond basic indices to capture more disaggregated data on the compounding and cumulative impacts of poverty, gender, disability, conflict as well as on learning outcomes.

There is a growing recognition of the need for better data for better policies, which is why countries have agreed to an SDG 4 monitoring framework that includes 43 global and thematic indicators. Yet today, fewer than half of countries report data on flagship indicators, such as learning outcomes in primary and secondary education.

A strong investment case

The UIS has calculated the costs of continuing to do business as usual against the costs of making the necessary investment in education data. The results are conclusive: it would cost on average about US$1.4 million per year per country to produce all of the SDG 4 indicators (or an overall global investment of $280 million per year). This is a small price to pay when set against the vast benefits of providing a quality education for all and the unacceptable costs of lost prospects for current and future generations.

Animation: 
Fade
Image Type:: 
Centered - Medium (860px max)
Image: 
Animation: 
Fade
Body: 

Studies have shown that inefficiency levels in education systems can be as high as 30%, with, for example, many students repeating grades or leaving school early – a dreadful waste of resources. The benefits of having data to identify under-performing schools and children at risk are self-evident and confirmed by even the most conservative scenario.

Better data would lead to a minimum 10% gain in efficiency on average in most countries. So, in return for an annual investment of US$1.4 million on education data, a country save an average of US$143 million a year in the running costs of its education system. Imagine having an additional US$143 million – on average – to spend on teachers, better classroom conditions and reaching marginalized children. To put it simply, investing millions today will save billions in the future.

A message from countries for the HLPF: More funding please

During recent regional meetings to prepare for this year’s HLPF, countries sent a strong message: more funding please. Delegates from the Asia-Pacific region reported that “greater investment was needed in national statistical systems that were struggling to meet the demand for more and better data for the Global Goals and targets” (ESCAP Regional Report). Countries in sub-Saharan Africa stressed the need for a “significant investment in data technologies, capacity, infrastructure, and human and financial resources” and called for a “solidarity fund for statistical development” (ECA Regional Report).

Data are a necessity – not a luxury – for all countries. With greater support, low-income countries could conduct surveys to track the educational pathways – and barriers – facing each individual in a household. They could see whether children with disabilities, for example, are in school or out. They could evaluate the skills of youth and adults to better target their policies and programs. Donors and development partners could leverage their investments, while civil society groups and communities could use the same information to help ensure that everybody – child, youth or adult – can have a quality education.

This is why we have joined the UIS to take one message to policymakers and the international community: make 2019 the year that we fund data so that no one is left behind.

If you believe in the power of data, join us in supporting this call:

  • Share this blog
  • Join @UNESCOstat to endorse the call to #FundData
Animation: 
Fade
Blog type:: 
Standard
Story blog main image opacity: 
50%
Featured blog check: 
Check this to make this content featured
Search keywords: 
data
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 
Author: 
Check to make this blog as featured: 
Featured
Mailchimp Status: 
Old Content
Caption text: 
Level 3 students at Sandogo B Public School, District 7 in Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso in November 2017.
Photo credit: 
GPE/Kelley Lynch
Blog Year: 
2019
Add section: 
Body: 

This post is the fifth in a blog series published in 2019 in the context of collaboration between the Association for the Development of Education in Africa (ADEA) and the Global Partnership for Education (GPE).

Many countries in Africa have pledged to guarantee equitable, inclusive, and quality education for all with a view to achieving universal primary education. To this end, formal and non-formal initiatives have been launched to ensure that no one is left out of the education system.

Africa’s education challenges

However, despite the great effort made in recent decades to achieve universal education, the challenge remains significant. Data published by the UNESCO Institute for Statistics (UIS) in February 2018 indicate that approximately 260 million children, adolescents, and young people around the world (one in five) are not enrolled in school—a figure that has hardly budged in the past five years. Of all the regions, Sub-Saharan Africa has the highest rates of exclusion from education.

Animation: 
Fade
Body: 

These challenges are now being compounded by insecurity. Many countries in Africa and around the world are currently facing terrorist attacks. A heavy toll is being exacted on the education system, which seems to be a prime target of terrorists.

According to UNICEF, in 2019, has forced nearly 2,000 schools in Burkina Faso, Mali, and Niger to close or become non-operational. Threats against education personnel, attacks on education facilities, and the use of schools for military purposes have disrupted the education of over 400,000 children across the three countries and left more than 10,000 teachers unable to work or displaced by the violence.

This situation has prompted the large-scale movement of persons in the affected communities (internally displaced persons) and of refugees in other neighboring countries. Children also get swept up in this movement, which represents a grave violation of their rights.

Animation: 
Fade
subscribe: 
Subscribe to our blog alerts
Animation: 
Fade
Body: 

This situation poses a threefold challenge:

  • Parents, overtaken by events and fleeing the attacks, are now unable to assume their responsibilities.
  • The public authorities, more concerned with the war against terrorism, are giving priority to the defense and security sectors while at the same time relegating such sectors as education to second place.
  • The humanitarian actors who seem to be interested in the fate of these children appear to be overwhelmed and are increasingly a prime target of terrorist groups, a situation that limits their sphere of activity.
Animation: 
Fade
Body: 

Children who are displaced or are victims of terrorism are very vulnerable and are much more exposed to terrible forms of exploitation, in particular sexual abuse and forced recruitment by armed groups.

Animation: 
Fade
Body: 

As a result, many of tomorrow’s leaders—future development actors—are adrift, a situation that should be of concern to us all.

The Role of ADEA’s Inter-Country Quality Node on Non-Formal Education

To contribute to the effort to educate these children who are deprived of education or are displaced by terrorism, the Association for the Development of Education in Africa (ADEA), through its new Inter-Country Quality Node on Non-Formal Education (ICQN-NFE) launched on April 25, 2019 in Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso, intends to conduct activities aimed at inclusive and holistic education so as to accommodate all these children who are not enrolled in school or are displaced and those who have been left out of the Education for All initiative.

To this end, the ICQN-NFE will launch a series of discussions that can assist policymakers with the provision of care to children who are not enrolled in school or are displaced by terrorism.

Animation: 
Fade
Body: 

The strategic plan of the ICQN-NFE will allow it to serve as an intergovernmental forum for policy dialogue and collaborative work while at the same time focusing on peer learning and sharing knowledge and best practices related to non-formal education in Africa among the Ministries of Education, the other ministries, and the main stakeholders.

The ICQN-NFE will therefore draw on the findings of a number of studies conducted by the former Working Group on Non-Formal Education (WGNFE) of ADEA—now the ICQN-NFE—obtained through field work over a ten-year period, with the aim of strengthening its network of partners and building on successful experiences so as to share these with ICQN-NFE member countries, namely:

  1. The synergies to be considered among formal education subsystems and different types of learning in the Koranic centers in Guinea, Mali, and Niger;
  2. The mapping of centers and other Koranic education facilities in three countries: Burkina Faso, Mali, and Senegal.
Animation: 
Fade
Body: 

These studies have facilitated the following activities in the countries involved:

  • A comprehensive analysis of the two subsystems in order to identify their strengths and weaknesses;
  • An assessment of their strengths that can be used to create synergies based on a holistic vision of education;
  • A presentation of specific proposals aimed at expanding access to education by disadvantaged groups as well as greater equity and the provision of quality education that takes into account the socioeconomic situations of learners.
Animation: 
Fade
Image Type:: 
Centered - Medium (860px max)
Image: 
Caption text: 
Representatives of developing country partners of GPE sharing experiences in Cotonou, Benin in November 2018.
Photo credit: 
GPE/Chantal Rigaud
Animation: 
Fade
Body: 
An appeal to the stakeholders aimed at education for all

The different governments in Africa, the development assistance partners, the humanitarian community, civil society, socially responsible enterprises, the decentralized regional and local authorities, and the media are now each being called upon to play a major role in the education of children who are not enrolled in school or are displaced by terrorism and violent extremism.

Animation: 
Fade
Body: 
Emphasis will have to be placed on education alternatives so as to allow large numbers of children either to make up lost ground or to have an opportunity to begin some form of training.
Animation: 
Fade
Body: 

In most countries affected by this violence, which curtails exercise of the fundamental rights of children, the time has come to ask the question: why is it that literacy and non-formal education centers that operate in the areas affected by insecurity continue to function and are sometimes spared this violence?

Animation: 
Fade
Blog type:: 
Standard
Story blog main image opacity: 
50%
Featured blog check: 
Check this to make this content featured

Read for later

Articles marked as Favorite are saved for later viewing.
close
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Separate tags by commas
To access this feature, please upgrade your account.
Start your free month
Free Preview