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I have been extremely busy studying and learning new and amazing things about agriculture. Since doing so, I have created some new and amazing content that will be coming to Get Dirty USA soon. In the meantime, I have been blessed with the amazing opportunity to do study European systems in agriculture on the beautiful island of Cyprus. Since I was much younger, I have been in love with animals and how they work. I have had amazing opportunities to work with animals and now that I study at North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University, I have been blessed with another amazing opportunity to study abroad in Cyprus at the University of Nicosia. The trip however is $8,000 and I need some help making that dream a reality. If you feel moved to donate please do and I will attach the GoFundMe link below. If not, no worries, new and exciting content is coming to you soon right here at Get Dirty USA.
GoFundMe: https://www.gofundme.com/mercer039s-study-abroad-trip-2019
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In the past, the relationship between Brazilian rural producers and the industry was very focused on conversation or a coffee at any time of the day. These practices were decisive at the time of purchase.
Now, other elements have also been gaining prominence and have contributed to major changes in Brazilian agribusiness. Among them, I mention special products, new technologies, and digital channels.
At a recent event, I had the opportunity to talk to a rural producer who was looking for seeds for colorful peppers. He confessed that this special product values about 30% his plantation.
This example shows a new profile of the Brazilian farmer: he has become a true accountant and has abilities to perform various accounts and find alternatives to increase his productivity.
In relation to new technologies, Brazil has experienced the emergence of several startups, with emphasis on companies that works with drones, satellites, big data and artificial intelligence. The solutions offered help farmers to produce more in less space.
Another important point in this change of direction of Brazilian agribusiness is the digital environment. The actions taken on YouTube, blogs and LinkedIn have stood out by helping, mainly, the agriculturists to raise the profitability.
The preference to seek information in the digital environment reflects the dynamism of the new generations of producers, accustomed to seek and obtain, in the shortest time necessary, cases of success, recommendations or clarifications varied.
Special products, new technologies, and digital channels impact the entire agribusiness chain. Farmers, industries and retailers have a great challenge ahead of them: do not get lost in the face of the possibilities and continue to seduce and delight new consumers.
(*) Rodrigo Capella is General Director of Ação Estratégica, a brazilian agency with extensive experience in developing marketing and communication actions for the agribusiness segment.
E-mail: capella@acaoestrategica.com.br
We want to thank Rodrigo Capella for his post. We thank our international viewers and we are open and interested to having brand new and exciting ideas at Get Dirty USA. Rodrigo welcome to the family. And remember agriculture is never just black and white.
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We are excited to announce our new featured farmer posts! We will begin to feature a farmer on the website to highlight some outstanding farmers around the globe. This week on our twitter we asked for the best farm picture that our followers had. We are excited to announce our first featured farmer... Will Taylor from Bar T Ranch in Honea Path, South Carolina. Congratulations!
Courtesy of Bar T Ranch in Honea Path, SC
To be featured go check us out on twitter @getdirtyusa and watch out for our post!
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Recently, I visited the Dominican Republic as a part of a family vacation that turned out to be a more significant learning experience than I ever expected it to be. I was able to witness some practices remarkably different from where I live in the United States. Some of these practices were good while others need some work and have to be addressed. Before we can discuss the differences in agriculture practice, we have to understand that the US and the Dominican Republic have very different economic situations. The US has a GDP of $15.68 trillion versus that of the DR which has a GDP of just $58.95 billion. This means that the GDP in the US is 266 times larger than that of the DR. The United States also has a GNI or Gross National Income 516 times that of the Dominican Republic at $9.78 trillion. What does this mean for agriculture? The Dominican Republic has a large tourism industry that has affected its economy positively, however, their agriculture yields have not been able to keep up with the “industry standard” set by other countries. Their agriculture workforce is being lost to the service industry which is reflected in its 14.3% unemployment rate and can credit itself to people simply trying to “move up the ladder” and away from the poverty many of them were born in. This is a country with very high-income inequality; the poorest of the population receives less than one-fifth of the GDP while the nations top 10% enjoy 40% of the GDP according to nationmaster.com. Those working in these low-income jobs many times are in the agriculture industry which has negatively impacted it’s formerly agrarian economy. Now that we have addressed some of its economic issues, I will briefly share what I noticed on my trip and what I believe the country can do to get better. The beauty in the Dominican Republic is that it has remained a very simple yet sustainable society regarding agriculture which will also be its downfall. The country and it’s people have a way of using all available resources, and while I was there, I saw this first hand in even the way fencing was set up to keep livestock in. In America, while some of us do choose to use barbed wire fencing, we also place man-made post to hold the fencing. In the DR, I noticed the universal practice of using existing trees and sticks to hold up their fencing, the barbed wire eventually growing into the trunk. This was astounding and a cheaper way to do things. I also noticed the coexistence of species within a pasture as if it was an African Savanna, which I believe is a more sustainable way to do things. I was able to witness one pasture with cattle, chickens, sheep, and horses within one pasture. This did bring up concerns of disease, possible overgrazing, and overall poor farming practice, as these animals were not necessarily placed there due to convenience. However, a necessity due to the lack of available land/pasture, due to the increased tourism economy. I also noticed a widespread practice of using Brahman Cattle which makes sense due to their tropical climate and their natural resistance to a lot of the common cattle diseases. However, they do have a few cons such as slow growth rates and difficulties rebreeding after calving. The “sustainable” practices in the DR may be good such as the free-range nature of a lot of the ranches and lack of widespread factory farming. These practices while sometimes good have caused the country to lag regarding exporting livestock and growing agriculture practices. The DR has a “science problem” meaning a lack of innovation regarding agriculture and working towards creating greater yields. To fix this problem the DR needs to fund more renewable energy. Its lack of renewable energy has caused it to spend more while destroying the land they’re farming. By using solar and wind energy, the DR could effectively reduce its cost on power and invest more in creating greater yield. They also need to invest in better technology for farmers that can’t necessarily afford to do so themselves; this means new milking equipment, better-regulated slaughterhouses and the implementation of better regulations on raising livestock. To create a better cow, we must breed a better cow. To do this, the DR needs to create a better breeding program to diversify it’s cattle populations and breed cattle with better yields. This doesn’t mean changing breeds; it does mean changing practice. All of this is relatively simple; the government needs to invest more in agriculture and fund agriculture education across the country to ensure the future of ag is bright. The US and the Dominican Republic although very different can learn from each other in various aspects. It all starts with education. We can all learn from each other no matter what field it is; farmers have been learning from each other for ages which is how we have been able to evolve and create better practices. Remember agriculture is never just black and white.
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