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Most businesses know that it’s not enough to merely market a product to the customer. Along with the product, brands have invested in creating a customer experience (CX) that will keep customers coming back to them. In our article ‘Delivering Customer Experience That Deliver Value’, we discussed how understanding a customer’s psyche is key in providing customer service that has actual value for your business. This means using psychology to aid your business in gaining a competitive advantage when it comes to retaining consumers’ loyalty and trust.

As explained by Rahul Varshneya, co-founder of marketing company Arkena.com, when thinking about the colors red and yellow for example, it is likely that a fast food chain will come to mind. This is no accident as the color red is often used to stimulate appetite while the color yellow brings out feelings of joy and happiness. By effectively associating themselves with these colors, fast food chains know that a customer’s subconscious automatically thinks of them when they feel hungry or even happy.

There are a number of other ways to use psychology for boosting the customer experience that goes beyond color. Certain brands understand that sometimes shopping in itself is the experience that customers go for and not necessarily the products. Businesses can make shopping more fun and interactive by making a game of it like timed bidding, for example. The act of shopping for its own sake can spark emotional highs of pleasure and fulfillment to keep customers coming back.

Another way is by using the peak-end rule. This rule states that more than the sum total, customers judge an experience by its most intense point and its end point. This explains why Apple retail stores always make sure store representatives make eye contact and thank customers after every purchase. The simple gesture sticks out and goes a long way in shaping customer loyalty to the brand.

The idea that the experiences surrounding a product can influence purchase decisions is called “atmospherics”. Smarter CX’s article ‘Consumers in Context: It’s Not What You Buy, It’s Where You Buy It’, explains that businesses are urged to invest in aspects such as the right lighting, interior design and music, in order to get customers to spend more than what they would normally. This was proven in a 1993 study by two psychologists from Texas Tech University. Customers in a wine store were found to have been willing to pay as much as 3 times more for a bottle of wine if classical music was playing. Something as simple as music, that most people never even think twice about, can increase sales dramatically.

Companies have known the importance of psychology in business for over a century, and are constantly taking steps to better understand what drives consumer habits and decisions. They also employ successful marketers who have a good background in psychology and are, therefore, highly sought after to help businesses appeal to their customers more effectively. This is why in Maryville University’s breakdown of how psychology students can use their degree for business, they note that in areas such as market research and human resources it is predicted to see growth of 19% and 9% respectively. This only leads many to believe that there will be an increasing focus on the customer psyche. Businesses know that by improving their CX strategies through various psychological concepts, they may just have the edge they need to succeed.

Article exclusively written for cloudcherry.com

By Amanda Rose

The post Psychological Concepts that are Useful in Creating Better CX Strategies appeared first on CloudCherry.

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Gartner reports from 2018 that 52% of marketers with CX responsibility expect their budgets to remain the same or decrease. However, expectations with the importance of CX is continuing to grow. 23% of B2B CMO’s see CX as a top 3 objective. So how do Marketers that assume CX responsibility address this with less budget without giving up important technology needed for other aspects of Marketing? This research appears to demonstrate a clear truth: it is often easier to say something than to do it. So how do business leaders start developing a customer experience strategy that keeps the engine of marketing running with the least amount of friction? The answer to me is easy – do nothing without input from customers and as a marketer stop spamming your potential customers and engage with them. Our customers are in control, not us.


Here are a few ways to align CX in your marketing –
  1. Technology – align technology to provide a better experience for them, not a better experience for you. Your technology stack should have some tie to align to customer experience, if it doesn’t you are hurting your customers. For example, exit intent on the website, do you like it when this happens to you? I hate it when I am shopping for B2B tech, but I love it when I am shopping for clothes for my wife. Definitely give me that extra 30% and free shipping, I’m all about it.
  2. Omni-channel – just because there is a channel available to market into, doesn’t mean you should. Build the relationship with your customers so there is real value in what they engage with you on. Let’s take your email automation for example: it is meant to make it easier for you and other marketers, but it should never be at the cost of the experience of the customer. I see so often emails blasting to thousands of people at a time (it doesn’t matter how great your content is), ads run with no value, calls made with no context, etc. The old saying “Treat others the way you want to be treated” is cliché but true. I have 4K unread emails in my inbox not on purpose but because I don’t have time to click each one let alone read them.
  3. Listen – if you aren’t actually trying to listen to your customers and then taking action on it, what is the point? How do you listen to customers/potential customers if you don’t have an avenue to capture the data when you do? Implement small processes to poll people on your processes and functions within marketing. Ask them things like “How are we doing in Marketing?” or “What would you like to see more of?” or “Tell us what you think about our brand and your experience?”. I would have our SDR team ask questions like this in their opening statement with people and I can’t tell you how amazing the feedback was that we got.
  4. Product – Development, design, innovation, and adaptive. Change is always occurring, align your product to change with the trends to serve your customers.
  5. Translate Strategy to Experience – There’s evidence that companies which are known for delivering extraordinary customer experiences are also those which are clear about their leading value discipline. 

In Forbes Insights 50 Most Engaged Companies, research shows leading brands known for creating higher levels of Customer Engagement. Such as, The Ritz Carlton, Amazon, Apple, Costco, Footlocker, Lowes, Southwest Airlines, Google, USAA, and Netflix. But none of these companies have CX as their core strategy. Consider the following examples: These companies do not separate their strategy from their CX strategy. Costco cannot stream their products to clients like Netflix does, any more than The Ritz Carlton can use Costco’s strategy of bulk reductions. Rather each tactic must concentrate on supporting the overarching strategy.

Remain Focused – Consider this famous quote from Steve Jobs, “People think focus means saying Yes to those things you have got to concentrate on. But, that’s not what it means whatsoever. It means saying no to the hundred other good ideas that there are. You have to pick carefully.” There are a number of options when designing a CX strategy. You may create applications, map touch points, streamline insights, and innovate all day long. However, the best way to navigate this maze of selections is to focus relentlessly on aligning CX to your main strategic initiative. The key to a differentiating CX is not about relentlessly concentration on getting closer to the consumer and forging strong bonds with them, but instead a relentless concentration on what you’re known for, and how it translates to value clients want to have. Forging strong bonds is still important and you must portay components of this in your branding and messaging. But if you don’t provide value regardless of the bond, it will fade. This is the recipe to building fandom with your clients. What value do you bring that is both related and unrelated to the product you offer? If you aren’t addressing the value in both areas it will be difficult to manage the expectations the new age consumer will have.

The post Designing The Customer Experience for Marketers appeared first on CloudCherry.

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I recently found myself shopping for a new TV. Our old Television had begun to emit an annoying high pitch and would sometimes shut down on its own. We were tired of adjusting the volume. So, we set-off to find a new TV. It was up to me to come across a brand-new model that would perform well. So, it’s Friday night and I had already got online and started my search. Being the nerd that I am, I had been tasked by my wife, with comparing the TVs, cost, and reviews on my phone as we shopped: your customer experience in your twentieth century. 

As I walked around from Target, to Costco, then to my local Best Buy, I found myself lost in a loop of customer comments on my phone. The bad kind of feedback. I knew I wanted to purchase a TV today and pick out one. But I was questioning my own initial decisions and experts’ decisions based on user reviews. I even had a friend who recommended a brand and after reading the reviews I was swayed away from it. After all, these people bought the TV and have first-hand experience. Not just in the voice of one person but many. I’d become so stuck in the reviews, I was lost in a comments rabbit hole. 

These other buyers had shared their experience. And I was convinced that only a few TV’s out of thousands were worth the risk. These reviews were from one product, at one store. Just one shop of hundreds that sell something like this. This one experience had invoked a wide range of emotion in buyers near and far. And let me tell you, these buyers were serious about their reviews. Nobody was mincing words. I’d even go so far to say that they had been enthusiastic about their responses. Their chosen TV had changed their lives, one way or the other.

Even though I admit again, I had been swayed by individuals I didn’t even know. I took all reviews seriously. The on-line research phase of the customer journey is real folks. More than ever before. I find myself doing the same thing for technology on a business level. Heavily looking at G2Crowd and Capterra. Exploring cheaper tech through FB ads that I have never heard of, to making sure they have clout on G2Crowd and other review sites. I want to see tangible results of a product that people used and their successes and failures. If the successes outweigh the risk, I might take a chance.

So as businesses how do we know when or how to ask for feedback? The direct impact of revenue saved by mastering the customer experience is overwhelming. “What we found: not only is it possible to quantify the impact of customer experience — but the effects are huge.” — “The Value of Customer Experience, Quantified,” Harvard Business Review. Customer experience is no longer optional or a nice to have. People are more demanding, want more personalized experiences, and need to be embraced with their needs and pain points.

“a one-point score improvement in the CX Index can lead to an increase of $65 million in revenue in the upscale hotel industry,” according to Forrester’s Harley Manning. Another study by Newvoicemedia.com found that “US Companies lose more than $62 billion annually due to poor customer experience.” These numbers are not small and quite frankly they can cripple a business entirely if not addressed. With all of our hands in social media at any moment of the day, a shared experience good and bad can have a compound impact for years in the future. These experiences are deep and at some moments become emotional for the consumer. To put this in perspective take 5 minutes of your day and go look at the comments thread of a large business on social. It will open your eyes that people want to share their experiences and in most cases are very vocal if it’s a bad one. I remember when my family and I decided to purchase a certain subscription. We loved the idea and used it heavily for 3-4 months. Then they started changing the rules and pricing so we decided we would cancel. I was amazed at the effort it took to cancel our subscription. Unclear direction, unresponsive emails, no phone number to call, the list went on. I realized they had a social Facebook page which I proceeded to go to, hoping I’d get somewhere. I spent the next 45 minutes reading hundreds of bad reviews and comments related to my exact scenario. So, my question to you is, do you think I’ll ever do business with this company again? Not in a million years. Was this because of my bad experience? No, I would eventually get over it. But when I see hundreds of other people have an issue, I start realizing there is a much deeper problem here. One that doesn’t seem to be of concern to them based on the time of these reviews to getting it resolved.


It seems sensible to me we are spoiled digitally, and we will continue to have new technology that offers us better experiences. Will you be a part of that shift? Marketing has changed and companies are no longer able to control the message. The message belongs to the consumer. We’ve moved from the age of info to the age of the consumer.

The post Customer Experience and The User Review appeared first on CloudCherry.

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Insights shine a light on hidden opportunities. CX insights can help you connect experience to your business goals, beat the competition and deliver a consistently delightful experience to your customers. Gaining insight is essential to your success.

At CloudCherry, we want to disrupt the customer experience industry. There’s a lot of noise out there about what CX teams should be doing. But rarely do platforms actually deliver on the thought leadership they put out through their PR efforts. Did you know – every time a buzzword is used, an influencer gets their wings?

Thought leadership is nice, but action is better. Here are five insights that your CX platform is probably not equipped to gather (but should be)

Journey-based insights

Everyone is talking about journeys. Everyone! But 99% of enterprises don’t bring those journeys into their CX programs. Most journey mapping exercises start out great with gathering everyone in a room, brainstorming touchpoints and designing a visual journey of how customers move through their interactions with your company.

However, that’s often where it stops. If you’re lucky, you might get your design team to take the sticky notes off the wall and put together a well-designed map. Most teams will never look at their journey map again – and very few companies will actually use it to inform their CX strategy.

Here’s how this needs to change. Your journey map is the most critical document your CX team has available to you. It helps you understand the context around your customer’s interactions with your company. It should frame every decision and every conversation you have with your customers. For example, as customers are becoming familiar with your product or service, you can send them relevant information at each stage in the journey to move them forward. Even better, you can see how each conversation resonates through NPS and CSAT feedback. The only way to do that is to bring your journey into your CEM so that you can coordinate activities along the journey.

Journey insights move your team from running surveys to having real-time, contextual conversations with your customers.

Connecting CX to ROI

Think about the business insights you’re getting from your CEM today. Are you being sold vague intangible ROI metrics or are you given a direct connection between CX and the money?

In the past, CX professionals have had to rely on proxy metrics like NPS and CSAT to show their impact on the business. If they were successful, NPS increased. But that’s where the connection stops. Did a higher NPS drive more revenue? How did it impact the overall bottom line?

Today, CX professionals need to connect their CX activities to the financials in order to show value to the business. The only way to do this is by integrating operational data like ARPU and churn rates with your experiential data.

Path Insights

We all learned that correlation doesn’t equal causation in high school science. So why are we using correlation analysis to make CX decisions? The thought process often goes like this: 50% of our detractors are between 25-35 years old. That must mean millennials don’t like our product. We’ll focus on older customers instead. But the insight you need is buried at least one step further back. In this case, it might be that millennials are more sensitive to an issue with your online store and expect more from your ecommerce solution. Without digging into the cause of your detractors’ frustration, it’s impossible to effectively address it.

Path analysis helps uncover the next proximal cause. Instead of only looking at the direct cause, we need to go a step further to find the experience drivers that actually impact customer actions. This requires using a platform that offers analysis using causal models.

Prescriptive Insights

Most companies today are pretty good at collecting descriptive analytics – data that describes the current state of your experience. Any of the data that you get from surveying customers about how they feel belongs in this category. But as Bruce Temkin describes in his webinar with CloudCherry, “to successfully implement a transformational CX program, firms need to move from descriptive analytics to prescriptive analytics.”

Translating descriptive analytics into tangible action insight is tricky. It requires understanding how each experience driver impacts what customers will do, and by how much. For example, improving the speed of service will usually improve customer satisfaction. But will it make people buy more or recommend you more often? And at what point do the returns from improving the speed of service start decreasing?

A platform like CloudCherry can pull out the action items and tell you exactly how each improvement will impact the financials – before you even spend the money to start experimenting.

Transformational Action

Companies collect so much information about customer behavior with every purchase, every click on the website and every conversation. But rarely do companies bring all of this data together to uncover the valuable hidden insights. Rather than just relying on survey data, operating with actual operational data reveals a whole new level of insight into what your customers do.

By integrating transactional and operational data into your customer journey, trends begin to emerge. Identifying these trends across departments and functional groups allow you to take transformation action based on real data.

Without these insights, you’re relying solely on what customers tell you they want – which is rarely what they actually need.

Beat the competition with insights that matter

Stop guessing at what customers will respond to. Customer experience is an art – but it’s also science. It’s possible to use the data that you’re already gathering to glean important insights. These insights will give you the competitive edge because you’ll be taking action faster, more effectively and more cost-efficiently than your competition.

In summary, the five insights every industry leader needs are:

* Journey-based Insights – take that customer journey map out of the desk drawer and start using it to measure your customer experience.

* Connect CX to ROI – understand how CX improvements affect real business metrics.

* Path Insights – discover the true drivers of the customer experience, rather than just the obvious correlation.

* Prescriptive Insights – move beyond descriptive analytics to understand what changes need to be made to improve the CX – not just describe it.

* Transformational Action – make changes based on real data and insights.

To learn more about how CloudCherry delivers on each of these insights, request a demo today with one of CloudCherry’s product specialists.

The post 5 Critical CX Insights You’re not Gathering Today appeared first on CloudCherry.

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“Firms will continue to regard CX as a collection of continuous improvement projects until they see an irrefutable, directly attributable connection to returns.” – Forrester, Hardwire Customer Experience 2018

This is the challenge that every CX leader needs to overcome. In order to prove their value to the company, secure the budget and buy-in they need to make changes, CX leaders must demonstrate an “irrefutable” connection to business metrics.  This requires a massive sea change in the metrics and strategy the profession is currently using to measure their success.   

But the good news is, as Tom Mouhsain says in the Forrester report cited above, “there is sufficient auditable evidence to link CX to all of the major financial performance drivers that determine profit — and ultimately to the return on shareholder equity.”  

It’s a big challenge, but with the right strategy, and the right data collection abilities, it’s no longer insurmountable. CX can be tied to the financial goals of your business.  

NPS can’t be your North Star 

Traditional CX metrics like customer satisfaction, customer effort and NPS are not directly tied to making money moves. While these metrics can help CX and marketing teams tell descriptive stories about the state of the customer’s experience, they aren’t credible when it comes to making business decisions.  

NPS was always meant to be a proxy for true customer loyalty, because we didn’t have the means to measure it before. But we’ve gotten into the habit of continually trying to improve NPS without actually asking why. Does it actually move the needle? At what point does increasing NPS have decreasing returns?  

Instead of simply continuing to improve NPS, CX pros need to expand their dashboard to include financially meaningful metrics that speak directly to their impact on the balance sheet and P&L. When that happens, CX teams will be keen to talk finances, while the CFO becomes an advocate for CX due to the financial success they are driving.  

The Three Levers CX can pull to impact business goals 

When moving from traditional metrics to financially credible success metrics, CX leaders have three levers they should look at; increasing revenue, reducing costs and lowering risk.  

Increase Revenue 

Improving the customer experience intuitively drives revenue through encouraging upsell opportunities, decreasing customer churn and increasing customer advocacy. Connecting these numbers to CX improvements is the tough part.  

Forrester has research-backed evidence that improving CX does, in fact, have an impact on revenue, across the financial industry. In their 2017 report “Drive Business Growth with Great Customer Experience” their models demonstrate “revenue potential clearly increases with higher CX Index scores.” 

Reduce Costs 

A stronger CEM program can reduce unnecessary costs for the business. Through reducing complaints, eliminating extra effort due to bureaucracy and redundancy and optimizing infrastructure, CX teams can massively impact the cost of servicing customers. But beware (and more on this later): cost cutting simply for the sake of the budget doesn’t have the same impact.  

Lower risk 

A positive customer experience and an engaged company develops trust between customer and company. This increased trust leads to more openness and a willingness to share data. For the financial industry, this is critical in understanding customers and accurately assessing risk.  

An increase in trust can also reduce the rate of loan defaults or fraudulent policy. Lowering risks through CX improvements provides another method of tying CX policies to financial and business goals.  

Keeping CX Front and Center in Cost Management Outperforms Indiscriminate Cost-Cutting  

Rather than looking for cost efficiency, companies must keep the golden ratio of CX in mind: Cost per Income (CIR). CIR compares the cost of servicing customers with the income they generate. The lower the cost to serve higher income customers, the better. This is how businesses make money. And CX teams have a lot of opportunities to improve this ratio.  

In particular, companies can improve CIR by increasing the number of products each customer is using. This naturally decreases the cost to serve each individual customer, making the business more efficient and increasing customer profitability.  

How can Companies increase the number of products per customer? Through personalization, upsell opportunities and increased engagement. In other words – through delivering a well-executed customer experience.  

Importance of Journey Mapping 

The key to cost cutting strategically and to linking improvements to financial metrics is by connecting every action to your customer journey map. Take this example from the Forester report:  

“DBS used journey mapping and digitalized processes like new account openings and credit applications to save 1.1 million customer hours and 327,000 employee hours, living up to its mantra of “Live More, Bank Less.” DBS distinguishes between digital and traditional customers and analyzes costs related to transactions, services, and customer acquisition alongside income per customer. This enables the bank to compare the CIR, share of profit, and ROE contribution of both customer groups. DBS found that digital customers are 42% of its customer base but account for 72% of its profit; have a ROE of 27% versus 18% for traditional customers; and have a CIR that is 22% lower than traditional customers.”  

All of that information can only be uncovered through the process of journey mapping. Understanding the paths each segment of customers travel allows DBS to attribute differences in customer income to differences in CX.  

Companies can benefit from customer journey mapping exercises in many different ways. By looking at frequent transaction types, they can streamline processes for customers and employees. This pulls on the revenue level because customers like to do business with companies that make it easier, but it also pulls on the costs lever because it reduces inefficiency. It doubly impacts the golden CIR – a big win for the CX team’s challenge to connect improvements to financial metrics.  

Using Proxy Metrics to tie CX to Financial Metrics 

In order to connect financial goals to CX metrics, teams need to create a chain from traditional metrics to the three levers discussed above: increased revenue, decreased costs, and lower risks.  

These proxy metrics breakdown the financial goals into measurable units that can be wired to customer experience results. For example, revenue might be broken down into increasing the number of products per customer, where CX is responsible for increasing the number of authentic touchpoints between customers and product educators. If CX can prove that as touchpoints increase, customers are more likely to convert on upsells, they’ve connected their activities to a financial goal by using proxy metrics.  

Don’t forget to pull out your customer journey map!  Distributing proxy metrics and indicators across the entire customer lifecycle right from account sign-up can help recognize possibilities for additional revenue and cost efficiencies. Revenue doesn’t just happen once – it’s an ongoing process across multiple channels and touchpoints – just like the customer experience.  

Don’t delay the process 

It takes time to build the models that your individual business will need to prove linkages between CX and finance. As stated in the Forrester report, “DBS Bank needed three years of data to confirm the relationship between customer engagement, satisfaction scores, proxy metrics, and the impact of digitalization on financial performance.” The takeaway? Be patient, but start now.  

If you’re struggling to connect financial metrics to CX improvements, you’re not alone. Book a demo with CloudCherry today to start your journey.  

The post CloudCherry – Tying Financial Goals to CX Metrics appeared first on CloudCherry.

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At CloudCherry, we believe customers are our backbone and value employees and influencers who make customers their top priority. This year, we came up with an idea to award such talented CX experts. The CX Champion Contest was all about nominating the best CX superheroes who go above and beyond their limits to surprise the customer and make them feel happy about the brand or business. There was a $1000 dollar cash prize along with recognition from leadership team, bragging rights for a long time and off course a special surprise worthy of a champion. 

We received 100+ nominations that made us aware of real talent being recognised at organisations. Peer-to-peer recognition is a key factor at driving motivation within a company and the CX champion contest showed us that how well people who perform are admired by others. Our criteria were to choose the best above the rest. We asked for CX stories that were inspiring in certain ways where a CX lover (who may or may not be a part of the customer support team) had gone beyond expectations to make a customer feel important. Solving out their issues or creating a better deal or making a small change from the backend to make the customer’s problem addressed in no time at all. 

Going through these nominations, we found that only choosing one story would be an injustice to the best ones that deserve real recognition, and hence, we finalised 3. 

Our top 3 winners are: 
Nate Brown  Director of Customer Experience at UL EHS Sustainability & Co-Founder of CX Accelerator 

Nate started his career in the year 2007 and has worked tirelessly for years to give back to CX industry. He is specialized at finding training employees to understand customer journeys and he is well versed in a variety of skills like CX disciple, employee engagement, etc. Nate has been recognised by ICMI as one of the Top 50 CX Thought Leaders. 

The person who nominated Nate, had a wonderful story to tell about him- 

“Not only does he share his own brilliant ideas, but he also strives to promote the ideas of others. Nate had a great idea for collecting unstructured feedback using promo USB buttons. It was really innovative and would be cost effective for broad implementation across many industries.”- Nominator. 

Check out his profile: https://www.linkedin.com/in/cxaccelerator/ 

Kristin Guthrie VP, Customer Experience at ICW Group 

Kristin has an experience of working in the industry since 1993. Her journey makes her a specialist and leader at sales and marketing, planning, strategising and customer service in both B2B and B2C environments. 

She is known for her strong skills like creating brand awareness, building a brand image to a customer and strong customer relationship management. 

Quoting the nominator- 

“ICW Group Insurance Companies is the largest group of privately held insurance companies. In recent years, with massive growth, the main challenge faced by the ICW group is to ensure that their customers have a positive and remarkable experience. With a company that’s been operating for almost five decades, transforming to a customer-centric culture that puts the needs of their customers first takes someone who is a progressive thinker, and has the determination and drive to change the business. As the leader of a newly created Customer Experience role, Kristin Guthrie clearly demonstrates the characteristics of a visionary leader. New to the company, she has been influential in getting the members of the executive team and other stakeholders to buy into the importance of CX and its impact to the bottom line. She adapted her leadership and communication style to different circumstances that helped her to effectively communicate the CX vision with clarity and passion that results in our organization taking clear action.”  

Have a look at her LinkedIN page: https://www.linkedin.com/in/kristinguthrie/ 

Christopher Toh Associate Director – Financial Planning & Analysis at Marina Bay Sands Pvt. Ltd 

Christopher has been in the hospitality industry since 1997 and his long journey makes him an expert at understanding the importance of customer feedback. He mixes his expertise of the hotel industry with his deep knowledge of CX to make Marina Bay Sands a more customer-friendly place. 

Look at his story from the Nominator’s point of view: 

“Chris is equal parts science and art, which is what it takes to lead an unparalleled CX program in a complex environment like the Casino and Hospitality business. Chris uses various tech platforms to showcase the benefits of data science in the world of CX. But then he leverages his deep understanding of the Hospitality business to add the ‘art’ in CX in problem definition, change management, focus grouping, brainstorming, negotiation and on and on. He possesses a deadly combination of skills and the mindset to integrate CX into every facet of the organization. At Marina Bay Sands, we now generate over 100,000 survey responses a year from a single physical property, over 80,000 written comments, surveys at 90 touch points on the customer journey, over 2,000 service audits. Christopher has made all this possible with his keen skillset.” 

Know more about Christopher at: https://www.linkedin.com/in/christopher-toh-5408ab25/ 

CloudCherry isn’t just about a product or a service, we are believers… We stand and care for CX enthusiasts who have a talent to make customers truly happy about their business. We have always admired and supported such specialists and will continue to do so even in the future. Our CX Champion Contest is just a small way of representing how much we actually care for CX superheroes and their contribution in making a company successful! 

The post The CX Champions Who Deserve More Than Just A Prize- Feb ‘19 appeared first on CloudCherry.

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At CloudCherry, we believe customers are our backbone and value employees and influencers who make customers their top priority. This year, we came up with an idea to award such talented CX experts. The CX Champion Contest was all about nominating the best CX superheroes who go above and beyond their limits to surprise the customer and make them feel happy about the brand or business. There was a $1000 dollar cash prize along with recognition from leadership team, bragging rights for a long time and off course a special surprise worthy of a champion. 

We received 100+ nominations that made us aware of real talent being recognised at organisations. Peer-to-peer recognition is a key factor at driving motivation within a company and the CX champion contest showed us that how well people who perform are admired by others. Our criteria were to choose the best above the rest. We asked for CX stories that were inspiring in certain ways where a CX lover (who may or may not be a part of the customer support team) had gone beyond expectations to make a customer feel important. Solving out their issues or creating a better deal or making a small change from the backend to make the customer’s problem addressed in no time at all. 

Going through these nominations, we found that only choosing one story would be an injustice to the best ones that deserve real recognition, and hence, we finalised 3. 

Our top 3 winners are: 
Nate Brown  Director of Customer Experience at UL EHS Sustainability & Co-Founder of CX Accelerator 

Nate started his career in the year 2007 and has worked tirelessly for years to give back to CX industry. He is specialized at finding training employees to understand customer journeys and he is well versed in a variety of skills like CX disciple, employee engagement, etc. Nate has been recognised by ICMI as one of the Top 50 CX Thought Leaders. 

The person who nominated Nate, had a wonderful story to tell about him- 

“Not only does he share his own brilliant ideas, but he also strives to promote the ideas of others. Nate had a great idea for collecting unstructured feedback using promo USB buttons. It was really innovative and would be cost effective for broad implementation across many industries.”- Nominator. 

Check out his profile: https://www.linkedin.com/in/cxaccelerator/ 

Kristin Guthrie VP, Customer Experience at ICW Group 

Kristin has an experience of working in the industry since 1993. Her journey makes her a specialist and leader at sales and marketing, planning, strategising and customer service in both B2B and B2C environments. 

She is known for her strong skills like creating brand awareness, building a brand image to a customer and strong customer relationship management. 

Quoting the nominator- 

“ICW Group Insurance Companies is the largest group of privately held insurance companies. In recent years, with massive growth, the main challenge faced by the ICW group is to ensure that their customers have a positive and remarkable experience. With a company that’s been operating for almost five decades, transforming to a customer-centric culture that puts the needs of their customers first takes someone who is a progressive thinker, and has the determination and drive to change the business. As the leader of a newly created Customer Experience role, Kristin Guthrie clearly demonstrates the characteristics of a visionary leader. New to the company, she has been influential in getting the members of the executive team and other stakeholders to buy into the importance of CX and its impact to the bottom line. She adapted her leadership and communication style to different circumstances that helped her to effectively communicate the CX vision with clarity and passion that results in our organization taking clear action.”  

Have a look at her LinkedIN page: https://www.linkedin.com/in/kristinguthrie/ 

Christopher Toh Associate Director – Financial Planning & Analysis at Marina Bay Sands Pvt. Ltd 

Christopher has been in the hospitality industry since 1997 and his long journey makes him an expert at understanding the importance of customer feedback. He mixes his expertise of the hotel industry with his deep knowledge of CX to make Marina Bay Sands a more customer-friendly place. 

Look at his story from the Nominator’s point of view: 

“Chris is equal parts science and art, which is what it takes to lead an unparalleled CX program in a complex environment like the Casino and Hospitality business. Chris uses various tech platforms to showcase the benefits of data science in the world of CX. But then he leverages his deep understanding of the Hospitality business to add the ‘art’ in CX in problem definition, change management, focus grouping, brainstorming, negotiation and on and on. He possesses a deadly combination of skills and the mindset to integrate CX into every facet of the organization. At Marina Bay Sands, we now generate over 100,000 survey responses a year from a single physical property, over 80,000 written comments, surveys at 90 touch points on the customer journey, over 2,000 service audits. Christopher has made all this possible with his keen skillset.” 

Know more about Christopher at: https://www.linkedin.com/in/christopher-toh-5408ab25/ 

CloudCherry isn’t just about a product or a service, we are believers… We stand and care for CX enthusiasts who have a talent to make customers truly happy about their business. We have always admired and supported such specialists and will continue to do so even in the future. Our CX Champion Contest is just a small way of representing how much we actually care for CX superheroes and their contribution in making a company successful! 

The post The CX Champions Who Deserve More Than Just A Prize- Feb ‘19 appeared first on CloudCherry.

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On October 12th, we co-hosted a webinar with the CX Network where customer experience legend Bruce Temkin shared his insights on turning customer feedback into actions. He walked us through the five stages of voice of the customer maturity and shared advice on how CX teams can move their firm from Stage 1 Novices to Stage 5 Transformers.  

In this article, we recap the discussion and highlight the key takeaways which can help you turn your customer insights into actions that drive business value.  

Presenters:  

Dawn Paulos – Dawn is the VP of Marketing at CloudCherry. She specializes in building high velocity, data-driven marketing teams for early-stage growth companies. 

Bruce Temkin – Bruce is a customer experience visionary, speaker, advisor, researcher, and co-founder of the Customer Experience Professionals Association. He is a managing partner at Temkin Group.  

The Goal: More Action from Data Analysis 

Businesses are collecting more data than ever before, but they often do very little with it. Using structured and unstructured data to learn about customers is great, but it’s what you do with that data, and when you do it that really matters.  

As Temkin said, “All of the efforts around surveying, integrating data, analyzing, etc. are only as valuable as the actions that they lead to.” 

Temkin believes businesses need to move from descriptive analytics (data that describes the current state of the customer experience) to prescriptive analytics (information that informs the team exactly what to do to improve the customer experience). In order to do so,

Most companies get value from their VoC programs, but not many companies say VoC has transformed strategic activities.  

A study presented by Temkin showed that 74% of companies say their VoC program is somewhat successful or very successful.  However, when looking at the stages of maturity for VoC programs, it shows they aren’t actually effective in influencing action.  When defining the stages, Temkin looks at how much or how thoroughly each type of company uses the data they collect. Note that collecting VoC data is now table stakes – almost everyone listens to their customers, but very few have moved their VoC program beyond collection.  

Stages of VoC Maturity 

Stage 1: Novices — companies just starting to look at VoC programs, but they haven’t done much with it. 

Stage 2: Collectors — companies that are very focused on figuring out and refining their listening points. 

Stage 3: Analyzers — companies that are already collecting and using data, but they spend a lot of time analyzing it to figure out key insights.  

Stage 4: Collaborators — companies where VoC has strong relationships with people across the organization. They have integrated efforts from insights work with the operations of the rest of the organization. 

Stage 5: Transformers — these are companies where customer insights are embedded all the way up to strategic activities of the firm. 

The maturity of most VoC programs is low. 

The most mature VoC programs, the Transformers, are using data from a variety of sources, and they’re effectively taking action on insights from that data. Temkin said, “As VoC programs become more mature, these teams get hungrier, and recognize the necessity for integrating other data sources across the organization.” This starts to accelerate the maturity of the program naturally.  

Unfortunately, very few companies are there yet. Temkin reports that 60% of VoC programs are soliciting feedback, but only 24% of VoC programs say they are good at making changes to the business based on insights.  

Collectively, the CX industry needs to be doing better.  

For many industries, customer experience is really the only way you can differentiate. Take for example, credit unions and airlines. Innovating on the customer experience in these crowded, cost sensitive industries is often the only way they can stand out. But getting all of the data from all of the systems they use, getting it to work together and provide valuable insights they can take action on is really hard. Often teams need more resources to analyze and action their data, but budget can be hard to come by.  

As Paulos stated, “CX teams often struggle to get budget because it’s really difficult to provide relevant and actionable data right away. Being able to tap into all of the data in the organization is critical in order to get a complete picture, but this is difficult to do.” 

Actions need to be timely, but this is often both difficult and expensive. 

Once you have insights, it’s time to act. Getting insights in real-time is key. The more real-time the insights come in, the more real-time actions can be taken, and this can often mean the difference between a good customer experience and a bad one. 

The example Temkin provides is a customer complaint about a dirty bathroom in a fast-food restaurant. Real-time insights on that customer complaint could hypothetically lead to four actions: 

Immediate response: If a customer complains about the dirty bathroom, talk to the customer and apologize. Do all the things you would do with an upset customer. And keep in mind, this immediate response is not only necessary for the people who complained, but you need to find all the other people who experienced the problem as well and apologize to them. This won’t be possible with a less then real time solution.  

Corrective action: Clean the bathroom so that no one else has the same experience. The fast this action happens, the fewer the customers that will be affected.  

Continuous improvement: Roll out new processes. Consider teaching the importance of a clean bathroom, and put something in place so that it doesn’t happen in the future.  

Strategic change: Get hand dryers so wastebaskets don’t overflow with paper towels.  

These are typical examples of actions that can be taken from customer insights. Each stage can be applied to any customer insight in any industry. But notice how important speed of insight is to making a difference to the customers directly impacted.  

Acting eventually is fine, but action needs to be quick to avoid impacting more customers with the same bad experience.  

6 key trends of customer insights 

To close out the webinar, Temkin presented six trends to consider which can help shape your customer insights efforts going forward.  

1. Deep empathy, not stacks of metrics 

Data alone isn’t going to give you what you need. Getting a feel for what customers are really feeling is more important than numbers and percentages. Unstructured data (such as support tickets, customer reviews, chats, and phone calls) will help provide the anecdotal, emotional information you need to understand areas that need change.  

2. Continuous insights, not periodic studies 

Getting meaningful insights into the hands of the people that make change happen is important for success. Market research was historically run annually or biannually, not ongoing. But a good VoC program is able to put meaningful insights into the hands of the people that need to understand it on a regular basis, in real-time.  

3. Useful prescriptions, not past descriptions   

By pulling in data from different resources we can collect information that helps us understand customers. Then, we can apply predictive analytics tools so we can help others across the business identify the actions they need to take.  

4. Enterprise intelligence, not customer feedback 

Customer feedback will always exist. But going forward, customer feedback is going to play a new role. It’s often been the primary or only source of insights, but that’s changing. We now have to match data across the entire organization. It’s not just what customers are saying anymore – the data from what they are actually doing is becoming more integrated into strategy.  

5. Mobile first, not mobile responsive  

Being “mobile responsive” is simply building the same solution for a mobile device as what already exists (example: making a survey mobile friendly). “Mobile first” is leveraging the additional meta data and functionality mobile devices provide. Your customers are using their phones at almost every step along their journey with you. Not being mobile first is a real missed opportunity. 

6. Customer journeys, not isolated interactions  

We really need to understand our customers’ journey so we can understand where to optimize. The thing you should be focusing on isn’t always the obvious thing.  

Conclusion 

Providing insights into the organization is a great start, but in order to sustain the investment of VoC and Customer Experience, you must begin to translate insights into actions. The faster you can understand the necessary actions, the better. With new technology solutions and an increasing amount of data, we’re constantly playing catch-up to remain effective and efficient.  

The post Webinar Recap from Temkin’s “Driving CX Action, not Just Insights appeared first on CloudCherry.

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CloudCherry Blog by Pala - 2M ago

It is International Women’s Day, a day to honor and celebrate the achievements of women who inspire us in their own unique ways. It’s a day to remember why ‘Women’ all around us are so amazing.

So, let’s begin by saying this out loud-

“If you want anything said, ask a man. If you want something done, ask a woman.”– Margaret Thatcher said it and we can’t agree any less!
In-depth neuroscience researches tell us that there are biological differences in the way a woman and a man would think but that does not prove men and can soar higher than women in leadership capabilities. To prove a point, this year on International Women’s Day, we want to acknowledge ‘the top 5 women CXOs’ who have inspired the world with their Customer Experience skills. Here are those 5 amazing wonder women who can take on any hurdle with a smile on their faces!

Jeanne Bliss

She is the Founder and President of CustomerBliss, and the Co-Founder of The Customer Experience Professionals Association.
Jeanne has over 20 years of experience into ‘Customer Experience’ as she learned early on from her father. She is specialized at guide leaders and businesses to earn customer-driven growth and development. Jeanne is the author of the famous book, “Chief Customer Officer” (Jossey-Bass, 2006). The book was the first and one of its kind, at the time, to address the role of a customer leadership executive. It soon became a bestseller and has been translated into eight languages.

Jeannie Walters

She has 20 years of experience helping companies improve loyalty and retention, employee engagement, and overall customer experience.
Jeannie is currently the CEO/Founder of 360Connext, a global Customer Experience consulting firm. Her zeal about making the everyday interactions we all have as customers better and writes, speaks, studies and trains on customer experience issues around the world, makes her so very special. Her mission is “To Create Fewer Ruined Days for Customers.” She is an active writer and blogger.

Annette Franz

The founder and CEO (Chief Experience Officer, of course!) of CX Journey Inc- She’s got 25 years of experience in both helping companies understand their customers and employees and identifying what drives engagement, satisfaction, retention and the overall experience – so that, together, a better experience for all constituents can be designed.
She blogs at CX-Journey, where she shares her passion for helping companies understand the importance of the employee experience and its role in delivering an exceptional customer experience, as well as transform their cultures to ensure the customer is at the center of all conversations. She was recently recognized as one of “The 100 Most Influential Tech Women on Twitter” by Business Insider and has been recognized by several other organizations as a top influencer in CX.

Melinda Gonzalez

What sets Melinda apart is her unique experience, her deep understanding of how a customer experience strategy is established early, and how it must evolve over time as the business grows. She is the founding Member of San Francisco Customer Experience Professionals Association (CXPA). Melinda has worked with SalesForce for a decade and says that those were the best years of her career. She was directly involved in studying & experimenting with growth practices that created one of the most enviable companies in the SaaS industry, arguably. She is specialized at both customer success and customer advocacy in both post-sales and product functions.

Rashiruleneey Rashid

She is the head of Customer Experience at Courts Malaysia SDN BHD. Her journey as into CX started about 21 years back with Courts and she believes, it is her biggest achievement in life. She specializes in understanding Customer Journey Management in-depth and has a keen sense to create Customer delight in every step of the way.
Rashiruleneey quotes- “Happy Customer will help to RETAIN and REGAIN the customer for long term relationship and company to CONQUER the business in the long term.”- CEO of Courts , Mr Dominic Wong. Her idea for creating true customer delight involves the “High-five” principle of CX.

Katherine Evans

She is the keynote speaker and founder at ‘The Client Whisperer’. Katherine has an experience of 20 years and counting in creating awesome customer experiences through understanding customer journeys a lot better. She has a keen sense in crafting engaging CX and she trains teams across the globe to scale heights in building a better brand.
Katherine believes in- “Customers are no longer buying products, they are buying EXPERIENCES through products and services.”

Lynn Baker

Lynn is an Executive Presence and Business Image Consultant with over 30+ years of experience in Customer Experience. She focusses on consulting and training business leaders on how to improve their CX strategy and make the customer feel like the center of attention. Lynn has started Unique Speaker’s Bureau in Johannesburg recently and drives a successful CX business with her keen skills.

Erica Sosna

She is a firm believer of Employee Experience. Her company specializes in Career matters, Corporate Trainings, Inspiring Talks, Career Coaching, Virtual Speaking, and Career Education Masterclasses. Erica believes that in today’s day-and-age, every employee wants to stay on the top of their game and that the company needs to understand an Employee’s journey to retain them. Erica is the founder of ‘The Career Equation’ and is also the author of ‘Your Life Plan’.
Even though she doesn’t come from the CX domain, she is still an inspirational person who understands that employee experience is equally important to build a successful business.

These wonderful Superwomen are not only doing a fantastic job at their own companies or lives, they are also paving way for many other women to come forward and achieve more than they already are… They are inspirational, they are realistic, and they are a league of their own! We at CloudCherry, would love to celebrate such marvellous ladies! Happy Women’s Day!!!

The post Top women CXOs appeared first on CloudCherry.

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You can’t decide where you’re going if you don’t take stock of where you are. An amazing customer experience won’t just happen by accident. To assess your readiness for CX improvement, look to the CX Maturity Model.

In thousands of interviews across industries, with companies of every possible size, we started to notice certain CX patterns emerging. Here’s how to find those patterns in your own organization, so you can assess your CX readiness and take action.

The Six Competencies

In a study done by Forrester, they concluded that a firm must master six specific CX competencies before they can achieve exceptional CX. Those competencies are:

  1. Research – understand customers in-depth by using both qualitative methods, like interviews, and quantitative methods, like web analytics
  2. Prioritization – identify and rank most important customer journeys and interactions, and allocate company resources based on those priorities
  3. Design – use research to guide CX design through the ideation, prototyping, testing, and refining processes
  4. Enablement – provide employees and partners with the right resources to deliver CX, through training, information, tools, and ongoing support across all touchpoints
  5. Measurement – quantify the quality of customer experiences through well-defined metrics that portray actionable insights
  6. Culture – create a system of shared values and behaviors that focus employees on delivering great CX through reinforcement and incentivization
The Six Competencies In Action

How would embracing these competencies look inside of a real-life organization? Following are a few examples of real companies that used these competencies to improve their overall CX model:

  • The HR technology firm Alight focused on their self-service portal, where 90% of HR interactions occur. Within their portal, they zeroed in on seven major life events (having a child, going on bereavement leave, etc.). They prioritized these events because they gleaned that if these events aren’t handled well, they can change the employee/employer relationship forever.  
  • Travelodge created one-page diagrams that summarized employee operations, so that anyone could pick it up and understand how to follow Travelodge’s customer-facing processes. From cooking breakfast to cleaning rooms, the company used enablement to empower all employees to perform to Travelodge’s standards.
  • The inbound marketing software company HubSpot created a “culture code” that aligns job applicants and employees around a set of core beliefs. They also employ a vice president of culture and experience, who is responsible for driving culture as the company grows. Through culture, they ensure that HubSpot’s evaluations, work, and hiring align with the company’s brand and goals.  
The Four Facets of Discipline

Once you’ve laid the groundwork for great CX, you need ways to sustain it for the long-term. This will require getting thousands of people to consistently work together to produce wonderful experiences across tens of products and channels. In other words, great CX management will require:

  • Rigor – effective documentation for standardizing performances
  • Cadence – a plan for how and when to perform CX activities to turn them into ingrained organizational habits
  • Coordination – collaboration on each activity, erasing disjointedness and gaps
  • Accountability – a senior person who can hold teams accountable for carrying out CX activities
How To Plot Your CX Maturity

To gauge your place on the CX maturity scale, you must assess your CX activities in each competency. Based on your maturity in each competency, to decide whether you’re a beginner, intermediate, or advanced. For each maturity stage, you can then begin to understand what activities you need to pursue to achieve your CX goals. Here is a short summary of each maturity stage:

  • Beginner – Put in place all activities, including staffing, processes, and assets, required to ensure your organization has this competency solidly and rigorously established. Establish this competency if your organization does not yet perform these activities with rigor.
  • Intermediate –Apply best practices in this competency with discipline to be on equal footing with the companies that do it best. You are ready to advance with this competency if your organization performs these activities with rigor.
  • Advanced – Discover cutting-edge tactics for this competency, so you can emulate and experiment with them to ensure your organization maintains its standing among those few that do it best. You are ready to innovate in this competency if your organization performs these activities with all four facets of discipline.
Key Takeaways

Most companies still have major flaws in every CX management competency. As a result, companies can’t understand the quality of a customer’s experience, and they ultimately fail to build customer-focused structures.

You can reverse this threat by properly assessing your CX activities through the lens of six competencies and four facets of discipline. This framework will help you highlight obstacles and opportunities that are specific to your stage of CX development.

The post The Customer Experience Maturity Model appeared first on CloudCherry.

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