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Chloe Bennet was born Chloe Wang on April 18, 1992, in Chicago, Illinois. She is the daughter of Bennet Wang, an investment banker, and Stephanie Crane, an internist.

Bennet’s father is Han Chinese and her mother is American. She has six brothers: three biological, two foster and one adopted; two are African American and one is Mexican-Filipino. She attended St. Ignatius College Prep. At 15, she moved to China to pursue a singing career under her birthname, Chloe Wang.

Chloe WANG "BENNET"
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On April 28-May 1, 2018, take pictures of graves in a nearby cemetery.

Because cemeteries are one of the most important resources for genealogists, Geneanet has launched the project ‘A Cemetery for Posterity’ to capture headstones before they are lost.

On April 28-May 1, 2018, we will need you to picture as many graves as possible worldwide with the Geneanet mobile app or with your camera.

If you can’t take pictures in a cemetery, you can help indexing existing pictures in the Geneanet collaborative database.

How to participate?

1. You have a mobile or tablet

  • Install the GeneaGraves app for Android and iOS,

  • Go to a nearby cemetery, launch the app, select a project or create a new one, then take as many pictures as you want,
  • Once you’re back home, upload the pictures to your Geneanet account via a Wi-Fi access point. These pictures will be free for every Geneanet member.

2. You don’t have a mobile or tablet

  • Go to a nearby cemetery and take pictures of graves with a camera,
  • Once you’re back home, upload the pictures to your personal computer, then send a message at archivalrecords@geneanet.org with the name of the cemetery and the number of graves your have photographed, and we will explain how to import your pictures to your Geneanet account.
  • Of course, you can also send us a message if you already have pictures of a cemetery on your camera memory card.

Please click here to see if your nearby cemetery is not already listed on Geneanet.

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Since its original discovery in 1985, archaeologists have uncovered some 222 skeletons in a Longobard medieval necropolis in Veneto, Northern Italy. Each one has a grisly story to tell—the woman with two brooches; two greyhounds; a horse without a head. But one in particular continues to leave researchers stumped.

In tomb T US 380, archaeologists found the skeleton of a man in his mid-40s, dated to between the 6th and 8th centuries. He’s missing a hand. More unusually, he’d replaced it with a ingenious—if deadly—prosthesis: a knife.

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Are you sure that you don’t have any errors in your family tree?

No individual whose date of marriage is later than date of death? No woman whose date of death is before the date of birth of their child?

GeneaNet offers Premium members to automatically and instantly check their family tree for errors.

And you may be surprised!

Click ‘Configure’ in the top menu bar.

Click ‘Check Family Tree’ in the left sidebar.

This will automatically and instantly create the list of errors found in your family tree.

To ignore some errors, just click the red cross icon in the right column (critical errors cannot be ignored).

After any update of your family tree, you can check it again by clicking the ‘Resume’ button at the bottom of the list.

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From the outbreak of the war to the summer of 1915, this part of the front was held by French troops, who began the military cemetery in June 1915. It continued to be used by Commonwealth field ambulances and fighting units, but burials practically ceased with the German withdrawal in February 1917. After the Armistice, 15 of the graves (Plot II, Row M, Graves 4-18) were brought in from scattered positions east of the cemetery. The cemetery now contains 528 Commonwealth burials of the First World War, the French graves having been removed to other burial grounds. (Source: CWGC)

Click here to access this new collection (460 pictures)

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Foncquevillers was in British hands in 1915 and 1916. On 1 July 1916, Gommecourt Wood was attacked by the 46th (North Midland) Division, and the Southern part of the village by the 56th (London) Division. The attack met with temporary success, but could not be sustained; and Gommecourt remained a salient in the German line until 27 February 1917, when it was evacuated. It was never retaken by the Germans; at the end of their offensive of March 1918, it was just within the British lines. (Source: CWGC)

Click here to access this new collection (287 pictures)

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Amanda Leigh Moore was born on April 10, 1984, in Nashua, New Hampshire, to Stacy (née Friedman), a former news reporter who once worked for the Orlando Sentinel, and Donald Moore, a pilot for American Airlines. Moore was raised Catholic, but has since developed a “hodgepodge of things” that she believes. Moore’s ancestry is Russian Jewish (from her maternal grandfather), English, and Irish. She is the middle of three children with an older brother, Scott, and a younger brother, Kyle. When Moore was two months old, she and her family moved to Longwood, Seminole County, Florida, outside of Orlando, because of her father’s job. She attended Bishop Moore Catholic High School in Orlando, Florida from 1998 to 2002.

Amanda Leigh "Mandy" MOORE
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Bucquoy was taken by the 7th Division in March, 1917. It was partly lost in April 1918, after a prolonged and gallant defence by the 62nd (West Riding), 37th and 42nd (East Lancashire) Divisions; and it was cleared on the following 21st August. The cemetery was begun in March 1917, when 23 men of the 2nd Queen’s were buried in what is now Plot II, Row A. Thirteen graves of April-August 1918 were added (Plot II, Row B) in September 1918 by the 5th Division Burial Officer. (Source: CWGC)

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Above all, Geneanet is a collaborative website

Mutual aid, collaboration and free sharing are the basics of Geneanet which promotes and supports a number of collaborative projects.

Some weeks ago, we have launched a new indexing tool for all the Geneanet members. It has two levels (beginner and advanced) and the number of documents to index will depend on your available time (about a quarter of an hour, about one hour or several hours).

Two valuable collections have been made available to index: the “Index to passenger lists of vessels arriving at Baltimore, 1820-97” and the “War of 1812 Pension Files”.

Join the Geneanet collaborative indexing project and help other genealogists finding their ancestors in these collections!

Index to passenger lists of vessels arriving at Baltimore, 1820-97

Start indexing this collection

View the complete collection

War of 1812 Pension Files

Start indexing this collection

View the complete collection

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Freedom on the Move from Cornell University is the first major digital database of fugitive slave ads from North America.

Readers of the May 24, 1796 Pennsylvania Gazette found an advertisement offering ten dollars to any person who would apprehend Oney Judge, an enslaved woman who had fled from President George Washington’s Virginia plantation, Mount Vernon. The notice described her in detail as a “light mulatto girl, much freckled, with very black eyes and bushy black hair,” as well as her skills at mending clothes, and that she “may attempt to escape by water… it is probable she will attempt to pass as a free woman, and has, it is said, wherewithal to pay her passage.”

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