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I have come to the realization that I have been basing my food consumption on the time frame that has elapsed since my VSG procedure rather than looking within and going with what feels right to me and my body.

This has been a HUGE source of frustration for me because I have been diligently working hard to move further down the weight scale, and yet despite my best efforts I am not moving below 240 pounds.

I know, I know...slow and steady wins the race. I understand the concept behind this statement, however feeling as though I have reached a plateau is, in and of itself, a rather grandiose form of frustration for me. I find myself questioning everything I am doing. So much so that I am beginning to point a crooked finger at myself all with the notion that I am in some way unknowingly sabotaging my own success thus far.

Writing that makes me realize that I guess I really don't believe the substance of that sentence, yet I am finding difficulty understanding why there is no movement on the scale. I know I am still losing my overall size because some of my older clothing items literally hand from my shoulders and my waist, but it is the obese part of me (refer to my previous blog posting "8 Months Post-op" for a deeper understanding) that feels as though I am doing something terribly wrong. I just don't for the life of me know what it can be.

If have nothing else right now, I have a sense of strength and determination to see this through. After all, I don't really have an option because a new life of obesity is NOT in my future. :mad:
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Gastric Sleeve | All About the Gastric S.. by Wandagettinfit4life - 3d ago
Hey y'all! I'm still here been working hard only $1300 more to go for balance on surgery! Plane tickets already purchased and passport card on the way! I am excited and nervous. My pre-op starts 5/22!!:eek:
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Today is a special day in that it marks the eight-month anniversary since I underwent VSG with Dr. William Arnold in Scottsdale, Arizona.

During this time a great deal has been learned not only about this procedure, the journey, and the expected outcome of said procedure and journey, but about myself as well. I now recognize that I am significant, valuable, and viable member of society, and that despite having lost a significant amount of weight, I will always see myself as an obese male. I say this not with any negative connotations, rather with a sense of reality that lends itself to teaching me more about myself and who I have chosen to become. I recognize and embrace who I once was because it is my belief that by doing so, I will never forget the struggle to get to this juncture in my journey.

I love who I have become, and I am excited to see where I will be at my 12-month anniversary. But I am also realistic in that I know how easy it is to revert to old habits. Over the course of the past three months I did just that. I make no excuses for my shortcomings, and I refuse to beat myself up over situations that I have since regained control over. But I saw firsthand how easy it is to falter. And because of my mistakes, I am a better person for having learned the hard way that it takes one moment; one decision; and one bite.

It really is that simple.

Over the course of the next four months I have set small goals for myself in an attempt to push onward in obtaining my overall weight loss goal of 185 pounds. Does that mean that I will reach said goal? Not necessarily. But it is what I strive to achieve. And If I can even come close (down to 200 pounds – that’s 10 pounds a month over the next four months) then I will be more than satisfied with myself. That will then be a net loss of 135 pounds lost to date. To reach my target weight will see me at 160 pounds lost. Either way, I will feel a HUGE sense of accomplishment.

I look forward to what the future has in store for me. I see nothing but great things taking place, and as such find myself in a position where some serious decisions must be made (more on that later) but know that wherever I find myself in this vast world, I will be in a much happier place than where I once resided.
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So I just wanted to say that at 18 months I overate last night and got sick. Didn't even think it was that much but obviously my belly thought otherwise. Just goes to show that even when you think you got this thing down you just never know. LOL.
Today at work my team got to go out to lunch. It was great. I decided to wear a skirt and I was just loving my new legs. I feel like Ariel when she got her new legs. LOL. I have always been insecure about having big calves. Even when I was skinny. But when I was obese my legs were huge. Like ham hawks. I hated them. I had the horrible fat bubble by my knee. Losing all this weight I have the bulk of my extra skin on my legs. I have worked so hard with the strength training and running to tone them up as much as I can. I eat right, stay hydrated, and take my vitamins. I do what I can. And it is definitely paying off. I have to say it....they are not perfect. Not even close to being as nice as they were when I was young but I can say I love my legs. It honestly makes me happy. :)
As for work, that is all going great. I finally got off my booty and started working on that last certification for my Gold level SCLA. On Mother's Day I took the last 2 tests and it is officially done. I am pretty dang proud of myself.
Oh, and I got these new straps for my knee issues when running. They are by ABCO Sport. They work wonders. Anyone having knee pain should give them a try. I bought them on Amazon and they were cheaper then on the brands website. Crazy. At any rate, they are wonderful. I actually got one for both knees even though one knee has less pain then the other.
Just thought I would check in and let you beautiful sleevers/soon to be sleevers know what is going on in my world. Hope you are all doing spectacularly and living the sleeved dream.
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By a show of hands (or a response below this post) how many of you out there in the Gastric Sleeve Community are like me in that you find yourself day in and day out stepping on the scale multiple times throughout the day, all with the hope of seeing some form of success as weight slowly drops off of our ever-changing bodies?

I admit it. It is a terrible habit of mine: the scale. As much as I embrace the fact that I am in a state of constant flux, I find that depending upon the outcome of my multi-visit weigh-in's, said outcome can and often times does determine the manner to which I approach my day. To say it is a make or break situation would be an understatement. If I show a loss on the day, all is well in the forefront of my mind and I generally stay off of the scale throughout the majority of the day. If I show inconsistencies on the day, I find that I am on the scale more times than I care to admit - all with the hope of seeing some sign of improvement as the day creeps on, and those terrible thoughts that I keep tucked away in the dark recesses of my mind tend to creep back in for a not so cordial visit.

It is my belief that as Gastric Sleeve recipients, we are not only expecting to, but expected to lose weight on a daily basis. By and large do we? Absolutely. Even if it is a half a pound on the day, it is a success because it is a half a pound less than the previous day's weigh-in. But if there is stagnancy, or if there is a half a pound gain...all bets are off and the rest of day is spent in some form of turmoil over the fact that there was a gain.

The reality is this: we are in fact in a constant state of flux. We are going to see minor (and yes, major) success throughout our weight loss journey. But hand in hand with that, we will also see minor (and hopefully not major) setbacks. It is all relative to the bigger picture that is the weight loss process. This is not to say we should knock ourselves down when we reach these varying changes, rather we should embrace them, reflect upon them, and learn from them. Because that is the only way we are going to be successful long term.

If we can better understand what we are (and are not doing) correctly regarding our exercise programs and our daily food intake, then we can effectively apply that knowledge to our ever growing arsenal of bariatric information, and from there utilize it to the best of our capabilities.

This is not to say we should live and die by our daily numbers. In fact, the opposite can be argued. Allow me to give you an example. As previously stated, I was notorious for stepping onto the scale throughout the day. Finally I decided to have my wife securely tuck the scale away in a designated area that I know nothing about. Once a week (usually on Saturday) she will pull out the scale and I will record my success for that week. This seems to be serving me well in that I am no longer obsessing over a number. I now recognize it is about a reduction in size more so than what the scale reads. And for that, I am grateful.

When I began this journey I was a 44 waist and a 2-3XL shirt. I am now a 34 waist and a L-XL shirt, and I couldn't be more pleased. I am still around 240 pounds, but the clothing sizes do not lie. In fact, they tell an all-together different story of my journey thus far. Would I like to lose more? Absolutely. But if I never lose another pound, but can remain at this size, I will have considered my surgery and weight loss journey to have been a major success.
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Well, my doctor set me up with a referral to a surgeon. I contact the surgeons office, because I am proactive like that. My first meeting with them is June 10th. Prior to scheduling the meeting, they asked that I reach out to my insurance to make sure that bariatric surgery is covered, which I had already done. I had checked online, I had made my husband get a copy of our SPD from his HR person. But after I called the surgeons office, I called my insurance on the phone to just triple check. The poor guy answering my call, I almost felt terrible for him.
I am the person asking for my W2's on January 30th, because I just want to get my taxes filed already, and then I am the person whose taxes are filed moments after receiving the W2's. I am proactive, as much as possible. So, I was asking about precertifications and what all was going to be needed. Waiting is hard for me, especially because I am not really talking about this yet with anyone but my husband and my best friend.
Soon, I should get a packet in the mail with information about which surgeon I am scheduled with and all the other new patient info etc. Yesterday was the day I called.
In a perfect world, I will have the surgery at the end of December. I don't know how feasible that is. So many of you have stories about how long this process took, but some of you seem to have it happen so much faster.

For now, I am logging food and my doctor started me on Qsymia. I'm trying to find a good recommendation for a meal replacement shake that is great for weight loss and ideally lactose free, because right now I am using Slim Fast shakes during the week for breakfast and lunch, and trying to each a ton of veggies for dinner, then some protein. Any recommendations?

This is all very stream-of-consciousness and rambling, and for that I am sorry....
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There are moments throughout this journey where I have felt that I have lost the maximum amount of weight possible. As a direct result, I had resigned myself to the fact that I may remain 6'1" and weigh 240 pounds for the rest of my life. After some serious contemplation I realized that resigning myself to my current weight is not enough. I want to reach my goal weight of 185 pounds (or somewhere close to it) by the end of the year. Armed with this new found determination, I decided to embark on an exercise regimen that would with equal parts drive, determination, and dedication, see me to my goal weight within the allotted time frame.

In beginning of this new regimen, I partook of a 30 minute DVD workout, followed by squats, push-ups, leg lifts, crunches, and planking. Since that time, I have added a kettle bell weight routine to the mix, all with the hope of obtaining the elusive numbers that tend to taunt me every waking moment.

I understand that this mentality may not sound altogether healthy, but I assure you, there is nothing unhealthy about what I am doing. I am simply going commando with my workout routine because, quite frankly, I feel as though I don't have much further to go with what I am currently doing (walking, etc.); that I have in some way stalled or reached a plateau and need to jump off in order to get things kick started in a new direction; and that if I maintain the minimal exercise program I am currently on, it will eventually do me a disservice rather than benefit me. So I have changed everything about what I am doing.

It's hard. I won't lie. I struggle. I groan. I swear at everything in existence as I force myself to do said exercise routines, but the sense of accomplishment I have upon completion is like something from another world.

I want this that bad. I have been heavy for over 40 years of my life. It is high time I take control of my weight, my life, my self-esteem, and my positive mental attitude, and turn it into something beneficial to me and to others I choose to surround myself with. Because I am in good company these days, and the folks I choose to have in my life not only support my efforts, the encourage them. A win-win if there ever was one.

I have lost over 80 pounds since September 2017. My goal is to have lost a total of 140 pounds by December 2018. That is a year and a half of doing everything possible to see this to fruition. With such great people by my side, I don't see how I can possibly fail, unless of course I fail myself. And that is not likely to happen again.
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I have bipolar disorder. And while many of you may think that means I am quite simply insanity defined, the truth of the matter is this: I have a chemical imbalance that triggers emotional responses - sometimes at inopportune times. While my behavioral patterns attempt to lend themselves to sway me to make irrational decisions in my life, I fight hard everyday to do the right thing and to ensure that I am on track with who I chose to be in this life. In short, I do not let this disorder define me. I am living with it, but I refuse to allow it to consume me.

Having this disorder is not unlike other disorders. It requires me to maintain said chemical levels through the use of medicinal aids in order to function in a manner suitable to everyday life. When I try to wean off of these medications (and I have tried in the past,) the results can often times be detrimental to my health. I mention this not as a means of garnering sympathy, rather because I know that there are others much like myself who live with this disorder and are on similar medications with adverse side effects who have undergone VSG and are fighting an uphill battle.

These medications, as they have been described by many medical practitioners, is the root cause of weight gain in someone with a normal metabolism and who can eat normal sized servings. For weight loss surgery patients it is widely known that these medications compete with weight loss efforts by causing weight gain. The only known remedy for this is to stop taking said medications. But that would appear illogical. After all, if it were that simple, someone like myself wouldn't bother to be on them. But because I require them to function with some level of normalcy, that doesn't seem like a rational option. So I did the next best thing and researched this topic. And what I found was equal parts confusing and hopeful.

On one hand it was confusing because many practitioners (especially in the bariatric world) denounce the effectiveness of bipolar medications in conjunction with weight loss surgery citing much of what was stated above. On the other hand, there have been studies conducted that have found that despite the use of these medicinal aids, for an obese person on said medication, weight loss surgery is the best alternative for fighting obesity.

So which is it? It would seem the medical world is divided regarding this matter. All the while, people much like myself are left wondering where we fit in with regard to bipolar disorder and weight loss surgery. The answer is, we don't fit in. But we need to. We need to become viable people in this world. We need to live, breathe, and exude happiness. We are faced with enough hardship, shouldn't we begin to focus on an alternative?

I refuse to accept that because of my condition I am condemned to life a life of obesity. And I refuse to accept that medication alone is the root cause of weight gain. I gained a few pounds over the course of my absence here not because of my medications, rather because I felt a little discouraged and fell back into my old habits. Nothing more. Nothing less.

My point is this (and then I will gently tuck away my soapbox). If you are living with bipolar disorder and you have undergone or want to undergo weight loss surgery, DO NOT let anything stand in your way. I have been successful thus far and so can you. Just do not allow yourself to slip back into the trappings of old habits because that, in reality, is the true culprit here. Does the medication as a whole promote weigh gain? Absolutely. But you can combat it. It takes a great deal of time and hard work, but you can do it.
I am proof of this.
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I have bipolar disorder. And while many of you may think that means I am quite simply insanity defined, the truth of the matter is this: I have a chemical imbalance that triggers emotional responses - sometimes at inopportune times. While my behavioral patterns attempt to lend themselves to sway me to make irrational decisions in my life, I fight hard everyday to do the right thing and to ensure that I am on track with who I chose to be in this life. In short, I do not let this disorder define me. I am living with it, but I refuse to allow it to consume me.

Having this disorder is not unlike other disorders. It requires me to maintain said chemical levels through the use of medicinal aids in order to function in a manner suitable to everyday life. When I try to wean off of these medications (and I have tried in the past,) the results can often times be detrimental to my health. I mention this not as a means of garnering sympathy, rather because I know that there are others much like myself who live with this disorder and are on similar medications with adverse side effects who have undergone VSG and are fighting an uphill battle.

These medications, as they have been described by many medical practitioners, is the root cause of weight gain in someone with a normal metabolism and who can eat normal sized servings. For weight loss surgery patients it is widely known that these medications compete with weight loss efforts by causing weight gain. The only known remedy for this is to stop taking said medications. But that would appear illogical. After all, if it were that simple, someone like myself wouldn't bother to be on them. But because I require them to function with some level of normalcy, that doesn't seem like a rational option. So I did the next best thing and researched this topic. And what I found was equal parts confusing and hopeful.

On one hand it was confusing because many practitioners (especially in the bariatric world) denounce the effectiveness of bipolar medications in conjunction with weight loss surgery citing much of what was stated above. On the other hand, there have been studies conducted that have found that despite the use of these medicinal aids, for an obese person on said medication, weight loss surgery is the best alternative.

So which is it? It would seem the medical world is divided regarding this matter. All the while, people much like myself are left wondering where we fit in with regard to bipolar disorder and weight loss surgery. The answer is, we don't fit it. But we need to. We need to become viable people in this world. We need to live, breathe, and exude happiness. We are faced with enough hardship, shouldn't we begin to focus on an alternative?

I refuse to accept that because of my condition I am condemned to life a life of obesity. And I refuse to accept that medication alone is the root cause of weight gain. I gained a few pounds over the course of my absence here not because of my medications, rather because I felt a little discouraged and fell back into my old habits. Nothing more. Nothing less.

My point is this (and then I will gently tuck away my soapbox). If you are living with bipolar disorder and you have undergone or want to undergo weight loss surgery, DO NOT let anything stand in your way. I have been successful thus far and so can you. Just do not allow yourself to slip back into the trappings of old habits because that, in reality, is the true culprit here. Does the medication as a whole promote weigh gain? Absolutely. But you can combat it. It takes a great deal of time and hard work, but you can do it.
I am proof of this.
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Good morning, it is Tuesday. Yesterday I had my procedure and I am told it was practically perfect. Thanks God for that! It didnt hurt really bad like my shoulder surgery did and I had a pretty comfortable day in the hospital. I was exceptionally blessed that my husband came and stayed with me all day we got to be close. At the end of the evening pain medication was making me nauseous - I’ve been getting nausea medicine almost every four hours I tried to lay off in the evening and through the night so that today will be better but, that wasn’t smart because everthing hurts.... Pain is not off the charts I know it’s exceptionally hard to get out of bed. Yesterday afternoon I feel like I have a ton of heartburn. Today I woke up hungry! I don’t know if that’s a good sign,Especially because people say after the surgery they lose that sensation.
I’m supposed to get out this evening. Orange Coast Memorial in Fullerton is a very nice hospital.
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