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All decorators struggle with jobs that have lots of print colors in small quantities. 4cp FUSION BOND transfers are the answer.  Not DTG printers! FUSION BOND transfers are printed out of a Ricoh printer onto special clear film.  The under base positive is printed out of the same Ricoh printer.  Make your under base screen with 110 mesh and register to the print on the film.  Then print FUSION BOND white ink directly onto the toner as the under base.  No catalyst is needed.  Apply powder glue and gel 220 degrees for 20 seconds through your dryer.  Apply the transfer to the bag, cap or garment at 310 degrees for 5 seconds.  Peel the film off in 10-15 seconds.  The ink is engineered to couple with the toner. So the transfer ink is all you feel on the garment, making it soft.  No weeding or cutting.  Sticks to almost any substate including non woven and coated materials. DO IT YOURSELF! You will need.. -Ricoh PROC5200S printer

-FB100 FILM

-FUSION BOND INK

-FB200 POWDER GLUE

The post Do It Yourself- Fusion Bond 4 Color Process Transfer appeared first on Fusion180Ink.com.

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25 Promotional Products to Add for Back-to-School Needs

Adding promotional back-to-school products is an excellent idea, as this will allow customers to shop at one location for all of their needs. From sports teams to pep rallies the demand for products with their school mascot or logo on the items is there. Now is the time to tap into the $24.7 billion promotional product industry. Listed are twenty products that you can potentially add to your shop!

-Branded Crayon Set

-Branded Cowbell

-Branded Spiral Notebook

-Branded Koozies

-Rally Towels

-USB Car Adapter

-Ponchos

-Inflatable Cheering Sticks

-Pompoms

-Umbrellas

-Foam Holders

-Soft squeezable Footballs

-School Spirit Flags

-Felt Pennants

-Water Bottles

-Sunglasses

-Sports Bags

-Folding Chairs

-Lanyards

-Stress Balls

-USB drives

-USB car chargers

-Hand Sanitizers
-Pens

-Paper Note Pads

The post 25 Promotional Products to Add for Back-to-School appeared first on Fusion180Ink.com.

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Guidelines for Selecting the Proper Mesh Count Background: Deciding the proper screen mesh count can be a puzzling task especially if you are new to the screen printing industry, but we have made this guide to help. Selecting the proper mesh is determined by the amount of screen printing ink deposited, the thickness of ink, color of garment, and how detailed the artwork you are working with is. Mesh Size/Mesh Count: Mesh size is measured by how many threads there are per square inch. EX: 110 mesh screen has 110 threads per square inch. Low Mesh Count: The size of the mesh has to do with how thick the ink you are using is. If you are printing with white, a thicker ink, a lower mesh count will work best. High Mesh Count: If you are looking for a detailed print then you would use a higher mesh count. This is due to the fact that the holes in the screen are more detailed while using a higher mesh count. This allows for finer detail in your print. A high mesh count will hold the fine lines or dots in the image. Guidelines: Course (40-110 mesh count) Medium (156 mesh count) Fine (200 and up mesh count) -40-61 Mesh Count – This mesh count is also known as a course mesh count. We recommend using this mesh count if you are working with metallic, shimmer, or glitter inks. This is due to the fact that these specialty inks have particles within them that will not go through finer meshes. -86 Mesh Count – This is considered a course mesh as well. This count works best for a heavier ink deposit. It is typically used for printing a bold copy onto a darker color fabric. 86 mesh count is perfect for an underlay. -110 Mesh Count – This is considered a medium course screen mesh and works great for spot colors and text. Most screen printers use 110 mesh count. -156 Mesh Count – This medium screen mesh is great for printing on light colored fabrics with regular detail and a medium ink deposit. -200-240 Mesh Count – This fine mesh is perfect for a lighter color garment or white garment and has a soft feel. It is great for high detailed artwork and halftones. This is not recommended for four color process or extremely detailed halftone artwork. -305 and Higher Mesh Counts– This fine mesh count works for high detail textile printing and fine halftones including four color process and simulated process prints. If you find yourself challenged by a particular situation please don’t hesitate to reach out and give us a call. We are always happy to help!

The post Guidelines for Selecting the Proper Mesh Count appeared first on Fusion180Ink.com.

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Fusion 180 Ink by Fusion 180º Ink - 1M ago
Background: Squeegee is a tool with a flat, smooth rubber blade utilized to push screen printing ink through the mesh onto the garment you are printing on. Squeegee’s can control the release rate, remove excess ink, and shear the ink. This tool is essential for sharp print edges. Tips: 1. Maintenance: The wrong squeegee or a damaged one can cost time and money. It is important to maintain, clean, replace, or sharpen the squeegee often, as the squeegee can be damaged over time and effect the sharpness of the print. A sharp squeegee works best, as the tool is used to guarantee the ink does not smear. 2.  Specialty Ink: Squeegees have a durometer and depending on the ink that you are using you need to use different degrees. For example, if you are using specialized ink (metallic or glow in the dark ink) than this requires more force to get through the mesh. In this case, you would select a harder squeegee. 3. Harder Squeegee: Other factors that determine which type of durometer to use include a smooth substrate versus an irregular or rough one, as well as the type of ink, color of garment, press you are using, and type of ink.
Smooth substrates, fine meshes, specialty inks, high speed automatic press all would require a harder squeegee. 4. Softer Squeegee: This means a coarse mesh, irregular or rough substrate, and an increased amount of ink coverage you would need to use a softer squeegee. For example, if you are using an underlay and need a light color on a darker substrate, a softer squeegee is essential.

The post Squeegee 101 appeared first on Fusion180Ink.com.

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9 Tips for Screen Printing with Low Temperature Ink Solutions to all of your screen printing problems are here now that we developed Fusion 180° low cure temperature ink, as you will now only need one formula to screen print on all fabrics. Listed are our nine tips for screen printing with our all in one ink. 1. Mesh Range You can use a low mesh count to a high mesh count. 60/inch to 280/inch (33/cm to 120 cm European) printable without viscosity modification. The more detailed the print the higher the mesh and the more ink deposit the higher the curing temperature.
2. Ink Curing Proper curing temperature and mesh depends on the thickness of ink deposit, garment, color of garment, artwork, and desired effect. Direct application onto the garment substrates and cures at 180°F (83°C) with 305 mesh/inch no underlay or at 240°F (116°C) with 86 mesh/inch.  The ink can also be cured with the flash in 4 seconds at 450°F degrees. (232°C) 3. Flash Cure

Cure Fusion 180 with a Flash without a Catalyst - YouTube

The ink gels at low flash temperatures for easy use with multi-color printing. Does not require a catalyst. Does not build up on screen.
4. Application Can print on any fabric and heat sensitive materials: polyester, soft vinyl material substrate acrylic, polyproplylene non-woven, artificial leather, nylon (polyamide), as well as 100% cotton and 50/50 (sweatshirt)
5. Viscosity

Fusion 180 Ink has Perfect Viscosity and Excellent Opacity - YouTube

The ink has low viscosity. There is pseudoscience plastic behavior at low temperature. The ink maintains Newtonian Viscosity at room temperature. It can be used through fine meshes.
6. Adhesion Adheres to all fabrics without a catalyst.
7. Clean up and Maintenance You may no longer need ink cleaners made with petrochemicals such as blended solvents. To clean the ink you need our INK CLEANER. Low cure ink can bind up in the screen when the pallet is too hot, if you leave the ink in the screen overnight, or if the screen was recently flashed. In order to clear the screen you need to spray reducer into the effected area, flood the screen with ink, and push the ink through the screen with a squeegee onto test print until the area is cleared. Lastly, the ink container should always be covered with a lid.
8. Storage Always store at cool room temperature below 90°F (32°F. This Series Ink may be crystalized below 40°F. If this happens, increase ink temperature up to 70°F to 80°F by the slow mixing friction.
9. Bleed Resistance / Transfer Ink Bleed resistance is very high for printing on 100% polyester, nylon and sublimated polyester. The ink can be used for transfers and foil adhesive.

The post 9 Tips for Screen Printing with Fusion 180 appeared first on Fusion180Ink.com.

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Fusion 180 Ink by Fusion 180º Ink - 1M ago
6 Artwork Mistakes to Avoid One of the most important elements of screen printing is using high quality art, as this will enable you to create eye-catching prints that are sharp, crisp, clear, and bold. High resolution art can help your shop looking professional and your prints staying high quality. 1. Not Double-Checking Your Artwork. Don’t forget to do a quality artwork check. Finding spelling and grammatical errors prior to printing the film of your artwork and overlooking the customers instructions are essential. This will guarantee you are following proper protocol as far as the look and feel of the artwork, whether it be a vintage look or a sharp one. Halftone details, dot-gain compensations, gradient overlays, as well as the density and transparency of the artwork colors should all be on your checklist as well. The few minutes to look over mistakes will save time and money in the long run. Always do a test-run prior to printing the entire job to ensure that there are no artwork mistakes. 2. Using a Low Quality Art File. Guarantee that you are using high resolution at 300dpi in order to obtain results that have a crisp and clear print. If you start with low quality the file will end up printing too small or in the wrong format for the job, finishing with sub-par work. There is no way around this, but starting from scratch. 3. Not Re-Creating Low Quality Artwork Designs from Scratch or Providing Guidelines for Artwork Sent. It can be tempting to work with what clients give you, but from personal experience, re-creating their low quality artwork file provided or requesting a higher resolution JPG or PSD of the file is essential. If you don’t than this can do your customers a disservice. Maintaining standards for the artwork provided and accepted from customers, making clear guidelines, and holding customers to them will only help your customers. They will thank you for providing them with a high-quality finished product. 4. Not Using Our Pigment Based Matching System and the Pantone Book. The best way to get the specific colors that your customers are looking for is to use our easy to use Pigment Based Matching System. You need a pantone book in order to know the exact colors that your customer wants, as no two monitors are the same. Our formulas for our matching system contain 10% of our pigment concentrate colors and 90% base.
Get started with our Start up Kit.
– 13 Quarts of Pigment Components
– 5 Gallons of Base
– 1 Gallon of Reducer
View our prices by clicking here! 5. Not Having a Back-Up Source for Your Art Department. Regardless of your art departments abilities, having a back up source on file to call if your art department gets overwhelmed is essential. This company will be able to help your art department if orders are piling with complicated or time-consuming separations in that you might have to turn down a job. 6. Not Improving Your Art Skills Screen printing wonderful, crisp, and clear prints starts with great artwork. If you improve your artwork skills by simply watching videos on Youtube or taking online courses, especially if you are new to screen printing, this will only help your shop improve and avoid misprints. In order to complete a finished look on garments that your customers will love, our tips will help! In the comment section, guess how many color imprints we used of low temperature ink on this 100% cotton t-shirt!
Our low temperature ink will work on all fabrics. Please click on the image above to read more about our Fusion 180 ink.

Save 20% off your first order

Code: SAVE20

FREE domestic freight at $150

Please click on the image to shop.

The post 6 Artwork Mistakes to Avoid appeared first on Fusion180Ink.com.

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5 New Videos Portraying Different Fabrics Low Temperature Ink Adheres to
    1. Low temperature ink covers fibrillation on 50% polyester, 50% cotton sweatshirts. Read ‘5 Step Guide for Printing on 50/50 Sweatshirts’

Fusion 180 Covers Fibers on 50/50 - YouTube

  2. Low temperature ink prevents rayon within tri-blend fabrics from burning. Every screen printer knows that screen-printing requires heat in order to create a print that fully adheres to your substrate. Regular plastisol ink cures at a higher dryer temperature causing brown or scorch marks on synthetic substrates. This destroys the quality of the print. These tips will prevent scorch marks on your final products.
Know which substrates that are prone to scorching.
White or light colored garments
Lighter weight cottons
Synthetic fabrics that won’t tolerate heat
Switch to Fusion 180. Prevent scorch marks on your final product by using low cure ink.
Cure at a Low Temperature. Fusion 180 cures at 240 degrees for 40 seconds through the dryer. Lowering the temperature of your dryer prevents these marks from occurring and will essentially keep your prints looking crisp, clear, and sharp. With regular Plastisol based ink you have to adjust the speed and heat settings to a lower temperature for a longer period of time, however with Fusion 180 you will not have to make any further adjustments and you would only need to make sure that you are curing at the proper low temperature. This will prevent fabrics from scorching.
Adjust your flash cure unit. The temperature of the flash cure unit should be lowered when using Fusion 180 and dealing with fabrics that are likely to scorch. The height of the unit should be raised so the substrate is farther from the pallet.
QUICK TIP: You do not need a catalyst to print with a flash.
Remove Scorch Marks. If garments suffer scorch marks under the flash cure unit you do not have to toss them into the pile of damaged garments. White garments CAN have the scorch marks removed by running them through the washing machine or spraying with hydrogen peroxide and water.
Scorching is common for nearly ever screen printing shop and can be avoided by following our simple tips.   Read ‘Tips for Preventing Scorching’

 

 

Fusion 180 Prevents Rayon Fabrics from Burning - YouTube

3. Low temperature ink covers fibers on 100% cotton.Read ‘6 Artwork Mistakes to Avoid’

Fusion 180 Covers Fibrillation on Cotton - YouTube

4. Low temperature ink prevents polyester fabrics from shrinking. Learn more about low temperature ink. 

Fusion 180 Prevents Polyester from Shrinking - YouTube

5. Low temperature ink covers fibers on 100% cotton fabrics.

Fusion 180 Covers Fibers on Cotton - YouTube

Please click on the image to read more. OVERVIEW- All in one screen printing ink -ONE formula to screen print on ALL fabrics Lowering the temperature of your dryer and using low temperature ink…
-Prevents The Rayon Within Tri-Blend Fabrics from Burning
-Covers Fibers on 100% Cotton
-Blocks Dye Migration on 100% Polyester
-Prevents Nylon or Non Woven Bags from Shrinking
-Adheres to Thicker Fabrics (50/50 Sweatshirts and Raincoats) -Prevents Scorching Learn More Don’t forget to use the code ’20off’
Free domestic freight $150+

The post 5 New Videos Portraying Different Fabrics Low Temperature Ink Adheres to appeared first on Fusion180Ink.com.

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Do you have a small quantity of shirts to print with many color separations?! We recommend using our Fusion Bond Transfer. This saves us time and money. Listed are 10 facts about our transfer. 1. Fusion bond transfer is a four color process transfer that sticks to all garments at 310 degrees Fahrenheit for 5 seconds. 2. After you wait 15 seconds you can peel the transfer off of the garment.

 

3. The outcome is bright and durable.

4. This new transfer blocks migration even on sublimated fabrics.
5. The process does not require weeding, cutting, or an under base transfer step.
6. There is great stretch for spandex products. 7. Group images of artwork on 11.5″ by 16″ image area. We have a minimum of 12 sheets. 8. Please send art to Dave@DaysoffDesigns.com at 300 resolution
9. Upon review of artwork, an additional art charge may apply. 10. Results are a SOFT HAND! View Listing

The post 10 Facts About Our Newest Listing, ‘Fusion Bond Transfer’ appeared first on Fusion180Ink.com.

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6 Helpful Tools for Your Screen Print Shop

 

  1. Inkjet Media Film
    Our waterproof inkjet media film is high quality, used for your screens, and competitively priced. SHEETS  | ROLLS
  2. Split TapeOur split tape is used to block ink smearing out of screen frame. The tape is made with a combination of Polypropylene, Polyisophorone, and Hydrocarbon resin. The white section has natural rubber adhesive and the black portion doesn’t. We offer 2″, 3″, and 4″ split tape. The tape peels off easily from the screen without damaging photo emulsion and will not leave residue on the screen. The natural rubber adhesive provides a long shelf life.  SPLIT TAPE.
  3. Fusion 180Fusion 180° is the ink of the future. Our dream was to create a extreme low temperature ink that will change screen printing for everyone in the industry and that is exactly what we accomplished with dedication and determination. Do you run into problems when printing on heat sensitive materials? Do you want to save money by not having to replace garments damaged by high heat or dye-migration? Look no further… Fusion 180° was created to solve all of these issues. All you have to do is lower the temperature of your dryer. Listed are 16 facts about Fusion 180° ink:
  • Proper mesh and curing temperature depends on the thickness of ink deposit, garment, color of garment, artwork, and desired effect
  • The ink cures at 240°F to 260°F for 70 seconds or at 450° with a flash
  • The mesh range is 86 mesh/inch to 305 mesh/inch
  • Flexible, soft, and has excellent opacity on dark color garments
  • Bleed and crack resistant
  • No catalyst needed
  • Will not shrink or melt heat sensitive materials (nylon, non woven bags, polypropylene, etc.)
  • Adheres to thicker fabrics (50% cotton/ 50% polyester sweatshirts)
  • Covers fibers on 100% cotton
  • Prevents Dye Migration on 100% polyester, 50/50 sweatshirts, and sublimated polyester
  • Can be used as a transfer ink and foil adhesive
  • Prevents the elimination of toxic atoms from PVC Polymer and the formation of HCI (Hydro-Chloride Gas)
  • You may no longer need ink cleaners made with petro-chemicals such as blended solvents
  • Saves energy, consumption, and space
  • Reduces energy bill and emissions
  • Increases production 3 Tips for Screen Printing with White Fusion 180° Ink
  • Not as much white ink is required to achieve good coverage on light color garments
  • Use an underlay screen of ink on dark color garments for best results
  • The height between the screen mesh and the substrate you are printing on should be 1/8 of an inch since white tends to be thicker
  • FUSION 180 WHITE
  • FUSION 180 STOCK COLORS
  • FUSION 180 METALLIC

 

4. Fusion Bond

Fusion Bond is phthalate free plastisol ink with a coupling/bonding component. Fusion bond makes the ink behave as if it has a catalyst, yet does not have one and stays soft. A direct screen print will stick to heat sensitive coated materials. The ink cures at 220°F -240°F. Fabrics that can stand the heat of a flash can be cured with a flash at 450°F for 4 seconds. This includes polyester and cotton bags. Fusion bond was specially formulated with coupling capability for a revolutionary transfer method that eliminates weeding on colored garments.
Benefits:
-Flash cure on all fabrics without catalyst
-Cure with a dryer at 220°F -240°F without catalyst
-Strong adhesion for direct screen print or transfer on cotton, polyester, nylon and coated materials
-Coupling capability with color laser toner (RICOH ProC5200s for best results)
-Strong wash durability  FUSION BOND 5. Fusion Bond Transfer Fusion bond transfer is a four color process transfer that sticks to all garments at 310 degrees Fahrenheit for 5 seconds. After you wait 15 seconds you can peel the transfer off of the garment.
BENEFITS:
  • This new transfer blocks migration even on sublimated fabrics.
  • The process does not require weeding, cutting, or an under base transfer step
  • There is great stretch for spandex products.
REQUIREMENTS:
  • 11.5″ by 16″ Image Area
  • Group Images on Artwork
  • We have a minimum of 12 sheets.
  • Please send art to Dave@DaysoffDesigns.com
  • Upon review of artwork, an additional art charge may apply

6. Packing Tape

Our packing tape is made out of Polypropylene and Polyisophorone. Adhesive is made of natural rubber. This natural rubber will last longer than water soluble acrylic in hot and cold weather. The tape will not peel and one application will be enough to hold the package closed. PACKING TAPE

The post 6 Helpful Tools for Your Screen Print Shop appeared first on Fusion180Ink.com.

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How to Create Even and Crisp Print Edges with Low Temperature Ink One major issue to overcome when screen printing is creating uneven ink edge. The edges of your ink might be fuzzy if a step in the screen printing process is not followed properly. We have listed five ways to guarantee a beautiful and bold print almost every time. 1. Substrate Movement- One of the major causes of print edges that are not clear is the fact that your substrate is moving during the screen printing process. In order to avoid this, you need to make sure that your pallets are tight. If you are printing with fleece or a heavier fabric, you may want to consider purchasing a Jacket-Hold Down. Low temperature ink will work on all fabrics without running into any issues. The ink will adhere to thicker fabrics and prevent heat sensitive fabrics from shrinking. Don’t forget to cure at 240 degrees Fahrenheit on cotton fabrics and 260 degrees Fahrenheit on Polyester fabrics. 2.Off-Contact Off-contact distance should be set at 1/16 of an inch for lighter substrates including cotton or polyester t-shirts and at 1/8 of an inch for thicker substrates including sweatshirts, raincoats, or fleece items. This will enable the screen to snap up, which will shear the ink as the squeegee passes. A test-run is essential. 3. Screen Tension- Your screen tension must measure between 25 and 35 N/cm² in order to ensure quality prints. Your screen tension meter should be double checked prior to every screen print job. This will guarantee a sharp, crisp, and clear print. If your screens loosen and screen tension is too low, mesh can change during the screen printing process. This causes the edges of the print to blur. 4. Ink Viscosity- Thoroughly mix your ink or add reducer to the ink to thin it out or to tailor the ink to your project reaching the ideal viscosity. 5. Stencil Problems- If your emulsion was not exposed properly, the edges of the stencil may weaken during washout or printing. This jeopardizes the edges of your images because If the emulsion used was thin then this can cause the blocks of your screen to show on the edges of your screen print.

The post How to Create Even and Crisp Print Edges with Low Temperature Ink appeared first on Fusion180Ink.com.

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