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The team at Evercade confirmed they would be visiting their factory (which now seems to be a bi-weekly/monthly thing now – which feels like a really good thing!) and promised news and information while they were there. Well… it’s coming thick and fast!

They just shared the first photos ever of the device (a solid looking prototype from this week) and also that the console would in fact have HD TV output!

  

You can visit the official website: evercade.co.uk for more information about the console!

The post FIRST PHOTOS and HD TV Output Confirmed For Evercade appeared first on Funstock.

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Gamer Creates Super Mario Level From Hell Using Mario Maker 2

Super Mario can be hard sometimes. We all get flustered, miss a jump, run into a Goomba or two. And don’t even mention the jellyfish… Then there were the Lost Levels, complete with poisonous mushrooms, wind effects and incredibly frustrating hidden blocks.

However YouTuber YTSunny has gone a step further – probably about 100 steps further – and basically created the Super Mario level from hell. Starting with the most innocent of all the levels, World 1 Level 1, YTSunny has created a level where fiery death not only lies around every corner, but hunts you down relentlessly. Arguably the most impressive aspect is how he navigates his own level.

Fancy your chances? You can check out the level below:

I made the worst ever 1-1 remake in Mario Maker 2 - YouTube

 

 

The post Would you take on the “Worst Ever” Super Mario Level? appeared first on Funstock.

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Konami have announced a brand-new Mini Console, which comes with a stack of classic games built-in!

Have we had enough mini “retro” consoles yet? Konami certainly don’t think so, with their announcement of the PC Engine CoreGrafx Mini! Yep – the legendary PC Engine console, originally released in Japan in 1987 as the PC Engine, is making a comeback and this time it will fit into the palm of your hand.

The games list features a mix of PC Engine games (Japanese versions) alongside TurboGrafx-16 games (English versions). There are some standout titles in the collection which certainly make a pretty compelling case for picking this mini console up, including the legendary R-type and a selection from perennially popular Bomberman series. To really recreate the feeling of playing classics such as these, the PC Engine CoreGrafx Mini features different modes that let you choose how your games look, such as by replicating the scanlines on a CRT TV. Connecting to your TV in the first place is handled via HDMI cable.

You can check out the games list via this official video from Konami:

PC Engine Core Grafx mini Lineup Trailer - YouTube

Release Date & Pricing

Sadly the PC Engine CoreGrafx Mini won’t be arriving in time for Christmas, but it’ll be in your hands early next year!

Release Date: March 19th, 2020

Price: £99.99

You can Pre-order the  PC Engine CoreGrafx Mini exclusively from Amazon

The post PC Engine CoreGrafx Mini Announced! Pre-orders Live! appeared first on Funstock.

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Fighting games were not created in the 1990s, but they sure did hit their stride during that halcyon period. Narrowing down a list of the top 10 of all time is almost as difficult as you can get when it comes to making lists. Because of their iterative nature, most fighting game franchises have spawned multiple games some of which are preferred over others but few of which are objectively better than another. That said, this list represents a classic smattering of titles that made appearances in the arcades and on home consoles. In fact, with the exception of two games, most every title on this last had both a home and arcade installment.

The arcade atmosphere – from the competition to the energy of hanging out with other gamers – is what really gave fighting games their initial jumpstart so it is nearly impossible to forget this component when evaluating them in hindsight. In fact, until eSports, there wasn’t really anywhere a gamer could go for serious competition other than the arcades. That said, here are the ten top fighting games of all time using that criteria:

10. Samurai Shodown

This stylistic rendition on the fighting game craze comes from the masters of the genre over at SNK and features some of the most beautiful sprite work you will see in a classic arcade and console game. From the wandering ronin Haohmaru to the flamboyantly dressed antagonist Amakusa Shiro, this game bleeds with Japanese culture but also includes references to others as well. Basically it is like Street Fighter II with weapons and a historical theme. Beyond that, the gameplay is a little slower and more considered. Special attacks are really devastating and matches tend to play out like a fencing match rather than a furious flurry of attacks. Cool effects like jets of blood coming from your opponent’s body when you land a heavy blow to the extensive use of voice sampling make Samurai Shodown an experience made for the arcades. You’ll be hard pressed to find a presentation and character roster as unique and high quality as this outside of Capcom’s arcade work. The game  is loud, stylish, cool as heck, and a must-play for every fighting game fan.

9. Dead or Alive

Just like Virtua Fighter except for ridiculous and combo heavy. In other words, the game is a seriously good time. Before the series got bogged down with boob physics and other vaguely insulting graphical features, Dead or Alive was an intense arena fighter from the makers of Ninja Gaiden that put a premium on over-the-top characters and devastating combos. What makes the original Dead or Alive game fun is that it took the earnestness out of fighting games and replaced it with a spirit that is hard to replicate. Often ridiculous and always fun, Dead or Alive understood what made fighting games so overwhelmingly addictive: The chance to play with friends in a competitive but fun game.

8. Mortal Kombat 11

As the newest game on this list, Mortal Kombat 11 continues in the glorious traditions of its forebears in an era where the arcades are no longer here. It is competitive, fun, weird, and utterly compelling on multiple levels. From complex gameplay systems to an emphasis on fighting online against opponents, Mortal Kombat 11 also doesn’t neglect narrative and lore, offering fans one of their most comprehensive games in this area to date. A fun title that has kept true to what it is, Mortal Kombat 11 only adds to the growing legacy of the fighting game genre in eSports and beyond.

7. Killer Instinct

How do you respond to increasing violence and gore in video games if you are a company like Nintendo? On top of that, how do you make a fighting game if your image was burnished off of kid-friendly fare? You could go the route of Data East and make a Street Fighter II ripoff in the form of Fighters History or you could go the route that Nintendo and Rare did when they developed Killer Instinct, a game that takes the combo-centric gameplay of Street Fighter II and mixes it with the grit of Mortal Kombat. Luckily for us, this fusion of mechanics and styles into a unique video game property resulted in a title with a style all its own. From massive chain combos to semi-violent fatalities, Killer Instinct took the best of both worlds, did its own thing with them, and produced a game that was as compelling as it was fun. It also didn’t hurt that the game ran on the hardware that was going to underpin the “Ultra 64” – or at least that’s what Nintendo claimed at the time. Silicon Graphics-inspired models like those found in Toy Story and Donkey Kong Country mixed in with the combo system of Street Fighter II and the dark vibes of Mortal Kombat might sound like the weirdest game you’ve ever read about, but it is Killer Instinct at its heart and it is absolutely bonkers good game.

6. King of Fighters 2002 Unlimited Match

Picking just one SNK series is almost as impossible as picking which King of Fighters game to put on this list. KOF2002 UM is often regarded as one of the best games by many fans – and for good reason. A massive roster, a complicated fighting system, and a dash of arcade showmanship that is sadly lacking in games today make this installment the one to try if you only can play one. The roster is what is truly overwhelming even for the time. Every fighter from almost every SNK fighting game series is in this game. That means you have access to a range of gameplay styles that fit your tastes. If you’re looking for a game that oozes with quality, this is your title.

5. Tekken 3

It was hard to choose between this game and Tekken 2. Really, the whole first three games in the Tekken series is an amazing set of games. But if we had to choose just one, we would pick the one that was huge in the arcades and which had a much-anticipated console release. Tekken 3 pushed the PlayStation to the limits just like it pushed the arcade’s graphics to the max. A series that combines special moves with the more serious fare found in Virtua Fighter, Tekken has always borrowed from other games but has morphed into its own tradition. That largely started to come into its own with the third game.

4. Soulcalibur II

Ask anyone who has played it and they will agree: Soulcalibur II is an amazing game. Heck, among weapons-based fighting games, it is a legend. What makes it so great? It has an interesting combination of a gameplay system that invites newcomers and rewards veterans as well as a beautiful landscape with characters that are imminently appealing and compelling in some way. Soulcalibur II amplifies its arcade heritage with flash and sparks but it builds its core elements around a very simple fighting system when compared to other games. Fighting games that involve weapons are often known for their complexity – and they’re often known for featuring only swords. Namco’s unparalleled ability to make each and every weapon feel unique and different is a testament to Soulcalibur II’s quality in execution.

3. Virtua Fighter II

Another sequel that takes the first game and does so much more with the core concept, Virtua Fighter II is a beautiful title even by today’s standards and it transformed the awkward, blocky characters of the first game into something that made 3D fighting games serious. Let’s face it – the first Virtua Fighter looked goofy. Sure, it was ahead of its time and is an amazing game by any stretch. But the 3D doesn’t hold up over time even if the gameplay does. It was meant to be a showcase property in the arcades for Sega back in the day and it remained that way pretty much throughout the life of the arcades. It always pushed the limits of current graphics and the debut of a Virtua Fighter game was often hailed for introducing new, cutting-edge tech in character models. This all began with Virtua Fighter 2, the quintessential Sega arcade game and a bright, gorgeous game that took the washed out first title and transmuted it into gold. All of the conventions that were revolutionary in Virtua Fighter 2 are things that we take for granted today.

2. Mortal Kombat II

The hallmark of a good sequel is whether or not it improves upon the first installment’s flaws while maintaining and even amplifying the magic that made it great in the first place. In this regard, Mortal Kombat II is a master class in how to pull off a sequel to a game. Not only does it take everything the first game did up a notch but it does it in a way that improves upon that game rather than distorting it or trying to change its core essence. Rather than staying away from controversy, Mortal Kombat II courted it and desensitized audiences to it. When you play a violent game today, you have pioneers like the MK series to thank for getting people on board with the idea of mature content in a video game. Plus, Mortal Kombat II did it in a way that subtly mocked the outrage. Things such as “friendships” and “babalities” alongside the riot-inducing fatalities that helped bring the first game to prominence poke fun at the prudes out there while also hinting to its fans that this is fantasy and is not meant to be taken so seriously. A game that can pull off both is a rare thing, indeed, but Mortal Kombat II avoided the camp of the third game and toned down the more realistic streak found in the first game. It is basically the Goldilocks title of the original trilogy. Doing everything just right not only makes it a great fighting game and an amazing sequel, but also a true classic of the fighting game genre.

1. Street Fighter II

Number one probably comes as no shock to anyone that has played fighting games before but it has to be said that Street Fighter II is the reason we are even writing this article. It is the fighting game par excellence. From flamboyant characters to vague lore to a rock-solid, airtight gameplay system, Street Fighter II stumbled into history and has sat atop the fighting game throne ever since. Before SFII, no one played fighting games and they were not on anyone’s radar. Arcades were filled with racers, shooters, pinball machines, and side-scrolling beat ‘em ups. This all changed after Street Fighter II’s release. It not only spawned a fleet of clones but also a ton of iterations in its own right. Singing this game’s praises is hard to do without sounding hyperbolic but this game is every bit the definition of revolutionary and groundbreaking.

The post The Top 10 Fighting Games of All Time! appeared first on Funstock.

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The competition between the Sega Mega Drive and the SNES was a true matchup of the titans. Luckily for Sega, one ace card it had up its sleeve was its massive portfolio of arcade properties, many of which were racing games. But bringing an arcade racer to the home console was often easier said than done and that’s why Sega’s impressive turnout in this regard continues to impress.

From the classic OutRun series to the bleeding-edge tech of Virtua Racing, Sega knew their market and they exploited it to the best of their abilities. One thing that Sega racers did that others often struggled with in the final product is a sensation of speed combined with rock-solid gameplay.

This list of Mega Drive games contains a smattering of both arcade and console-only games but the core thing that ties them all together is that they offer truly remarkable racing experiences on the system. Here are our top 10 racing games on the Sega Mega Drive:

10. Turbo OutRun

Take what makes OutRun great and streamline it into an experience that is akin to a racing game on tracks. Think of it like a rollercoaster racing game or something along those lines because it is equally as intense. Initially released as an upgrade for the original OutRun arcade cabinet, Turbo OutRun was eventually ported to the Mega Drive. The game offers players the choice of an automatic or two-speed manual transmission for their car, another change from the first game, as well as one of three power ups after passing through a checkpoint. While not a lot distinguishes it from OutRun outside of a few changed mechanics here and there, the subtle changes make major differences in the feel of the game. Each offers its own vibe and is a throwback to that old arcade spirit even on the Mega Drive.

9. Lotus 2: RECS

You have one of three Lotus cars to select from in a racing game that pumps the first title full of steroids. While the first Lotus game seemed spartan when it came to what you could do, the sequel is absolutely brimming with options. Not only that but it adds music to the game as well as three different difficulty settings. There are two game modes, a time attack mode and a championship mode, with the courses a little bit shorter but more varied this time around. Everything about this game is geared towards speed and its stripped down, purpose-driven setup emphasises this. So what does the RECS part of the name mean? It is basically the game’s version of a track builder – and it is pretty glorious. Stuff like this was unheard of in the 16-bit era but here we have it. More a sum of its parts than excelling in any single area, Lotus 2 is a great throwback to a pure arcade racer.

8. Championship Pro-Am

Rare’s remake of RC Pro-Am for the Nintendo, this track racing game involves guiding your dune buggy-esque vehicle around a track and beating your opponents. Played from an omniscient third-person viewpoint, you see everything around you in a perspective that is almost like a prototype of Mario Kart. In that vein, you collect power ups and weapons to help you along in the game and the basic challenge lies more in mastering the gameplay mechanics but without the flash and arcade-style speed of other racers on this list. A great game that makes you feel like you are playing with toy cars, Championship Pro-Am is the definition of old school.

7. Ayrton Senna’s Super Monaco GP 2

Your goal in this arcade-inspired racer is to win the Drivers World Championship. There are three primary racing modes to choose from including Senna GP, world championship, and beginner mode. In the first mode you get to select a track to race on as well as a transmission style including automatic, manual, and a manual with a gearbox option. Beginner mode lets you practice before you race and then leads into the master mode which gives you a range of racing options and challenges. All in all, this game gets points for attempting to bring options and simulation to the racing genre. It might appear to be just your typical arcade racer upon first glance, but once you dig deeper you quickly realize how much this title has to offer.

6. Super Off Road

Another track racer, Super Off Road is a dirt racer from a third-person omniscient viewpoint that offers simple gameplay mechanics that is amazingly fun and compelling in action. You compete against other players or the computer in various tracks of ever-increasing difficulty with hills and valleys that make driving in a straight line a challenge. There are power ups and everything you would expect from an arcade racer but it isn’t terribly over the top or ridiculous. It’s a pure challenge and that is what makes it so fun and one of the best on the Mega Drive.

5. Road Rash 2

This is something a little bit different from the other entries on this list: A motorcycle racing game. Road Rash 2 is largely the first game amped up on some steroids and with new stuff thrown in for good measure. It is largely inspired by games like OutRun in that it features blazing fast speeds and really cool tracks but the central conceit of Road Rash 2 is the motorcycle-to-motorcycle combat that makes it a biker brawler on top of being a racer. If you like games with vehicular combat but you want that to be realistic, Road Rash 2 has your number. It was also one of those original “controversy” games in the video game world because some people thought it inspired violence though, as anyone that has played it will tell you, the only thing about it that inspires violence is its difficulty at points.

4. The Duel: Test Drive 2

Need for Speed owes a lot to The Duel, the original police chase racing game. You need to make it to the next gas station checkpoint without getting destroyed or running out of gas and you can expect a police escort on each and every leg of the race. This game improved upon the first installment with better graphics, more variety in where you raced, and in the option to race against computer controlled opponents. If the prospect of test driving exotic cars and running away from the law inspires you then The Duel: Test Drive 2 is a classic you might want to give a look.

3. Super Hang-On

Race around the world on a super-fast motorcycle in one of Sega AM2’s masterpieces of the arcade and Mega Drive. Inspired by OutRun but using motorcycles, Super Hang-On emphasizes speed above all else and this makes it an intense experience. This is because a lot of the game is avoiding obstacles and staying on a blazing fast roller coaster from hell without incident. When you add competition with other racers into this mix, you get a game that is absolute madness. In many ways it presages games like F-Zero on the Super Famicom to give you some idea of how it feels in spirit and vibe.

2. OutRun

OutRun was one of those arcade spectacles that drew in crowds by sheer force of its awesome looking cabinet. On the home consoles, however, OutRun largely works because of its simple gameplay mechanics and blazing fast speed. Racing exotic cars? Check. Tons of different locations? Check. Arcade game mechanics? Of course. OutRun had the unenviable task of taking a large, experience-driven arcade game and shrinking it down to something palatable and workable on home consoles. The Mega Drive version succeeds and in ways that you might not expect. When Sega promised that the Genesis could do arcade perfect games, this is what they were talking about.

1. Virtua Racing

When a system does things that no one thought it could, people are impressed. Sure, Virtua Racing had help from some extra chips and hardware built into the cartridge, still the largest cart ever made for the Mega Drive, but it is all worth it in the end. Retailing for a lot more than your standard Mega Drive game, Virtua Racing is the arcade game at home…more or less. Virtua Racing is like the precursor for Ridge Racer and everything that came after it. While it looks like an abstract art experiment today, it was cutting edge back when it was released. Porting this to the Mega Drive was no joke and really showed how innovative companies can be when push comes to shove. Too bad we didn’t get more of that on the Mega Drive but something tells us the extra-expensive cart price had something to do with that.

The post The Top 10 Racing Games for SEGA Mega Drive (Sega Genesis) appeared first on Funstock.

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The objective of this genre of game is easy enough for anyone to understand. How titles in the beat ‘em up genre distinguish themselves, however, is through their unique integration of other concepts into the move forward and beat the heck out of everything formula.

Whether it is a fantasy theme, a popular IP from mainstream media, or even two horror franchises fused into an interesting brawling game, the beat ‘em up genre’s rules are pretty much anything goes. That’s probably why we have such a variety of styles in this top 10 list.

Here we’ve compiled our ten favorite beat ‘em up games from all times, spanning home consoles as well as the arcades. If you’re looking for the best of the best, you’ll find them here, there’s no doubt. Of course, if we’ve left any of your favourites out, let us know in the comments section below or on social media… but we’re certain that these ten beat ‘em up games demonstrate the best of the best the genre has to offer:

10. Double Dragon

Billy and Jimmy Lee are the original dynamic duo when it comes to beat ‘em up games in the minds of many gamers. This game has appeared on pretty much every system and spawned a legion of sequels and spin off properties – even a movie, albeit a bad one. The formula here is classic beat ‘em up which means you will move forward and even up, smashing everyone’s face that gets in your way. There is a story, and it is pretty dark, which just makes the gritty feel of the game that much cooler. A great introduction to the genre, Double Dragon has withstood the test of time and it is not hard to see how.

9. The Simpsons Arcade Game

The Simpsons were a cultural phenomenon like nothing before them so it is no surprise that it spawned an arcade game. But no one could have predicted that it would have been a beat ‘em up game featuring the iconic characters from the show. Whether it was Marge’s vacuum or Lisa’s jump rope, Konami’s ability to capture the spirit of the show in an innovative and organic way still stands as a case study in how to treat a licensed IP right. There’s really no part of this game that doesn’t click and, aside from the eventual monotony that sets in, it’s a rousing good time through and through. It is almost mind boggling to imagine what an updated version of this game could be like given the new gameplay mechanics and conventions that have developed since its release. Some people call this the best The Simpsons game ever made, and there’s more than enough reasons to back up that moniker.

8. Cadillacs and Dinosaurs

A beat ‘em up game based upon the comic book Xenozoic Tales, Cadillacs and Dinosaurs comes from the other big name in this genre, Capcom. A weird yet really interesting setting combined with simple game mechanics makes this button mashing extravaganza an experience. Of all of the games on this list, this title has the most unique presentation and, depending on where your tastes in games lie, that could be a good thing or a bad thing. Beyond that, the title is a must-play for fans of Capcom’s work and gamers who want something a little looser than the older side scrolling beat ‘em up games.

7. Golden Axe

Take the beat ‘em up genre to a fantasy setting, add magic, and Sega’s trademark arcade style, and you get Golden Axe. Choose one of three combatants that look like they were ripped directly from the pages of a Dungeons and Dragons book. A few interesting game mechanics introduced by Golden Axe include magic attacks and ranged weaponry. For example, the dwarf Gilius Thunderhead’s axe almost puts the game on easy mode while the screen clearing magic attacks help relieve the pressure in those situations where your character is getting overwhelmed. On top of all of this is a truly epic story that involves a Sauron-like figure called Death Adder who is terrorising the mythic world you journey through. And we do mean mythic: One stage takes you on a journey through a village located on the back of a gigantic turtle as it swims through water to ferry you to the other side. How’s that for fantasy?

6. Knights of the Round

A more traditional fantasy setting than Golden Axe, Knights of the Round is another Capcom arcade title that does a great job of capturing the magic of the Arthurian saga in a beat ‘em up game. It came out much later than Golden Axe and can be likened to that game on steroids. Like most of Capcom’s arcade games during this period, you can expect epic graphics, sound, and a story told through text and cut scenes. Pretty much everything else we got out of Capcom during this era was a bonus as the company was wrapped up in the Street Fighter II craze which printed money for them. If you want to see their prowess at making a solid arcade brawler using a classic saga as the backdrop, give Knights of the Round a playthrough.

5. Alien vs. Predator

Again, Capcom can do no wrong when it comes to shoehorning various series into the beat ‘em up format. Alien versus Predator combines two 1980s horror franchises into one amazing romp through sci-fi inspired landscapes that evoke both HR Geiger and Capcom’s other arcade titles. This is the company at their peak and this game is absolutely why arcades were such awesome places. This game is intended for co-op play and it really comes to life the more players you have on the screen. There is some slowdown but you won’t really notice it. Alien vs. Predator is a wild game that fans of the movies should not hesitate to play.

4. X-Men

Konami’s X-Men took a somewhat unknown Marvel comic book IP and exploded it onto the arcade scene. A lot of gamers’ first experience with X-Men was through this game and, if you know anything about the 1990s, you know how huge the X-Men became. The art style is distinctly late 1970s, early 1980s X-Men and the storyline is a bit nonsense but everything else you expect is there. Mutant powers, martial arts, acrobatics, and endless waves of Sentinels that work for Magneto now for some reason. Classic villains make an appearance, there’s a vague storyline that is somewhat engaging, but the vibe and spirit of the game is pure Marvel comic book action.

3. Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles Arcade Game

Another example of how Capcom knows how to take a popular comic book IP and transform it into something absolutely magical for the beat ‘em up genre, Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles Arcade Game is another game that makes use of ranged mechanics but eschews screen-clearing magical attacks or mutant powers like in X-Men. This game is about pure button mashing and it shows. You won’t notice that, though, because it is so darn fun. Another game that is made to be played with friends, TMNT Arcade Game didn’t exactly kickstart the turtle craze but it certainly solidified it. It also spawned a slew of console ports that were extremely faithful to the arcade original – something many of the games on this list failed to do (which is still a shame).

2. Final Fight

The game that would have been called Street Fighter if not for a last minute change, Final Fight uses huge sprites, detailed backgrounds, and a gritty street crime storyline to put players in what can only be classified as a pure arcade beat ‘em up game. You can see how this game presaged Street Fighter II in many ways. From the graphics to the way the characters are styled and move, the early bones of the SFII graphics are present and accounted for in Final Fight. What will probably shock modern gamers most about the Final Fight arcade game is just how unforgiving it can be. This game is not easy. It was built to eat your quarters. If you were the rare person who actually beat this title in the arcades, you were either out of a lot of money or a true master of the genre. This holds true in every port of this game since. If you want something old school tough but beautiful, Final Fight is the game for you.

1. Streets of Rage 2

This was not a hard choice. Streets of Rage took the formula that Final Fight perfected and made it console ready. On top of that it introduced screen clearing mechanics like in Golden Axe and a storyline that was somewhat more compelling than many. The second game in the series took everything great about the first game and made it that much better. So what makes Streets of Rage 2 better than Final Fight? Because Streets of Rage was developed for the consoles and not the arcades, its challenge is real. It isn’t cheap and it doesn’t care about destroying your wallet. This makes the challenges organic and fair. It also makes your lives and continues more weighty. The sequel also added new characters with different fighting styles that gave gamers more options when it came to how they played the game. Streets of Rage 2 shows why console was such a potent force in both the arcades and the console market even though it never appeared in an arcade box.

The post The Top 10 Retro Beat ‘Em Up Games appeared first on Funstock.

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Ten more games confirmed alongside a new Announcement Trailer!

Evercade dropped a brand new announcement trailer today, giving us an in-depth look at their retro handheld console. We’ve known the details and specs of the console for a while but we certainly get a nice demonstration of the unique cartridge system from which the Evercade will run original ROMs. We’re especially liking the look of the console and cartridge packaging, which is certain to give retro fans a nostalgia trip!

Evercade - Official Announcement Trailer - YouTube

Alongside the announcement trailer, we also got details of the Mega Cat Studios cartridge, which will be joining the growing list of licensed multi-game cartridges that the Evercade will run games from. Intriguingly the Mega Cat Studios cartridge will bring an eclectic mix of original “retro style” games to the party featuring popular titles like Coffee Crisis and Log Jammers. 

Here’s the full games list for the Mega Cat Studios Catridge;

The post WATCH: The New Evercade Announcement Trailer (+New Games!) appeared first on Funstock.

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When we consider media for computers, one format that was in widespread use in the early years of personal computing but which fell out of favour entirely is the cassette tape.

Largely phased out of the market in favour of floppy disks, cassette tapes could store a reasonable amount of data but were, as anyone who has used them will tell you, a bit finicky and particular to work with on a day-to-day basis.

One of the most popular personal computers to make use of cassette tape storage was the Amstrad CPC 464, a machine built by Amstrad to compete with popular models from Sinclair and Commodore. An 8-bit computer that used tape cassette storage (but also included a floppy disk drive attachment), the CPC in CPC 464 stands for color personal computer and sold some 3 million units in the United Kingdom, Germany, France, Spain, and other areas of Europe.

The hardware would go on to become a mainstay of Amstrad’s lineup and spawned a series of successors that built upon the core unit and even a game console called the GX4000. The CPC 464 used a Zilog Z80A CPU with either 64 or 128 KB of RAM available in an all-in-one form factor that uses the keyboard as the computer’s body.

For storage, as we outlined above, the CPC 464 used either a tape deck or a floppy drive which, again, was built into the keyboard. Interestingly, the computer’s monitor serves as the powersource for the unit and came available in color as well as green and monochrome. Like many of its competitors, the Amstrad CPC 464 was a relatively low-cost machine that attempted to serve a variety of purposes including entertainment and even business applications. The success of the model line spawned a slew of compatible accessories as well as business and productivity software.

Chase H.Q. for the Amstrad CPC

Because of its lower cost, the computer enjoyed success as a consumer and business device with the former focusing primarily on the then-nascent video gaming market and the latter offering commercial operations cheap access to computers. As you can probably imagine, because of this massive appeal, there is a ton of software out there for the CPC 464. To give you some sense of how much of a winning formula the CPC 464 proved to be for Amstrad, the company would eventually buy out competitor Sinclair. Today, the machine enjoys a cult following of fans who still play and develop software for it.

Bomb Jack for Amstrad CPC

A major reason for this is because of how accessible and understandable the machine is for programmers of all levels. Emblematic of its time, the Amstrad CPC 464 shows just how closely aligned the interests of the video game industry and the computer industry were in the early days. With many early console makers also marketing their machines as productivity devices, it’s amazing to see how specialised and focused the Nintendo and later consoles were in comparison. But the reason for combining so many features into one unit – to convince the consumer to buy into the whole idea – can’t be denied. After all, it’s probably a lot of the reason we see so many consoles now trying to reach once again into the areas once the domain of a PC in their attempt to win over consumers with media box features and the like.

The post A Brief History of: Amstrad CPC 464 appeared first on Funstock.

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They’ve only gone and thrown in 22 little cartridges!

It’s safe to say that SEGA have made the Mega Drive Mini pretty appealing already – with two classic controllers, some tidy modern features and an impressive list of SEGA classics. But things get even better if you’re lucky enough to be able to pick one of the Japanese Collector’s Edition consoles, which will ship with a set of 22 framed cartridges!

Now – the cartridges aren’t full-size, but this is probably just sensible. Overall we guess the effect is a nod toward how platinum records are displayed on record company walls. Given the iconic status of some of the games included with the Mega Drive Mini, you probably wouldn’t even call it overkill…

Although European readers won’t be able to get their hands on these, you can still pre-order the European Mega Drive Mini right here!

The post The Japanese Mega Drive Mini Collector’s Edition Comes with Something Special! appeared first on Funstock.

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It’s full-size. It’s got a fully operational keyboard. The C64 is back!

Ok, ok – so we’ve had the C64 Mini for quite a while already. However we still think there will be plenty of appetite for this new offering from Retro Games Ltd. – dubbed “THEC64” . For starters, it’s full-size and comes complete with a fully operational keyboard featuring the signature brown keys found on the original C64. It also comes with a micro switch retro joystick, which you can see in the video below. You’ll have three modes to choose from: C64 Basic, Vic20 Basic and a mode to launch any of the 64 preinstalled games directly. To bring the original console a little more up-to-date there’s also HDMI output (720p) and four USB inputs.

We don’t yet have the full list of pre-installed games, but expect to see classic C64 titles such as Attack of the Mutant Camels, Boulder Dash, California Games, Galencia and Gridrunner. It releases on Dec 5th 2019 with a UK retail price of £109.99. It’s not yet up on Amazon in the UK, but be sure to check back as we expect this to start appearing in retailers very quickly!

In the meantime, check out the Official Announcement Video Below!

THEC64 — Coming December 2019 - YouTube

The post VIDEO: A New C64 Console Will Arrive in December! appeared first on Funstock.

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